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  • Keep those umbrellas handy today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says Sunday could be a washout.  There are storms possible throughout the day in Tulsa. “We are going to have occasional showers and thunderstorms in the morning,” Plate said.  “Showers and thunderstorms are still likely in the afternoon.  The high will be in the lower 80’s.” There is a chance the afternoon storms could be severe.   “Damaging winds would be the most likely threat,” Plate continues.  “We can’t rule out some large hail, up to a quarter size.” We could also see more storms Sunday night.  The low will be close to 70 degrees.
  • A tragedy in Tulsa Friday night involving a husband and wife. The apparent murder/suicide happened around 8:14 p.m. near 41st and Garnett. A police supervisor reports when officers arrived at the scene, they found the couple dead. “On this night, the male suspect had apparently killed his wife and then taken his own life,” the supervisor said.   Witnesses told investigators the couple had been having problems. So far, no names have been released.   We will update the story when more information comes into the newsroom.  
  • A woman suffered serious injuries after being hit by a vehicle Friday night in south Tulsa. The auto-pedestrian crash happened around 9:45 p.m. near 71st and Trenton. Police at the scene report the victim had come from a nearby apartment complex. “Apparently, the individual was running from one of those locations,” an officer said.  “Still not entirely certain what exactly was going on in that regard.  She attempted to cross 71st Street and did not apparently make the appropriate effort to clear traffic and was struck by a westbound vehicle.”  The driver of the vehicle did stay at the scene. No word on if any citations were issued. An update on her condition hasn’t been released.  
  • Today is your best bet for outdoor plans.   National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says rain will stay out of the forecast. “Saturday should be mostly sunny with a high in the lower 90’s,” Plate said.  “A northeast wind up to 10 MPH.” There is a chance for thunderstorms late Saturday night.  The low will be close to 72 degrees. Sunday could be a total washout.  NWS is reporting an 80 percent chance of showers.  The low will around 68 degrees.  
  • The idea of forming a “Space Force” as a branch of the military gets ridiculed in some circles, but for former Navy pilot and current NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, it’s abundantly clear that America’s enemies see space as a potentially devastating avenue of attack. His comments came during a wide-ranging, exclusive interview with KRMG from his office in Washington, D.C. [Hear the entire interview HERE, or use the embedded audio player below] “Our very way of life in this country is dependent on space, in a way that most Americans don’t recognize,” Bridenstine said Friday. “And it’s an existential threat, if we were to lose space, it would be an existential threat to our country.” He ticked off just a few of the many systems that rely heavily on a timing signal from the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system. “Every banking transaction in the United States is dependent upon a timing signal from GPS. That means if we lose GPS, we lose banking in the United States of America. In other words, there will be no milk in the grocery store in a matter of three days if we lose GPS. That GPS timing signal is not just necessary for banking transactions, it’s also  necessary to regulate the flows of electricity on the power grid, it’s necessary to regulate the flows of data on wireless networks, and terrestrial networks. So again, if we lose GPS, it’s an existential threat to the United States of America.” Our country’s enemies have been busy developing several methods of attacking the U.S. in space, he said, including jamming, spoofing, hacking and dazzling - all forms of attack that are fairly inexpensive and could be deployed against American assets in space. “This is what’s important to note,” Bridenstine said. “They have declared that space is America’s Achilles’ heel. We should take note of that.”   Administrator Bridenstine also spoke at length about the many projects in which NASA is engaged, including launching a probe toward the sun, building a permanent base on the moon, and of course sending humans to Mars. The Parker Solar Probe was launched last week, and will become (by far) the fastest human-made object in history. It will eventually reach speeds of some 430,000 miles per hour - roughly 1,700 times the speed of a bullet fired from a rifle. Its mission is to help scientists understand solar wind, solar flares, and most importantly solar eruptions, which could potentially pose an extreme danger to our planet. Another mission would see the U.S. return to the moon, in a big way.  NASA wants to have a permanent presence on the moon, a space station in orbit around it (called “The Gateway”) and the ability to utilize what some believe may be trillions of dollars worth of “rare earth” metals that could potentially be found on the moon’s surface. That’s not all; Bridenstine says in 2009, NASA scientists discovered that there are “hundreds of billions of tons of water ice at the poles of the moon, on the surface at the polls of the moon.” “It’s a resource that’s available for us to use on the surface of the moon. So it’s water to drink, it’s air to breathe, but it’s even more,” he told KRMG. “When you crack (water) into its component parts, hydrogen and oxygen, and you put it into liquid form, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, that is the same propellant that powered the space shuttles.” Building a sustainable, reusable system of rockets, surface vehicles, and tugs (shuttles) between the earth and the moon, and between the moon and the Gateway, would also help NASA reach its next goal - Mars. It’s a lot to administer, but the enthusiasm and passion in Bridenstine’s voice as he talks about what NASA has done - and plans to do - is palpable. “Without question, it’s the best job I’ve ever had, and there’s a lot more to do.”