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  • Former President George Herbert Walker Bush was hospitalized Sunday in Houston after an infection spread to his blood, just days after the death of his wife, Barbara. >> George H.W. Bush hospitalized with blood infection days after death of Barbara Bush 'He is responding to treatments and appears to be recovering,' his spokesman, Jim McGrath, tweeted Monday. Here are nine things you should know about Bush, who served as the 41st president of the United States from 1989 to 1993: 1. He has a form of Parkinson's disease. The former president uses a motorized scooter or wheelchair to get around. 2. He is 'the longest-living president in U.S. history,' Time reported last November. The 93-year-old Bush, born June 12, 1924, in Milton, Massachusetts, is 111 days older than the second longest-living U.S. president, Jimmy Carter.  >> George H.W. Bush now longest-living president in U.S. history 3. He and Barbara had the longest marriage of any presidential couple in U.S. history. The pair wed Jan. 6, 1945. >> Barbara Bush: What you should know about the former first lady 4. He graduated from Yale in 1948. According to CNN, he earned his bachelor's degree in economics in just 2 1/2 years. 5. He has five living children: George W., John (known as Jeb), Neil, Marvin and Dorothy. George W. Bush served two terms as president from 2001 to 2009. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush ran for the Republican nomination in the run-up to November's election, but lost his bid to President Donald Trump. Another child, Pauline Robinson 'Robin' Bush, died as a child in 1953 after being diagnosed with leukemia, The Washington Post reported. >> PHOTOS: George H. W. Bush through the years 6. He served in the Navy during World War II. Bush, who reportedly enlisted on his 18th birthday in 1942, flew 58 combat missions during the war, including one that required he be rescued by a submarine after his plane was hit by Japanese anti-aircraft fire. For his bravery, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. 7. He launched his political career in 1963. He served as a congressman, CIA director and Ronald Reagan's vice president. 8. In 1989, he became the first sitting vice president to win the presidency since 1837. According to CNN, he 'offered his predecessors — Nixon, Ford, Carter and Reagan — secure telephones so he could reach them day or night.' >> Read more trending news  9. He 'has parachuted eight times,' CNN reported. His most recent skydive was a tandem jump in celebration of his 90th birthday. >> Click here to watch — The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • If you’ve ever wondered exactly what sorts of things Facebook would like you not to do on its service, you’re in luck. For the first time, the social network is publishing detailed guidelines to what does and doesn’t belong on its service — 27 pages worth of them, in fact. So please don’t make credible violent threats or revel in sexual violence; promote terrorism or the poaching of endangered species; attempt to buy marijuana, sell firearms, or list prescription drug prices for sale; post instructions for self-injury; depict minors in a sexual context; or commit multiple homicides at different times or locations. Facebook already banned most of these actions on its previous “community standards” page, which sketched out the company’s standards in broad strokes. But on Tuesday it will spell out the sometimes gory details. The updated community standards will mirror the rules its 7,600 moderators use to review questionable posts, then decide if they should be pulled off Facebook. And sometimes whether to call in the authorities.
  • A frozen novelty manufacturer is voluntarily recalling certain ice pops that are sold in 15 states for possible listeria contamination. >> Read more trending news According to US Recall News, Ziegenfelder Co., of Wheeling, West Virginia, is recalling about 3,000 cases of Budget $aver Cherry Pineapple Monster Pops and Sugar Free Twin Pops because of the possible health risk.  The ice pops were distributed to retail grocers in 15 states: Alabama Arkansas Florida Maine Missouri Nebraska Nevada New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Texas Utah Washington Wyoming The ice pop products were delivered between April 5 and April 19, US Recall News reported. The Cherry Pineapple Monster Pops carry the UPC code 0-74534-84200-9, and have lot codes D09418A through D10018B. The Sugar Free Pops carry the UPC code 0-74534-75642-9, and have lot codes D09318A through D10018B.  So far, there are no reported illnesses or incidents involving the products. More from the FDA can be found here.
  • President Donald Trump’s decision to elevate the White House physician to lead the Veterans Administration was in peril on Tuesday, as top Senators in both parties announced that a confirmation hearing set this week for Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson would be ‘postponed until further notice,’ as the Senate requested all documents on “allegations or incidents” involving Jackson since 2006. “We take very seriously our constitutional duty to thoroughly and carefully vet each nominee sent to the Senate for confirmation,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA), the Chairman of the Senate Veterans Committee, and Sen. John Tester (D-MT), the top Democrat on that panel. “We will continue looking into these serious allegations and have requested additional information from the White House to enable the committee to conduct a full review,” the two said in a joint statement. The move came amid reports from various news organizations that raised questions about Jackson’s stewardship of the White House Physician’s Office. The delay of the hearing was a major setback for the White House, again raising questions about vetting operations for nominees in the Trump Administration. Jackson was already facing questions about whether he was the right person to manage the sprawling VA, which has been beset by a series of troubles in recent years. President Trump fired his first VA chief, David Shulkin, in late March.
  • A huge four-alarm fire broke out in New York City's Bronx borough early Tuesday, blazing through businesses in Fordham. >> Read more trending news