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Latest from Glenn Schroeder

    Las Vegas casinos could watch tens of thousands of employees walk off the job for the first time in more than three decades after union members voted to authorize a strike at any time starting June 1, a move that could cripple the city’s world-famous resorts. About 25,000 members of the Culinary Union who work at 34 different casino-resorts across the tourist destination cast ballots in two sessions Tuesday, showing the collective power of the largest labor organization in Nevada. The move hands union negotiators a huge bargaining chip as they work to solidify new five-year contracts. The union last voted for a strike in 2002 but reached a deal before employees walked out. The last strike, in 1984, spanned 67 days and cost the city and workers tens of millions of dollars. The latest strike would mean losing workers with roles critical to making a casino-hotel run: bartenders, housekeepers, cocktail and food servers, porters, bellmen, cooks and other kitchen workers. It would affect properties including Caesars Palace, Planet Hollywood, Bellagio, MGM Grand, Stratosphere, The D and El Cortez.
  • Energized by the #MeToo movement, two national advocacy groups are teaming up to lodge sexual harassment complaints against McDonald’s on behalf of 10 women who have worked at the fast food restaurant in nine cities. The workers — one of them a 15-year-old from St. Louis — alleged groping, propositions for sex, indecent exposure and lewd comments by supervisors. According to their complaints, when the women reported the harassment, they were ignored or mocked, and in some cases suffered retaliation. The legal effort was organized by Fight for $15, which campaigns to raise pay for low-wage workers. The legal costs are being covered by the TIMES UP Legal Defense Fund, which was launched in January by the National Women’s Law Center to provide attorneys for women who cannot afford to bring cases on their own. The complaints, filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, are being announced on Tuesday, two days ahead of the company’s annual shareholder meeting in Oak Brook, Illinois. Responding to the claims, McDonald’s spokeswoman Terri Hickey said there is “no place for harassment and discrimination of any kind” in the workplace.
  • The National Rifle Association’s incoming president has linked school shootings and other violence to using medications such as Ritalin. Retired Lt. Col. Oliver North told “Fox News Sunday” that perpetrators of school violence “have been drugged in many cases” and “many of these young boys have been on Ritalin since they were in kindergarten.” He also blamed a “culture where violence is commonplace,” pointing to TV and movies. North’s comments followed the attack Friday at Santa Fe High School outside Houston that left eight students and two teachers dead. Investigators have given no indication that they believe the 17-year-old suspect, Dimitrios Pagourtzis, used Ritalin, which treats attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or other drugs. Pagourtzis’ attorney, Nicholas Poehl, said Sunday that he was not aware that his client was on any specific medication. He said he was surprised that someone with North’s experience with the criminal justice system would “make those kind of generalizations with a case that’s less than 48 hours old.” An NRA spokesman, Andrew Arulanandam, confirmed North was speaking on the organization’s behalf and said “there are others who share this viewpoint.”
  • U.S. regulators Thursday approved the first drug designed to prevent chronic migraines. The Food and Drug Administration’s action clears the monthly shot Aimovig for sale. It’s the first in a new class of long-acting drugs for preventing migraines. Three other shots are expected to win approval by next year, and several pills for preventing migraines are being tested. Current prevention treatments include pills originally developed for epilepsy and other conditions and the wrinkle reducer Botox, but many patients abandon them because they don’t help much or cause serious side effects. Amgen Inc. of Thousand Oaks, California, and Swiss drug giant Novartis AG developed Aimovig. Injected monthly just under the skin using a penlike device, the drug will cost $6,900 per year without insurance. Migraines can cause disabling symptoms: throbbing headaches, nausea and vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound. About 10 million Americans get them frequently. They’re most common in people in their 30s, mostly women, and can last for several hours or even days. In one study, patients given Aimovig saw their migraine days cut from eight to four a month, on average. Those who got dummy shots had a reduction of two. Each patient group had similar minor side effects, mostly colds and respiratory infections.
  • Lung cancer screening has proved to be stunningly unpopular. Five years after government and private insurers started paying for it, less than 2 percent of eligible current and former smokers have sought the free scans, researchers report. The study didn’t explore why, but experts say possible explanations include worries about false alarms and follow-up tests, a doctor visit to get the scans covered, fear and denial of the consequences of smoking and little knowledge that screening exists. “People are not aware that this is a test that can actually save lives,” said Dr. Richard Schilsky. “It’s not invasive, it’s not painful, there’s no prep, nothing has to be stuck into any body cavity,” so to see so little use “is shocking.” Schilsky is chief medical officer of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, which released the study Wednesday in advance of the group’s meeting next month. Lung cancer is the top cancer killer worldwide, causing 155,000 deaths in the United States each year. It’s usually found too late for treatment to succeed.
  • It’s Prime time at Whole Foods: Amazon is rolling out discounts for Prime members at the organic grocer. The benefits start Wednesday at stores in Florida and will expand nationwide this summer. Prime members will get an additional 10 percent off sale items and exclusive deals on certain groceries. This week in Florida, for example, Prime members can get $2 off a pound of organic strawberries or save $10 a pound on wild halibut steaks. Amazon wouldn’t say if it plans to add the benefits to Whole Foods stores in Canada and the United Kingdom. Since it bought Whole Foods last year, Amazon.com Inc. has cut prices on some groceries, begun offering same-day delivery to Prime members in several cities and extended its 5 percent cash back Amazon rewards credit card to Whole Foods purchases. But turning its Prime membership into the Whole Foods loyalty program could drive more people to its stores. Amazon said last month that it had more than 100 million paid Prime members worldwide. That was before it announced it’s raising the price to $119 a year, up from $99. Prime members get fast shipping from Amazon.com and other perks, like access to its video streaming service.
  • The number of cases of sexually transmitted diseases in California reached a record high last year and officials are particularly concerned by a spike in stillbirths due to congenital syphilis, state health authorities said Monday. More than 300,000 cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis were reported in 2017, a 45 percent increase from five years ago, according to data released by the California Department of Public Health. Chlamydia and gonorrhea are most common among people under 30, the report said. Rates of chlamydia are highest among young women, while men account for the majority of syphilis and gonorrhea cases. If left untreated, chlamydia and gonorrhea can lead to infertility, ectopic pregnancy and chronic pelvic pain. Syphilis can result in blindness, hearing loss and neurologic problems.
  • European intelligence chiefs warned Monday that Russia is actively seeking to undermine their democracies by disinformation, cyberattacks and more traditional means of espionage. The heads of Britain and Germany’s domestic intelligence agencies, as well as the European Union and NATO’s top security officials, pinpointed Moscow as the prime source of hybrid threats to Europe, citing attempts to manipulate elections, steal sensitive data and spark a coup in Montenegro. They also cited the chemical attack against a former Russian spy in Britain this year that Britain has blamed on Russia. “Our respect for Russia’s people cannot and must not stop us from calling out and pushing back on the Kremlin’s flagrant breaches of international rules,” the head of Britain’s MI5 spy agency, Andrew Parker, told an intelligence gathering in Berlin. Parker branded the attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury an act of “criminal thuggery” that was swiftly followed by Russian attempts to divert blame. That resulted in at least 30 alternative theories about the attack being spread by Russian authorities and media. “Whatever nonsense they conjure up, the case is clear,” said Parker, adding there was no doubt about the origin of the attack against Skripal.
  • Nearly half of U.S. cancer doctors who responded to a survey say they’ve recently recommended medical marijuana to patients, although most say they don’t know enough about medicinal use. The results reflect how marijuana policy in some states has outpaced research, the study authors said. All 29 states with medical marijuana programs allow doctors to recommend it to cancer patients. But no rigorous studies in cancer patients exist. That leaves doctors to make assumptions from other research on similar prescription drugs, or in other types of patients. “The big takeaway is we need more research, plain and simple,” said Dr. Ilana Braun of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, who led the study published Thursday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Patients want to know what their doctors think about using marijuana. In the new study, cancer doctors said their conversations about marijuana were almost always started by patients and their families, not by the doctors themselves.
  • Four more states are reporting illnesses in a food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its numbers on the outbreak Wednesday, revealing that 149 people in 29 states had gotten sick. It’s unclear if new illness are still occurring. There’s a lag in reporting, and the most recent illness began two weeks ago. Florida, Minnesota, North Dakota and Texas have joined the list of states reporting at least one E. coli illness linked to the outbreak. At least 64 people have been hospitalized, including 17 with kidney failure. One death, previously reported, occurred in California. Health officials have tied the outbreak to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, which provides most of the romaine sold in the U.S. during the winter.
  • Glenn Schroeder

    KRMG Morning News Anchor

    Glenn is a self-described news and sports junkie. His passion for radio dates back to 1975. That's the year he got his first taste of life behind a microphone, handling play-by-play duties at his high school radio station. The University of Michigan graduate's circuitous journey to KRMG began at a very small radio station in Alamogordo, New Mexico. After stints at stations in Las Cruces, Mexico and Pueblo, Colorado, Glenn moved to Tulsa is 1991. It didn't take long for the Detroit native to realize that this is where he wanted to plant his roots. The Edward R. Murrow award winning journalist, who spent 10-years at KVOO, cites the Oklahoma City bombing as the most profound and difficult story he's ever covered. "The misery of those who lost loved one was deep and unrelenting. Yet, their strength and faith allowed our emotional scares to heal." Glenn's hobbies include running, gardening, Michigan football and NASCAR. "It's the only sport my wife enjoys." Glenn met Beth, the love of his life, in 1999. The two were married less than two years later.

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  • After days of uncertainty about a planned June 12 summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, President Donald Trump on Thursday told Kim in a letter that because of hostile statements from the Pyongyang regime in recent days, the summit in Singapore would not take place. “Sadly, based on the tremendous anger and open hostility displayed in your most recent statement, I feel it is in appropriate, at this time, to have this long-planned meeting,” the President wrote in his letter to Kim. The decision came as North Korean officials seemed to back away from public assurances that they would give up on their nuclear weapons program, which had been Mr. Trump’s demand from the start – as the President delivered a clear warning to Kim about a possible conflict. “You talk about your nuclear capabilities, but ours are so massive and powerful that I pray to God they will never have to be used,” Mr. Trump wrote. Here is the President’s letter to Kim Jong Un.
  • You normally don’t need much more than the New York Yankees visiting Globe Life Park  to make for a fun evening at the ballpark. But when President George Bush is sitting near the dugout, and heckles a likeness of himself, things ramp up a bit. Near the end of a between innings race between Texas Legends, the President Bush character trailed those of Sam Houston and Nolan Ryan. When the ballonish mascot passed the president's box, Bush leaned forward and shouted “get moving.” That spurred the duplicate W to speed up and win the race. See the video below. The Rangers won a slug-fest over the Yankees, 12-10.
  • President Donald Trump renewed his attacks on how investigators dealt with allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 elections and any links to his campaign, as he again charged that top officials at the FBI had committed misconduct, led by former FBI Director James Comey. “The FBI is a fantastic institution but some of the people at the top were rotten apples,” the President said. “James Comey was one of them.” “I’ve done a great service for this country by getting rid of him,” the President said in a recorded interview aired on the Fox News morning program, “Fox and Friends.” Mr. Trump and his allies have been on a public blitz in recent days against the Russia probe, trying to cast the actions of the FBI – and the Obama Administration – as an effort to infiltrate his campaign, in order to dummy up charges of collusion against his campaign and top aides. “The firing of Comey is a good thing”: President @realDonaldTrump discusses former FBI Dir. James Comey & possible spying by the FBI pic.twitter.com/7J4lS7PG40 — FOX & friends (@foxandfriends) May 24, 2018 Democrats though point out that while the FBI was investigating the Trump Campaign during the 2016 election, news of it never leaked, even as Comey was publicly inserting himself into the campaign with announcements about Hillary Clinton and her email troubles. On Thursday afternoon, officials at the Justice Department will brief lawmakers in both parties about how the FBI used an informant to check out reports of ties between Russia and the Trump Campaign in 2016. Originally, only House GOP lawmakers were going to be involved, but protests from Senators forced that to change; the briefings will involve the FBI Director, the Deputy Attorney General, and the Director of National Intelligence. Those three officials met earlier this week with President Trump at the White House, as Mr. Trump has charged the FBI basically planted a ‘spy’ in his campaign, an allegation that has so far gained little traction outside a group of more conservative House Republicans. As for Special Counsel Robert Mueller, his office provided an update of sorts on the investigation while submitting documents to a federal judge handling criminal charges against Paul Manafort, once the head of the Trump Campaign in 2016. “The Special Counsel’s conduct of the investigation remains ongoing,” the Mueller team reported, saying the probe continues to look at “links and/or coordination between Russia and individuals affiliated with the campaign of President Trump.” “The investigation is not complete and its details remain non-public,” the Special Counsel’s office stated, in arguing against the public release of search warrants involved in the Manafort case. Meanwhile on Wednesday, Mueller’s office started moving toward the final stages in the guilty plea of one-time foreign policy advisor George Papadopoulos. “The parties respectfully request that the Court refer this case for the preparation of a presentence investigation report, and that the parties provide a joint status report within thirty days, no later than June 22, 2018,” the two sides agreed in a court document. Legal experts said that showed the feds were ready to have Papadopoulos sentenced, and that he likely had no more information to offer to investigators. Papadopoulos pleaded guilty in October 2017 to lying to investigators, when asked about Russian contacts who had told him they had negative information on Hillary Clinton. The Special Counsel’s office outlined their indictments and guilty pleas this way in their Manafort case submission:
  • President Donald Trump will discuss North Korea, immigration and the NFL's new policy on national anthem protests in an interview airing this morning on Fox News' 'Fox and Friends.' >> PREVIOUSLY: Trump slams Comey, DOJ in wide-ranging 'Fox & Friends' interview Brian Kilmeade's interview with Trump was taped Wednesday in Bethpage, New York, after the president appeared at a forum about MS-13, The Hill reported.  Trump tweeted about the interview Wednesday night. >> Read more trending news  'Will be interviewed on @foxandfriends tomorrow morning at 6:00 A.M. Enjoy!' he wrote. >> See the tweet here Please return for updates.
  • The National Weather Service issued issued a Severe Thunderstorm Warning Tulsa Creek and Rogers counties until 6:15 Wednesday evening.  Meteorologists say the biggest hazard with the storm is 60 mph wind gusts and quarter size hail. Tune to NEWS102.3 and AM740 KRMG for the latest on the severe weather threat.