ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
81°
Mostly Cloudy
H 89° L 65°
  • cloudy-day
    81°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 89° L 65°
  • cloudy-day
    88°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy. H 89° L 65°
  • cloudy-day
    83°
    Evening
    Mostly Cloudy. H 89° L 65°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Three Big Things
 you need to know
1
2
3
WATCH: President Trump’s speech on Afghanistan

WATCH: President Trump’s speech on Afghanistan

Going against his own gut feeling that he should pull military forces out of Afghanistan, President Donald Trump on Monday night vowed to intensify American actions against terrorists based in the region, though he gave few details on how U.S. policy would change or on how many more soldiers would be sent in, as the American presence in Afghanistan seems likely to continue, almost 16 years since the September 11 attacks that led to a lengthy U.S. intervention. “My original instinct was to pull out, and historically I like following my instincts, but all of my life I heard that decisions are much different when you sit behind the desk in the Oval Office,” the President acknowledged in a speech from Fort Myer, located just across the Potomac River from the White House. “A hasty withdrawal would create a vacuum that terrorists – including ISIS and Al Qaeda – would instantly fill, just as happened before September 11th,” Mr Trump added. The President gave no details in his speech on his decision to reportedly send more troops to Afghanistan, though it would be nowhere near the levels the U.S. had in the immediate aftermath of the Nine Eleven attacks. Here is the President’s speech.

Native American tribes tackle death penalty issue

Native American tribes tackle death penalty issue

The sexual assault and murder of an 11-year-old girl near Shiprock, New Mexico, has reignited the debate. Ashlynne Mike's mother is urging the Navajo Nation to opt in to the death penalty, particularly for crimes that involve children. Southwestern tribe has long objected to putting people to death. The culture teaches that all life is precious. Tribes have been able to opt into the death penalty for certain federal crimes on tribal land for decades, but nearly all reject it. Legal experts say the decision goes back to culture and tradition, past treatment of American Indians and fairness in the justice system. One federally recognized tribe, the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma, has opted in.  

Wreckage of WWII ship that delivered first atomic bomb found on ocean floor

Wreckage of WWII ship that delivered first atomic bomb found on ocean floor

Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese torpedoes.  The sinking of the Indianapolis remains the Navy's single worst loss at sea. The fate of its crew - nearly 900 were killed, many by sharks, and just 316 survived - was one of the Pacific war's more horrible and fascinating tales.  The expedition crew of Research Vessel Petrel, which is owned by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, says it located the wreckage of the Indianapolis on the floor of the North Pacific Ocean, more than 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) below the surface, the U.S. Navy said in a news release Saturday. 'To be able to honor the brave men of the USS Indianapolis and their families through the discovery of a ship that played such a significant role in ending World War II is truly humbling,' Allen said in the news release. The Indianapolis, with 1,196 sailors and Marines on board, was sailing the Philippine Sea between Guam and Leyte Gulf when two torpedoes from a Japanese submarine struck just after midnight on July 30, 1945.  It sank in 12 minutes, killing about 300. Survivors were left in the water, most of them with only life jackets.  There was no time to send a distress signal, and four days passed before a bomber on routine patrol happened to spot the survivors in the water.  By the time rescuers arrived, a combination of exposure, dehydration, drowning and constant shark attacks had left only one-fourth of the ship's original number alive.

WATCH: President Trump’s speech on Afghanistan

Going against his own gut feeling that he should pull military forces out of Afghanistan, President Donald Trump on Monday night vowed to intensify American actions against terrorists based in the region, though he gave few details on how U.S. policy would change or on how many more soldiers would be sent in, as the American presence in Afghanistan seems likely to continue, almost 16 years since the September 11 attacks that led to a lengthy U.S. intervention.

“My original instinct was to pull out, and historically I like following my instincts, but all of my life I heard that decisions [More]