ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
73°
Cloudy
H 78° L 64°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    73°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 78° L 64°
  • cloudy-day
    75°
    Afternoon
    Cloudy. H 78° L 64°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    77°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 78° L 64°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Russell Mills

    UPDATE: Tulsa police confirm a 911 call from a citizen led them to Taheerah Ahmad and her daughter shortly after noon Tuesday. TPD Ofcr. Jeanne MacKenzie says the caller told them they’d seen a black Lexus in a parking lot in the 300 block of North Main Street, and believed the people in that vehicle might be Taheerah Ahmad and her eight-year-old daughter. When police arrived, they arrested Ahmad and took her in for questioning. The child was taken to the Child Crisis Center where experts in dealing with traumatized children can work with her to both help her and to get a statement from her about what happened. MacKenzie tells KRMG the child was not physically harmed. Police say Taheerah Ahmad allegedly stabbed her 11-year-old daughter multiple times and took off with her seven-year-old daughter, Hafza Hailey. A child, age nine, said Ahmad duct-taped the hands of the children, put socks in their mouths and stabbed the 11-year-old. She then reportedly left the scene. Officers said the nine-year-old was able to flee to a relative's home. The kitchen was also burning when officers arrived, according to officials.  Ahmad is around 6 feet tall and 190 pounds, according to police. The seven-year-old child is reportedly wearing an ankle-length peach dress and gold bracelets on her wrists. She has puffy hair in a ponytail.  Investigators believe Ahmad is in a Black Lexus RX300 with a paper tag or in a navy-blue Ford sedan.  Police said Ahmad has lived in Tennessee and Texas in the past, and they are not sure where she could be headed. The 11-year-old stabbing victim is in serious condition following surgery. Anyone who sees Ahmad or Hailee needs to call 911 or 918-596-2627.
  • A Tulsa County jury Friday recommended that Michael Bever serve life with the possibility of parole after convicting him in the murders of five family members. Deliberations were fairly brief, less than two hours, after the jury listened to testimony regarding mitigation, and hearing both the prosecution and defense offer arguments about a possible sentence. Because Bever was a minor at the time of the crimes, which occurred in July of 2015, the death penalty was not an option. Instead, jurors had to choose between life in prison with, or without, the possibility of parole. And that decision was impacted by a ruling of the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals Thursday, which said the jury had to consider whether a juvenile convicted of murder is “irreparably corrupt and permanently incorrigible.” If the jury doesn’t unanimously agree that the prosecution has proved that beyond a reasonable doubt, the court ruled, the jury can not consider life without parole for a juvenile. But the argument isn’t over just yet. Judge Sharon Holmes will formally sentence Bever on July 24th, and Tulsa County D.A. Steve Kunzweiler said Friday, “we are certainly going to be advocating to Judge Holmes, to the extent that the law will allow it, that she has the discretion to make determinations whether sentences run concurrent or consecutive.” Life with the possibility of parole is considered to be a 45-year sentence in Oklahoma, but it also falls under the 85% guideline, so Bever couldn’t apply for parole until he’s served 38.25 years.  If the judge sentenced him to concurrent life sentences, that would effectively make the sentence life without parole.
  • The jury in the Michael Bever case didn’t waste a lot of time coming to a verdict on the count of assault with intent to kill during the sentencing phase of the trial. After convicting him on all six counts of murder and assault in the deaths of his family members and the near-fatal attack on his sister, they heard testimony Thursday on possibly mitigating his sentence. They recommended he serve 28 years in prison for the assault; now, they’ll begin considering whether he should serve life, or life without parole, for the five murder convictions. Because he was a minor at the time of the crimes, the death penalty is not an option. The State of Oklahoma calculates a life sentence at 45 years; it’s also an 85% crime, which means the convict has to serve 85% of the sentence before they’re eligible for parole. So on a 45-year sentence, Bever would have to serve 38.25 years before he could even apply for parole - and that’s if the sentences run concurrently. The jury will return to the courtroom Friday to hear testimony before making recommendations on the murder counts. The judge could possibly overrule the jury and impose a different sentence, though that rarely happens.
  • A Tulsa County jury has found Michael Bever guilty on all counts in the murders of his parents and three siblings, as well as the assault on another sister. The trial lasted three weeks, and involved extremely emotional testimony regarding the brutal nature of the crimes. The murders occurred at the Bever home in July 2015. The Oklahoma State Medical Examiner's Office released a report in October of that year, indicating that the most brutal attack was on the suspects' mother, April Bever, 44. She was reportedly stabbed 48 times, including 18 wounds to the neck and head, as well as suffering blunt force trauma. Her husband, David Bever, 52, was wounded by 'sharp force' at least 28 times, and also suffered blunt force wounds. Daniel Bever, 12, Christopher Bever, 7, and Victoria Bever, 5, were all stabbed to death. A 13-year-old sister survived the attack despite stab wounds; a 2-year-old sister was found unharmed on the second floor of the home when police arrived. Robert Bever, now 21, pleaded guilty in a deal to avoid the death penalty. Because Michael, now 19, was a juvenile at the time of the crimes, the death penalty was not on the table. The jury will now consider whether he should be sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole, or life without parole. If they decide to give him leniency, he still wouldn’t be eligible for a parole hearing until 2056.
  • A man is shot and killed after a second vehicle driver fires shots into his car. Paul Jordan heard the crash when the car hit a tree yesterday  near 3200 North Garrison Avenue and ran to see if he could help. “The blood was pooling in the seat,” Jordan said Tuesday. “He was slumped over in the other side and I was trying to get something to put pressure on his wounds they were on his side down through here.” But 27-year old Jeremy Woodfork's injuries were too severe. He died near 3600 North MLK Boulevard. Woodfork is Tulsa's 15th homicide of the year.
  • UPDATE: 6:35AM TUESDAY- Tulsa Police Homicide Sergeant Dave Walker confirmed to KRMG the man killed by police did fire a shot, but said based on body-cam footage, he believes police fired first. Listen to our interview with Sergeant Walker here. UPDATE: Police now say that the suspect shot and killed Monday did fire a shot at the officers before they returned fire and killed him. TPD Deputy Chief Dennis Larsen tells KRMG the as-yet unidentified man fired a single round from a .45 caliber handgun. Stay with KRMG for further updates on this developing story. Two members of the Tulsa Police Department’s anti-gang task force opened fire on a man occupying a vehicle in an east Tulsa motel parking lot Monday, killing him. The incident occurred at the Extended Stay Inn and Suites, a few blocks east of Memorial Road on 41st Street, about 12:30 p.m. TPD Capt. Rick Helberg told KRMG at the scene that the officers were checking out a grey SUV, occupied by three men, when they saw the man in the front passenger seat had a gun in his hands. “On their initial approach, they were talking and then they looked down and saw the gun,” Helberg said. It’s unclear at this point if the man raised or pointed the weapon, but both officers reacted quickly, and opened fire. “The officer has to assume that that person's pulling out that gun to shoot them, so -- no choice,” Helberg added.  The two other men in the vehicle at the time were uninjured. Nearby, Garrett Lamar was in his room at the motel when he heard “six or seven” shots fired, he told KRMG. “I waited a couple minutes, and stuck my head out the door,” Lamar said, “and I saw two cops pointing their guns at a vehicle where the window had been shot out, and another guy laying on the ground, so I politely closed my door and went back inside.” TPD has not released the names of any of the people involved as of this writing. 
  • Update: The fire was contained and Broken Arrow police made entry into the house, finding the suspect unresponsive around 7pm. Police told KRMG the suspect, Joey Brashears, became responsive a short time later. Criminal charges are pending, according to police. A 911 call triggered a police response to a Broken Arrow home about 10:30 Thursday. The caller didn’t speak, but the call taker could hear a disturbance over the open line, according to BAPD Ofcr. James Koch. He tells KRMG when officers arrived on the scene, a woman came out and said she was a kidnapping victim, and that the suspect was still inside the home. She had injuries consistent with assault, Koch added, and was taken to an area hospital. But the suspect, later identified as Joey Brashears, 56, still refused to comply with officers’ demands. So the Special Operations Team was deployed, and eventually they used CS and OC gas to try and resolve the standoff. Around 5pm, BAFD had to respond to the scene because the house caught fire. It’s unclear if the fire was caused by SOT, or the suspect. Even then, the suspect did not come out of the house, and at this writing investigators still don’t know his status. KRMG will update this story as new information becomes available. 
  • In its ten-year existence, the Oklahoma Thunder has managed to win six national championships, and is currently on a winning streak stretching back to 2015. Overall, the team has managed to win about 120 games with a total of seven losses. The team features several players well known to local college football fans, and plays several home games a year in the Tulsa area. Yet most people have never heard of the Oklahoma Thunder, and if they have, they probably think it’s a basketball team. “Yeah, I get that all the time,” Rashid Lowe told KRMG Wednesday. Lowe is the head coach of the Thunder, which joined the Gridiron Developmental Football League, or GDFL, in 2011 after three seasons in the now-defunct WFL. The GDFL is similar to a AAA baseball league, except the NFL franchises don’t own or operate the teams. But it’s professional football, and the Thunder is known for its explosive, high scoring offense. “We put our foot on the pedal, and we don’t let up,” Lowe said. “We probably average 50 to 60 points a game in outdoor football, which is pretty much unheard of.” A few names area fans might recognize include Prentice Elliot (OSU), Trey Johnson (TU), Eric Davis (OSU), Brandon Webb (OSU), Brandon Sheperd (OSU), and many more who had stellar college careers, as well as several who have spent time in the NFL, the CFL, and arena leagues. The Thunder kicks off the 2018 campaign on Saturday, April 29th at 7:00 p.m. against its arch-rival, the Oklahoma Outlaws, based in OKC. Home games this season will be played at East Central High School in Tulsa.
  • With no severe weather expected in the next couple of days, it appears Oklahoma is about to set a new record for the latest start to tornado season since modern records have been kept. “We seem like we will break the state record for the slowest start to the tornado season,” according to Steve Piltz, Meteorologist-in-Charge at the Tulsa office of the National Weather Service. He added that it’s not as unusual to go this far into April without a tornado in northeast Oklahoma, but for the state in general it’s extremely rare. Unprecedented, in fact. The record as of this writing is April 26th, 1962. Parts of the state set another record this April as well - the most days with temperatures below freezing. As Piltz pointed out, late cold snaps don’t mitigate the danger from tornadoes, because weather patterns can change quickly in Oklahoma. “You just look back to 2013, where we had snow in northeast Oklahoma in early May,” he told KRMG, “and that was the month that then led to the El Reno tornado, which could be classified as one of the worst in the history of the tornado records.” That storm reportedly marked the first time in recorded history that storm chasers were killed by a tornado.
  • Investigators Monday said they’ve solved the disappearances of two 16-year-old girls, the murders of one of the girls’ parents, and the fire that destroyed the victims’ home near Welch, Oklahoma in 1999. Danny and Kathy Freeman were found inside the burned mobile home - although family members actually found the husband’s body the next day, after investigators left the scene. That’s just the beginning of the missteps that led the case to languish for nearly two decades. Private investigators had identified the suspects years ago, but police ignored them and actually threatened to confiscate their licenses if they persisted. That’s according to a probable cause affidavit filed Monday for the arrest of Ronnie Busick, 65, the only surviving suspect. Two other men believed to have carried out the murders, Warren “Phil” Welch II and David Pennington, have died. Disturbingly, DA Matt Ballard said Monday, it appears the girls were kept alive for days. They were raped, and possibly tortured, and their tormentors took Polaroid photos of them which apparently survived for years and were shown to a number of people. But none of those people stepped forward. The case was apparently solved after a cache of evidence related to the investigation was recently found in a storage area at the sheriff’s office.
  • Russell Mills

    Anchor/Reporter

    Russell Mills came to Tulsa in 1991 with an AA degree in Broadcast Journalism and a new family. He worked in local television for more than 20 years as a show producer, assignment editor, and online content director. He built one of the first television news websites in the country and helped pioneer streaming audio and video, especially as it related to weather and live news coverage on the Internet. Russell says working for KRMG fulfills a longtime dream. "I worked in newsrooms for a long, long time before finally getting the chance to get out and cover the news in person. I can't tell you how much I love doing just that -- driving toward the big story to talk to the people involved gets my adrenaline going like almost nothing else in life." Russell grew up in Bozeman, Montana then spent several years as an "itinerant musician and restaurant worker," living in Wyoming, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico and California before finally starting college at 28 and discovering broadcasting as a possible career path. He is married to Shadia Dahlal, a nationally-known Middle Eastern Dancer and instructor, and has two stepchildren. You can connect with Russell via TwitterFacebook, or Linked In

    Read More
  • We have updated information regarding a strong storm in Fairfax Saturday afternoon. National Weather Service Meteorologist Sarah Corfidi says they are looking into whether a tornado touched down. “We did receive reports that there was a tornado in that area,” Corfidi said.  “More than likely, someone from the National Weather Service team will go out on Sunday and look for damage and see where the damage was.  See if it’s consistent with a tornado or strong line winds.” The fast, strong storm that swept through Fairfax did leave damage in its path. One resident reacted to seeing a semi turned over by the strong winds. “Man, I’m just, wow!” She said.  “I couldn’t believe it.  I was just like, wow!” There have been no reports of any serious injuries. We do know a fence at a baseball diamond was heavily damaged and drivers had to dodge several fallen tree limbs.
  • The sunglasses can remain at home if you have outdoor plans for today.   There is a chance for thunderstorms during the morning hours.  National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Lacy says we’ll see plenty of clouds from there.  “Highs only around 80 or so,” Lacy said.  “We’ll see more clouds around.” The low Sunday night will be close to 62 degrees. Don’t put away your umbrella to start the week.  In fact, NWS is reporting a chance of thunderstorms for the next several days.   
  • We have updated information regarding a 39-year-old woman accused of abducting her daughter after stabbing an 11-year-old child. Tulsa County court records show Taheerah Admad has now been charged with assault and battery with intent to kill, first-degree arson and two counts of child neglect. An Amber Alert was issued following the abduction. She was eventually spotted by members of the public and tracked down in a downtown parking lot. Original:  Tulsa police on Tuesday arrested a woman who they say bound and gagged her three daughters, stabbed the eldest repeatedly and set their house on fire. Police said a patrol officer found 39-year-old Taheerah Ahmad around midday in a vehicle in downtown Tulsa. Ahmad was taken into custody and her 7-year-old daughter who had been reported missing was found safe, police said. Investigators said that following her arrest, Ahmad told them she became upset after observing two of her children reading a book. It was not immediately known what book they were reading, police said. Ahmad was booked into the Tulsa County Jail on complaints of assault and battery with a deadly weapon with intent to kill, child abuse and first-degree arson. Tulsa police officer Jeanne MacKenzie said earlier that the 7-year-old girl helped her 9-year-old sister escape Monday night, and the 9-year-old ran to a nearby house for help. MacKenzie told the Tulsa World that when authorities arrived, they found an 11-year-old girl with so many stab wounds that emergency responders 'couldn't even count them.' The house was on fire, and Ahmad and the youngest girl were missing. The middle child told police that their mother placed socks in their mouths, bound their hands with duct tape and began stabbing the eldest child, MacKenzie said. The 11-year-old remained hospitalized Tuesday and police said she was unconscious and that her condition was 'very severe.
  • If you're headed out to one of the many events in Tulsa today, the forecast shouldn't be an issue. However, National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Lacy says conditions could change Saturday night. “I would say most of the day will be fairly hot and sunny,” Lacy said.  “We’ll have an increase in the possibility of storms Saturday night.” The high today will be close to 92 degrees. As of early this morning, there is 30 percent of thunderstorms Saturday night.  The low will be around 67 degrees.     Temperatures will cool down on Sunday.  NWS is reporting a high near 85 degrees.  
  • A piece of U.S. military history will fly into Tulsa on Monday. And the history is the plane itself. The B-17 bomber “Texas Raiders” will be at Jones Riverside Airport Monday through Thursday. The number of B-17's has gone from more than 12,000 in their heyday to less than 12 flying today. You can take a tour of the plane on the ground for $10 for adults, $5 for kids, or $20 for a family up to five. Or, for prices starting at $475, you can even go on a flight aboard the flying fortress in the skies above Tulsa. You can find more information about the flights here.