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Latest from Steve Berg

    Men's Health has their list of the 25 best gadget gifts. Choices range from Philips smart light bulbs that you control with your voice or smart device. Or you could opt for the Furbo treat-tossing dog camera, so you can interact with your lonely pet at home while you're away and feed them treats remotely. The Parrot Mambo Fly is a drone that you can control with your smartphone and take pictures with. Or maybe you know someone who would like the BioLite Campstove2, which doubles as both a cooking stove and a charger for electronic gear on camping trips. You can find the full list from Men’s Health here.
  • The MONTH a child is born could make them more prone to ADHD. It almost sounds like astrology, but ABC 13 News in California reports that researchers found it has more to do with being the youngest kid in class. They found that children born in the month of August were more likely to be diagnosed and treated for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. August-born kids are almost a year younger than some classmates, which they say might contribute to ADHD.
  • A man was shot and killed by a Muskogee Police officer at the 'I Don't Care' bar and grill in Muskogee around 2:00 p.m. Monday afternoon, as three officers were attempting to arrest him for multiple outstanding warrants. Police didn’t say exactly how they found out that Andrew Kana was at the restaurant, but they say they had put one of his hands in handcuffs, when he pulled a gun with the other hand. That’s when they say one of the officers fired his gun, hitting Kana in the chest. Kana had a warrant for Domestic Assault by Strangulation in Muskogee County, as well as three out-of-state warrants in Idaho for Assault and Battery with a Dangerous Weapon, Possession of a Firearm after a Felony, and Domestic Assault in the Presence of a Minor Child. Muskogee Police will handle the investigation internally and then pass along their information to the County D-A. The three officers who responded are on routine leave.
  • If you want to put a security camera on your home, there's lots of 'do it yourself' choices nowadays. Popular Mechanics found no less than EIGHT cameras they like, that you can buy and install yourself. Most of them are in the price range of $120 to $190. Some, like the Arlo by Netgear, have free cloud storage of recordings, which come in handy. Some, like the Ring Stickup cam have a subscription fee. The Ring cam, as well as one from Nest and one from Amazon, have a two-way listen and talk feature, so you could yell at that porch pirate to “get lost.” Some have night-vision. Some come with a DVR included. Click here for a link to the Popular Mechanics article if you want to comparison shop.
  • So what's on the voters' minds today as they head to the ballot box? The Pew Research Center has been asking and found that about three-quarters of both Democrats and Republicans say control of Congress is a major factor in their vote this year. Healthcare is a huge issue with Democrats, as is the economy for Republicans. Voter enthusiasm in general is at the highest level in more than 20 years. Compared to the last midterms 4-years ago, enthusiasm has jumped from 36-percent to 67-percent for Democrats. For Republicans, the change is only from 52-percent to 59-percent. He's not actually ON the ballot, but President Trump is a factor for 6 in 10 registered voters, both for and against. And not surprisingly, the result of that factor is split along party lines with 66-percent of Democrats considering their midterm choices a vote against the President and 48-percent of Republicans saying it's a vote for him. 
  • A resident shoots his daughter's ex-boyfriend at a home near 21st Street between Harvard and Lewis.  Tulsa police tell us, “He tried to break in, tried to force entry and the dad shot him.” The daughter was there when the shooting happened Wednesday, along with her mother and some friends who are staying there after evacuating from the area near Hurricane Florence.  No word on the man's condition who was shot.  Police say he was shot inside the house.
  • A piece of U.S. military history will fly into Tulsa on Monday. And the history is the plane itself. The B-17 bomber “Texas Raiders” will be at Jones Riverside Airport Monday through Thursday. The number of B-17's has gone from more than 12,000 in their heyday to less than 12 flying today. You can take a tour of the plane on the ground for $10 for adults, $5 for kids, or $20 for a family up to five. Or, for prices starting at $475, you can even go on a flight aboard the flying fortress in the skies above Tulsa. You can find more information about the flights here.
  • U-Haul says more people were moving into Tulsa last year. Tulsa just made the list of the top 50 Destination Cities at number 50, after missing the list the previous year. The number of arriving trucks was up 4-percent in 2017. This particular list doesn't include the number of U-Haul trucks leaving Tulsa, so it's unclear if there's a net loss or net gain, but it’s still a good upward trend. U-Haul says summer is a busy moving season, with 45-percent of all their moves happening between Memorial Day and Labor Day. You can find more on the list here.
  • The government is getting ready to sell off thousands of vintage Army handguns, and you have a chance to buy one. The Army's official sidearm until 1986, the M1911 is instantly recognizable. It will be sold in four grades, $850, $950, $1050, including an auction grade for the really nice ones, with the price determined by the bidding. There are a few rules. You have to be and adult and of course have no legal prohibition from possessing a firearm. You also need to be in a group that's affiliated with the Civilian Marksmanship Program with proof of marksmanship activity. But Guns.com says there are lots of such groups and proof of activity is usually as simple as a copy of your concealed carry permit. The sale process starts June 4th. You can find more info about the process here.
  • Mother's Day is this upcoming Sunday. You did remember, right? If not, we've got some ideas.  Of course, you can't go wrong with flowers or chocolates, but Business Insider has some interesting ideas. They include a self-watering indoor herb garden. Or a map of mom’s hometown or favorite vacation spot. Or a cutting board in the shape of her home state. Or a DNA test kit to learn more about her ancestors. You can find the full list of ideas for gifts for mom here.
  • Steve Berg

     Steve Berg joined KRMG in the fall of 2008 and currently anchors the news segments of The KRMG Evening News. Born at St. Francis Hospital (the exact year is not important for our purposes here) and raised in the Brookside neighborhood, Steve is proud to call himself a native Tulsan. Steve is a graduate of Tulsa Edison High School and Oklahoma State University. His first job in broadcasting was at KOSU-FM radio in Stillwater. He then spent roughly 16 years in television, with stints in Pocatello, Idaho, Lansing, Michigan, and at KOTV in Tulsa, before turning his attention back to radio and his current job at KRMG.Steve has won multiple awards for his reporting during his career, most recently in 2010 from the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters in the Feature Series and General News categories.In his free time, Steve enjoys running, snow skiing, reading, video games, movies, TV, trying out new one-of-a-kind restaurants and spending time with friends and family.

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  • Police were called to the Broken Arrow High School on Thursday after a threatening message was found on a bathroom mirror. Officers say the message referenced a shooting set to happen on Friday. Police interviewed a student, 18-year-old Hipolito Hernandez. Hernandez was then arrested on a complaint of Threatening a Violent Act.  Officers decided that the threat was not credible, but the timing was alarming. “The threat was made one day prior to the anniversary date of the Sandy Hook school shooting,” said BAPD Major Scott Bennett. “We will do everything in our power to prevent chances of a similar event happening here in Broken Arrow. This includes strictly enforcing existing threats laws.”  
  • Journalists were kept away from a secret federal appeals court hearing on Friday in Washington, D.C., as officials sealed off an entire floor for arguments in a mysterious grand jury case which some believe could be related to the Special Counsel investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. The case – known officially as “In re: Grand Jury Subpoena” – has been sealed in its entirety when it comes to public records, as it moved from the district court to the appeals court level in recent months. Reporters at the courthouse – which is just down the hill from the U.S. Capitol – at first tried to gather outside the courtroom where the secret arguments were going to take place, but then security officials sealed off the entire fifth floor of the building, making it nearly impossible to find out who was involved in the matter. “We have spread out across the building,” tweeted Darren Samuelsohn, a reporter for Politico. “No sightings yet to report of note.” Reporters kicked off the 5th floor entirely for a sealed appeals hearing that may involve #Mueller on s grand jury dispute. They are even searching stairwells for reporters. We have split up and trying to cover all entrances and exits…. — Sarah N. Lynch (@SarahNLynch) December 14, 2018 Arguments in the sealed Mueller case are ongoing. Everyone was booted out of the Court of Appeals and the entire floor was cleared. — Charlie Gile (@CharlieGileNBC) December 14, 2018 The possible tie to the Mueller investigation was reported by Politico earlier this year, when one of their reporters observed someone asking for a secret court filing to take to a law firm involved in the matter. There are two different sealed case involving an unknown grand jury which have attracted attention at the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals – as the relatively speedy nature of the cases – and then today’s sealing off of an entire floor – has prompted intense interest. “To this day, I can’t fathom what the heck it could be that would move this fast and get this much secrecy,” said national security lawyer Bradley Moss. Several media folks have asked me and colleagues for weeks what we can imagine this case being, assuming Trump's people are telling the truth and it's not them. To this day, I can't fathom what the heck it could be that would move this fast and get this much secrecy. https://t.co/EH6X08KDq8 — Bradley P. Moss (@BradMossEsq) December 14, 2018 Here’s the docket on the case – as you can see, it offers little in the way of information. But with officials sealing off the entire courthouse floor to deal with it – the case certainly raises questions about what’s going on.
  • This is horsepower in its rawest form. >> Read more trending news  A Facebook video of two Belgian draft horses pulling a tractor-trailer up an icy driveway in southeastern Minnesota went viral this week, the Star Tribune reported. The truck driver took video of the 13-year-old horses -- Molly and Prince -- after his truck got stuck in the snow, the newspaper reported. Lizzie Hershberger, who owns the horses, told KARE that the animals were not harmed when they pulled the truck. Her husband, Jacob Hershberger, admitted the horses had never attempted such a weighty task, but he said they handled it well, the television station reported. “It’s quite amazing how a video can go viral from little Minnesota,” Lizzie Hershberger told the Star Tribune. The couple, formerly Amish, bought the horses six months ago, Lizzie Hershberger told the newspaper. The horses are trained and Jacob Hershberger uses them weekly, KARE reported. “(Jacob is) semi-retired from the trucking, so he bought himself these Belgians and he just loves them. He uses them multiple times a week,” Hershberger told the Star Tribune. The Hershbergers were not surprised when a truck driver spun out as he attempted to return an empty trailer, which is usually used to haul livestock, KARE reported. A second truck was waiting at the bottom of the driveway, so Jacob Hershberger hitched up the horses. “It’s a neat story,” Lizzie Hershberger told the Star Tribune. “We just like the idea that horses still get used and I think that people just aren’t really aware of that.”
  • Kentucky Fried Chicken is trying out a new tradition, just in time for the holidays. The chain is offering a new way to enjoy the aroma of the Colonel's secret recipe in your own home: A KFC yule log.  It's called the KFC 11 Herbs & Spices Firelog and it smells like chicken. KFC partnered with Enviro-Log to create the new product, which lasts up to three hours and is made of 100 percent recycled materials.  KFC officials said, 'the smell of the Colonel's original recipe is unmistakable' and 'it may result in a craving for fried chicken.'  >> Trending: Del Monte recalling more than 64,000 cases of Fiesta Corn in 25 states It's only available for a limited time at   www.KFCfirelogs.com. It costs $18.99, but there’s a limit, only one per customer.  
  • Facing outrage from voters that taxpayer money was being used to pay for sexual harassment settlements against members of Congress involving employees on Capitol Hill, the House and Senate on Thursday approved a package of reforms designed to force members of Congress to pay for any such judgments with their own money in the future. Rep. Gregg Harper (R-MS), the head of the House Administration Committee, noted that the bill will rightly hold “members of the House and Senate personally liable for unlawful harassment and retaliation.” “Time is finally up for members of Congress who think they can sexually harass and get away with it,” said Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA), who last year told of being harassed on Capitol Hill when she was a young Congressional staffer. “They will no longer be able to slink away with no one knowing that they have harassed,” Speier told reporters. House Democrat Jackie Speier said men and women who sexually harass others will have to pay back the U.S. Treasury for any settlements made. It will be done through a lump sum, garnishing savings or wages, or even digging into their social security if necessary pic.twitter.com/q7RLQpgcKh — POLITICO (@politico) December 13, 2018 Click here for the details of the 80 page bill. The bill gives lawmakers 180 days to pay any harassment award; if that has not happened, then Congressional officials are authorized to garnish the pay of lawmakers, or take money from the member’s retirement savings account. If the accused member leaves the Congress, the law would give Congressional officials the power to garnish the wages of that former lawmaker in their new job, as well as taking money from an annuity or even out of that member’s Social Security benefits. Negotiations had been in limbo for several months as Senators resisted some of the changes approved by the House – Speaker-designate Nancy Pelosi has said the House will move to strengthen its own rules dealing with other workplace discrimination issues, even if the Senate will not. JUST IN: The bipartisan sexual harassment bill I'm leading with @RoyBlunt has passed the Senate & House and will soon be signed into law! This will fundamentally change the way sexual harassment cases are handled in Congress and protect victims instead of protecting politicians. — Amy Klobuchar (@amyklobuchar) December 13, 2018 Another change in the bill removes the requirement that staffers who say they’ve been sexually harassed, will not have to deal with a 30-day ‘cooling off period,’ in which they are not allowed to bring a lawsuit, after they make a harassment complaint. It’s the first major change in sexual harassment policies in the Congress since the “#MeToo” movement began. The bills were passed quickly in both the House and Senate; no votes were taken, as the plans were approved by unanimous consent.