ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
75°
Mostly Sunny
H 92° L 70°
  • clear-night
    75°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Sunny. H 92° L 70°
  • clear-day
    87°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Sunny. H 92° L 70°
  • clear-day
    87°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 92° L 70°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local
Oklahoma’s new attorney general confirms he’ll run in 2018
Close

Oklahoma’s new attorney general confirms he’ll run in 2018

Oklahoma’s new attorney general confirms he’ll run in 2018
Photo Credit: David Vandever
Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter, FOX23 Anchor Shae Rozzi, and KRMG's Russell Mills (April 17, 2017)

Oklahoma’s new attorney general confirms he’ll run in 2018

He’s been a state representative, Secretary of State for Oklahoma, and now he’s the state’s top law enforcement official.

Monday, Attorney General Mike Hunter sat down with KRMG and our partners at FOX23 for an extensive interview on a wide range of topics.

[Hear our entire interview with Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter HERE]

He left no doubt that his plans include running for election to the same office in 2018.

“This is a job that I’m trained for, and I’ll have to work very hard to earn people’s vote,” he said.

So while he’ll be a candidate, he’s also got a lot on his plate serving out the term of former AG Scott Pruitt, who was appointed Administrator of the EPA by President Trump.

Early in the conversation, KRMG asked about the lawsuits filed by Pruitt against the EPA.

“We anticipate that our involvement with the federal government is going to be much more collaborative, much more cooperative,” Hunter said. “The lawsuits that are pending, we believe, are going to be settled in a way that’s favorable to the state, and restores what we think the traditional boundaries of the states and the federal government are.”

And he says, that doesn’t mean tossing out all oversight on the oil and gas industry.

“I’m convinced that we can have clean air and clean water without destroying the economy,” he said, “without costing this state hundreds of jobs.”

But he’s planning on continuing to push Oklahoma’s lawsuit against Colorado over that state’s legalization of recreational marijuana.

“Our view is that the trafficking out of Colorado is very damaging to the state. We think that we have made our case. So far we have not gotten relief, but I’m optimistic that working with the State of Nebraska in a similar lawsuit, that we’re going to be successful.”

One problem plaguing state agencies is drastic budget cuts, but Hunter says happily, his office draws money from several sources that don’t involve appropriations.

“We’re in an unusual situation because we’re not 100 percent self-funded, but we’re primarily self-funded through legal activities on behalf of the state,” he explained. “We’re allowed to, when we win a judgement, we’re allowed to keep a small percentage of that judgement and keep that in a revolving fund to fund operations. We also get a percentage of the tobacco settlement monies every month.”

Hunter was elected to the Oklahoma House of Representatives in 1984 and served for six years.

He was General Counsel for the Oklahoma Corporation Commission from 1993-94, and served as Chief of Staff for Oklahoma Congressman J. C. Watts from 1995-99.

He became Secretary of State under Governor Frank Keating from 1999 to 2002, and again for Governor Mary Fallin from November of last year until February of this year, at which time he was appointed as AG.

He also served as Secretary of the Oklahoma Commissioners of the Land Office in 2009-10.

Hunter also worked with former Gov. Keating as EVP and COO of the American Council of Life Insurers.

He worked with Keating again as COO of the American Bankers Association before returning to Oklahoma again - “for good,” he told KRMG.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Hurricane victims in the Florida Keys are receiving fresh barbecue meals from thanks to an airlift program by FedEx, reported. >> Read more trending news FedEx began airlifting more than 10,000 meals a day from Fort Myers to the Keys, following through on a request from one of its aircraft mechanics, Scott Guy. FedEx assigned two feeder aircraft to transport 3,700 pounds of food each day to residents affected by Hurricane Irma from Sunday through Wednesday, USA Today reported. Guy is a member of Operation BBQ Relief, which was formed to feed the hungry after a tornado struck Joplin, Mo., in 2011. The organization served 371,760 meals over 11 days on the Texas Gulf Coast after Hurricane Harvey, then shifted its focus to the Florida region hit by Hurricane Irma, USA Today reported.
  • Americans suffering from drug and alcohol addiction often find themselves with few alternatives outside of a jail cell or expensive rehabilitation facilities. But there is an alternative, available in Tulsa, that provides a chance to turn one’s life around with the help and support of others who know what the struggle is like. The organization is called Oxford House, and local outreach worker Thomas Floyd says it has experienced rapid growth in Oklahoma in recent years. “It’s actually the largest sober-living organization in the world,” he told KRMG. “How I actually got involved with it was a life of 20 years of addiction, incarceration, all those things. And the last time I was incarcerated, some people came in to the prison I was in and talked about Oxford House.” He moved into an Oxford House in 2013, he said. “The men in that house taught me about a 12-step program and how to live a productive life,” Floyd added. “We’re growing at a really fast rate here in Oklahoma, we’re up to 102 houses, 899 beds, in which we accept individuals either off the street, or out of treatment or detox, or just like me, out of prison. And we get them plugged into a 12-step program and teach them how to live life, on life’s terms.” He said there are three charter requirements for an Oxford House, which are segregated into house that accept males, females, or females with children. “The house must be democratically ran, it must be financially self-supporting, and it must evict anyone who drinks or uses.” He said residents have to pitch in on chores, hold a job, and contribute to the house’s collective finances. One can check the Oxford House vacancies website to see if any room is available in a particular area. A check by KRMG showed a number of beds available in the Tulsa area. To learn more about Oxford House, visit the website.
  • Ahead of a Tuesday Republican runoff, President Donald Trump is fully inserting himself in a U.S. Senate race in Alabama, holding a rally Friday night for Sen. Luther Strange (R-AL), who faces a spirited challenge from former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore, in a race that has strained GOP alliances in the Yellowhammer State. The President will stop tonight in Huntsville, Alabama – not far from there, Mr. Trump had a gigantic rally back in late February of 2016, as he drew some 30,000 people to a football stadium in Madison. “I am supporting “Big” Luther Strange because he was so loyal and helpful to me!” Trump wrote in one of a number of tweets about the Alabama race. Senator Luther Strange has gone up a lot in the polls since I endorsed him a month ago. Now a close runoff. He will be great in D.C. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 21, 2017 Behind in the polls, Strange used a Thursday night debate with Moore to repeatedly remind Alabama voters who the President was supporting. “The first question is, who does the President support? The President supports me,” Strange said. As for Moore, he has drawn support from a number of conservative Republicans, but now finds himself pitted against someone who has the backing of the President, something that Strange mentioned several times at a debate on Thursday night. “This race is not me against the President,” Moore said. Moore would seem to be a perfect ally for the President – someone who rails against the GOP Establishment, focusing much of his ire on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell – but Mr. Trump has stuck with “Big Luther,” who has trailed in the polls leading up to the runoff. “If they believe in Trump’s agenda – Moore is the clear choice,” said Rep. Steve King (R-IA), “but if they follow the cult of personality – then Strange.” Both US Senate Candidates have delivered their opening statements. pic.twitter.com/ogDS7MlRRT — Jalea Brooks (@JaleaBrooks) September 21, 2017 Strange was appointed earlier this year to fill the seat of Jeff Sessions, who left the Senate to become U.S. Attorney General – Sessions was the first Senator to support Mr. Trump, but that has not earned him any loyalty from the President, who has castigated Sessions repeatedly. While the President has backed Strange, Moore has received the backing of Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), who ran third in the original primary. But the big voice on Friday will be that of President Trump, who has certainly been putting his political capital on the line for Strange. Alabama is sooo lucky to have a candidate like 'Big' Luther Strange. Smart, tough on crime, borders & trade, loves Vets & Military. Tuesday! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 20, 2017
  • Special counsel Robert Mueller's team of investigators is seeking information from the White House related to Michael Flynn's stint as national security adviser and about the response to a meeting with a Russian lawyer that was attended by President Donald Trump's oldest son, The Associated Press has learned. Mueller's office has requested a large batch of documents from the White House and is expected to interview at least a half-dozen current and former aides in the coming weeks. Lawyers for the White House are in the process of trying to cooperate with the document requests. Though the full scope of the investigation is not clear, the information requests make evident at least some of the areas that Mueller and his team of prosecutors intend to look into and also reveal a strong interest in certain of Trump's actions as president. A person familiar with the investigation who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation said investigators want information on, among other topics, a June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower that Donald Trump Jr. attended with a Russian lawyer as well as on the administration's response to it.
  • Former Tulsa police officer Betty Shelby was acquitted of criminal charges in the death of Terence Crutcher, but the Crutcher estate has moved forward with civil litigation. [CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story on KRMG.com indicated the city council had voted to pay for Shelby to hire private representation. We have corrected this after speaking with the Office of the City Attorney] The Tulsa City Council voted Wednesday night to allow the Office of the City Attorney to represent Shelby in that federal lawsuit.  Gerry Bender, the Litigation Division Manager for the city attorney’s office, tells KRMG that is standard procedure when a city employee faces litigation over something that happened in the performance of their professional duties. “There’s a process whereby any city employee - whether police, fire, someone working out in the field for water or sewer or anything else - if they get sued for doing something that occurred during the course and scope of their duties as an employee, they are allowed to make a request to the city council to have the city attorney’s office represent them, and that’s what happened in this particular instance,” Bender said Thursday. “When Officer Shelby was served, she came to our office with a request. That request was passed on to the city council. The city council went into executive session last night to consider that request, and when they came out of executive session the city council voted to extend representation by the city attorney’s office to former Officer Shelby.” The City of Tulsa is also named as a respondent in the lawsuit. Bender said there has also been a tort claim filed, which Bender says was filed “to attempt to satisfy requirements of the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act, which is a negligence standard, but that was filed with the city after the complaint was filed, and we’re going to take issue with the timeline on that.” There is no hearing scheduled yet in the federal lawsuit.