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STUDY: Commonly prescribed meds could almost double dementia risk

STUDY: Commonly prescribed meds could almost double dementia risk

A head injury, stroke or brain tumor could cause dementia. But did you know your prescribed medication could put you at risk, too? >> Read more trending news Researchers from the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom recently conduced a study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, to explore the link between a certain class of drugs and the memory loss condition.  To do so, they used QResearch, a large database of anonymized health records, to examine nearly 285,000 adults in the U.K., aged 55 and older, between 2004 and 2016.  The team then reviewed each subject’s prescription records to determine their exposure to anticholinergics, which can include antidepressants, bladder antimuscarinics, antipsychotics and antiepileptic drugs.  >> Related: Common painkillers triple side effects of dementia, study says  After analyzing the results, they found those on anticholinergic medications had almost a 50% increased chance of developing dementia, compared to those who didn’t have prescriptions for anticholinergic drugs. The risk was only associated with 1,095 daily doses within a 10-year period, which is equivalent to an older adult taking a strong anticholinergic medication daily for at least three years. “The study is important because it strengthens a growing body of evidence showing that strong anticholinergic drugs have long term associations with dementia risk,” coauthor Carol Coupland told CNN. “It also highlights which types of anticholinergic drugs have the strongest associations. This is important information for physicians to know when considering whether to prescribe these drugs.” Although the authors said “no firm conclusions can be drawn about whether these anticholinergic drugs cause dementia,” they hope their findings can help professionals better understand the disease. They also advised patients to not stop taking their medications until consulting with their doctor. >> Related: Rate of dementia deaths in US has more than doubled, CDC says As for antihistamines, skeletal muscle relaxants, gastrointestinal antispasmodics, antiarrhythmics, or antimuscarinic bronchodilators, the scientists noted there were no significant dementia risks associated with them.

Barking seals mimic ‘Star Wars’ theme, ‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star’

Barking seals mimic ‘Star Wars’ theme, ‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star’

Scientists at the University of St. Andrews taught three young gray seals to sing, literally. >> Read more trending news Seals, which generally bark, and other marine mammals are known for some of the sounds they make. Whales sing, dolphins click, penguins peep and walruses bellow. Researchers, though, were able to train the three young seals to bark out the notes to the opening bars of the theme from “Star Wars” and “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” The research is published in the journal Current Biology. It’s not just that teaching a seal to sing is an interesting project, St. Andrews scientists said they wanted to learn more about how seals communicate with each other, according to Smithsonian magazine. Knowing how seals communicate in the wild could become important in the future to conservation efforts.  

Jump in wildfires means smoke’s health impact will spread

Jump in wildfires means smoke’s health impact will spread

Climate change in the Western U.S. means more intense and frequent wildfires churning out waves of smoke that scientists say will sweep across the continent to affect tens of millions of people and cause a spike in premature deaths. That emerging reality is prompting people in cities and rural areas alike to gird themselves for another summer of sooty skies along the West Coast and in the Rocky Mountains — the regions widely expected to suffer most from blazes tied to dryer, warmer conditions. “There’s so little we can do. We have air purifiers and masks — otherwise we’re just like ‘Please don’t burn,’” said Sarah Rochelle Montoya of San Francisco, who fled her home with her husband and children last fall to escape thick smoke enveloping the city from a disastrous fire roughly 150 miles away. Other sources of air pollution are in decline in the U.S. as coal-fired power plants close and fewer older cars roll down highways. But those air quality gains are being erased in some areas by the ill effects of massive clouds of smoke that can spread hundreds and even thousands of miles on cross-country winds, according to researchers. With the 2019 fire season already heating up with fires from southern California to Canada, authorities are scrambling to better protect the public before smoke again blankets cities and towns. Officials in Seattle recently announced plans to retrofit five public buildings as smoke-free shelters.

WHAT: Join NEWS102.3 KRMG, FOX23 and the American Red Cross for our annual Red, White and You Blood Drive  WHEN: June 27 and 28 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m  WHY: We invite you to be an all-American hero and roll up your sleeve and help fill the Missing (blood) Types  WHERE: American Red Cross Tulsa Blood Donation Center just west of HWY169 on 11th St. | Woodland Hills Mall, lower level, Sears Court from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m | St. John Broken Arrow, 1000 W Boise Circle (June 27, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.) | Nienhuis Community Center, 3201 N. 9th St. (June 28, from 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.) NEWLY ADDED LOCATIONS: For those of you that have requested additional locations, we’ve heard you and two more have been added! St. John Broken Arrow, and the Nienhuis Community Center.  GIFTS: All those coming to donate will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.     The American Red Cross, KRMG and FOX23 invite you to be an all-American hero and roll up your sleeve and help fill the Missing Types at the annual Red, White and You Blood Drive June 27 and 28 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Tulsa Blood Donation Center, 10151 E. 11th St.  Also, Woodland Hills Mall, lower level, Sears Court from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., June 27-28.  Additional Red, White and You blood drives:  All those coming to donate will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.   This drive is part of the Missing Types campaign to help raise awareness about the unmet need for blood and how donors can help save lives.   Only three out of 100 people in the U.S. give blood. There simply aren’t enough people donating blood to help patients in need.   Yet each day, kids battling cancer, accident victims being raced into emergency rooms, and new moms with complicated childbirths, need lifesaving blood transfusions.    To ensure that lifesaving blood products are available when and where they are needed, the Red Cross urges more individuals to roll up a sleeve and give.   When you give an hour of your time to donate blood, you can help save more than one life.   Donating blood is a simple process and only takes about an hour from start to finish, but the actual donation itself only takes about 8-10 minutes.   To help reduce fear and prepare for a successful blood donation experience, here are six helpful tips to know before rolling up a sleeve:  You don’t need to know your blood type. According to a survey conducted last year on behalf of the Red Cross, 53 percent of people believe they need to know their blood type to donate blood — this is simply untrue.  Hydrate – drink an extra 16 oz of liquid before and after donating.  Enjoy a healthy meal rich in iron and vitamin C before donating – avoid foods high in fat just prior to donation.  Wear comfortable clothing with sleeves that can be raised above the elbow.  Complete a RapidPass on the day of donation, prior to arriving, to save time.  Remember to bring an ID!  CAMPAIGN SURVEY RESULTS   A 2019 national survey, conducted on behalf of the Red Cross, revealed a troubling disconnect between the public’s perception of blood donations and the realities of patient transfusion needs. Those results included:   A third (33%) of the public has never considered that blood may not be available when a loved one needs it.* Just last month, the Red Cross only had just six units of type O blood available for every 100,000 people, but more than twice that is needed every day.   According to a 2019 survey conducted on behalf of the Red Cross, clothes (69%), money (63%) and food (53%) are the primary ways that the public has donated to help others in the past year.* Only three percent of people in the U.S. give blood.   Blood transfusion is one of the most common hospital procedures in the U.S. Yet, “Never really thought about it” was cited in a just released 2019 Red Cross survey as the primary reason (26%) that people do not give blood among those who haven’t given recently.*   More than half (54%) the public believes it is necessary to know their blood type in order to donate blood—this is simply not true. Potential blood donors do not need to know their blood type before giving blood. After individuals give blood, the Red Cross provides each donor their blood type.  As the survey shows, we rarely think about blood until someone we love needs it and it’s missing. Through the Missing Types campaign, the Red Cross seeks to raise awareness for the need for new blood donors to ensure patients continue to receive lifesaving blood transfusions.
WHAT: Join NEWS102.3 KRMG, FOX23 and the American Red Cross for our annual Red, White and You Blood Drive  WHEN: June 27 and 28 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m  WHY: We invite you to be an all-American hero and roll up your sleeve and help fill the Missing (blood) Types  WHERE: American Red Cross Tulsa Blood Donation Center just west of HWY169 on 11th St. | Woodland Hills Mall, lower level, Sears Court from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m | St. John Broken Arrow, 1000 W Boise Circle (June 27, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.) | Nienhuis Community Center, 3201 N. 9th St. (June 28, from 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.) NEWLY ADDED LOCATIONS: For those of you that have requested additional locations, we’ve heard you and two more have been added! St. John Broken Arrow, and the Nienhuis Community Center.  GIFTS: All those coming to donate will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.     The American Red Cross, KRMG and FOX23 invite you to be an all-American hero and roll up your sleeve and help fill the Missing Types at the annual Red, White and You Blood Drive June 27 and 28 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Tulsa Blood Donation Center, 10151 E. 11th St.  Also, Woodland Hills Mall, lower level, Sears Court from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., June 27-28.  Additional Red, White and You blood drives:  All those coming to donate will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.   This drive is part of the Missing Types campaign to help raise awareness about the unmet need for blood and how donors can help save lives.   Only three out of 100 people in the U.S. give blood. There simply aren’t enough people donating blood to help patients in need.   Yet each day, kids battling cancer, accident victims being raced into emergency rooms, and new moms with complicated childbirths, need lifesaving blood transfusions.    To ensure that lifesaving blood products are available when and where they are needed, the Red Cross urges more individuals to roll up a sleeve and give.   When you give an hour of your time to donate blood, you can help save more than one life.   Donating blood is a simple process and only takes about an hour from start to finish, but the actual donation itself only takes about 8-10 minutes.   To help reduce fear and prepare for a successful blood donation experience, here are six helpful tips to know before rolling up a sleeve:  You don’t need to know your blood type. According to a survey conducted last year on behalf of the Red Cross, 53 percent of people believe they need to know their blood type to donate blood — this is simply untrue.  Hydrate – drink an extra 16 oz of liquid before and after donating.  Enjoy a healthy meal rich in iron and vitamin C before donating – avoid foods high in fat just prior to donation.  Wear comfortable clothing with sleeves that can be raised above the elbow.  Complete a RapidPass on the day of donation, prior to arriving, to save time.  Remember to bring an ID!  CAMPAIGN SURVEY RESULTS   A 2019 national survey, conducted on behalf of the Red Cross, revealed a troubling disconnect between the public’s perception of blood donations and the realities of patient transfusion needs. Those results included:   A third (33%) of the public has never considered that blood may not be available when a loved one needs it.* Just last month, the Red Cross only had just six units of type O blood available for every 100,000 people, but more than twice that is needed every day.   According to a 2019 survey conducted on behalf of the Red Cross, clothes (69%), money (63%) and food (53%) are the primary ways that the public has donated to help others in the past year.* Only three percent of people in the U.S. give blood.   Blood transfusion is one of the most common hospital procedures in the U.S. Yet, “Never really thought about it” was cited in a just released 2019 Red Cross survey as the primary reason (26%) that people do not give blood among those who haven’t given recently.*   More than half (54%) the public believes it is necessary to know their blood type in order to donate blood—this is simply not true. Potential blood donors do not need to know their blood type before giving blood. After individuals give blood, the Red Cross provides each donor their blood type.  As the survey shows, we rarely think about blood until someone we love needs it and it’s missing. Through the Missing Types campaign, the Red Cross seeks to raise awareness for the need for new blood donors to ensure patients continue to receive lifesaving blood transfusions.
WHAT: Join NEWS102.3 KRMG, FOX23 and the American Red Cross for our annual Red, White and You Blood Drive  WHEN: June 27 and 28 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m  WHY: We invite you to be an all-American hero and roll up your sleeve and help fill the Missing (blood) Types  WHERE: American Red Cross Tulsa Blood Donation Center just west of HWY169 on 11th St. | Woodland Hills Mall, lower level, Sears Court from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m | St. John Broken Arrow, 1000 W Boise Circle (June 27, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.) | Nienhuis Community Center, 3201 N. 9th St. (June 28, from 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.) NEWLY ADDED LOCATIONS: For those of you that have requested additional locations, we’ve heard you and two more have been added! St. John Broken Arrow, and the Nienhuis Community Center.  GIFTS: All those coming to donate will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.     The American Red Cross, KRMG and FOX23 invite you to be an all-American hero and roll up your sleeve and help fill the Missing Types at the annual Red, White and You Blood Drive June 27 and 28 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Tulsa Blood Donation Center, 10151 E. 11th St.  Also, Woodland Hills Mall, lower level, Sears Court from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., June 27-28.  Additional Red, White and You blood drives:  All those coming to donate will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.   This drive is part of the Missing Types campaign to help raise awareness about the unmet need for blood and how donors can help save lives.   Only three out of 100 people in the U.S. give blood. There simply aren’t enough people donating blood to help patients in need.   Yet each day, kids battling cancer, accident victims being raced into emergency rooms, and new moms with complicated childbirths, need lifesaving blood transfusions.    To ensure that lifesaving blood products are available when and where they are needed, the Red Cross urges more individuals to roll up a sleeve and give.   When you give an hour of your time to donate blood, you can help save more than one life.   Donating blood is a simple process and only takes about an hour from start to finish, but the actual donation itself only takes about 8-10 minutes.   To help reduce fear and prepare for a successful blood donation experience, here are six helpful tips to know before rolling up a sleeve:  You don’t need to know your blood type. According to a survey conducted last year on behalf of the Red Cross, 53 percent of people believe they need to know their blood type to donate blood — this is simply untrue.  Hydrate – drink an extra 16 oz of liquid before and after donating.  Enjoy a healthy meal rich in iron and vitamin C before donating – avoid foods high in fat just prior to donation.  Wear comfortable clothing with sleeves that can be raised above the elbow.  Complete a RapidPass on the day of donation, prior to arriving, to save time.  Remember to bring an ID!  CAMPAIGN SURVEY RESULTS   A 2019 national survey, conducted on behalf of the Red Cross, revealed a troubling disconnect between the public’s perception of blood donations and the realities of patient transfusion needs. Those results included:   A third (33%) of the public has never considered that blood may not be available when a loved one needs it.* Just last month, the Red Cross only had just six units of type O blood available for every 100,000 people, but more than twice that is needed every day.   According to a 2019 survey conducted on behalf of the Red Cross, clothes (69%), money (63%) and food (53%) are the primary ways that the public has donated to help others in the past year.* Only three percent of people in the U.S. give blood.   Blood transfusion is one of the most common hospital procedures in the U.S. Yet, “Never really thought about it” was cited in a just released 2019 Red Cross survey as the primary reason (26%) that people do not give blood among those who haven’t given recently.*   More than half (54%) the public believes it is necessary to know their blood type in order to donate blood—this is simply not true. Potential blood donors do not need to know their blood type before giving blood. After individuals give blood, the Red Cross provides each donor their blood type.  As the survey shows, we rarely think about blood until someone we love needs it and it’s missing. Through the Missing Types campaign, the Red Cross seeks to raise awareness for the need for new blood donors to ensure patients continue to receive lifesaving blood transfusions.
WHAT: Join NEWS102.3 KRMG, FOX23 and the American Red Cross for our annual Red, White and You Blood Drive  WHEN: June 27 and 28 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m  WHY: We invite you to be an all-American hero and roll up your sleeve and help fill the Missing (blood) Types  WHERE: American Red Cross Tulsa Blood Donation Center just west of HWY169 on 11th St. | Woodland Hills Mall, lower level, Sears Court from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m | St. John Broken Arrow, 1000 W Boise Circle (June 27, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.) | Nienhuis Community Center, 3201 N. 9th St. (June 28, from 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.) NEWLY ADDED LOCATIONS: For those of you that have requested additional locations, we’ve heard you and two more have been added! St. John Broken Arrow, and the Nienhuis Community Center.  GIFTS: All those coming to donate will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.     The American Red Cross, KRMG and FOX23 invite you to be an all-American hero and roll up your sleeve and help fill the Missing Types at the annual Red, White and You Blood Drive June 27 and 28 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Tulsa Blood Donation Center, 10151 E. 11th St.  Also, Woodland Hills Mall, lower level, Sears Court from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., June 27-28.  Additional Red, White and You blood drives:  All those coming to donate will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.   This drive is part of the Missing Types campaign to help raise awareness about the unmet need for blood and how donors can help save lives.   Only three out of 100 people in the U.S. give blood. There simply aren’t enough people donating blood to help patients in need.   Yet each day, kids battling cancer, accident victims being raced into emergency rooms, and new moms with complicated childbirths, need lifesaving blood transfusions.    To ensure that lifesaving blood products are available when and where they are needed, the Red Cross urges more individuals to roll up a sleeve and give.   When you give an hour of your time to donate blood, you can help save more than one life.   Donating blood is a simple process and only takes about an hour from start to finish, but the actual donation itself only takes about 8-10 minutes.   To help reduce fear and prepare for a successful blood donation experience, here are six helpful tips to know before rolling up a sleeve:  You don’t need to know your blood type. According to a survey conducted last year on behalf of the Red Cross, 53 percent of people believe they need to know their blood type to donate blood — this is simply untrue.  Hydrate – drink an extra 16 oz of liquid before and after donating.  Enjoy a healthy meal rich in iron and vitamin C before donating – avoid foods high in fat just prior to donation.  Wear comfortable clothing with sleeves that can be raised above the elbow.  Complete a RapidPass on the day of donation, prior to arriving, to save time.  Remember to bring an ID!  CAMPAIGN SURVEY RESULTS   A 2019 national survey, conducted on behalf of the Red Cross, revealed a troubling disconnect between the public’s perception of blood donations and the realities of patient transfusion needs. Those results included:   A third (33%) of the public has never considered that blood may not be available when a loved one needs it.* Just last month, the Red Cross only had just six units of type O blood available for every 100,000 people, but more than twice that is needed every day.   According to a 2019 survey conducted on behalf of the Red Cross, clothes (69%), money (63%) and food (53%) are the primary ways that the public has donated to help others in the past year.* Only three percent of people in the U.S. give blood.   Blood transfusion is one of the most common hospital procedures in the U.S. Yet, “Never really thought about it” was cited in a just released 2019 Red Cross survey as the primary reason (26%) that people do not give blood among those who haven’t given recently.*   More than half (54%) the public believes it is necessary to know their blood type in order to donate blood—this is simply not true. Potential blood donors do not need to know their blood type before giving blood. After individuals give blood, the Red Cross provides each donor their blood type.  As the survey shows, we rarely think about blood until someone we love needs it and it’s missing. Through the Missing Types campaign, the Red Cross seeks to raise awareness for the need for new blood donors to ensure patients continue to receive lifesaving blood transfusions.
Warren leads Democrats into first night of 2020 debates On the eve of the first major gathering of Democratic Party candidates in the 2020 race for President, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) drew over a thousand interested Democrats to a town hall gathering at Florida International University on Monday, pressing the case for the federal government to do more to help working Americans find economic security in the future. 'I don't want a government that works for big corporations, I want one that works for families,' Warren said to applause, making the case for a higher minimum wage for workers, major ethics reforms for government officials, voting reforms, major tax changes, and more. 'Let's start with a wealth tax in America,' said Sanders, as she called for 'big structural change in this country,' rattling off a number of her policy ideas, getting big cheers for new limits on lobbying, action on climate change, and better wages for all workers. “A full time minimum wage job in America will not get a momma and a baby out of poverty,” Warren said.  “That is wrong, and that is why I am in this fight.” Of the ten Democrats on the debate stage Wednesday night, Warren is by far the strongest candidate in the first group, as she has been gaining momentum in recent weeks in a variety of polls. The four other top Democrats in the race will be on stage together on Thursday - Biden, Buttigieg, Harris and Sanders. Along with Warren, two other Democrats attracted press attention in south Florida before the Wednesday debate, as Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington State talked about his signature issue of climate change, and ex-Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas rallied with teachers in Miami. 'It's a great opportunity for me to listen to you, to have the chance to introduce myself,' said O'Rourke, who is one of the better known names on the first night of the Democratic debate. The first debate night in Miami features three Democratic Senators (Booker, Klobuchar, Warren), two House members (Gabbard, Ryan), two former House members (Delaney, O'Rourke), one current mayor (DeBlasio), one former mayor and Cabinet member (Castro), and one Governor (Inslee). While some like Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) arrived in Florida on Tuesday afternoon - getting unsolicited advice along the way from fellow passengers on her flight to Miami - Inslee was for a second day hammering away at his main issue of climate change. 'Today we're announcing a new freedom in America, and that's freedom from fossil fuels,' Inslee said at an event in the Everglades. Inslee followed up his Everglades visit with a Tuesday evening event where he took shots at Big Oil. For most of the Democrats over the next two nights, there is a simple game plan.  'Our goal,' a memo to reporters from Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) said, 'Introduce Cory to Democrats tuning in for the first time,' noting that when you do the math, each candidate is only going to get between seven and eleven minutes of total speaking time. 'I can’t wait to share with you my vision for a more just and fair nation,' Booker said. Meanwhile, Warren was making plans for an impromptu visit on Wednesday to a facility south of Miami, where immigrant children detained by border authorities are being held. “I'm going to Homestead,” Warren said to cheers after being urged to focus on the issue by an activist at a town hall meeting in Miami. “If you can come, come and join us,” Warren urged the crowd, as her campaign set a 10:45 am visit on Wednesday, which seems all but certain to draw extra news media attention, just hours before the first night of the Democratic debates. While Warren was on the move, her colleague Sen. Booker was doing more mundane things at the same time back in Washington, D.C. - helping people put their suitcases in the overhead bin on his flight to Miami.