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    An earthquake with a preliminary measurement of 8.0 on the Richter scale hit north-central Peru early Sunday, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. >> Read more trending news  The earthquake struck at 2:41 a.m. and was centered approximately 50 miles southeast of the village of Lagunas and about 100 miles east-northeast of Yurimaguas, according to The Associated Press. There were no immediate reports of casualties or of major damage, the AP reported. The Peruvian government’s emergency department tweeted it registered a magnitude of 7.2 for the quake. Power was lost in several Peruvian cities, according to the AP.
  • At least two people were killed Saturday night after a tornado hit El Reno, Oklahoma, KOCO reported. >> Read more trending news  The twister hit a hotel, mobile home park and several other buildings, the television station reported. The fatalities were confirmed by Andrew Skidmore, emergency manager for Canadian County, ABC News reported. 'Search and rescue continue, National Guard will report here within the hour; still an unknown number of people missing, two confirmed fatalities,' Skidmore told the network. 'We called every available resource to come help.” El Reno is located about 30 miles west of Oklahoma City. Severe weather also struck Green County, Oklahoma, on Saturday, and a tornado caused damage and injuries in Sapulpa just after midnight. The American Budget Value Inn in El Reno suffered extensive damage, as the tornado ripped off the motel’s second floor, KFOR reported. 'As far as we know right now, there is no one in the rubble,' the hotel's owner, Ramesh Patel, KOCO. The woman who was working in the motel’s office broke her leg, Patel told ABC News. Officials said multiple mobile homes were flipped at the Sky View Mobile Home Park, which is near the motel, according to KFOR. Tweedy Garrison, a resident at the mobile home park, said she gathered her grandchildren into the kitchen when the tornado hit. 'We had debris coming down on top of us, knocked us all down. There was no way we could have gotten out without help,' Garrison told KFOR. 'I had 2% on my phone. (My son’s) name showed up (on caller ID) and I hit the button, told him that we got hit, the boys are fine. And within five minutes, he was there.” The tornado comes after a very busy and severe weather week. According to ABC News, since Monday 104 tornadoes have been reported across eight states, including Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Texas, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois and Maryland. 'We have absolutely experienced a traumatic event here in El Reno,' Mayor Matt White told ABC News. 'None of this is easy, we're all shook up.”
  • The Latest on the French Open (all times local): ___ 12:21 a.m. Angelique Kerber won't complete a career Grand Slam this year. The three-time Grand Slam winner lost in the first round of the French Open on Sunday, beaten 6-4, 6-2 by Anastasia Potapova on Court Philippe Chatrier. Kerber's preparations for Roland Garros, where she never advanced past the quarterfinals, were hampered by a right ankle injury she suffered at the Madrid Open. The 81st-ranked Potapova sealed the opening set with a crosscourt backhand winner and broke twice at the start of the second. Kerber saved two match points before shanking a forehand wide sealing her fate. Kerber, the No.5-seeded woman in Paris, won the Australian Open and US Open in 2016 and Wimbledon in 2018. ___ 11:50 a.m. Tennis and tropical plants, an incongruous mix beautifully blended on the new Court Simonne Mathieu at Roland Garros. The airy, sunken arena with two tiers of seating and surrounded on all four sides by steamy tropical greenhouses saw its first match on the opening day of the 2019 tournament. Set amid historic greenhouses, the arena had a difficult birth because of initial fierce opposition to its construction. But the finished result is a triumph of taste and splendid architecture, with the glass and steel structure blending seamlessly into its surroundings. About half of the seats were occupied for the first match, with former champion Garbine Muguruza facing Taylor Townsend. ___ 11:35 a.m. French Open organizers say American player Sam Querrey has withdrawn from the clay-court Grand Slam tournament. Querrey, who was set to take on Spanish qualifier Pedro Martinez in the first round, has been replaced in the main draw by lucky loser Henri Laaksonen of Switzerland. A Wimbledon semifinalist in 2017, the 62nd-ranked Querrey cited an abdominal problem as the reason for his withdrawal. ___ 11:15 a.m. The year's second Grand Slam is underway. Under sunny skies, former No. 1 Angelique Kerber lost the first two games to 81st-ranked Anastasia Potapova in the opening match on Court Philippe Chatrier. The French Open is the only Grand Slam tournament that Kerber has never won. On Court Suzanne Lenglen, 11th-seeded Marin Cilic is facing Thomas Fabbiano. Also, 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza is up against 96th-ranked American Taylor Townsend in the first match at the tournament's newest stadium, Court Simonne Mathieu. ___ 8:45 a.m. Roger Federer is in action on the opening day of the French Open. Returning to play at Roland Garros for the first time since 2015, Federer opens against 73rd-ranked Lorenzo Sonego in the third match on Court Philippe Chatrier. Also Sunday, 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza faces 96th-ranked American Taylor Townsend in the first match at the tournament's newest stadium, Court Simonne Mathieu. Sixth-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas, who beat Federer at the Australian Open, plays Maximilian Marterer. Others in action include: seventh-seeded Kei Nishikori; last year's semifinalist Marc Cecchinato; last week's Italian Open champion Karolina Pliskova, Venus Williams and Sloane Stephens. The French Open is the only one of the four Grand Slam tournaments to begin on a Sunday. ___ More AP Tennis: https://apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Amanda Eller, found alive after being missing for 17 days in a Hawaii reserve, went on social media to thank the people who never gave up searching for her. >> Read more trending news  In a video posted to Facebook, Eller, 35, spoke from her hospital bed in Maui with her boyfriend, Ben Konkol, at her side, KHNL reported.  “The last 17 days of my life have been the toughest days of my life,' Eller said. 'It’s been a really significant spiritual journey that I was guided on, and there were times of total fear and loss and wanting to give up, and it did come down to life and death and I had to choose, and I chose life. I wasn’t going to take the easy way out.” Eller had not been seen since May 8, when she disappeared after a hike in a Maui Forest Reserve. The reserve is known for its steep and rugged terrain. Eller’s vehicle was found with her cellphone and wallet inside in a parking lot at the reserve. Eller, a physical therapist who also teaches yoga, was hiking on the Kahakapao Trail when she went missing, KHNL reported. She suffered a fractured leg and did not have shoes, which had been swept away in a flash flood when she was trying to dry them, CNN reported. >> Family says missing Maui hiker has been found Eller said she picked berries and guava to eat and drank water when she believed it was clear enough, CNN reported. She also suffered from severe sunburn. The rescue team said they found Eller in a deep ravine between two waterfalls during an aerial search Friday afternoon, KHON reported.  I felt in my heart she was alive,' Eller's mother, Julia Eller, told the television station Saturday. “I never gave up hope for a minute. Even though at times, I would have those moments of despair, I stayed strong for her because I knew we would find her if we just stayed with the program, stayed persistent and that we would eventually find her.'  On Facebook, Amanda Eller thanked her rescuers and local residents who helped in the search. 'Just seeing the community of Maui come together — people who know me, people who don't know me all came together. Just under the idea of seeing one person make it out of the woods alive. It warms my heart,' she said. 
  • A large earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 8.0 struck the Amazon jungle in north-central Peru early Sunday, the U.S. Geological survey reported. The quake, at a moderate depth of 110 kilometers (68 miles) struck at 2:41 a.m., 80 kilometers (50 miles) southeast of the village of Lagunas and 158 kilometers (98 miles) east-northeast of the larger town of Yurimaguas. There were no immediate reports of casualties, although some buildings collapsed and power cuts were reported in a number of cities. Earthquakes that are close to the surface generally cause more destruction. In a tweet, President Martín Vizcarra called for calm and said that authorities were checking the affected areas. The mayor of Lagunas, Arri Pezo, told local radio station RPP that the quake was felt very strongly there, but it was not possible to move around the town because of the darkness. In Yurimaguas, a number of old houses collapsed, and the electricity was cut, according to the National Emergency Operations Center, which gave the magnitude of the quake as 7.2. In the capital, Lima, people ran out of their homes in fear. Earthquakes are frequent in Peru, which lies on the Pacific's so-called Ring of Fire.
  • Iraq offered Sunday to mediate in the crisis between its two key allies, the United States and Iran, amid escalating Middle East tensions and as Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers steadily unravels. Iraqi foreign minister, Mohammed al-Hakim, made the offer during a joint news conference in Baghdad with visiting Iranian counterpart Mohammad Javad Zarif. 'We are trying to help and to be mediators,' said al-Hakim, adding that Baghdad 'will work to reach a satisfactory solution' while stressing that Iraq stands against unilateral steps taken by Washington. In recent weeks, tensions between Washington and Tehran soared over America deploying an aircraft carrier and B-52 bombers to the Persian Gulf over a still-unexplained threat it perceives from Tehran. The U.S. also plans to send 900 additional troops to the 600 already in the Mideast and extending their stay. The crisis takes root in President Donald Trump's withdrawal last year of America from the 2015 nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers that capped Iran's uranium enrichment activities in return to lifting sanctions. Washington subsequently re-imposed sanctions on Iran, sending its economy into freefall. Trump has argued that the deal failed to sufficiently curb Iran's ability to develop nuclear weapons or halt its support for militias throughout the Middle East that the U.S. says destabilize the region, as well as address the issue of Tehran's missiles, which can reach both U.S. regional bases and Israel. Zarif, who was been on a whirlwind diplomatic offensive to preserve the rest of the accord, insisted that Iran 'did not violate the nuclear deal' and urged European nations to exert efforts to preserve the deal following the U.S. pullout. Speaking about the rising tensions with the U.S., Zarif said Iran will be able to 'face the war, whether it is economic or military through steadfastness and its forces.' He also urged for a non-aggression agreement between Iran and Arab countries in the Gulf. The Shiite-majority Iraq has been trying to maintain a fine line as allies Tehran and Washington descended into verbal vitriol. The country also lies on the fault line between Shiite Iran and the mostly Sunni Arab world, led by powerhouse Saudi Arabia, and has long been a battlefield in which the Saudi-Iran rivalry for regional supremacy played out. The mediation offer by al-Hakim, Iraq's foreign minister, echoed one made Saturday by Mohamad al-Halbousi, the Iraqi parliament speaker. Al-Hakim also expressed concern for Iran's spiraling economy. Iranians make up the bulk of millions of Shiites from around the world who come to Iraq every year to visit its many Shiite shrines and holy places and their purchasing power has slumped after Trump re-imposed the sanctions. 'The sanctions against sisterly Iran are ineffective and we stand by its side,' al-Hakim said. Meanwhile, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani suggested the Islamic Republic could hold a referendum over its nuclear program. The official IRNA news agency said Rouhani, who was last week publicly chastised by the country's supreme leader, made the suggestion in a meeting with editors of major Iranian news outlets on Saturday evening. Rouhani said he had previously suggested a referendum to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in 2004, when Rouhani was a senior nuclear negotiator for Iran. At the time, Khamenei approved of the idea and though there was no referendum, such a vote 'can be a solution at any time,' Rouhani was quoted as saying. A referendum could provide political cover for the Iranian government if it chooses to increase its enrichment of uranium, prohibited under the 2015 nuclear deal. Earlier last week, Iran said it quadrupled its uranium-enrichment production capacity though Iranian officials made a point to stress that the uranium would be enriched only to the 3.67% limit set under the deal, making it usable for a power plant but far below what's needed for an atomic weapon. Rouhani's remarks could also be seen as a defense of his stance following the rare public chastising by the supreme leader. Khamenei last week named Rouhani and Zarif — relative moderates within Iran's Shiite theocracy who had struck the nuclear deal — as failing to implement his orders over the accord, saying it had 'numerous ambiguities and structural weaknesses' that could damage Iran. Khamenei, who has final say on all matters of state in Iran, did not immediately respond to Rouhani's proposal of a referendum. The Islamic Republic has seen only three referendums since it was established in 1979 — one on regime change from monarchy to Islamic republic and two on its constitution and its amendments. ___ Karimi reported from Tehran, Iran. Associated Press writer Bassem Mroue in Baghdad contributed to this report
  • Lithuanians are choosing a new president in a runoff vote between two candidates who both say they want to maintain a strict tone toward neighboring Russia while easing sometimes harsh rhetoric. Gitanas Nauseda, a prominent economist, and Ingrida Simonyte, a former finance minister, are vying to succeed the popular Dalia Grybauskaite, who has called Russia 'a terrorist state.' Both candidates in this NATO member have said they won't go to Moscow and meet President Vladimir Putin unless Russia withdraws from Crimea, which it annexed from Ukraine in 2014. That move sparked fears that other former Soviet republics, including the Baltic states, could be next. The campaign ahead of Sunday's second round has been dominated by voters' anger over economic inequality — one of the highest in the European Union — and corruption.
  • Roger Federer is in action on the opening day of the French Open. Returning to play at Roland Garros for the first time since 2015, Federer opens against 73rd-ranked Lorenzo Sonego in the third match on Court Philippe Chatrier. Also Sunday, 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza faces 96th-ranked American Taylor Townsend in the first match at the tournament's newest stadium, Court Simonne Mathieu. Sixth-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas, who beat Federer at the Australian Open, plays Maximilian Marterer. Others in action include: seventh-seeded Kei Nishikori; last year's semifinalist Marc Cecchinato; last week's Italian Open champion Karolina Pliskova, Venus Williams and Sloane Stephens. The French Open is the only one of the four Grand Slam tournaments to begin on a Sunday. ___ More AP Tennis: https://apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • A likely tornado destroyed a motel, swept through a nearby mobile home park and caused significant damage in the Oklahoma City area, according to the National Weather Service. Meteorologist Rick Smith in Norman told The Associated Press that the suspected twister hit El Reno on Saturday night as a powerful storm system rolled through the state. Crews were expected to arrive on the scene Sunday to determine the severity of the damage to the town located just west of Oklahoma City. No information was immediately available about possible fatalities The American Budget Value Inn was destroyed by the storm. Images from the scene showed emergency crews sifting through rubble after part of the motel's second story collapsed into a pile of debris strewn about the first floor and parking lot. Elsewhere, overturned cars and twisted metal could be seen briefly as intermittent lightning flashed across the sky and the wailing sirens of approaching emergency vehicles were heard in the distance. Trailers at the Skyview Estates mobile home park adjacent to the motel also were damaged, as was part of a nearby car dealership. 'We have absolutely experienced a traumatic event,' El Reno Mayor Matt White said during a news conference early Sunday. White said several people were transported to hospitals in Oklahoma City, but did not give an exact number.. 'We're doing a search and rescue right now ... we have all hands on deck,' White said. Saturday night's storm in El Reno comes after a week of tornados, severe rain and flooding in Southern Plains and Midwest, including a tornado that hit Jefferson City, Missouri. The region's most recent spate of bad weather and flooding has been blamed for at least nine deaths. Tweety Garrison, 63, told The Associated Press early Sunday that she was inside her mobile home — along with her husband, two young grandchildren and a family friend — when the storm hit. Garrison said when she heard the storm coming she immediately hit the ground. Moments later, she said, she heard the mobile home next door slam into hers, before it flipped over and landed on her roof. Garrison said the incident lasted five to 10 minutes. She said there was a tornado warning on her phone but the sirens did not go off until after tornado hit. Garrison's 32-year-old son, Elton, said he'd heard the wailing tornado sirens and had just laid down at home about a half-mile (.8 kilometer) away when his phone rang. He recognized his mother's number, but there was no voice on the other end when he answered. 'I thought, 'That's weird,'' Elton Garrison said. Then his mother called back, and delivered a chilling message: 'We're trapped.' Elton said when he arrived at his parent's home, he found it blocked by debris and sitting with another trailer on top of it. He immediately began clearing a path to the home so that he could eventually lift a portion of an outside wall just enough so that all five occupants could slip beneath it and escape. 'My parents were in there and two of my kids, one 9 and the other 12 ... my main emotion was fear,' Garrison said, who has lived in El Reno for about 26 years. 'I couldn't get them out of there quick enough.' Garrison said he was not alarmed by the warning sirens when he first heard them at home. 'We hear them all the time here, so it didn't seem like a big deal ... I heard a lot of rain with the wind. But when it kinda got calm all of a sudden, that's when it didn't feel right.' Garrison, whose sport utility vehicle remained at the mobile park early Sunday because the area had since been cordoned off by authorities, said his parents had only recently recovered after losing their previous home to a fire a few years ago. 'Now this,' he said, before expressing gratitude that everyone inside his parents' home had emerged without serious injury. In the next breath, Garrison added: 'Items can be replaced. Lives can't.' ___ Associated Press photographer Sue Ogrocki contributed to this report.
  • The Latest on elections for the European Parliament (all times local): 12:50 p.m. In Castelbuono, a Medieval mountain town in Sicily's province of Palermo, a steady but sluggish stream of voters is showing up to cast ballots. Many of the town's residents are backing the 5-Star Movement, a populist party now in a coalition government with the anti-migrant League party. One of these is Vincenzo Messineo, a 32-year-old laborer who's concerned about youth unemployment and the influx of migrants. 'We don't want them all here,' he said. 'Europe is united so why can't they be divided among other countries too?' For Anna Maria Ippolito, a 62-year-old 5-Star Movement supporter, financial inequality is a top concern. 'Six percent of the Italian population has all the wealth,' she said. 'It's not at all right. Paying the taxes that we do now just lets the rich get richer and the poor poorer.' On Europe, she thinks it's time to rein in the big guns. 'Up to now, it's all been about Germany and France,' she said. 'They're the ones dragging us into this European disaster.' Migrants are on the mind of Silvia Bonomo, too, but she feels Europe needs to 'open itself up' and do more to welcome people fleeing war and hardships. The 62-year-old middle-school teacher voted for the center-left Democratic Party. 'They wouldn't be coming if they didn't have a reason to,' she said. 'Migrants are seen as stealing jobs, which they are not. They're seen as criminals, which they are not. They are just like us.' ___ 12:30 p.m. People's Party Our Slovakia, a far right party that has 14 seats in Slovakia's parliament is expected to win seats in the European legislature for the first time. The party openly admires the Nazi puppet state that the country was during World War II. Party members use Nazi salutes, blame Roma for crime, consider NATO a terror group and want the country out of the alliance and of the European Union. The party received a boost in April after Slovakia's Supreme Court dismissed a request by the country's prosecutor general to ban it as an extremist group whose activities violate the Constitution. Turnout in Slovakia at the previous vote in 2014 was 13%, the lowest in all EU countries. The polls favor the leftist Smer-Social Democracy party, the senior member of the current coalition government, to top the voting with about 20%. Slovakia has 14 seats in the European Parliament. ___ 11:40 a.m. The center-right German candidate to head the European Commission says he hopes voters will back a 'Europe of stability' and a united and ambitious continent. Manfred Weber, whose European People's Party group hopes to retain its status as the biggest in the European Parliament, said after voting in his native Bavaria Sunday: 'I don't want to see a right-populist Europe (that) wants to destroy the idea of togetherness ... and I'm also against a Europe which is in the hands of the left.' Ska Keller, a German Green who heads her group's European election slate, said in Berlin that 'the European Union should lead the way in climate protection. We need social cohesion, we need to strengthen democracy in Europe and I hope that this will meet with much support.' ___ 11:25 a.m. Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz says he hopes the European Parliament elections will strengthen the center rather than parties on the far right and left. Kurz told reporters in Vienna Sunday that he hopes his center-right People's Party will keep first place in the race for seats in the EU legislature. The vote has turned into a first test of support ahead of a national election in September following the collapse of Kurz's governing coalition a week ago in a scandal surrounding the now-departed leader of the far-right Freedom Party, which was his junior coalition partner. Regardless of the result, Kurz faces a no-confidence vote brought by the opposition in parliament Monday. He said he expects the Freedom Party and the Social Democrats to back it, which would bring him down. ___ 10:55 a.m. Spanish caretaker Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez says that he hopes the outcome of Sunday's European and local elections will lead to more 'political stability' for Spain as he starts his attempt to form a government. Sánchez called on 'all the political forces to open a horizon of political stability' after he voted early Sunday morning with his wife in Madrid. He added that the elections are 'to decide the future of progress and wellbeing for the entirety of our country and Europe.' Voter opinion polls point to a victory for Sánchez's Socialist Party in the European elections. Elections are also taking place for administrations in all Spain's cities, including deciding on a second term for the female mayors of Madrid and Barcelona, and 14 of its 19 regions. Sánchez's Socialists won April 28 national elections in Spain, but fell short of winning an outright majority and will need to earn the support from rivals in Parliament to stay in power. ___ 10:40 a.m. Hungary's prime minister says he hopes the European Parliament election will bring a shift toward political parties that want to stop migration. Viktor Orban said Sunday after casting his vote at a school near his Budapest home that the issue of migration, which he believes is stoppable, 'will reorganize the political spectrum in the European Union.' Orban, whose Fidesz party had its membership suspended in the center-right European People's Party, the largest political bloc in the EU parliament, because of concerns about Hungary's democracy, said Fidesz would want to stay in the EPP only if it can influence the group's future strategy. Orban met recently with Italian Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, but has not committed to joining the more radically nationalist alliance that Salvini has been forming. Fidesz is expected to win up to 14 of Hungary's 21 seats in the EU parliament. ___ 8:05 a.m. Belgians are heading to the polls in European Union, national and regional elections Sunday. Polls opened at 8 a.m. (0700GMT) and the first estimates and exit polls were expected by 6 p.m. (1700GMT). In the national elections Belgians are looking to end months of political limbo after the biggest party in the governing coalition quit over Prime Minister Charles Michel's support for the U.N. migration pact. Michel has steered a caretaker government doing only day-to-day business since December, but with the country's 8 million voters choosing from more than a dozen parties, chances are that it will prove difficult to quickly form a stable coalition. ___ 6 a.m. Bulgarians are voting in the European Parliament elections after a series of scandals overshadowed the debate on key issues of the EU's future. Voters on Sunday are casting ballots for their country's 17 seats in the 751-member European Parliament. The vote is seen as a test for the center-right party of Prime Minister Boyko Borissov, which suffered a setback after senior officials were involved in corruption scandals. Latest surveys show only three parties, belonging to mainstream European political groups, passing the election threshold — the ruling GERB party, the Socialist party, and the liberal MRF. Projections suggest the nationalist and far-right vote will be split between several smaller parties, which could prevent them from capturing seats in the EU legislature.