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  • The best school district in Oklahoma is right here in Tulsa County. So says a company called Niche, according to the story by Business Insider. Niche researches and compiles information on all the nearly 100,000 grade school, middle school, and high schools in the U.S. And they say the Jenks district is the best in the state.  They look at four main categories, Academics, Health & Safety, Diversity, and Teachers. And Jenks got an A+ on the first two, and and A on the second two. You can find the full list of all the states here.
  • Comedian Aziz Ansari released a statement Sunday in response to allegations of sexual misconduct first reported on women's website . According to the article published Saturday, a 23-year-old photographer said Ansari pressured her into having oral sex and 'repeatedly asked her for sexual intercourse after she had already declined' after the pair went on a date in September.>> Eliza Dushku says she was molested by 'True Lies' stunt coordinator at age 12 She said she gave physical cues that she was not interested, but the comedian either did not notice or ignored them. The woman added that she told Ansari during the encounter that she 'didn't want to feel forced because then I'll hate you, and I'd rather not hate you.' She said Ansari texted her the next day to say it was fun meeting her. 'Last night might've been fun for you, but it wasn't for me,' she said she wrote back. 'You ignored clear non-verbal cues; you kept going with advances.' After explaining her discomfort, she said Ansari apologized, saying he had misread the situation. >> Read the full story here (WARNING: Graphic content.)  'In September of last year, I met a woman at a party. We exchanged numbers. We texted back and forth and eventually went on a date. We went out to dinner, and afterwards we ended up engaging in sexual activity, which by all indications was completely consensual,' the statement read, according to USA Today. >> Read more trending news  'The next day, I got a text from her saying that although 'it may have seemed okay,' upon further reflection, she felt uncomfortable. It was true that everything did seem okay to me, so when I heard that it was not the case for her, I was surprised and concerned. I took her words to heart and responded privately after taking the time to process what she had said.' The statement added: 'I continue to support the movement that is happening in our culture. It is necessary and long overdue.' Read more here.
  • With a temporary funding plan for Uncle Sam set to run out Friday night, there was no clear path forward as yet for Congress and the White House, as the President and Democrats remained on a collision course over efforts to secure a deal on spending levels for the 2018 federal budget, as well as an agreement on the status of certain illegal immigrants brought here as children, raising the possibility of a government shutdown at the end of the week. After arriving back at the White House on Monday night, President Donald Trump re-tweeted four of his own Twitter posts from recent days, as he bluntly criticized Democrats in Congress over immigration and the budget. “DACA is probably dead because the Democrats don’t really want it,” the President said, as he charged that Democrats “just want to talk and take desperately needed money away from our Military.” Senator Dicky Durbin totally misrepresented what was said at the DACA meeting. Deals can’t get made when there is no trust! Durbin blew DACA and is hurting our Military. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 15, 2018 Let’s take a look at some of legislative sore spots that might come up this week: 1. Budget caps and the military – When you hear about talks on a spending deal, this has to do with the regular budget that the Congress works on each year, covering the funding for government programs like the military, various government departments, the Congress and the Judiciary. President Trump has been calling for a $54 billion increase this year in money for defense – Democrats say they’ll back that if they also get an equal increase in non-defense programs, something GOP leaders don’t want to do. One overall problem with funding levels for this year is simple – until you figure out how much money the feds will spend in 2018, you can’t finish the spending bills for this year. It’s one reason why another short term budget might be needed. It is not too much to ask that your government be able to stay open while not kicking a million kids out of the country. — Brian Schatz (@brianschatz) January 15, 2018 2. Hurricane and wildfire disaster aid – Officials from Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have been making noise for weeks that more aid is overdue to areas hit by major hurricanes in 2017. They also agree that the emergency aid offered up by the President has not been enough. That’s why the $44 billion plan proposed by the White House in December quickly grew into an $81 billion package – and why some lawmakers think it should be even larger. Is it possible that Congress approves that extra aid this week as one way to get a short term funding plan through the House and Senate? Stay tuned. . @FLGovScott pens letter to @SenateApprops urging the U.S. Senate to pass a #HurricaneIrma & #HurricaneMaria disaster relief package. https://t.co/0iWHiff2oe pic.twitter.com/SP7gEdWRId — Jordan Ferrell (@jordaneferrell) January 3, 2018 3. No deadline right now on DACA & Dreamers – The most important thing to remember about the back and forth over the DACA program is timing – it does not have to be solved this week. When President Trump moved to end the Obama Administration program, he set a six month deadline for the Congress to act. That runs out March 5. Democrats don’t want to wait for early March, and have tried to tie any deal on the Dreamers to a plan that funds the federal government – that’s why they want to do it now, at the January 19 shutdown deadline. It still seems like a long shot for the DACA/Dreamers matter to get done in the next three days, simply because the fight over it has so intensified since last Thursday, and immigration remains a very controversial topic. Let's be clear: The January 19 deadline to fund the government and the March 5 DACA deadline are two totally separate issues and should be different conversations entirely. pic.twitter.com/iUZwqEB1LG — David Perdue (@sendavidperdue) January 10, 2018 4. Children’s health insurance – Back at the end of September, the legal authorization expired for a federal-state program which helps about 9 million children get health care coverage. When Congress approved a short term funding plan for the government in December, the House and Senate also kicked in some extra money for the CHIP program – now lawmakers have reached another point where funding is in question for some states, which might have to ratchet back on services if nothing is done this week on Capitol Hill. One recent study said 20 states might have to cut off CHIP coverage. It’s one more thing in the mix this week. It has been 107 days since Congress failed to extend CHIP. In 2007 CHIP extension was bipartisan and despite debates with the Bush administration, Congress never let the appropriation expire. — Emma Sandoe (@emma_sandoe) January 15, 2018 5. Who has more leverage? – This is an interesting argument in Washington, D.C. Democrats believe they have the edge on the DACA issue, especially if the President uses it as the basis for arguing that Democrats are to blame for any government shutdown. Many GOP lawmakers contend they will be sticking up for national defense and a strong border, not for illegal immigrants. My rule of thumb on fights between the Congress and the President usually boils down to one simple idea – never underestimate the power of the President, and his bully pulpit to drive home his arguments. Democrats though think the country will rise up in opposition if Dreamers start being deported en masse. President Trump has the veto pen – he can use it, if he wants to do that. Stay tuned. This could be a very interesting week in the halls of Congress.
  • The competition for full-size pickup truck customers in the U.S. is as rough-and-tumble as ever, with Ram and Chevrolet rolling out brawny-looking new models that are larger, lighter and more efficient than their predecessors. For the first time in recent memory, two Detroit automakers are introducing new big trucks at the Motor City’s auto show at the same time, in a hot sales market that U.S.-based automakers have dominated for years. Last year, Ford, Fiat-Chrysler and General Motors combined sold more than 2.2 million full-size trucks, controlling 93 percent of the segment. Big pickup truck sales are important to automakers, which make huge profits on them. Sales rose nearly 6 percent last year to almost 2.4 million, even though total U.S. auto sales dropped 2 percent. One in every seven vehicles sold last year was a big pickup, up from one in every nine in 2009 in the midst of the Great Recession. Ford’s F-Series pickup is the country’s top-selling vehicle, followed by the GM’s Chevy Silverado and Fiat-Chrysler’s Ram. GM unveiled the Silverado Saturday night, while Fiat Chrysler is to roll out the new Ram Monday at the North American International Auto Show. Both are meaner-looking and bigger, but much lighter. Each has sophisticated engine or transmission improvements that give them better gas mileage as they go after the F-Series.