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WARNING: Graphic details from testimony in Bever brothers hearing

Police say Robert and Michael Bever openly talked about murdering their parents and three siblings the night they were arrested.

Tulsa District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler told KRMG news, “you all heard the same stuff our office, and quite frankly defense counsel, has had to kind of keep under our hat for the last seven months.”

It wasn’t easy to hear.

Deputies testified about what the brothers told them and also in place of the boy’s 13-year-old sister who, along with her two-year-old sister, survived the attack. “She, I think, really appreciated the opportunity to not be in that circumstance,” Kunzweiler told us.

FOX23 and KRMG's Lynn Casey heard every moment of the testimony, read her notes below.

A Broken Arrow detective testified about interviewing Robert Bever. He said Robert Bever said he’d been planning to kill his parents since he was 13. He said he and Michael discovered their fascination with murder over late-night talks and made a plan. 

The detective said Robert Bever told him he got a job at a call center to earn money to buy knives, body armor, helmets, bullets and guns. He said they ordered body armor and collected knives for months. He said he found he could order guns and get them delivered to a gun shop and did that. He said he ordered ammunition to be delivered to their home the day after their family was killed.

The detective said Bever told him the brothers planned to cut up the victims' bodies and store them in tubs in the attic and clean up the house. He also said they planned to kill their entire family, including killing their two-year-old sister by cutting her head off with an ax.

He said Bever told him the brothers planned to make two videos, one with the bodies for police and one without bodies and blood that could be released to the public.

He said they then planned to take the family car to pick up guns at a gun shop and ammunition delivered that day and drive out of state to heavily populated places and kill random people. He said Bever told him they planned to kill five people each per place, then move on to other locations. They had ordered 2,000 rounds of pistol ammunition and 250 rounds for a shotgun.

The detective testified that Robert Bever said the gun shop told him two pistols and a shotgun had arrived for them before the incident, and the two bought handkerchiefs to wear under helmets to avoid “helmet hair.” The brothers then reportedly gathered six knives.

He said Robert Bever told detectives he admired serial killers and mass shooters and said he believed killing more than one person would make him God-like. Robert Bever reportedly told the detective that killing was not a bad thing, and that he always thought about doing it. The detective said Robert told him that if he killed enough people, he would eventually kill someone who was not contributing to society, which would be a good thing.

Robert also reportedly told the investigator he liked firearms because his parents hated them. According to the detective, he said they believed they could kill 100 people on their killing spree without anyone missing them.

He testified that the two originally planned to carry out the attack in September, but instead decided to do it in July. He said Robert Bever laughed and chuckled frequently while telling the story, becoming mildly exciting at parts.

Another detective testified about interviewing the surviving sister while she was in critical condition after the incident. He said she told them she went into their room to tell them their mother wanted them to do the dishes, and they told her to look at what was on Michael's computer screen.

She said Robert came up behind her, put a hand over her mouth and cut her throat. Robert Bever told detectives he believed she would die silently, but she screamed.

The sister told investigators she screamed until her mom came. She said she ran to tell her younger sister to lock herself in the bathroom while Robert chased her, and Michael Bever stayed and killed the mother. The girl said she then tried to find a cell phone and ran to open the front door in order to sound the alarm. She said she passed out on the front lawn and awoke to Michael Bever dragging her back into their home as she heard her younger brothers screaming inside the house.

She said the next thing she knew there was a police officer banging on the door. He broke in and carried her out.

The sister said Robert and Michael talked for a year about wanting to kill their family and steal their money. She said they admired mass shooters, wishing more of them got away with their crimes. According to the girl, the brothers said there were too many people in the world.

According to the detective, the children’s mother said they were simply “boys being boys” when she told her about what the boys were saying. She said her father was only upset that the boys were wasting their money. She said none of the children have ever been to school, and none of them made any friends.

The sister said her father threw the kids across the room in the past when he was angry, and she remembered hearing the parents talk about being too rough on Robert and Michael when they were younger. She said she witnessed one fight between her mom and dad in which her dad threw her and hit her head on the wall.

She did not have to testify in person, as the judge said the testimony from the detectives who interviewed her were sufficient when coupled with other evidence.

A judge ruled that two brothers accused of killing their family have been bound over for court.

 

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