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    LaMarcus Aldridge had 24 points and 18 rebounds as the San Antonio Spurs fended off a late rally to beat short-handed Golden State 104-92 on Sunday night, extending the Warriors' skid to three games. Kevin Durant scored 26 points and Klay Thompson had 25 for Golden State, which is 2-5 since an eight-game winning streak. DeMar DeRozan had 20 points and Rudy Gay added 19 to help San Antonio snap a three-game slide. The Warriors were without injured starters Stephen Curry and Draymond Green, and their absence led to a cold start. Three nights after being held to a season-low output in a 107-86 loss at Houston, the two-time defending NBA champions nearly matched that dubious mark. San Antonio jumped out to a 33-27 lead in the first quarter as Gay scored 12 points in the opening period. The Spurs frustrated the Warriors offensively for much of the game. After quickly regaining an errant pass on their end of the court in the third quarter, Durant passed up a 3-pointer to fire a pass in the lane to Damian Jones only to have Gay stuff him at the rim. San Antonio finished with five blocked shots. Golden State's lone lead came when Andre Iguodala made a pair of free throws to put the Warriors ahead 46-45 with 3:47 remaining in the second quarter. The lead lasted a minute before the Spurs closed the first half on an 11-2 run. TIP-INS Warriors: Curry missed his sixth straight game with a strained left groin. Golden State is 2-4 without him. . Green missed his second consecutive game with a strained right toe. . Warriors coach Steve Kerr got a technical foul 47 seconds into the second quarter after protesting a foul on Jonas Jerebko. . Durant was called for a technical after complaining about a non-call on his first field goal attempt of the second half. Spurs: Aldridge has 202 games with at least 20 points and 10 rebounds since 2006. LeBron James has 203 such games during that same span. . Pau Gasol missed his sixth straight game with a sore left foot. . Davis Bertans sat out as he remains in the league's concussion protocol. UP NEXT Warriors: Host Oklahoma City on Wednesday night. Spurs: At New Orleans on Monday night. ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Three protest leaders and six others went on trial Monday for their involvement in the 'Occupy Central' demonstration that paralyzed Hong Kong's financial district for more than two months in 2014. Fanned by more than 100 supporters, some holding the yellow umbrellas that came to symbolize the movement, the nine defendants pumped their fists in the air and chanted 'Shame to political prosecution!' before entering the West Kowloon courthouse. Two university professors and a pastor, who together spearheaded the campaign to press for free elections of Hong Kong's top leader, are charged with conspiracy to commit a public disturbance and incitement to commit public nuisance. The other defendants — two current and one former lawmaker, two student leaders and a political activist — face charges of incitement to commit a public nuisance. Each charge carries a maximum penalty of seven years. Three university students prosecuted in 2016 for their leadership role in the protests received community service. But Hong Kong judges have since faced mounting pressure from Beijing to hand down heavier sentences to deter future protests. Some in the semi-autonomous Chinese city fear that central government meddling will erode judiciary independence, a bedrock value that undergirds the city's standing as a global business capital. The protesters, in what was also known as the umbrella movement, laid siege to government headquarters for 79 days but failed to win any concessions. Thousands staked out encampments on major thoroughfares in the financial district. Several hundred were arrested. Ranging in age from 30 to 74 years old, the nine defendants span generations of Hong Kong citizens who have been agitating for full democracy as the former British colony transitions to Chinese sovereignty under a 'one country, two systems' arrangement that is supposed to preserve the city's civil liberties. The trial is expected to last 20 days.
  • Asian shares were mostly higher Monday after a buying spree on Wall Street kept up investor optimism into a new week, despite continuing worries about trade tensions. KEEPING SCORE: Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 rose 0.5 percent to 21,784.87, while Australia's S&P/ASX 200 fell 0.7 percent to 5,693.30 in early trading. South Korea's Kospi gained 0.3 percent to 2,099.45. Hong Kong's Hang Seng added 0.6 percent to 26,331.84, while the Shanghai Composite stood at 2,693.93, also up 0.6 percent. Shares were mostly higher in the rest of Asia, with benchmarks rising in Taiwan and Indonesia. WALL STREET: The S&P 500 index rose 6.07 points, or 0.2 percent, to end the week at 2,736.27. The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 123.95 points, or 0.5 percent, to 25,413.22. The Nasdaq composite slid 11.16 points, or 0.2 percent, to 7,247.87. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies picked up 3.41 points, or 0.2 percent, to $1,527.53. But the S&P 500, which finished higher for the second straight day, ended the week with a loss of 1.6 percent. TRADE WORRIES: The Trump administration has imposed a 10 percent tariff on $200 billion of Chinese goods over complaints Beijing steals or pressures foreign companies to hand over technology as the price of market access. That tariff is set to rise to 25 percent in January. Another $50 billion of Chinese goods already is subject to 25 percent duties. Beijing has responded with penalty duties on $110 billion of American goods. Washington and Beijing have resumed talks over their spiraling trade dispute. JAPAN TRADE: Japan reported a trade deficit for October but has seen a recovery in exports after getting slammed by natural disasters in September. Data from the Ministry of Finance showed exports grew 8.2 percent from the same month the previous year. In September, exports fell 1.2 percent from the previous year in the first decline for the world's third-largest economy since 2016. Imports in October grew 19.9 percent on-year. ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude oil added 83 cents to $57.51 a barrel. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gained 74 cents to $67.50. CURRENCIES: The dollar fell to 112.69 yen from 113.26 yen late Friday. The euro strengthened to $1.1410 from $1.1339. ___ Yuri Kageyama is on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyama On Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/yurikageyama/?hl=en
  • Japan recorded a trade deficit in October but a recovery in exports after getting slammed by natural disasters in September, according to government data released Monday. Exports grew 8.2 percent from the same month the previous year, the Finance Ministry said. In September, exports fell 1.2 percent from the previous year in the first decline for the world's third-largest economy since 2016. Imports in October grew 19.9 percent on-year. Worries are continuing over trade tensions after President Donald Trump imposed penalty tariffs on billions of dollars' worth of Chinese exports. Weaker U.S.-China trade generally hurts the export-dependent Japanese economy. Trump has also complained about Japanese auto imports. Bilateral trade talks are expected next year. Monday's data showed Japan racked up a trade deficit of 449 billion yen ($4 billion). Japan's imports from the U.S. jumped 34 percent, including imports of food, oil, steel and other metals and machinery, while exports to the U.S. grew nearly 12 percent, mostly in autos, machinery, medical products and rubber. Cabinet Office data released last week showed a contraction for the Japanese economy, at an annualized rate of 1.2 percent in July-September, as consumer spending, investment and exports slipped. Natural disasters have hurt Japan recently, including the closure of a major airport in the western Kansai area after a typhoon. A major earthquake that hit the northernmost island of Hokkaido, causing fatal landslides and widespread blackouts, has also weighed on the economy. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been pushing for growth with his 'Abenomics' policies based on a deflation-fighting stimulus program of cheap lending. ___ Yuri Kageyama is on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyama On Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/yurikageyama/?hl=en
  • There was a time when LeBron James getting pestered by Lance Stephenson would have worked out wonderfully for the Miami Heat. Sunday was not one of those times. The scenario: It was late in the game, the outcome was decided, and Stephenson — James' former rival, now his teammate with the Los Angeles Lakers — challenged him to finish the game off with a 3-pointer. 'I bet you won't go for the 3,' Stephenson said. The Heat probably wish that conversation never took place. James' capped his 51-point night with a 32-foot 3-pointer in the final seconds, pointed at Stephenson to let him know he was wrong, and the Lakers rolled past the Heat 113-97 for their seventh win in their last nine games. James reached 50 for the 13th time in his career, including Game 1 of last season's NBA Finals. 'It's just playing with greatness,' Lakers guard Lonzo Ball said. 'Tonight he took the game over.' James shot 19 for 31 from the field, 6 for 8 from 3-point range, became the seventh player to score at least 51 in a game against Miami, and started his two-game reunion tour in sensational fashion. The Lakers' next game is Wednesday night in Cleveland, the only other place besides Miami and L.A. that James has called home as a professional. 'It's always great to be here,' said James, who hugged a slew of familiar faces in the arena he used to call home. 'We had some not-so-good times, we had more great times, so it's always a respect factor and a love for the people in Miami and especially the people who work here.' And finally, he left Miami a winner again. Since leaving the Heat after the 2014 NBA Finals James was 0-4 against Miami; his teams were 0-7, when including the three Cleveland-Miami games that he sat out for various reasons. James put on a show. The Heat threw a shoe. It was their fourth straight home loss and frustrations boiled over. Josh Richardson got ejected in the fourth quarter after throwing one of his sneakers into the stands, upset about a call that he felt he didn't get moments earlier. 'I just can't let that happen,' Richardson said. Wayne Ellington scored 19 points for Miami (6-10), which is off to its second-worst start in the last 12 years. The Heat were 5-11 at this point of the 2016-17 season, the only other time they've been worse after 16 games in that span. Richardson and Tyler Johnson each scored 17 points for the Heat, while Rodney McGruder added 14. 'We're going to get to work,' Heat coach Erik Spoelstra vowed. They need some health, too. Goran Dragic missed the game for Miami because of a right knee problem, one that will be further evaluated Monday. Dwyane Wade remained on leave after the birth of his daughter, and may return to the Heat this week. Miami hasn't forgotten James, obviously — he still gets loud cheers when introduced in his former home arena — but just in case anyone in attendance needed a reminder of his game, he delivered. He made eight of his first nine shots and had the whole arsenal working; dunks in transition, stepback 3-pointers, turnarounds from the baseline. 'When he's hitting shots like that, what do you want us to do?' Heat center Hassan Whiteside mused. Even with James' greatness, the biggest shot for the Lakers might have come from Brandon Ingram with 3:46 left. Miami had clawed within eight and the shot clock was about to expire on the Lakers, but Ingram connected on a long jumper from the left wing to make it 104-94. From there, the only drama was whether James would get 50. And he did. 'Just give him the ball,' Lakers guard Kyle Kuzma said, 'and get out of the way.' TIP-INS Lakers: The Lakers arrived Saturday night after playing in Orlando and aren't scheduled to fly to Cleveland until Tuesday. ... Kentavious Caldwell-Pope scored 19 points, Kuzma scored 15 and Ingram finished with 13. Heat: The last time Miami lost four straight at home was early in the 2014-15 season.... Miami had a five-shot possession in the third quarter, four offensive rebounds coming before Ellington made a 3-pointer. CONSISTENT LEBRON Whenever James changes teams — Cleveland to Miami in 2010, Miami to Cleveland in 2014, Cleveland to the Lakers this past summer — his new team starts 9-7. HEAT HELP James Johnson played for the first time this season after finally being declared good to go following offseason sports hernia surgery. He had four fouls in the first half and finished with eight points. UP NEXT Lakers: Visit Cleveland on Wednesday night. Heat: Host Brooklyn on Tuesday night. ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/tag/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Sunday he's donating $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, to boost financial aid for low- and middle-income students. The Baltimore university said the contribution — the largest ever to any education institution in the U.S. — will allow Johns Hopkins to eliminate student loans in financial aid packages starting next fall. The university will instead offer scholarships that don't have to be repaid. University President Ronald Daniels said Bloomberg's contribution will also let the institution permanently commit to 'need-blind admissions,' or the principle of admitting the highest-achieving students, regardless of their ability to pay for their education. 'Hopkins has received a gift that is unprecedented and transformative,' he said in a statement, noting the prestigious school was founded in 1876 by a $7 million gift from Baltimore merchant Johns Hopkins that was, similarly, the largest gift of its kind at the time. By way of comparison, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched the Gates Millennium Scholars program in 1999 with a $1 billion commitment over 20 years. The Chronicle of Higher Education listed it as the largest private donation to a higher-education institution in the U.S. earlier this month. Bloomberg said he expects the money will allow Hopkins to offer more generous scholarships and ease the debt burden for graduates. 'America is at its best when we reward people based on the quality of their work, not the size of their pocketbook,' he said in a statement. 'Denying students entry to a college based on their ability to pay undermines equal opportunity.' The 76-year-old founder of the global finances services and media company, Bloomberg L.P., is among the world's richest people. He graduated from Hopkins in 1964, served as New York mayor from 2002 to 2013 and has for years weighed running for president — including in 2020.
  • Shareholders on Monday gave final approval to the merger of television network Nine Entertainment and newspaper publisher Fairfax Media into an Australian media giant to be known only as Nine despite one shareholder's late bid to stop the deal. Antony Catalano, a former chief executive of the online real estate listings portal Domain Group which is majority-owned by Fairfax, said he will ask the Federal Court on Nov. 27 to stop the merger. Catalano, who owns shares in both Domain and Fairfax, wrote to Fairfax chairman Nick Falloon late Sunday offering to buy 19.9 percent of Fairfax and asking for Monday's Fairfax shareholders meeting to be delayed. The Fairfax board said in a statement on Monday that it remained unanimously behind the merger with Nine. 'The letter contains no actual proposal that could be considered by Fairfax shareholders as an alternative to the proposed scheme of arrangement with Nine Entertainment,' the statement said. The merger was supported by 81.5 percent of Fairfax shareholders representing 88.6 percent of shares. The deal had needed the support of at least 60 percent of shareholders representing at least 70 percent of shares. Falloon said that subject to court approval, the merger would occur on Dec. 7 and the new entity would begin trading on the Australian share market on Dec. 10. The merger would give Nine shareholders 51.1 percent of the combined entity and make Nine chief executive Hugh Marks leader of the new company. Fairfax shareholders would own the remaining 48.9 percent of the company, which will become Australia's largest media player. The Fairfax family name which has been part of the Australian media landscape for 177 years appears set to disappear.
  • Kyle Busch and Kevin Harvick combined to win 16 races, lead 3,459 laps and each were considered a heavy favorite to win a second NASCAR championship. They let the race they needed slip away, and champion Joey Logano pounced. Busch, Harvick and Martin Truex Jr. comprised NASCAR's 'Big Three' this season, but it was a Big 0 for the trio in the Cup finale Sunday at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Harvick, dominant in the No. 4 Ford all year, lagged on the speed charts all weekend. The Joe Gibbs Racing' pit crew flubbed two stops for Busch — the blunders cost him six and four spots off pit road — that denied one of NASCAR's biggest career winners a second title. 'We were so bad tonight on the racetrack and on pit road that nothing was kind of going our way,' Busch said. 'It was just not all there the way that we needed it to.' Busch's stops for the No. 18 Toyota were the pits. At the end of the first stage, lug nuts were not properly secured to the right front tire that slowed the stop and cost Busch key track position. On a stop later in the race, the air hose got stuck under the front of the car as the pit crew worked on the left side. Front tire changer Cam Waugh — wearing a firesuit as green as the M&M'S paint scheme — played a pivotal role in both mistakes. With his firesuit stripped to his waist, Waugh trudged through the garage and apologized to a JGR official back at the hauler. Waugh tossed his gear into a locker and angrily shouted 'No!' when asked for comment on the over-the-wall crew's performance. Gibbs, the Super Bowl and NASCAR champion, was diplomatic about the errors. 'We were just off today. Tough day for us,' Gibbs said. 'I don't think you ever really know why. I think you've got to study all that. It was kind of small things here that slowed us down. But when we had to have a great pit stop, we had a great pit stop.' Busch's crew did atone late in the race with a flawless stop in the No. 1 pit stall gifted to him when teammate and pole winner Denny Hamlin surrendered the spot. By then, it was too late, and Busch had nothing left on a late restart. The botched pit stops compounded the team's lack of speed. 'You can always have stops where things don't go your way,' Gibbs said. 'That's part of life. Those guys turned around and had the stop of the night to give us a chance to maybe win a race. That's just their world.' Busch, who had career highs in top-fives (22) and top-10s (28), won the race en route to the title in 2015 and finished fourth Sunday. Harvick, who tied Busch with a series-high eight wins, finished third behind Logano and Truex. Harvick was nailed with a cheating violation in a win at Texas that cost him his automatic berth into the championship race. Harvick made the final round with a stout effort last week at Phoenix and seemed poised to win a title to pair with his 2014 championship. He led 58 laps early in the race — with interim crew chief Tony Gibson calling the shots for suspended crew chief Rodney Childers — but soon saw the sun set on his championship push. 'When it got dark, we just lost the rear grip and couldn't get off the corner and was having trouble turning in the corner,' Harvick said. 'We just never could get the rear grip back to where we needed to, and I couldn't take off.' Logano did, zipping past Truex late to win his first Cup championship in a season where he was the outlier of the 'Big Three.' ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Cambodia has reiterated it intends to end the work of the U.N.-backed tribunal that last week convicted the last two surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Deputy Prime Minister Sar Kheng said the tribunal's work had been completed and there would not be any additional prosecutions for acts that led to the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million people in the 1970s. The only other person convicted was the regime's prisons chief. He cited the terms under which the tribunal, staffed jointly by Cambodian and international prosecutors and judges, had been established, limiting its targets to senior leaders of the Khmer Rouge regime that was in power from 1975 to 1979. The rules also allow prosecuting those most responsible for carrying out atrocities. Sar Kheng spoke Saturday at a government ceremony in the northern province of Oddar Meanchey and his remarks were reported Sunday. On Friday, the tribunal convicted and gave life sentences to Nuon Chea, 92, the main Khmer Rouge ideologist and right-hand man to its late leader Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, 87, who was the regime's head of state. The sentences were merged with the life sentences they were already serving after an earlier conviction for crimes against humanity. In nine years of hearings and at a cost exceeding $300 million, the tribunal has convicted only one other defendant, Kaing Guek Eav, alias Duch, who as head of the Khmer Rouge prison system ran the infamous Tuol Sleng torture center in Phnom Penh. Cases of four more suspects, middle-ranking members of the Khmer Rouge, had already been processed for prosecution but have been scuttled or stalled. Without the cooperation of the Cambodian members of the tribunal, no cases can go forward. Long-serving Prime Minister Hun Sen has repeatedly declared there would be no more prosecutions, claiming they could cause unrest. Hun Sen himself was a midlevel commander with the Khmer Rouge before defecting while the group was still in power, and several senior members of his ruling Cambodian People's Party share similar backgrounds. He helped cement his political control by making alliances with other former Khmer Rouge commanders. In his remarks, Sar Kheng sought to reassure former Khmer Rouge members that they would not face prosecution. 'Because there are some former Khmer Rouge officers living in this area, I would like to clarify that there will be no more investigations taking place (against lower-ranking Khmer Rouge members), so you don't have to worry,' said Sar Kheng, who is also interior minister. He acknowledged that even without more prosecutions, the tribunal still had to hear the appeals expected to be lodged by Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan, but aside from that task, its work was finished.
  • Drew Brees grinned, paused as if searching for the right words, and even let out the beginnings of a laugh. The Saints have made 40-point outings look routine lately, and the record-setting quarterback is trying to enjoy it without showing a hint of complacency. 'It's a lot of points, but we have a high standard for ourselves,' Brees said. 'You're still not satisfied because you know you could have done a little bit better — but the end result is good.' Brees passed for 363 yards and four touchdowns, and the Saints won their ninth straight with a 48-7 demolition of Philadelphia on Sunday that marked the Eagles' worst loss by far since they won last season's Super Bowl. In fact, it was the worst loss by a reigning Super Bowl champion. 'I haven't gotten my (butt) kicked like that in a long time,' Eagles defensive end Chris Long said. Brees completed 22 of 30 passes and did not turn over the ball, giving him 25 TD passes and only one interception this season. Brees' fourth touchdown seemed to encapsulate New Orleans' audacious approach to the game. He hit running back Alvin Kamara in stride down the right sideline for a 37 yards on a fourth-and-7 play that gave the Saints (9-1) a 45-7 lead early in the fourth quarter. 'It's hard to stop us,' Kamara said. Receiver Michael Thomas said the Eagles were 'just in the way, next team up. We just had to do what we had to do, regardless.' Brees' other touchdown passes went for 3 yards to Austin Carr, 15 yards to rookie Tre'Quan Smith and 23 yards to Thomas. Smith finished with 10 catches for 157 yards, while Thomas' four catches for 92 yards made him the first receiver in Saints history to surpass 1,000 yards receiving in each of his first three seasons. Mark Ingram rushed 16 times for 103 yards, including touchdowns of 14 yards and 1 yard. Kamara added 71 yards to help New Orleans finish with 546 total yards and score at least 40 for the sixth time this season. Meanwhile, New Orleans' defense produced a second straight dominant showing after largely stifling Cincinnati the previous week. The Saints now have outscored their past two opponents 99-21 combined, is not easy to do in a league known for competitive balance. 'It blows my mind, too, trust me,' said Saints defensive tackle Sheldon Rankins, who had one of three sacks on Carson Wentz. 'That just speaks volumes not only to the type of talent we have on this team but how locked in everybody is. I think everybody knows how special we can be and everyone knows the end goal. If everybody here isn't thinking Super Bowl then they're in the wrong locker room.' DESCENDING EAGLES Wentz was intercepted three times — once by Marshon Lattimore and twice by Chris Banjo — and finished with 156 yards on 19-of-33 passing. Time will tell if the lopsided loss marked the beginning of the end of the Eagles' title defense. Philadelphia (4-6) remained two games behind Washington (6-4) for first place in the NFC East, but more injuries befell its already depleted lineup. The Eagles offered virtually no resistance to New Orleans and looked thoroughly outclassed by the surging Saints. Rookie running back Josh Adams rushed for a 28-yard TD that pulled the Eagles within 17-7 in the second quarter, but the Saints responded with a Smith's TD on which the receiver held onto a hard throw over the middle while being sandwiched by two defenders. That made it 24-7 at halftime and the game was not competitive after that. 'The product we're putting out there is not up to our standards,' Wentz said. 'I'm not playing up to my standards, but we know the talent we have.' ANOTHER RECORD Twice this season, Brees has thrown for four TDs in a game without an interception, giving him an NFL-record 23 such performances in his career. His latest put him one ahead of New England's Tom Brady. INJURIES Eagles: Center Jason Kelce hurt his left elbow in the first quarter and was replaced by Stefen Wisniewski. Safety Avonte Maddox left with a knee injury on New Orleans' second possession. Defensive back Rasul Douglas had to be helped off the field with a left leg injury in the third quarter. Long snapper Rick Lovato was taken from the game to be evaluated for a concussion. Saints: Right guard Larry Warford left to be evaluated for a concussion in the third quarter and was replaced by Cameron Tom. UP NEXT Eagles: Host the New York Giants on Sunday. Saints: Host Atlanta on Thursday night. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL