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Latest from Glenn Schroeder

    Denver teachers voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to go on strike after more than a year of negotiations over base pay. Rob Gould, lead negotiator for the Denver Classroom Teachers Association, said 93 percent of unionized teachers voted in favor of a strike. The union represents 5,635 educators in the Denver Public School system, which could see a strike as soon as Monday. “They’re striking for better pay, they’re striking for our profession and they’re striking for Denver students,” Gould said. The main sticking point was increasing base pay, including lessening teachers’ reliance on one-time bonuses for things such as having students with high test scores or working in a high-poverty school. Teachers also wanted to earn more for continuing their education.
  • An arrest warrant has been issued for a northern Illinois man who police say allowed an 11-year-old relative to drive herself to school in a stolen rental car while he rode along. The Lake County News-Sun reports that employees at a Round Lake Park elementary school saw the girl pull up to the school’s drop-off point on Jan. 9. She and a 9-year-old girl who was in the back seat exited the car. Police say 31-year-old Khafilu Oshodi of Round Lake then moved into the driver’s seat and drove away. He’s wanted on two counts of child endangerment and driving with a suspended license. Police Chief George Filenko says the drop-off area is very busy and the incident could’ve “resulted in any number of tragic scenarios” if the child lost control.
  • A Pennsylvania police department’s request for volunteers to get drunk for law and order purposes generated a predictably enthusiastic response. The Kutztown Police Department sought three volunteers to drink hard liquor to the point of inebriation so officers could be trained how to administer field sobriety tests during traffic stops. A call for volunteers on Facebook accumulated hundreds of responses and over 1,000 shares in less than a day. The post was soon updated with the news that the department had its volunteers for the April 4 training session. Volunteers were required to have a clean criminal history and have a responsible party to take care of them after the training. Participants are also required to be willing to drink hard liquor until inebriated.
  • Want to know how much your hospital is going to charge for that knee surgery? U.S. hospitals are now required to post list prices for medical services online, under federal rules meant to help patients find affordable care and avoid hefty surprise bills. The spreadsheets, often thousands of lines long, will leave many patients overwhelmed. Procedures are described in medical jargon and abbreviations. That’s if you can find the lists. “The information is not user-friendly,” says AARP’s David Certner. Most hospitals list standard charges which are far above the prices negotiated by insurance companies. But the posted charges for a surgery, for example, don’t include separate things like room rates for overnight stays. They don’t include fees for every doctor involved in a patient’s treatment. And doctors outside a patient’s insurance network could send big bills separately.
  • The nation’s craft beer taps are being squeezed by the government shutdown, which has put new releases on hold, prevented new breweries from opening and stopped shipments of some suds across state lines. The partial shutdown halted operations at the federal agency that regulates alcohol production and distribution. That means government employees can’t issue the permits needed for the beer to flow. “I’ve been joking with people that if you’re going to want a new beer coming out pretty soon, you’re going to have to drink your brother-in-law’s home brew,” said Russ Klisch, founder and president of Lakefront Brewery in Milwaukee. Brewers are increasingly nervous that they will lose money if brewery openings and seasonal beers are delayed much longer in the dispute over President Donald Trump’s demand for taxpayer funding of a wall along the border with Mexico. At Lakefront, the release of a new beer has been postponed because the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau isn’t open to approve labels for the bottles and cans. The brewery can sell beer in Wisconsin, but sales in other states require federally approved labels.
  • A legal opinion from the U.S. Department of Justice made public Monday could threaten the viability of online gambling that crosses state lines such as poker. The 23-page opinion interprets the federal Wire Act, which prohibits interstate wagering, to apply to any form of gambling that crosses state lines, not just sports betting. The opinion marks a reversal for the department, which under the Obama administration in 2011 said online gambling within states that does not involve sporting events would not violate the federal law. The 2011 opinion opened the door for cash-strapped states and their lotteries to bring online gambling to their residents, as long as it did not involve interstate sports betting. Nevada, New Jersey and Delaware legalized online gambling after that opinion was issued, and the three states have agreements allowing poker players to compete online across the states. Pennsylvania became the fourth state to legalize online casino gambling in 2017.
  • A U.S. judge in California on Sunday blocked Trump administration rules, which would allow more employers to opt out of providing women with no-cost birth control, from taking effect in 13 states and Washington, D.C. Judge Haywood Gilliam granted a request for a preliminary injunction by California, 12 other states and Washington, D.C. The plaintiffs sought to prevent the rules from taking effect as scheduled on Monday while a lawsuit against them moved forward. But Gilliam limited the scope of the ruling to the plaintiffs, rejecting their request that he block the rules nationwide. The changes would allow more employers, including publicly traded companies, to opt out of providing no-cost contraceptive coverage to women by claiming religious objections. Some private employers could also object on moral grounds. California and the other states argue that women would be forced to turn to state-funded programs for birth control and experience unintended pregnancies.
  • Beer drinkers can’t claim blissful ignorance for much longer. Starting next month, packages of Bud Light will have prominent labels showing the beer’s calories and ingredients as well as the amount of fat, carbohydrates and protein in a serving. Bud Light is likely the first of many to make the move. The labels aren’t legally required, but major beer makers agreed in 2016 to voluntarily disclose nutrition facts on their products by 2020. Many brands, including Corona Light, Guinness, Heineken and Coors Light, already have calories and other nutrition information on their bottles or packaging. But it’s in small type, or hidden on the bottom of the six-pack, and ingredients aren’t listed. Bud Light went with a big, black-and-white label, similar to the ones required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on packaged foods.
  • Routine food inspections aren’t getting done because of the partial government shutdown, but checks of the riskiest foods are expected to resume next week, the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday. The agency said it’s working to bring back about 150 employees to inspect riskier foods such as cheese, infant formula and produce. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said the agency can’t make the case that “a routine inspection of a Nabisco cracker facility” is necessary during the shutdown, however. The FDA doesn’t oversee meat and poultry and those inspections are continuing. Gottlieb said FDA inspections would have ramped up this week for the first time since the holidays, so the lapse in inspections of high-risk foods will not be significant if they resume soon. He said his concern would grow if those inspections were halted for several weeks.
  • A cat who went missing from suburban Detroit for two months turned up more than 1,000 miles away in Florida. Dearborn resident Judy Sanborn was shocked when she received a call in December from BluePearl pet hospital in Tampa, The Detroit Free Press reported. Staff told her they had her 2 1/2-year-old tabby named Bandit. Staff told Sanborn that a local resident had found the cat, who’d been identified through his microchip. Jose Calderon, an emergency veterinary technician manager at BluePearl, said he’s never seen an animal take such a long trip in his 30-year career. A block over, a street over, or maybe even (from) Orlando, which is an hour away from us. This is the farthest away I’ve seen,” he said. It’s unclear how Bandit made the cross-country trek.
  • Glenn Schroeder

    KRMG Morning News Anchor

    Glenn is a self-described news and sports junkie. His passion for radio dates back to 1975. That's the year he got his first taste of life behind a microphone, handling play-by-play duties at his high school radio station. The University of Michigan graduate's circuitous journey to KRMG began at a very small radio station in Alamogordo, New Mexico. After stints at stations in Las Cruces, Mexico and Pueblo, Colorado, Glenn moved to Tulsa is 1991. It didn't take long for the Detroit native to realize that this is where he wanted to plant his roots. The Edward R. Murrow award winning journalist, who spent 10-years at KVOO, cites the Oklahoma City bombing as the most profound and difficult story he's ever covered. "The misery of those who lost loved one was deep and unrelenting. Yet, their strength and faith allowed our emotional scares to heal." Glenn's hobbies include running, gardening, Michigan football and NASCAR. "It's the only sport my wife enjoys." Glenn met Beth, the love of his life, in 1999. The two were married less than two years later.

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  • Denver teachers voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to go on strike after more than a year of negotiations over base pay. Rob Gould, lead negotiator for the Denver Classroom Teachers Association, said 93 percent of unionized teachers voted in favor of a strike. The union represents 5,635 educators in the Denver Public School system, which could see a strike as soon as Monday. “They’re striking for better pay, they’re striking for our profession and they’re striking for Denver students,” Gould said. The main sticking point was increasing base pay, including lessening teachers’ reliance on one-time bonuses for things such as having students with high test scores or working in a high-poverty school. Teachers also wanted to earn more for continuing their education.
  • With no evidence that President Donald Trump’s weekend speech on immigration and a border wall had changed the dynamic in Congress related to a partial government shutdown, Senate leaders set a pair of votes on competing plans from Democrats and Republicans for Thursday afternoon, the first time Senate Republicans have allowed votes to end the shutdown since before Christmas. “The President’s made a comprehensive and bipartisan offer,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. “It’s a strong proposal, it’s the only thing on the table.” “It was not a good faith proposal. It was not intended to end the shutdown,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer. “The President’s proposal is one-sided.” The political jousting came as representatives of federal workers – who seem likely to go without a paycheck again this Friday – urged the Congress and the President to fully fund the government, and then settle their differences over border security spending. Your Coast Guard leadership team & the American people stand in awe of your continued dedication to duty, resilience, & that of your families. I find it unacceptable that @USCG members must rely on food pantries & donations to get through day-to-day life. #uscg pic.twitter.com/TZ9ppUidyO — Admiral Karl Schultz (@ComdtUSCG) January 23, 2019 “Every family in the FBI has mortgages, car payments, bills that come in at the end of the month,” said Tom O’Connor, the head of the FBI Agents Association. “You have to pay those. Try doing that without a paycheck,” O’Connor told a Washington news conference. Meanwhile, the Trump Administration announced it was calling more federal employees back to work – as the Department of Agriculture said Farm Service Agency offices would resume operations on Thursday. “The FSA provides vital support for farmers and ranchers and they count on those services being available,” said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. Farmers have complained for weeks that the lack of FSA offices was hampering all sorts of work, like applying for bailout payments related to retaliatory tariffs against the U.S., filing paperwork for operating loans, and a variety of other crop programs. But those Farm Service Agency workers won’t be paid until the Congress resolves the shutdown. Good News: @USDA just announced that all Farm Service Agency offices will reopen beginning Thursday, January 24th and offer expanded services to #Ag producers. More information and a list of services here: https://t.co/o8oiQkdnaS — Senator Deb Fischer (@SenatorFischer) January 22, 2019 Back on Capitol Hill, there were no signs that the President’s immigration offer from Saturday was going to break the gridlock over Mr. Trump call for $5.7 billion in border security funding. But the mere fact that there were going to be votes in the Senate related to the shutdown – the first votes on government funding since before Christmas – was seen by some as a welcome event. “I’m pleased that the gears of the legislative process are moving,” said Matt Glassman, a fellow at the Georgetown University Government Affairs Institute. Senate leaders agreed to two procedural votes on Thursday – with 60 votes needed – first on the President’s border plan, plus funding for the federal government, and then on a Democratic plan which combines disaster aid with a plan to simply fund shuttered agencies through February 8. For Glassman and a few others – the decision to set those votes so that Republicans would go first, and then Democrats second, raised questions about whether GOP Senators might vote first to approve money for a border wall, and then also vote to re-open the government, despite the President’s opposition. 1/ My Twitter feed tells me it's folly to think that Thursday's second cloture vote (open government with a 2-week CR) will get 60 votes (47 D + 13 R). I'm not so sure. Just because only 10 GOP signed a bipartisan letter doesn't mean that's the full lid on GOP votes. — Sarah Binder (@bindersab) January 22, 2019 A spokesman for the Senate Majority Leader rejected that idea, saying that Sen. McConnell was against the Democratic plan – but the schedule on Thursday does give GOP Senators the option to first vote for the border wall funding – and when that fails – then vote to re-open the government for about two weeks.
  • It's one thing to WATCH a show like Game of Thrones, but it’s something else to take a swing at an actual sword fight! Tomorrow night starting at 6:00 p.m., the Flying Tee driving range in Jenks is hosting a fundraiser for Tulsa Tyrants, a team in the Armored Combat League, which is just what it sounds like. These guys put on suits of armor and fight with real swords and battle axes and maces. League rules mandate that they dull the edges on the weapons, but they still pack a punch. Once they're done fighting, they'll walk out to the range and raise money by letting people buy chances to hit golf balls at them! They'll then cap the night by having a watch party for the new TV show on the History Channel called Knight Fight, which is all about sword-fighting competitions. You can find out more about the event here.
  • The Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma hosted an event designed to help federal workers who are furloughed or working without pay as a result of the ongoing partial federal shutdown. CFBEO Executive Director Eileen Bradshaw told KRMG her agency was contacted by federal “These are folks who don’t need to navigate the charitable assistance system,” she told KRMG Tuesday, pointing out that many of them don’t even know where to start. “211 is a real treasure for folks who find themselves in this situation,” she added. “If they need something other than food, they can call 211, explain what the need is, chances are there’s someone in our community who’s willing to help.” She told KRMG people lined up at 2:00 p.m. for the event, which ran from 3:00 to 7:00 so that both day and evening workers could make time to take advantage of the free food. KRMG spoke with federal workers who said they’d never expected to need food assistance, and had never visited a food bank before. But they were extremely grateful for the assistance.
  • Two former University of Oklahoma students publicly apologized Tuesday for a video posted on Twitter last week. One of the girls on the video was in black face and made a racial slur. The university released the statements from Frances Ford and Olivia Urban.  Urban called the video 'the most regrettable decision of my life' and says there's no excuse for such behavior 'in private or public.'  Ford says the video was 'insensitive and irresponsible.' University President James Gallogly announced Monday that both women had voluntarily withdrawn from campus. Students held a rally on campus Tuesday demanding action from campus administrators.