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State of emergency declared, burn ban in effect for 36 counties

Due to the wildfires that have burned over the last 24 hours, Governor Mary Fallin has declared a state of emergency for all 77 counties.

Fallin also issued an executive proclamation that declares a burn ban for 36 counties.

“My thanks go out to the firefighters and first responders who have been battling wildfires in several areas of the state,” said Fallin. “The emergency declaration allows state agencies to acquire resources that can aid in that firefighting effort.” Fallin said in a press conference.

Under the Executive Order, state agencies can make emergency purchases and acquisitions needed to expedite the delivery of resources to local jurisdictions. The declaration also marks a first step toward seeking federal assistance should it be necessary.

Oklahoma Forestry Services recommended the ban based upon an analysis of fire activity, wildland fuel conditions and the predicted continued drought as criteria for recommending the ban.

The Governor’s Burn Ban covers 36 counties mostly in western and south-central Oklahoma. Counties under the burn ban are: Alfalfa, Beaver, Beckham, Blaine, Caddo, Canadian, Cimarron, Cleveland, Comanche, Cotton, Custer, Dewey, Ellis, Garfield, Grady, Grant, Greer, Harmon, Harper, Jackson, Kingfisher, Kiowa, Lincoln, Logan, Major, McClain, Noble, Oklahoma, Payne, Pawnee, Roger Mills, Texas, Tillman, Washita, Woods and Woodward.

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