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Gold Coins From The Roman Empire Discovered In Italy

Gold Coins From The Roman Empire Discovered In Italy
  • Tulsa County deputies were serving a warrant near Apache and M.L.K Jr. Blvd. when the suspect took off Wednesday morning. Investigators say the suspect, John McIntosh, was at work when he assaulted a deputy and drove to his home near Hamilton Elementary School. McIntosh then took off again and climbed the roof of the school near Virgin and Sheridan. Hamilton Elementary and Tulsa MET Junior & Senior High School were put on lockdown. Deputies were eventually able to get McIntosh off the roof and place him under arrest.
  • The Owasso Police Department released surveillance photos today of a possible suspect in a case of indecent exposure. The incident occurred shortly after noon last Friday (Feb. 15th) in a Sprouts parking lot near 96th Street North and Highway 169. Deputy Chief Jason Woodruff tells KRMG the 911 center took a call from a woman who reported some disturbing behavior. “A woman reported she was walking through the parking lot and observed a man who was exposing himself and touching himself inside the vehicle,” Woodruff said Wednesday. “He did leave the area before officers could get on scene, so we weren’t able to find him,” he added, “but we were able to recover some security footage (and were) able to get some pretty good pictures of him.” Anyone with information on the incident or the suspect is urged to call the Owasso Police TipLine at 918-272-COPS (2677) and reference case number 2019-0449. Tipsters can remain anonymous.
  • In a historic first from the U.S. Supreme Court, the Justices ruled unanimously on Wednesday that the Eighth Amendment ban on excessive fines does apply to state and local governments, ruling in favor of an Indiana man who had his expensive car seized by police after he was arrested for a small amount illegal drugs. Writing for the High Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said 'the protection against excessive fines guards against abuses of government’s punitive or criminal law-enforcement authority' found in the Eighth Amendment. Originally, the Bill of Rights was intended only to be applied to the federal government - but over time, the courts have ruled that it also applies to the states, and this was the first time the U.S. Supreme Court took that step when it comes to the issue of police and civil seizures. “For good reason, the protection against excessive fines has been a constant shield throughout Anglo-American history,' Ginsburg wrote. 'Exorbitant tolls undermine other constitutional liberties.' At issue was a Land Rover SUV that Tyson Timbs had purchased before his arrest, with money from an insurance policy after the death of his father. Under Indiana guidelines, the maximum monetary fine which could be levied against Timbs for his crime of dealing in a controlled substance was $10,000 - but the car was worth more than four times that amount. Reaction was swift in favor of the ruling, as the NAACP Legal Defense Fund labeled it, “A huge victory for criminal justice reform.”
  • A west-central Florida couple is accused of illegally running a dental office out of their home garage, the Bradenton Herald reported. >> Read more trending news  Enrique Sanabria Gravier, 48, and his wife, Adriana Gutierrez Hoyos, 47, were arrested Tuesday by North Port Police and the Florida Department of Health and charged with practicing dentistry without a license and conspiracy to commit a felony, the newspaper reported. The couple is also accused of performing extractions and putting braces and crowns on patients, the Herald reported. The investigation, nicknamed Operation Extraction, began Nov. 5 when the Florida Department of Health received a tip that two people had been operating an unlicensed office, called Enrique Dentistry, out of their home for the past five years, WFTS reported. According to a probable cause affidavit, Gravier and Hoyas kept a book of clients in their residence and only performed dentistry work on Hispanic clients, most of whom were undocumented immigrants, WFTS reported. According to authorities, on Feb. 6 a North Port Police Department detective made a controlled telephone call to Hoyos, in which she said a cleaning was $100, the television station reported. They set an appointment for Feb. 13. The detective arrived for his appointment, spoke Spanish to Hoyos and waited in the couple’s living room, WFTS reported. According to the affidavit, the detective, who took audio and visual recordings, saw Hoyos book additional appointments by phone while other clients waited in the living room, the Herald reported. The practice had no medical insurance, and Gravier and Hoyos have not been paying taxes, the newspaper reported, citing the affidavit.
  • Skygazers got a special treat early Tuesday as the “super snow moon” – the largest supermoon of 2019 – glowed overhead. >> PHOTOS: 'Super snow moon,' largest supermoon of 2019, lights up the sky >> Full snow moon rises this week; it’s the largest supermoon of the year Social media users are sharing their photos with the hashtag #snowmoon and #supermoon. Here are some of our favorites: >> Read more trending news  1. Santa Ana, California Photo by @LOrtizPhoto_OCR, Twitter 2. Albert Park, Victoria, Australia Photo by @davidcollinsphotography, Instagram 3. New York City Photo by @socaboy77, Instagram 4. Providence, Rhode Island Photo by @MikeCohea, Twitter 5. Portland, Maine Photo by @jmiltonphoto, Instagram 6. Miami Beach, Florida Photo by @arielitorose, Instagram 7. Great South Bay, New York Photo by @greatsouthbayimages, Instagram 8. Southern Wisconsin Photo by @TomPurdyWI, Twitter 9. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Photo by @NancyFromCanada, Twitter

Washington Insider

  • Recovering from recent shoulder surgery, and with plans to testify before at least three Congressional committees, Michael Cohen was granted an extra sixty days by a federal judge to report to prison to serve his three year sentence for campaign finance violations and lying to Congress in a case that has drawn the personal ire of President Donald Trump. 'Given Mr. Cohen's recent surgery and his health and recovery needs, at this time Defendant requests an extension of his reporting date for sixty (60) days,' lawyers for Cohen wrote in a request to Judge William H. Pauley, III, who approved it on Wednesday morning. 'Mr. Cohen also anticipates being called to testify before three (3) Congressional committees at the end of the month,' the letter continued - no dates have yet been set for that testimony, which is expected to occur before the House and Senate intelligence committees, along with the House Oversight Committee. On Wednesday night, Democrats set the first public hearing for Cohen next Wednesday, before the House Oversight Committee. Cohen plead guilty last year to charges in two different criminal matters - first, lying to Congress about the extent of contacts during 2016 between the Trump Organization and developers in Russia looking to build a Trump Tower Moscow, and second, over campaign finance violations surrounding hush money payments made to two women before the elections, to keep them quiet about their affairs with Mr. Trump. Cohen told a federal judge that he paid money to two women at the direction of a specific candidate for federal office, and coordinated “with one or more members of the campaign.” That person was referred to only as 'Individual-1,' which from the court documents was obviously President Trump. With testimony still ahead in Congress by Cohen - GOP lawmakers who have steadfastly defended the President in the Russia investigation - have already started to attack Cohen. “When Cohen appears before our Committee, we can only assume that he will continue his pattern of deceit and perjury,” said Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) and Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC), in a letter to the chairman of the House Oversight Committee. A day after his Oversight testimony, Cohen will appear before the House Intelligence Committee for a closed door session. President Trump has alternately denied wrongdoing in his work with Cohen, and attacked his former lawyer as a ‘rat.’ “I never directed Michael Cohen to break the law,” the President tweeted last year.
  • In a historic first from the U.S. Supreme Court, the Justices ruled unanimously on Wednesday that the Eighth Amendment ban on excessive fines does apply to state and local governments, ruling in favor of an Indiana man who had his expensive car seized by police after he was arrested for a small amount illegal drugs. Writing for the High Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said 'the protection against excessive fines guards against abuses of government’s punitive or criminal law-enforcement authority' found in the Eighth Amendment. Originally, the Bill of Rights was intended only to be applied to the federal government - but over time, the courts have ruled that it also applies to the states, and this was the first time the U.S. Supreme Court took that step when it comes to the issue of police and civil seizures. “For good reason, the protection against excessive fines has been a constant shield throughout Anglo-American history,' Ginsburg wrote. 'Exorbitant tolls undermine other constitutional liberties.' At issue was a Land Rover SUV that Tyson Timbs had purchased before his arrest, with money from an insurance policy after the death of his father. Under Indiana guidelines, the maximum monetary fine which could be levied against Timbs for his crime of dealing in a controlled substance was $10,000 - but the car was worth more than four times that amount. Reaction was swift in favor of the ruling, as the NAACP Legal Defense Fund labeled it, “A huge victory for criminal justice reform.”
  • In a historic first from the U.S. Supreme Court, the Justices ruled unanimously on Wednesday that the Eighth Amendment ban on excessive fines does apply to state and local governments, ruling in favor of an Indiana man who had his expensive car seized by police after he was arrested for a small amount illegal drugs. Writing for the High Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said 'the protection against excessive fines guards against abuses of government’s punitive or criminal law-enforcement authority' found in the Eighth Amendment. Originally, the Bill of Rights was intended only to be applied to the federal government - but over time, the courts have ruled that it also applies to the states, and this was the first time the U.S. Supreme Court took that step when it comes to the issue of police and civil seizures. “For good reason, the protection against excessive fines has been a constant shield throughout Anglo-American history,' Ginsburg wrote. 'Exorbitant tolls undermine other constitutional liberties.' At issue was a Land Rover SUV that Tyson Timbs had purchased before his arrest, with money from an insurance policy after the death of his father. Under Indiana guidelines, the maximum monetary fine which could be levied against Timbs for his crime of dealing in a controlled substance was $10,000 - but the car was worth more than four times that amount. Reaction was swift in favor of the ruling, as the NAACP Legal Defense Fund labeled it, “A huge victory for criminal justice reform.”
  • Already facing a series of lawsuits over his plan to bypass Congress and shift over $6.6 billion from accounts in the Pentagon and Treasury Department into border security and a border wall, President Donald Trump on Tuesday defended his decision to divert those resources away from what the House and Senate approved for the military.   'We have absolute right to do that, I have an absolute right call for national security,' the President told reporters in the Oval Office on Tuesday afternoon. 'We need strong borders.'    Mr. Trump's comments came as the Pentagon was still working through the details of how to implement the President's executive actions, as lawmakers waited to see if military construction projects in their home states would be caught up in Pentagon efforts to fund the border wall. 'We write to express concern and opposition to your unilateral decision to reprogram Congressionally approved funding dedicated for critical military construction projects in order to fund a costly and ineffective border wall,” wrote lawmakers from New Hampshire in a letter to the President. “Congress refused to give Trump funding to build his wasteful wall. Instead of listening, he’s declared a #FakeTrumpEmergency,” wrote Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) on Twitter. President Trump “failed to convince Mexico, the American people or Congress to pay for his massive, misguided border wall,” added Rep. Paul Tonko (D-NY). “Congress specifically refused to fund the president’s wall at the level he requested & the Constitution does not allow him to overrule Congress when it comes to spending federal dollars,” said Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA). Meanwhile, Democrats in the House continued to sign on to a resolution which would overturn the President’s national security designation - even before learning the details of where the Trump Administration would get the money from inside the Pentagon.  As for the lawsuits piling up against his executive actions, the President shrugged those off, noting that he had accurately predicted that opponents would file a lawsuit in the Ninth Circuit against his move. “I was put here for security - whether it's Space Force, which we're doing today, or whether it's borders,” Mr. Trump said to reporters. “Because if our nation doesn’t have borders, we don’t have too much of a nation,” he added.  
  • A day after posting a photograph online of a federal judge which included a crosshairs near her head, U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered Roger Stone to appear at a Thursday hearing to explain what he was doing, and whether it should impact restrictions imposed on Stone about charges brought against him in the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 elections, and any ties to the Trump campaign. In an order issued Tuesday morning, U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson summoned Stone to explain 'why the media contact order entered in this case and/or his conditions of release should not be modified or revoked in light of the posts on his Instagram account.' Stone posted the photo on Monday - and stood by it for much of the day - repeating his objections to having his case assigned to Judge Jackson, who is also presiding over a case brought by the Special Counsel's office against 12 Russian intelligence agents, charged with hacking materials from Democrats during the 2016 campaign. 'Any inference that this in someway threatens the judge is false,' Stone wrote on Monday about the photo - which he then pulled down. Monday night, Stone's lawyers submitted an official 'Notice of Apology' to the judge, trying to head off any sanctions. 'Undersigned counsel, with the attached authority of Roger J. Stone, hereby apologizes to the Court for the improper photograph and comment posted on Instragram today. Mr. Stone recognizes the impropriety and had it removed,' his lawyers wrote. But that evidently was not enough for Judge Jackson, whose order raised the question of whether further limits would be placed on Stone, a political operative who worked briefly for the Trump campaign, and has been charged with coordinating actions between the campaign and Wikileaks over emails involving the Hillary Clinton campaign. Stone has charged that the Special Counsel's office wrongly tipped off CNN to his imminent arrest in late January; last week, the judge ordered the feds to submit information about that matter.