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Latest from Rick Couri

    KRMG just received the following note from Sand Springs police. Our 911 service and non-emergency lines have been affected by a fire at the AT&T offices in Tulsa. YOU MAY CALL (918-246-2546) FOR ASSISTANCE from SSPD/SSFD or EMSA. We will only have one line operational right now, so please do not call this number for general questions, only for emergencies. We will stage officers and firefighters who are not assigned to calls to the following locations that you can go to if you need help: City Hall - 100 E. Broadway QT North - 200 S. Highway 97 Charles Page High School - 500 n. Adams Road QT South - 2 E. 41st Corner of 41st and 129th W. Ave.
  • NASA is sending a rover flight to the Red Planet in 2020. They want you to be part of it. On the web page NASA 2020, the agency writes;  'As we get ready to launch this historic Mars mission, we want everyone to share in this journey of exploration,' said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) in Washington. ‘It’s an exciting time for NASA, as we embark on this voyage to answer profound questions about our neighboring planet, and even the origins of life itself.’ The opportunity to send your name to Mars comes with a souvenir boarding pass and 'frequent flyer' points. This is part of a public engagement campaign to highlight missions involved with NASA's journey from the Moon to Mars. Miles (or kilometers) are awarded for each 'flight,' with corresponding digital mission patches available for download. More than 2 million names flew on NASA's InSight mission to Mars, giving each 'flyer' about 300 million frequent flyer miles (nearly 500 million frequent flyer kilometers). From now until Sept. 30, you can add your name to the list and obtain a souvenir boarding pass to Mars here. Good luck, we’re not sure if there will be snacks on the flight.
  • With more than 160,000 cubic feet of water per second gushing out of Keystone Dam and more rain expected over the next few days, the city if Tulsa wants you to know more about flooding. The city released an updated flood map you can access by tapping on the link below. Keystone Dam Inundation Map  The map shows the path of the Arkansas river from Keystone Lake all the way past Muskogee, Webers Falls, and into Ft. Smith. The city suggests using the map to get a good idea about how much any property you own or rent could be affected by the release. With more severe weather possible tonight, keep KRMG close-by so you can be prepared and  know the latest about the weather.
  • Reports began coming in to emergency workers just before 8 am, saying the workers platform was “swinging wildly out of control,” at the Devon Energy building in Oklahoma City.  The Oklahoma City Fire department tweeted the video below showing the platform smashing into the building, breaking glass. Crews now report the basket is once again secured and the two workers inside are secure and being checked by medics.
  • Police say Sarah Hill, a non-custodial parent, picked Austin up from school Monday and went missing.  Cops tell is Sarah was driving a maroon, 2007 Mazda CX-7 with license plate EKP237. Police ask anyone with information to call 918-968-2733.                    
  • It’s been a productive first 100 days for Jenks businessman Kevin Stitt. That’s according to the man himself, and those working for him.  “We’ve gone from legislature vs governor, cabinet secretary vs cabinet secretary, to everyone working together,” Commerce secretary Sean Kouplen told us.  Stitt believes his biggest step forward is requiring accountability. But he tells the KRMG Morning News he’s also enjoying the job. “People ask me what’s the biggest surprise, and I tell them it’s how much fun I’m having,” he began. “It’s so cool to get a new job and to really be enjoying it.” Joining the KRMG Morning News for an in-depth hour on his first 100 days, Stitt told us work is getting done in a different way.  “I am bringing a different environment and atmosphere to the capitol.” Lieutenant governor Matt Pinnell is pleased to see the governor instill a sense of accountability. “I come into my cabinet meetings every week and we’re not just sitting around shooting the breeze,” he told KRMG. “We have real metrics,” he added. “ What are our one month goals, what are our two month goals, what are our quarterly and one-year goals,” he went on. Stitt promises to continue his high energy approach, something Kouplen believes will happen. “If I’ve heard him say ‘move the needle’ once, I’ve heard him say it 100 times,” Kouplen chuckled. Join the KRMG Morning News from 8 am-9 am today to hear governor Stitt and some of his key cabinet members as we cover their biggest achievements, and plans for the future. Listen to the entire hour here.
  • Employees at the Skunk Grow Supply near Memorial and 51st say they are hoping to identify a man and woman who allegedly burglarized their business. Officials told FOX23 and KRMG the two walked in and stole a grow tent, worth about $130. But this is the second time they’ve had a similar situation. The first time someone walked out with more than $2,000 worth of equipment. Surveillance video captured the moment the two suspects started running out the door and toward their car in the parking lot. That’s when one of the owners and a customer who had been helping expand the location started chasing the two. One of the men jumped on top of the car. The owner says they’re  concerned for their safety, and plan to take extra safety precautions in the future.
  • The Woody Guthrie Center showcase of memorabilia includes movie posters, movie props, and other items from the Outsiders movie. “We’re thrilled to help support and promote this incredible addition to the Tulsa arts,” Deana McCloud told us during a recent visit to the museum. Her personal favorite in the collection is clear. “Dallas Winston,” she exclaimed while pointing at the leather jacket worn by actor Matt Dillon as he portrayed the character. “Who didn’t love watching Dallas Winston just saunter with that swag, just right down the street,” she went on. The exhibit offers a sneak peek at other items from the Francis Ford Coppola film based on the S.E. Hinton novel McCloud connected with so completely. “I can see myself in this story,” she began. “I can see my friends, this is the real world, not just something an adult wrote.” Included are screen-worn wardrobe items such as Matt Dillon's leather jacket, a hooded sweatshirt worn by C. Thomas Howell in the 'Rumble,' as wells as behind-the-scenes photography, call sheets, and a signed script. The exhibit will remain on display until the opening of the museum, that date is not yet been announced. Listen to the entire interview with Deana here.
  • Coach Trimble retired as the Jenks head coach in 2018 after being diagnosed with ALS in 2016. In his time with the Trojans, Trimble took his teams to 17 state title games, wining 13.  Trimble’s courageous journey and continuing positive attitude is affecting more than those he’s touched in Jenks. “He’s being the person I don’t think I’m brave enough to be,” former Union head coach and current Owasso told KRMG.  Despite fierce, on-field battles with those Jenks his teams, Blankenship is amazed by the lesson Trimble is teaching. “He’s being the man we all want to be,” he said. Current Union head coach Kirk Fridrich agrees, telling us “when I first heard of it, it was like a punch in the gut to me. Like Blankenship, despite losses in high stakes games, he learned to care about Trimble. “I was surprised by how much he meant to me,” he began, “how much it bothered me.” Allan’s TrimbleStrong Foundation is a focus for the coach in his frequent speaking stops.  Join the KRMG Morning News joined the KRMG Morning News for a special 8am in-depth hour. You can listen to the legacy, love, and impact coach Trimble has made by tapping or clicking on this link.
  • In sports terms, it’s game night. The weeks. months, and in some cases, years of work come to a head as voters decide Oklahoma’s leadership team for the next several years. Here at the Bricktown Event Center in Oklahoma City, the GOP will host governor candidate Kevin Stitt and several other candidates while others, like republican congressional candidates Markwayne Mullin and Kevin Hearn stay in their districts. Follow along below for a timeline of how things go here just a few miles from where the candidates want to work. You can keep up with the national results here and watch below for the latest updates locally. 2:55pm - Arrived at the event center a bit early because the doors are suppose to open at 3:00pm. It seems that was only a suggestion as the media area is almost completely full but we wedged into a spot down front. 3:15pm - Good news from the Stitt campaign, they’ve negotiated a deal for free internet and power access at the venue. As of yesterday, the building wanted to charge all the media for not only Ethernet service, but connections to power and the “mult-box,” the framice providing access to the mic podium for all the media. 4:30pm - Not much happening other than technical issues for the last 90 minutes but the stage is set and volunteers are mostly in place. Doors are supposed to open at 6pm, we’ll see if they go early. 7:00pm - As the polls close the mood here is elevating quickly, this crowd senses something special is about to happen. 7:30pm - The returns are shoing it may not be as close as we thought, Stitt leading handily. 8:00pm - Kevin Stitt’s margin is growing fast, 10-12 points now. 8:40pm - Senator James Lanford joined us to break down the local and national races. He told us he’s not at all surprised. 8:55pm - Just got a text from the Stitt campaign, they tell me Mr. Edmondson called to concede. 9:38pm - Governor-elect Kevin Stitt is speaking, and declaring a big win. 9:48pm - All done here and Kevin Stitt will join us tomorrow at 7am on the KRMG Morning News.
  • Rick Couri

    Managing Editor

    Rick Couri began his career with KRMG in 1982 and has since done "everything you could do" at the station. Rick has covered top sporting events such as the Olympic Games, the World Series, football bowl games and championship tennis. He even spent a day with boxing great Muhammad Ali. On the news side Rick was in Joplin and Moore hours after F-5 tornados. He’s also covered political conventions and a presidential visit.

    Rick is entering his 32nd year as the color voice for TU basketball, and 16th year as the play-by-play voice for Union football. He’s also broadcast Tulsa basketball, Oklahoma State football, and spent seven years as the voice of the Tulsa Talons Arena league football team.

    Rick and Christine, his wife of 28-years, have three children. Son Kelly (38), and his wife Jill, are the parents of granddaughters Hayden, and Hannah. 34-year-old daughter Lindsey works for Union public schools, and 21-year-old daughter Delaney Catalina is a senior education major at Texas A&M University. When away from the microphone, Rick is a 22 year PADI scuba instructor. He and his family have a dive instruction company, http://www.okiescuba.com/. While Rick will tell you he is a "sports guy", those familiar with the Tulsa market know Rick's influence extends well outside the circle of sports. As Co-host of the KRMG Morning News, Rick has interviewed everyone from local celebrities to national figures.  A community leader who gives of his time and talent, Rick's commitment to the annual funding campaign for Operation Aware has resulted in over $1.3 million dollars being raised for this important charity. KRMG listeners have learned to appreciate Rick's insightful reporting and have developed a trust unique in today's media personalities. 

    Read More
  • Tulsa police and city water crews are asking drivers to avoid the intersection at 21st and 129th East Avenue.  A-36-inch water line burst there around three Friday morning, bringing officers and a repair crew to the scene.  “First step they said was to get the water shut off but then (workers) said the intersection is still going to be torn up for a considerable amount of time after that,” TPD Cpl. Matt Arnold said.  Power was shut off to the area for worker safety. We're told the intersection will be a mess until repairs can be made.
  • Registration opens for the Owasso city-wide block party. This year's event will be held Sept. 14. The city says these block parties are a great way to meet your neighbors, which could lead to a safer community. The deadline to register is August 28, 2019.
  • The 53rd Annual Porter Peach Festival is happening until Saturday night.  Bad weather damaged 90-percent of the crop last year, forcing growers to bring in peaches from Texas.  The festival features live music, local art and a parade Saturday morning. Porter is located at 201 Street South and North 4200 Road.
  • After a high profile confrontation in the first set of Democratic debates in the 2020 race for the White House, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris will be paired together again on the same debate stage, as Democrats will gather in Detroit July 30-31. The makeup of the two debates were announced after a draw live on CNN, as the network randomly placed the 20 qualifying candidates for the second pair of Democratic debates. While Biden and Harris headline the second night, the debates will kick off with three of the top five Democrats on stage for the first debate:  Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.
  • An accident is under investigation affecting the eastbound lanes of the Turner Turnpike at the Tulsa gate.  The accident happened around 8 p.m. Thursday and involved two vehicles, including an SUV.  We're told a FedEx truck at the scene may have had hazardous material on board.  Sapulpa police say one person died in the SUV that was involved in the collision. The driver was traveling in the wrong direction on the roadway. One eastbound lane at the bridge was opened for traffic at 4:30 a.m.

Washington Insider

  • After a high profile confrontation in the first set of Democratic debates in the 2020 race for the White House, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris will be paired together again on the same debate stage, as Democrats will gather in Detroit July 30-31. The makeup of the two debates were announced after a draw live on CNN, as the network randomly placed the 20 qualifying candidates for the second pair of Democratic debates. While Biden and Harris headline the second night, the debates will kick off with three of the top five Democrats on stage for the first debate:  Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.
  • With GOP lawmakers in Congress publicly expressing their concerns about a campaign rally chant aimed at Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), President Donald Trump on Thursday made clear he did not endorse the 'Send her back' call, as Democratic leaders expressed fears for Omar's security. 'I wasn't happy with that message that they gave last night,' the President told reporters at the White House. Asked several times by reporters why he didn't stop the chant, Mr. Trump said it was a 'packed arena,' very specifically saying he did not endorse the message against Omar. 'I was not happy with it,' the President added. 'I didn't like that they did it.' Here was the moment the chant started during his rally, in response to his criticism of four minority women Democratic House members, including Omar: On Capitol Hill, a number of Republicans expressed their concern about the message from the Trump crowd. 'No American should ever talk to another American that way,' said Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK). 'That's a very inappropriate sentiment in this country,' Cole told reporters just off the House floor. “The tweet was wrong & the chant last night grotesque,” wrote Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) on Twitter. “What I’m hearing from Capitol Police is that threats are up across the board for all members,” said Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC), who expressed his concern about the ‘send her back’ chant just a few hours after the rally had ended. As for Omar, she met on Thursday morning with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, as reporters pressed her to respond to the chant. “We have said this President is racist,” Omar said as she walked from the Capitol back to her House office. Democrats said they were concerned about Omar’s safety and possible threats against her. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), the head of the House Democratic Caucus, encouraged lawmakers and the Capitol Police to quickly share any information about threats to police back in their home districts. “We got to make sure every single person, Democrat, Republican, progressive, conservative, the left and the right, get through it together,” Jeffries said.
  • Pressing ahead with one of their main agenda items in the 116th Congress, Democrats are poised to push a bill through the House on Thursday which would more than double the federal minimum wage over the next six years, taking it from the current level of $7.25 an hour, and pressing it up to $15. 'This is a fair and overdue adjustment,' argued Rep. Joseph Morelle (D-NY), as debate started Wednesday on the floor of the House.  'American workers haven't had the benefit of a federal minimum wage increase in over a decade, while the prices of everything have gone up,' said Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-OH). House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pressed Democrats to stick together on the minimum wage bill, arguing it 'lifts 1.3 million Americans out of poverty.' But for most Republicans, the idea of raising the wage would be a giant economic mistake, hurting rural areas, and younger Americans looking for work. 'When Congress should be focused on pro-growth policies, this bill would be detrimental to American families, workers, and entrepreneurs,' said Rep. Michael Burgess (R-TX). Republicans have pointed repeatedly to a recent Congressional Budget Office report, which estimated that the $15 minimum wage could cause job losses of 1.3 million - with a high estimate over 3.7 million. 'That's like firing the entire population of the state of Oklahoma,' said Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), in a line that's been used by a number of GOP lawmakers in recent weeks. The original plan was to raise the minimum wage in five steps over five years - but because of resistance among some Democrats - the plan was changed to make it a six year increase. The bill would raise the wage in steps, first to $8.45 an hour, then $9.50 a year after that, followed by a jump to $10.60, then $11.70 an hour, $12.80 an hour, $13.90, and lastly to $15 an hour. After that, the minimum wage would be indexed to rise along with median wage growth in the United States. While Democrats will certainly celebrate the passage of the plan - the bill seems unlikely to get a vote in the Republican-led Senate.
  • Accusing the Trump Administration of intentionally withholding documents and information about the failed effort by President Donald Trump to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, the House on Wednesday voted along party lines to find the Attorney General and Secretary of Commerce in Contempt of Congress. 'Neither of the Departments have provided the documents we have asked for,' said Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), as the House resolution targeted both Attorney General William Barr, and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. 'I even asked Secretary Ross to meet with me personally,' Cummings said on the House floor. 'He refused.' It was the second time Barr had been held in contempt by the current Congress; the first was a civil contempt citation passed by the full House for ignoring a subpoena for his testimony about the Russia investigation and the Mueller Report. Democrats said it was nothing but a cover-up by the White House. Just before the vote, Barr and Ross sent a letter to Democrats asking that the contempt vote be delayed, as Republicans argued that the Trump Administration has been cooperating with requests for documents - something Democrats say just isn't true. 'It is unfortunate that the House has scheduled a vote to hold two sitting members of the President's Cabinet in contempt of Congress given the clear record of cooperation,' Barr and Ross wrote, as they said 'any contempt vote is, at best, premature.' 'This is all about a show,' said Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX), as Republicans rallied around a message that Democrats were pursuing political attacks on the President, while ignoring major issues on Capitol Hill. 'Don't play politics with contempt,' said Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC). 'We're better than that.' Democrats countered that the courts have already shown that the Trump Administration didn't tell the truth about why the citizenship question was being pursued - as Democrats argued that the feds had held back information to Congress about the Census citizenship question. 'Wilbur Ross lied. William Barr lied,' said Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY). In a defiant statement sent out just after the vote, the White House denounced the House action. “Today’s vote by Speaker Pelosi and House Democrats to hold Attorney General Barr and Secretary Ross in contempt is ridiculous and yet another lawless attempt to harass the President and his Administration,” the statement read.
  • Next summer will mark forty years since I drew my first paycheck on Capitol Hill as a Page in the House of Representatives. Between working for the Congress, and then covering lawmakers as a reporter, I've seen lawmakers almost come to blows, watched Speakers angrily denounce their critics, seen lawmakers block the doors to the House floor to keep lawmakers from leaving, and all sorts of other legislative mischief. But I have never seen what happened on Tuesday, when Rep. Emmanuel Cleaver (D-MO) did what amounted to a 'gavel drop,' as he refused to read a parliamentary ruling against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and simply walked away. 'I abandon the Chair,' Cleaver said, after getting my attention by clearly not reading the script in front of him, and speaking in the first person from the Speaker's Chair. Maybe it's happened before in the almost 230 years that the House and Senate have been at work - but what Cleaver did on Tuesday was something that left my jaw on the floor. In his off-the-cuff remarks, Cleaver seemed to indicate that he had given a pass to Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI), who during debate on a resolution condemning President Trump, had denounced a group of minority women Democrats as 'anti-American.' When one Democrat rose to ask that Duffy's words be 'taken down' and scrubbed from the Record, Cleaver brushed off the complaint. And he evidently thought the same should have been done for Speaker Nancy Pelosi, when she referred to the President's 'racist tweets,' directly going against precedents of the House which clearly state that such speech is against the rules. In a statement, Cleaver said he was simply frustrated at what was going on before his eyes. 'I have spent my entire life working with people of all faiths and stripes in an effort solve real-world problems with concrete solutions, but never have we been this divided and this unwilling to listen to countering opinions or accept objective truths,' the Missouri Democrat said. 'However, a house divided against itself cannot stand, regardless of how strong the foundation,' Cleaver added. Some of my colleagues were just as surprised at the turn of events. The rules rebuke of Pelosi was historic as well - it was the first time a Speaker had words 'taken down' in 35 years, since a famous floor spat between Speaker Tip O'Neill, and future Speaker Newt Gingrich (though not many people at the time would have predicted Gingrich's ascension to that leadership post).