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Latest from Glenn Schroeder

    President Donald Trump says pharmaceutical company Pfizer is “rolling back price hikes, so American patients don’t pay more.” Trump is tweeting that he and Health Secretary Alex Azar discussed the issue Tuesday with Pfizer CEO Ian Read. Pfizer has issued a statement saying Read has agreed to “defer the company’s price increases that were effective on July 1 to give the president an opportunity to work on his blueprint to strengthen the healthcare system.” Pfizer says it will “return these prices to their pre-July 1 levels as soon as technically possible.” Trump complained about the price increases on Twitter Monday, writing: “Pfizer & others should be ashamed that they have raised drug prices for no reason. They are merely taking advantage of the poor & others unable to defend themselves.”
  • Google’s YouTube says it is taking several steps to ensure the veracity of news on its service by cracking down on misinformation and supporting news organizations. The company said Monday it will make “authoritative” news sources more prominent, especially in the wake of breaking news events when misinformation can spread quickly. At such times, YouTube will begin showing users short text previews of news stories in video search results, as well as warnings that the stories can change. The goal is to counter the fake videos that can proliferate immediately after shootings, natural disasters and other major happenings. For example, YouTube search results prominently showed videos purporting to “prove” that mass shootings like the one that killed at least 59 in Las Vegas were fake, acted out by “crisis actors.” In these urgent cases, traditional video won’t do, since it takes time for news outlets to produce and verify high-quality clips. So YouTube aims to short-circuit the misinformation loop with text stories that can quickly provide more accurate information. Company executives announced the effort at YouTube’s New York offices.
  • Starbucks will eliminate plastic straws from all of its locations within two years, citing the environmental threat to oceans. The company becomes the largest food and beverage company to do so as calls to cut waste globally grow louder. Plastic straws have become a flashpoint. A week after its hometown banned plastic drinking straws and utensils, the Seattle company said Monday that by 2020, it will be using straws made from biodegradable materials like paper and specially designed lids. The company already offers alternative straws in Seattle. Other cities, like Fort Meyers, have banned plastic straws. Similar proposals are being considered in places like New York and San Francisco. The waste issue is coming up in company boardrooms, though Starbucks is taking the lead among global companies on straws. In February, Dunkin’ Donuts said that it would eliminate polystyrene foam cups from its stores by 2020. McDonald’s shareholders voted down a proposal requesting a report on plastic straws in May.
  • A new study provides fresh evidence that the first dogs of North America all but disappeared after the arrival of Europeans. The only surviving legacy appears to be a cancer that arose from the cells of a dog that lived more than 8,000 years ago and has since spread to other canines throughout the world, an international team reported Thursday in the journal Science. Researchers compared the genomes of ancient and modern American dogs. Results confirm that the first domesticated dogs of North America arrived with people from Asia over the same Bering land bridge used much earlier by humans. These dogs thrived for thousands of years, but mostly vanished after contact with Europeans. Scientists don’t know why they disappeared. “I just find it really surprising,” says geneticist Elinor Karlsson from the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, who did not participate in the study. “There were millions and millions of dogs all over the continent (that) died out after the Europeans arrived. And the fact that we don’t know anything about it is kind of a big hole.” In an attempt to fill in the historical gaps, researchers sequenced the genetic material of 71 dog remains collected from bones found in Siberia, the United States and Mexico.
  • Long before Viktor Vekselberg was tied to a scandal over the president and a porn star, the Russian oligarch had been positioning himself to extend his influence in the United States. Working closely with an American cousin who heads the New York investment management firm Columbus Nova, Vekselberg backed a $1.6 million lobbying campaign to aid Russian interests in Washington. His cousin Andrew Intrater served as CEO of a Vekselberg company on that project, and the two men have collaborated on numerous other investments involving Vekselberg’s extensive holdings. Now, Intrater’s investment firm is wrestling with the fallout from financial sanctions the U.S. Treasury Department lodged in April against Vekselberg, one of a group of oligarchs tied to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Columbus Nova has insisted it only managed Vekselberg’s vast assets. But an Associated Press review of legal and securities filings shows that the cousins sometimes collaborated in a more deeply entwined business relationship than was previously known.
  • The Trump administration said the government would no longer encourage schools to use race as a factor in the admissions process, rescinding Obama-era guidance meant to promote diversity among students. The shift announced Tuesday gives colleges the federal government’s blessing to leave race out of admissions and enrollment decisions and underscores the contentious politics that for decades have surrounded affirmation action policies, which have repeatedly been challenged before the Supreme Court. The Obama administration memos encouraging schools to take race into account were among 24 policy documents revoked by the Justice Department for being “unnecessary, outdated, inconsistent with existing law, or otherwise improper.” Attorney General Jeff Sessions called the changes an effort to restore the “rule of law,” though civil rights groups decried the move and some universities said they intended to continue their diversity efforts as before. The action comes amid a high-profile court fight over Harvard University admissions that has attracted the government’s attention, as well as Supreme Court turnover expected to produce a more critical eye toward schools’ race-conscious admissions policies.
  • China says it’s “fully prepared” for a trade war with the United States if it kicks off in earnest on Friday. Hopes are dwindling for the world’s two biggest economies to reach a breakthrough this week before Washington starts charging tariffs on $34 billion in Chinese imports. Beijing has pledged to retaliate with equal tariffs on $34 billion in U.S. goods. The Foreign Ministry said Tuesday that China will be “fully prepared to take a package of necessary measures” to safeguard its national interests. U.S. companies ranging from whiskey distilleries to automakers like Ford and Tesla could be hit if China ramps up retaliatory measures. President Donald Trump has accused China of unfairly acquiring U.S. technology and limiting market access for finance and technology firms — claims that China denies.
  • Hey, did my congressman really say that? Is that really President Donald Trump on that video, or am I being duped? New technology on the internet lets anyone make videos of real people appearing to say things they’ve never said. Republicans and Democrats predict this high-tech way of putting words in someone’s mouth will become the latest weapon in disinformation wars against the United States and other Western democracies. We’re not talking about lip-syncing videos. This technology uses facial mapping and artificial intelligence to produce videos that appear so genuine it’s hard to spot the phonies. Lawmakers and intelligence officials worry that the bogus videos — called deepfakes — could be used to threaten national security or interfere in elections. So far, that hasn’t happened, but experts say it’s not a question of if, but when. “I expect that here in the United States we will start to see this content in the upcoming midterms and national election two years from now,” said Hany Farid, a digital forensics expert at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. “The technology, of course, knows no borders, so I expect the impact to ripple around the globe.”
  • The Federal Reserve has given the OK to 32 of the 35 biggest banks in the U.S. to raise their dividends and buy back shares, judging their financial foundations sturdy enough to withstand a major economic downturn. Announcing the results of the second round of its annual stress tests, the Fed also approved the plans of Wall Street powerhouses Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, but on condition they keep their total dividend payouts and stock buybacks at current levels. The new tax law that took effect in January helped tip the two banks’ capital reserves below required levels under the hypothetical stress, the Fed said. It was pegged as a one-time impact of the tax law. The Fed rejected outright the capital plan of the U.S. holding company of Germany’s Deutsche Bank, citing weaknesses in its assumptions for forecasting revenues and losses. State Street Corp. gained Fed approval on condition that it improve its analysis of hypothetical lending risks with other big banks.
  • It may seem like a contradiction, but more adults in the U.S. say they are exercising at the same time more of them are becoming obese. About 24 percent of adults last year said they exercise enough each week to meet government recommendations for both muscle strengthening and aerobic exercise, according to a large annual health survey. That was up from 21 percent in 2015. The same survey says 31 percent of adults indicated they were obese last year, up slightly. Another, more rigorous government study has also found adult obesity is inching up. So if more Americans are exercising, how can more also be getting fatter? Some experts think the findings may reflect two sets of people — the haves and have-nots of physical fitness, so to speak. “It’s possible the people becoming more active are already normal weight,” said John Jakicic, director of the University of Pittsburgh’s Physical Activity and Weight Management Research Center.
  • Glenn Schroeder

    KRMG Morning News Anchor

    Glenn is a self-described news and sports junkie. His passion for radio dates back to 1975. That's the year he got his first taste of life behind a microphone, handling play-by-play duties at his high school radio station. The University of Michigan graduate's circuitous journey to KRMG began at a very small radio station in Alamogordo, New Mexico. After stints at stations in Las Cruces, Mexico and Pueblo, Colorado, Glenn moved to Tulsa is 1991. It didn't take long for the Detroit native to realize that this is where he wanted to plant his roots. The Edward R. Murrow award winning journalist, who spent 10-years at KVOO, cites the Oklahoma City bombing as the most profound and difficult story he's ever covered. "The misery of those who lost loved one was deep and unrelenting. Yet, their strength and faith allowed our emotional scares to heal." Glenn's hobbies include running, gardening, Michigan football and NASCAR. "It's the only sport my wife enjoys." Glenn met Beth, the love of his life, in 1999. The two were married less than two years later.

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  • A duck boat accident on Table Rock Lake in Branson, Missouri, killed 17 people Thursday night, including the boat’s driver and nine members of an Indiana family, according to authorities. Fourteen other people were injured. >> Read more trending news  Update 12:50 p.m. EDT July 22: The 17 people killed in the duck boat accident have all been identified, according to The Associated Press. They are: Indiana family members 45-year-old Angela Coleman, 1-year-old Arya Coleman, 69-year-old Belinda Coleman, 76-year-old Ervin Coleman, 7-year-old Evan Coleman, 40-year-old Glenn Coleman, 70-year-old Horace Coleman, 2-year-old Maxwell Coleman, and 9-year-old Reece Coleman. Missouri natives 69-year-old William Asher, 68-year-old Rosemarie Hamann, 63-year-old Janice Bright, 65-year-old William Bright, and 73-year-old Bob Williams. Arkansas natives 53-year-old Steve Smith and 15-year-old Lance Smith. Illinois native Leslie Dennison, 64. Update 8:45 a.m. EDT July 21: The Stone County coroner confirmed to KSDK that William Asher, 69, and his girlfriend, Rose Hamann, were among those killed in Thursday night's duck boat accident in Missouri. The news station reported that the couple lived in St. Louis County, Missouri. They were visiting Branson to celebrate Hamann’s birthday, which was on Monday, according KSDK. Todd Dennison’s mother, 64-year-old Leslie Dennison, was also killed in the boat accident, the Kansas City Star reported. In an emotional and brief interview Friday, Todd Dennison told the newspaper that his mother was visiting Branson with his 12-year-old daughter, Alicia, and that they were together for less than an hour before they boarded the duck boat. He told the Star that while in the hospital on Thursday night, his daughter told him that she could feel her grandmother pushing her upward from below while the boat was sinking.“She said her grandmother saved her,” Todd Dennison told the Star. Update 1:30 a.m. EDT July 21: Authorities have identified more victims in the duck boat accident. Steve Smith and his teenage son, Lance Smith, from Osceola, Arkansas, were among those killed in the crash. Steve Smith was a pastor and Lance Smith was preparing to open his own church in less than a week, according to CNN, first reported by The Christian Chronicle.  Steve Smith’s daughter, Loren Smith, suffered a concussion during the accident but survived. Smith’s wife, Pam Smith, opted to stay behind and was not on the boat. William and Janice Bright from Higginsville, Missouri, near Kansas City, were also identified as victims in the crash. WDAF reports that the couple had three children, 16 grandchildren and had been married for 45 years. “My great nieces and nephews now have no grandparents,” Karen Abbott, William Bright’s sister, told WDAF. Update 11:00 p.m. EDT July 20: A summer vacation ended in tragedy for nine members of an Indiana family, along with eight other tourists, killed when a duck boat capsized Thursday evening on a lake in Branson, Missouri. The Coleman family had traveled to Branson for their annual road trip, according to The New York Times, which interviewed Carolyn Coleman. Coleman said she lost two of her brothers-in-law and that three generations of the family died in the accident, including four young children, the Times reported. “We just lost some wonderful people,” she said. The Indianapolis Star reported that the four children killed in the accident were all under the age of 10. 'They were very loved,' Ingrid Coleman Douglas said in a telephone interview with the Star. Coleman Douglas said the victims included two of her uncles, cousins and their children. 'It’s a huge family on all sides. It’s unimaginable. I would never have thought I would have lost this number of people this way,' she said. Coleman Douglas identified the victims as her uncles Horace 'Butch' Coleman and Irving Raymond Coleman; Horace Coleman's wife, Belinda Coleman; her cousins, Angela Coleman and Glenn Coleman; Angela's 2-year-old son Maxwell; Glenn's two sons Evan and Reece; and his 1-year-old daughter, Arya. Glenn's wife, Tia Coleman, and Angela's older son, whose name has not been released, survived the accident, the Star reported. Update 5:15 p.m. EDT July 20: Stone County authorities now say all 17 of the victims in the duck boat accident have been accounted for and that nine of the victims were from the same family, according to Gov. Mike Parson’s office. Two members of the family, identified by local news outlets as the Coleman family, survived. Officials said the victims range in age from 1 to 70 years old. Meantime, mourners are putting flowers on the victims’ cars in the Ride the Ducks parking lot, and the community of Branson, Missouri, is holding several candlelight vigils Friday night in memory of those killed.  One of the vigils is scheduled at Table Rock Lake where the accident happened, according to KY3-TV. Update 4:30 p.m. EDT July 20: Family and friends are mourning the staggering loss of life on Table Rock Lake Thursday evening. One woman lost nine members of her family, USA Today reported, citing Gov. Mike Parson’s office. Update 2:20 p.m. EDT July 20: Branson Mayor Karen Best told The Associated Press that Bob Williams, the man who was driving the Ride the Ducks boat that sunk Thursday in a southwest Missouri lake, was a “great ambassador for Branson” who “was at every event.” Seventeen people died, including Williams, and 14 others were injured Thursday when the duck boat capsized in Table Rock Lake, according to authorities. Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said earlier Friday that the boat’s captain survived. In a statement posted on Facebook, employees of Ride the Ducks Branson said the business would be closed “while we support the investigation, and to allow time to grieve for the families and the community.” “This incident has deeply affected all of us. Words cannot convey how profoundly our hearts are breaking,” the statement said. “Thank you for your support, and we ask that your thoughts and prayers be with the families during this time.” Update 11:40 a.m. EDT July 20: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said Friday morning that authorities recovered four more bodies after a duck boat capsized in southwest Missouri, KSMU reported, bringing the death toll from Thursday’s incident to 17. Rader said 14 people were taken to hospitals after the incident. He said the driver of the Ride the Ducks boat died. The captain survived. Update 11:20 a.m. EDT July 20: Nearly two decades ago, the National Transportation Safety Board issued a warning about boats with overhead canopies like the one that sank Thursday on Table Rock Lake after a deadly accident claimed 13 lives in Arkansas, according to the Kansas City Star. The Miss Majestic duck boat was carrying 21 passengers when it sank in 1999 in Lake Hamilton, the Star reported. Authorities found seven dead passengers trapped inside the boat when they recovered it, four of which were pinned to the underside of the canopy, according to the Star. “Contributing to the high loss of life was a continuous canopy roof that entrapped passengers within the sinking vehicle,” NTSB officials said in an accident report. Authorities continued searching Friday for four people who are presumed dead after Thursday’s accident in southwest Missouri. Officials said 13 other people have been confirmed dead in the incident. Update 10:25 a.m. EDT July 20: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said divers are going back in the water Friday in search of four people who remain missing and are presumed dead after Thursday’s duck boat accident on Table Rock Lake. Rader said the search had shifted to “recovery mode for the bodies that are still missing,” at a news conference Friday morning. 'It's been a long night,” Rader said. “It's been a very trying night.” Rader said the driver of the Ride the Ducks boat died but that the captain survived. Update 10:05 a.m. EDT July 20: Authorities are expected to provide an update on the investigation into Thursday's deadly duck boat accident in Missouri at a news conference Friday. Update 9:55 a.m. EDT July 20: President Donald Trump shared sympathies Friday to the families and friends of the people involved in Thursday’s deadly duck boat accident in southwest Missouri. “Such a tragedy, such a great loss,” the president wrote Friday in a tweet. “May God be with you all!” Update 8:15 a.m. EDT July 20: Officials with the State Highway Patrol said Friday that two more bodies have been found after Thursday’s duck boat accident in southwest Missouri, bringing the death toll to 13.  >> On AJC.com: Bahamas boating tragedy brings vacation safety to the forefront State Highway Patrol Sgt. Jason Pace said four other people remained missing. Original report: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said 14 people were taken to hospitals after the incident. Seven were being treated early Friday, he said. The boat capsized after a strong line of thunderstorms moved through the area around 7 p.m. Thursday. Rader said weather “was a factor” in the incident. Authorities said the boat had 31 people on board, including children, when it capsized.  The boat had life jackets on board, according to CNN. The news network reported that other boats on the water docked before the bad weather hit. The National Transportation Safety Board has sent a team to investigate and are asking anyone who witnessed the accident to come forward. A dive team and rescue officials worked through the night to find survivors. They ended the search around 11 p.m., according to KY3. Emergency responders set up a staging area overnight on the lakeshore near the Showboat Branson Belle, local media reported, although the Belle was not involved in the accident. Branson officials opened an emergency shelter inside city hall for the victims. National Weather Service meteorologist Steve Linderberg said a top wind speed of 63 mph was measured around 7 p.m. Thursday at Branson Airport.  “There’s nothing to slow down winds in an open area,” he said. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson is watching the developments. DUKW, known as duck boats, are six-wheel-drive amphibious vehicles that were used by the U.S. military during World War II and the Korean War.  Since then, duck boat tours have become popular and are offered on lakes and rivers around the United States, including Missouri, Wisconsin, Massachusetts and Alabama. Ripley Entertainment acquired the Ride The Ducks in Branson in late 2017 from Ride the Ducks International, a subsidiary of Norcross, Georgia-based Herschend Family Entertainment Corp. Ride the Ducks International manufactures amphibious vehicles and licenses them for tours at affiliates. It also operates duck tours at Stone Mountain Park in Georgia. The company formerly operated tours in several other cities, including Baltimore, San Francisco and Philadelphia. But in recent years it ended operations following deadly accidents.  In 2015, a Ride the Ducks tour bus collided with a charter bus carrying student on the Aurora bridge in Seattle. Five students were killed and several others injured. The Associated Press and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution contributed to this report.
  • Tulsa detectives are investigating an early Sunday morning homicide. The fatal shooting happened around 2:18 a.m. outside of a club near Apache and Yale. Sgt. Dave Walker says everything started with a disturbance at another bar. “The disturbance carries over into this parking lot where he ends up shot several times,” Walker said.   It’s believed the shooter wasn’t involved in the disturbance at the bar.  Instead, Walker states the suspect may have been called to the club parking lot to play the role of cavalry.   So far, the shooter is still on the loose. Police are interviewing witnesses downtown.   Anyone with information regarding the shooting is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.  
  • A man is said to have non-life threatening injuries after getting shot in the shoulder late Saturday night. The shooting happened around 11 p.m. outside of a QuikTrip near 41st and Memorial. An officer at the scene reports an altercation occurred between four people in a champagne colored car and two people inside of a truck. “One of the individuals kicked the back of the truck,” the officer said.  “Another one gets out with a pistol and fires one round into the truck, striking the driver in the shoulder.” The shooter then jumped back in the car and took off down the road. A female inside the truck wasn't hurt. Police have not released a description of the shooter.  We do know investigators have plenty of witnesses and surveillance video from the store.   Anyone with information regarding the shooting is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.
  • It didn't take Tulsa investigators long to find a stabbing suspect on Saturday.  That's because Leon Davis called police to report he had stabbed the victim in self-defense and the knife was in his pocket.  He apparently made the call after leaving the scene.   The stabbing allegedly happened around 3:43 p.m. at the Cove Apartments near 11th Memorial. A police supervisor reports the victim was stabbed in the abdomen and it's believed his injuries are non-life threatening.  After speaking with detectives, Davis was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon. “The suspect's claim of self-defense was not supported by the evidence and his statement to detectives,” the supervisor said.   Davis has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.  
  • The Federal Bureau of Investigation on Saturday released a highly redacted copy of the application made by the bureau to a special intelligence court, asking to establish surveillance in the fall of 2016 on Carter Page, a one-time foreign policy adviser to President Donald Trump’s campaign, showing officials feared that Page was working with Russia to undermine the Presidential election. “The FBI believes Page has been the subject of targeted recruitment by the Russian Government,” the document states – interrupted by redactions – but then continues, “undermine and influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election in violation of criminal law.” The FBI released an unclassified version of the FISA application document after requests under the Freedom of Information Act. At one point, the 412 page document states that “the FBI believes that the Russian Government’s efforts are being coordinated with Page and perhaps other individuals associated with Candidate #1’s campaign.” “Page has established relationships with Russian Government officials, including Russian intelligence officers,” the documents states, before additional evidence was redacted, in order to protect intelligence sources and classified information.