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Latest from April Hill

    The Wagoner County Sheriff’s Office is focusing on busting sex offenders who fail to register. Wagoner County deputies say they recently discovered that Raymond Bryant was registering at his parent’s home near Coweta, but had not lived there in years.  Investigators learned that Bryant has was self-employed doing lawn care jobs.  They set up a meeting last Wednesday to discuss a job at a convenience store in Coweta.  When Bryant arrived, he was taken into custody for his outstanding warrant without incident.   Bryant was transported to the Wagoner County Detention Center and was booked in on a 10,000 bond. Sheriff Chris Elliott said, “We will continue to aggressively pursue any offender that does not register as a sex offender when they are required to do so.”
  • The University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University have a warning for students after voters passed medical marijuana. Oklahoma voters approved medical marijuana during a June election. Both universities are federally funded and must follow federal law. Leaders at the two locations say all marijuana, including medical marijuana, remains banned on the two campuses. OU and OSU say in a joint news release Thursday that they are legally required to comply with the Federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act. The law mandates drug prevention programs and prohibits the use of illegal drugs on campus or at university-sponsored events and activities.  The two must also comply with the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act that describes the drug-free policies required at workplaces with certain federal contracts. The two say students and employees 'cannot consume, smoke or possess marijuana on campus' even if they have a prescription.
  • Police were called to the home of Felicia Jones on August 17, 2017.   Jones was found stabbed to death in her apartment near Admiral and Garnett.  42-year-old Beverly Nichols told investigators that she found Jones dead after having to break into the apartment.  Nichols and Jones were roommates.  On Tuesday, the Tulsa County District Attorney issued an arrest warrant for Nichols after reviewing all of the evidence tested by the police lab from the scene. Anyone with information on Nichols can call Crime Stoppers at (918)596-2677.    
  • Crews are working to repair a gas line after a mess near 5th and Main Monday morning. Police say a construction crew hit the line around 11:30. A building near the Mayo was evacuated as a precaution. No injuries were reported. Workers one the scene didn’t have a time table for when the line would be fixed.
  • The Oklahoma Medical Examiner's Office released an autopsy report Monday on 28-year-old Alexander Tilghman. The report says that toxicology tests found no evidence of drugs or alcohol in Tilghman's body. Police say Tilghman walked into Louie's On The Lake in Oklahoma City and started shooting on May 24. Authorities say Tilghman shot a 39-year-old woman, her 12-year-old daughter and a 14-year-old family friend as they arrived for a birthday party.  All three survived. Tilghman was fatally shot by bystanders. The report shows that Tilghman suffered gunshot wounds to the chest, left thigh and back. Prosecutors later ruled that two bystanders who fired at Tilghman were justified. 
  • The Oklahoma State Department of Health posted the new rules on Friday. The original rules approved by the board earlier this month sparked outrage from medical marijuana supporters who said they went too far. The board approved last-minute changes to ban the sale of smokable pot and require a pharmacist in every dispensary.  The rules also required female patients seeking a license to undergo a pregnancy test first. All of that language is deleted from the new rules. The agency's board is expected to consider them at a special meeting on Wednesday.
  • A medical examiner is trying to determine what led to the death of a woman, whose body was discovered Thursday morning in Sapulpa. Employees called police to report a suspicious truck in the parking lot that didn’t belong to anyone at the business. Firefighters had to break into the truck where they found the woman unresponsive. Paramedics pronounced her dead on the scene. Police say there re no obvious signs of trauma to the body. Officers are calling the death suspicious because she was found in the backseat.
  • Randy Alan Hamett is accused of kidnapping a woman from her Broken Arrow home in April, using a taser on her and tying her ankles and wrists.  Prosecutors say Hammet cut a hole in the woman’s house to avoid her home alarm system.  Hamett forced the victim into a car with the gun she bought to protect herself against him. He eventually allowed the victim to text her parents about her whereabouts so they would not become suspicious. The woman’s parents became worried that she was in danger and contacted police. Investigators where then able to track the pair down at a hotel in Arkansas.  U.S. Attorney Trent Shores announced Wednesday that a jury found Hamett guilty of Kidnapping, Possessing and Receiving Stolen Firearm and Ammunition, and Possession of Firearms and Ammunition While Subject to a Domestic Violence Protective Order.  Hamett faces a maximum penalty life in prison, a $250,000 fine, and five years supervised release for the kidnapping conviction. 
  • Michael Bever was in court Tuesday on a scheduled sentencing hearing. A judge has postponed sentencing for for the 19-year-old Broken Arrow man convicted of fatally stabbing his parents and three siblings. Bever told Judge Sharon Holmes he wants 'a chance to have a normal life someday.'  He also said after the guilty verdict was read at the trial he thought about how he never got his GED. Prosecutors read a letter from the adopted mother of the two surviving sisters that says they will spend the rest of their lives 'looking over the shoulders' if Bever is released. Jurors recommended a sentence of life with the possibility of parole, but prosecutors say Bever should receive a sentence of life without parole. Judge Holmes postponed sentencing until Aug. 9.
  • Investigators say a passerby called authorities July 12 after spotting an emaciated teen near Chandler. The 15-year-old boy was found living in a barn and eating sticks, leaves and grass to survive. Court records show charges were filed Monday in Lincoln County against the boy's father, stepmother and two older brothers.  The boy's father was also charged with child abuse by injury and the stepmother with enabling child abuse by injury. Lincoln County authorities say the teen weighed 80 pounds when he was discovered sharing a barn with goats, rabbits and chickens.
  • April Hill

    News Director

    April Hill's first "job" in radio was in college at WMSV. Early every morning she would rise and shine after waiting tables late into the night. Hill didn't actually get paid. She was just thrilled to have an opportunity to get real live on-air experience. The importance of her first morning radio anchor gig wouldn't be realized until more than a decade later.

    Hill's first paid job in broadcasting was at the CBS TV affiliate in Jackson, MS, in 1998. Her shift as the associate producer on the morning show at WJTV started at 10:00 p.m. Hill said, "I remember telling my boss how excited I was after getting my first paycheck and he laughed. The check was very small, but I was still a kid really. I'd never had a check that big." She worked a retail job to afford rent in a high crime area of town. "I didn't care. For the first time, I had my own place all to myself. I also got a good laugh when people asked where I lived. Their facial expressions, filled with horror, were so entertaining."

    Hill decided to get in on the action in front of the camera. The market size in Jackson was too big for them to giver her a shot (although she tried). After sending out at least 100 resumés with no response. Hill quit her job to concentrate on chasing her dream full-time. Hill's  brother lived in Tulsa and was willing to let her live there rent free for a few months. "I drove to every small television station from Florida to Iowa, 25 cities altogether. I got only one offer and that's all I needed."

    In 2001, Hill started as a reporter at KLKN-TV in Lincoln, NE. She said, "I really loved Lincoln. It's filled with honest, hard working people." Hill was what they call in the business a one-man-band. She was the reporter, photographer and the editor. Living in a capitol city, and the home of the Husker's, taught her how to cover every story under the sun. "I worked weekends at first, so I was on the 50-yard line every home game covering the fans. I then moved up to the legislature beat Monday through Friday. In between, there were tornados, snow storms and drought... a lot like here in Oklahoma."

    In 2007, Hill decided she wanted to move home. Since she grew up in the small town of Independence, KS, Tulsa was the perfect distance and size. "I had been away from home for so long and it was strange when I would talk to people who knew about my home town. Some had even been there." She took a producer job at KJRH, which had a weather camera on main street in Independence. Hill said, "The meteorologists would use it as much as possible during my newscast because they knew I'd love it."

    Hill was back home and content, until KRMG's Steve Berg approached her about a weekend anchor job that was open at the radio station. "I thought, oh radio? I haven't done that in a while. Sounds like fun." Dan Potter was the news director and hired her a couple of months later. Hill worked seven days a week for three years. She said, "I looked forward to my weekends at KRMG, but I wanted full-time. I wanted it so badly that I would fill-in working both jobs on holidays and only took one weekend off for a family wedding." Her hard work paid off.

    The morning show host at the time, KRMG's Joe Kelley, hired Hill full-time as soon as a position was available. She said, "I loved it from day one. Joe and I just clicked. He worked hard and recognized my work ethic and passion for the radio station. So, Joe became my mentor and all of the sudden promotions started happening faster than I could even ask." A few months after going full-time, Hill was asked to take the morning anchor position. It was only another few months and she was tapped to be the news director, taking over Kelley's position when he moved to sister station WDBO in Orlando. "My emotions were all over the board. I was losing my best boss and gaining the highest position of my career."

    Kelley left Hill in good hands. Dan Potter took over as morning host (remember, he was the one who hired her). "Dan and I are going to continue the momentum than KRMG has been building for years. We're here to stay and even get better. I believe that 100 percent."

    Read More
  • London police say investigators are treating a Tuesday morning crash outside the Houses of Parliament as a “terrorist incident.” Here are the latest updates: Update 5:46 a.m. EDT Aug. 14: A man in his late 20s has been arrested “on suspicion of terrorist offenses” in connection with the crash that left “a number of people” injured, London police said in a news release. The injuries are not believed to be life-threatening. The man, who was driving a silver Ford Fiesta, struck cyclists and pedestrians before hitting security barriers in the area, police said. The car was not carrying any passengers, police said. “At this stage, we are treating this as a terrorist incident and the Met's Counter Terrorism Command is now leading the investigation,” the news release said. Authorities are requesting anyone with photos, videos or information about the incident to contact police. Read more here. Original report: London’s Counter-Terrorism Command is leading the probe into a Tuesday morning crash outside the U.K. Houses of Parliament, The Associated Press is reporting. Police said a man driving a car slammed into security barriers in the area about 7:37 a.m., hurting pedestrians. None of the injured “are in life-threatening condition,” the AP reported. Police arrested the man. Metropolitan police tweeted that authorities are “keeping an open mind” about the investigation. In March 2017, four people were killed in a terror attack in the same area, the AP reported. – The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • With less than three months until the mid-term elections for the U.S. House and Senate, four more states hold primaries today for the Congress, but the roster of races is unlikely to produce the news associated with last week’s tight race in a special U.S. House election in Ohio, which amplified questions about whether the GOP can maintain control of Capitol Hill after November. Primaries take place on Tuesday in four states: Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont and Wisconsin. No sitting incumbents in the Congress are on upset alert at this point – though there could always be some out-of-the-blue defeat that no one saw coming; but really, this is more about setting the roster for the final races in November. At this point in time, the Congressional change for November is 57 seats in the House, and 3 in the Senate. (Please note that various news organizations calculate these numbers differently.) As you can see from the data, the total change is already equal to that for the House in the 2016 election cycle, as a large amount of turnover continues in the Congress. Most people don’t realize that currently in the U.S. House, almost 200 of the 435 seats are held by lawmakers who were elected since 2012 – that number will grow substantially after the 2018 elections. In the Senate, fully half of Senators have less than eight years in office, just over one term. The primaries for 2018 are rapidly coming to an end – next Tuesday brings Alaska and Wyoming; Arizona and Florida vote on August 28. Then, after Labor Day, Massachusetts, Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island finish out the primaries for the 2018 mid-term elections for Congress. November is not that far away.
  • The Wagoner County Sheriff’s Office is focusing on busting sex offenders who fail to register. Wagoner County deputies say they recently discovered that Raymond Bryant was registering at his parent’s home near Coweta, but had not lived there in years.  Investigators learned that Bryant has was self-employed doing lawn care jobs.  They set up a meeting last Wednesday to discuss a job at a convenience store in Coweta.  When Bryant arrived, he was taken into custody for his outstanding warrant without incident.   Bryant was transported to the Wagoner County Detention Center and was booked in on a 10,000 bond. Sheriff Chris Elliott said, “We will continue to aggressively pursue any offender that does not register as a sex offender when they are required to do so.”
  • Embarking on a mission that scientists have been dreaming of since the Sputnik era, a NASA spacecraft hurtled Sunday toward the sun on a quest to unlock some of its mysteries by getting closer than any object sent before. If all goes well, the Parker Solar Probe will fly straight through the wispy edges of the sun’s corona, or outer atmosphere, in November. In the years ahead, it will gradually get within 3.8 million miles of the surface, its instruments protected from the extreme heat and radiation by a revolutionary new carbon heat shield and other high-tech wizardry. Altogether, the Parker probe will make 24 close approaches to our star during the seven-year, $1.5 billion journey. “Wow, here we go. We’re in for some learning over the next several years,” said Eugene Parker, the 91-year-old astrophysicist for whom the spacecraft is named.  It was Parker who accurately theorized 60 years ago the existence of solar wind — the supersonic stream of charged particles blasting off the sun and coursing through space, sometimes wreaking havoc on electrical systems on Earth. This is the first time NASA has named a spacecraft after a living person.
  • The 'Queen of Soul,' legendary singer and songwriter Aretha Franklin, is gravely ill, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news Family members confirmed the news Monday to WDIV-TV after a report from entertainment site Showbiz411 claimed Franklin, 76, was being surrounded by friends and family in Detroit. Tom Joyner, a nationally syndicated radio host and friend of Franklin’s, said Monday that Franklin has been in hospice care for a week, according to The Detroit News.  Franklin had announced plans to retire from touring in February 2017 to focus on her family and a few select projects, the News reported. 'I feel very, very enriched and satisfied with respect to where my career came from, and where it is now,” Franklin told WDIV in 2017. “I'll be pretty much satisfied, but I'm not going to go anywhere and just sit down and do nothing. That wouldn't be good either.” Franklin has canceled several concerts this year due to health issues, Fox13Memphis reported. According to The Associated Press, “she was ordered by her doctor to stay off the road and rest up.” She performed  in her hometown of Detroit in June 2017, the Detroit Free Press reported. She ended the concert with an appeal for those in the crown to, “Please keep me in your prayers,” according to the newspaper. >> Photos: Aretha Franklin through the years She last performed in November at Elton John’s AIDS Foundation gala in New York City, the News reported. Franklin was born March 25, 1942, in Memphis, Tennessee. Her family moved to Detroit when she was young, according to Fox13Memphis. Franklin started singing when she was young, with encouragement from her mother, Barbara, and her father, the Rev. C.L. Franklin. She started out singing gospel but launched a career in secular music after she turned 18. She rose to fame after signing in 1967 with Atlantic Records. Franklin’s career, spanning six decades, has spawned hits including “Respect,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and “Chain of Fools.” She’s considered one of the best-selling artists of all time, selling more than 75 million albums worldwide. Franklin was inducted in 1987 to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. She’s earned 18 Grammy Awards and a Presidential Medal of Freedom for her work. In 2005, then-President George W. Bush described Franklin as “a woman of achievement, deep character and a loving heart.” Check back for updates to this developing story.