ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
68°
Partly Cloudy
H 73° L 59°
  • cloudy-day
    68°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 73° L 59°
  • cloudy-day
    69°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 73° L 59°
  • cloudy-day
    60°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 80° L 64°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Glenn Schroeder

    A glass bong taller than a giraffe. Huggable faux marijuana buds. A pool full of foam weed nuggets. Las Vegas’ newest attraction — and Instagram backdrop — is a museum celebrating all things cannabis. Nobody will be allowed to light up at Cannabition when it opens Thursday because of a Nevada ban on public consumption of marijuana, but visitors can learn about the drug as they snap photos. It’s a made-for-social-media museum where every exhibit has lights meant to ensure people take selfies worthy of the no-filter hashtag. The facility — whose founder says has a goal of destigmatizing marijuana use — will likely land among the talking points officials and others use to try to draw gambling-resistant millennials to Sin City. It will welcome its first visitors almost 15 months after adults in Nevada began buying recreational marijuana legally, with sales far exceeding state projections.
  • Apple and Google want to help you spend less time on their phones — really. Like that time you checked Facebook at 3 a.m. Stats don’t lie. Their new tools for managing screen time will let you see how often you picked up the phone after bedtime or how long you’re on Instagram at work (shame on you). Apple’s tools also let you control how long your kids spend on their devices, if you’re concerned that screens are taking time away from sleep, homework or exercise. Apple’s tools launch Tuesday as part of the free iOS 12 software update for iPhones, iPads and the iPod Touch. Google’s controls are being tested on its Pixel-branded Android phones. Apple’s new controls for kids let you manage their time on their own devices, such as an iPad or a hand-me-down iPhone. Once you’ve got them set up, you can use your iPhone to check when your children are on their devices and what apps or websites they’re using. You can restrict particular classes of apps and even establish a quiet period when most apps shut down.
  • A school-based survey shows nearly 1 in 11 U.S. students have used marijuana in electronic cigarettes, heightening health concerns about the new popularity of vaping among teens. E-cigarettes typically contain nicotine, but many of the battery-powered devices can vaporize other substances, including marijuana. Results published Monday mean 2.1 million middle and high school students have used them to get high. Vaping is generally considered less dangerous than smoking, because burning tobacco or marijuana generates chemicals that are harmful to lungs. But there is little research on e-cigarettes’ long-term effects, including whether they help smokers quit. The rise in teenagers using e-cigarettes has alarmed health officials who worry kids will get addicted to nicotine, a stimulant, and be more likely to try cigarettes. Last week, the Food and Drug administration gave the five largest e-cigarette makers 60 days to produce plans to stop underage use of their products. Nearly 9 percent of students surveyed in 2016 said they used an e-cigarette device with marijuana, according to Monday’s report in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. That included one-third of those who ever used e-cigarettes.
  • The woman accusing Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her is willing to tell her story in public to a Senate panel considering his nomination to the Supreme Court, her lawyer said Monday. Kavanaugh had been on a smooth confirmation track, but the new allegations have roiled that process. Republican senators have expressed concern over a woman’s private-turned-public allegation that a drunken Kavanaugh groped her and tried to take off her clothes at a party when they were teenagers. Debra S. Katz, the attorney for the woman, Christine Blasey Ford, said her client considered the incident to be an attempted rape. “She believes that if were not for the severe intoxication of Brett Kavanaugh, she would have been raped,” Katz told NBC’s “Today.” Kavanaugh has “categorically and unequivocally” denied the allegations, a statement the White House repeated Monday. “This has not changed,” said White House spokesman Kerri Kupec.  “Judge Kavanaugh and the White House both stand by that statement.”
  • A leading cancer doctor has resigned from New York’s Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center over his reported failure to disclose millions of dollars in payments from pharmaceutical companies. Dr. Jose Baselga resigned Thursday after The New York Times and ProPublica reported that he had not disclosed his financial ties to companies including the Swiss drugmaker Roche in dozens of articles he wrote for medical journals. Baselga said in his resignation letter than he feared the matter would be a distraction from his role overseeing clinical care at Sloan Kettering. He said he hoped the medical community would work to develop a more standardized system for reporting industry ties. Baselga said his failed disclosures were unintentional and should not reflect on the value of his research.
  • U.S. health officials are sounding the alarm about teenage use of e-cigarettes, calling the problem an “epidemic” and ordering manufacturers to reverse the trend or risk having their flavored vaping products pulled from the market. The warning from the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday cited recent data pointing to a sharp rise in underage use of the devices, including Juul, Vuse and others. It marks a shift in the agency’s tone on e-cigarettes. Since 2017, FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb has discussed e-cigarettes as a potential tool to ween adult smokers off cigarettes, although that benefit hasn’t been proven. But Gottlieb said in an address at FDA headquarters that he failed to predict the current “epidemic of addiction” among youth, mainly driven by flavored products. “The disturbing and accelerating trajectory of use we’re seeing in youth and the resulting path to addiction must end,” Gottlieb told agency staffers and reporters.
  • The discovery of a black Labrador named Lucy led to the unraveling of a criminal case Monday against an Oregon man who had begun serving a 50-year prison sentence. Joshua Horner, a plumber from the central Oregon town of Redmond, was convicted on April 12, 2017, of sexual abuse of a minor. In the trial, the complainant testified Horner had threatened to shoot her animals if she went to the police about the alleged molestation, and said she saw him shoot her dog and kill it to make his point. Six months after a jury convicted Horner in a verdict that was not unanimous, he asked the Oregon Innocence Project for help. The group took up his case. When the group raised concerns in April about the case with Deschutes County District Attorney John Hummel, he agreed to work with them.
  • Today’s teens are always on their smartphones, many check social media “constantly” and prefer texting over face-to-face communication. But a new poll finds that these same teens also say that social media has a positive effect on their lives, helping them feel more confident, less lonely and less depressed. The poll was released Monday by Common Sense Media, a San Francisco-based nonprofit group focused on kids’ use of media and technology. It found that 89 percent of teenagers have their own smartphone. That’s up from 41 percent in 2012, the last time the survey was conducted. But while 2012′s teens were all over Facebook, the age group’s presence on the social network has plummeted in the past six years. Only 15 percent of teens now say Facebook is their main social network. In 2012, 68 percent did. Today, 44 percent of teens say their primary social network is Snapchat, making it the most popular social media app, followed by Instagram (which is owned by Facebook) at 22 percent.
  • Twitter’s permanent ban of conspiracy-monger Alex Jones on Thursday again underscored the difficulty many social-media services face in trying to consistently apply their rules against harassment and other bad behavior. The platform took action against Jones and his Infowars show for “abusive behavior,” referencing videos posted Wednesday that showed him berating CNN journalist Oliver Darcy for some 10 minutes between two congressional hearings on social media. Jones has behaved badly before — calling survivors of a shooting in Parkland, Florida “crisis actors” and saying the mass killing at Sandy Hook Elementary in 2012 was fake. Videos of the latest exchange show Jones calling Darcy “a possum that climbed out of the rear end of a dead cow,” referencing his “skinny jeans” and repeatedly saying, “just look at this guy’s eyes” and “look at that smile.” The action follows moves by Facebook, YouTube, Apple, and Spotify to limit or remove Jones’ material from their services. But Twitter went a step further, saying it will continue to monitor reports about other accounts potentially associated with Jones or Infowars and will “take action” if it finds any attempts to circumvent the ban.
  • India’s top court on Thursday struck down a colonial-era law that made homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, a landmark victory for gay rights in the world’s largest democracy. In a unanimous decision, five Supreme Court justices ruled that the law was a weapon used to harass members of India’s gay community and resulted in discrimination. After the ruling, opponents of the law danced and waved flags outside the court. “We feel as equal citizens now,” activist Shashi Bhushan said. “What happens in our bedroom is left to us.” The law known as Section 377 — put in place by the British in 1861 — held that intercourse between members of the same sex was against the order of nature. The five petitioners who challenged the law said it was discriminatory and led to gays living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. Arvind Datar, the attorney for the petitioners, argued in the court that the penal provision was unconstitutional because it provides for the prosecution and sentencing of consenting adults.
  • Glenn Schroeder

    KRMG Morning News Anchor

    Glenn is a self-described news and sports junkie. His passion for radio dates back to 1975. That's the year he got his first taste of life behind a microphone, handling play-by-play duties at his high school radio station. The University of Michigan graduate's circuitous journey to KRMG began at a very small radio station in Alamogordo, New Mexico. After stints at stations in Las Cruces, Mexico and Pueblo, Colorado, Glenn moved to Tulsa is 1991. It didn't take long for the Detroit native to realize that this is where he wanted to plant his roots. The Edward R. Murrow award winning journalist, who spent 10-years at KVOO, cites the Oklahoma City bombing as the most profound and difficult story he's ever covered. "The misery of those who lost loved one was deep and unrelenting. Yet, their strength and faith allowed our emotional scares to heal." Glenn's hobbies include running, gardening, Michigan football and NASCAR. "It's the only sport my wife enjoys." Glenn met Beth, the love of his life, in 1999. The two were married less than two years later.

    Read More
  • After posting a schedule for a Monday morning vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh for the U.S. Supreme Court, unable to work out an agreement for testimony from a woman who accused the judge of sexual misconduct back when they were teenagers, Republicans gave extra time to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford to consider testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee. “It’s not my normal approach to b indecisive,” Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA) tweeted late Friday night from his home state of Iowa, as he tried to both press ahead with a vote on President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, and hold open the possibility of testimony from Ford. The late night change of heart created an odd mixture of reaction, as even after Grassley said he was giving more time to Ford’s legal team, Democrats were still churning out news releases after midnight criticizing Republicans for their treatment of the allegations against Kavanaugh. “By blocking both an FBI investigation and a hearing where all three witnesses present during the assault could answer questions under oath, the Senate will fail in its duty to the American people,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT). Judge Kavanaugh I just granted another extension to Dr Ford to decide if she wants to proceed w the statement she made last week to testify to the senate She shld decide so we can move on I want to hear her. I hope u understand. It’s not my normal approach to b indecisive — ChuckGrassley (@ChuckGrassley) September 22, 2018 With all the extensions we give Dr Ford to decide if she still wants to testify to the Senate I feel like I’m playing 2nd trombone in the judiciary orchestra and Schumer is the conductor — ChuckGrassley (@ChuckGrassley) September 22, 2018 As the sun rose on Saturday morning, it still wasn’t clear whether Ford would testify. “Dr. Blasey Ford has been clear in her desire to testify following an independent, thorough investigation by the FBI,” said Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL). But Republicans were still suspicious of the allegations brought by Ford, who says she was sexually attacked by Kavanaugh at a high school party in the 1980’s. “Their decision to reveal this allegation at the most politically damaging moment reeks of opportunism,” said Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). Under the timeline originally unveiled by the Judiciary Committee on Friday night, Republicans scheduled a vote for Monday morning on a list of judges, with one prominent name at the top of the list: “Brett M. Kavanaugh, to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States,” it read. The recalcitrance, stubbornness and lack of cooperation we’ve seen from Republicans is unprecedented. And candidly, the dismissive treatment of Dr. Ford is insulting to all sexual assault survivors. — Sen Dianne Feinstein (@SenFeinstein) September 22, 2018 Ford’s lawyers wanted her to testify next Thursday – Grassley and Republicans were offering Wednesday. There was also talk of Ford talking directly to investigators in California, instead of traveling to Washington, D.C.
  • Officially at the airport, the Tulsa area received 2.34 inches of rain on Friday and there is more in the forecast for today. Parts of Tulsa County received a whole lot more rain.  National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate breaks down who received the most. “In the Tulsa area, the heaviest rain was in the southern part of the city,” Plate said.  “It was in the south Tulsa, Broken Arrow and Bixby areas where four to six inches fell.   Statewide, areas around Ada were slammed by showers.  Plate tells us Fittstown received close to 14 inches of rain.  Road Flooding:  Showers in south Tulsa, Broken Arrow and Bixby caused multiple closures in the area. Police confirm South Yale Avenue between 61st and 51st was closed for some time because of water over the road. The same was true for 101st and Garnett in Broken Arrow. The roads have since been reopened. Savastano's at 106th and Memorial in Bixby announced on their Twitter page they were closed due to flooding.
  • Don't put away those umbrellas just yet. National Weather Service Meteorologist Sarah Corfidi says we have a chance for more showers in the Tulsa area today.  Right now, the NWS is predicting a 40 percent chance of rain.   “For Tulsa, it’s going to be mostly cloudy, with some showers still in the area,” Corfidi said.  “The high will be in the low 70’s.” Today is the first day of fall, but the temperature will be below normal for this time of year in our area.  Corfidi tells us the normal high is close to 82 degrees. Any rain we see today should stop by the evening hours.  The low Saturday night will be close to 60 degrees.
  • Ending several days of increasingly political battles over a woman who accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct, Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee declared Friday night that they were unable to reach an agreement for the testimony of Kavanaugh’s accuser, and set a committee vote for Monday over the heated objections of Democrats. “It’s Friday night and nothing’s been agreed to despite our extensive efforts to make testimony possible,” said Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA), the chairman of the Judiciary Committee. Democrats sternly disputed those assertions, charging that Republicans were doing all they could to avoid hearing from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who claimed that Kavanaugh assaulted her at a party during their high school years in the early 1980’s. “It’s clear that Republicans have learned nothing over the last 27 years,” said Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), referring to the confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, which featured accusations of sexual harassment leveled against him by law professor Anita Hill. Just before the deadline, Ford’s lawyers asked for extra time. Ford lawyer: “The 10:00 p.m. deadline is arbitrary. Its sole purpose is to bully Dr. Ford and deprive her of the ability to make a considered decision that has life-altering implications for her and her family. She has already been forced out of her home…” — Nancy Cordes (@nancycordes) September 22, 2018 But Republicans said enough was enough. “Chairman Grassley has made every effort all week to find a comfortable way for the Senate to hear Dr. Ford’s story, including sending staff to her,” said Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). “Delay, delay, delay,” said Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX), as the Senate Judiciary Committee website listed a 10 am Monday “Executive Business Meeting,” where Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination was the first on the list. Democrats said like with Anita Hill, Ford’s charges merited a review by the FBI, and then hearings by the Judiciary Committee; but the White House and Senate Republicans resisted those calls. “This strikes us as simply a check-the-box exercise in a rush to confirm Judge Kavanaugh,” a group of Democratic Senators wrote in a joint letter. “The 11 Republican men on the committee are treating this like a hostage situation,” said Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-HI). “They just don’t get it.” Democrats also expressed outrage about President Trump’s first real comments directed at Kavanaugh’s accuser, as the President took to Twitter on Friday morning to say that Ford should have gone to the police 36 years ago if something bad happened. “When women speak up about sexual assault they should be listened to and supported, not bullied, rushed, or given artificial deadlines,” said Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), who was elected partly in 1992 because of the political backlash to how Republicans dealt with Anita Hill’s allegations against Justice Thomas. To every survivor of sexual assault: WE BELIEVE YOU. WE HAVE YOUR BACK. https://t.co/Zx23ePG1ez — Senator Jeff Merkley (@SenJeffMerkley) September 22, 2018 If Republicans move ahead with a vote in committee on Monday, they could push the Kavanaugh nomination through the full Senate – even with Democrats using every delaying tactic in the book – by the end of next week, just in time to get the judge confirmed before the Supreme Court’s term begins on the First Monday in October.
  • A ferry that overturned on Lake Victoria has resulted in 100 deaths so far and hundreds feared missing, the BBC reported Friday. >> Read more trending news  Only 37 people were rescued Thursday before poor visibility ended the search, CNN reported. Forty-four bodies were recovered Thursday and the rest were recovered Friday, Reuters reported. The MV Nyerere ferry was headed from Bugorora when overturned near Ukara island, the BBC reported. The precise number of those aboard the ferry when it capsized was hard to establish, officials said, but it was believed that at least 300 people were on board. Lake Victoria, the largest lake in Africa, touches the borders of Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya.