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    Investigators have arrested a man “on suspicion of terrorist offenses” and said they are treating a Tuesday morning crash outside the Houses of Parliament as a “terrorist incident,” London police said. Here are the latest updates: Update 9:10 a.m. EDT Aug. 14: President Donald Trump responded to Tuesday’s attack in a tweet. “Another terrorist attack in London,” the president wrote. “These animals are crazy and must be dealt with through toughness and strength!” Authorities said three people suffered injuries that did not appear to be life-threatening on Tuesday morning after a man in his late 20s slammed a silver Ford Fiesta into cyclists and pedestrians in front of the Houses of Parliament. The car stopped when it hit a barrier, police said. The man, who has not been identified, was arrested on suspicion of terrorism offenses. “Given that this appears to be a deliberate act, the method and this being an iconic site, we are treating it as a terrorist incident and the investigation is being led by officers from the Counter Terrorism Command,” Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu said. Authorities do not believe any other suspects were involved in the incident. Update 7:08 a.m. EDT Aug. 14: Three people were injured when a man drove through security barriers outside the U.K. Houses of Parliament, the London Ambulance Service tweeted Tuesday. “Two patients were treated at the scene and taken to hospital, and a third patient with minor injuries was assessed at the scene,” the tweet read. Prime Minister Theresa May thanked first responders and expressed sympathy for the victims. “My thoughts are with those injured in the incident in Westminster and my thanks to the emergency services for their immediate and courageous response,” she tweeted. Meanwhile, Britain’s emergency COBRA committee announced it would be meeting in response to the suspected terrorist attack, The Associated Press reported. Update 5:46 a.m. EDT Aug. 14: A man in his late 20s has been arrested “on suspicion of terrorist offenses” in connection with the crash that left “a number of people” injured, London police said in a news release. The injuries are not believed to be life-threatening. The man, who was driving a silver Ford Fiesta, struck cyclists and pedestrians before hitting security barriers in the area, police said. The car was not carrying any passengers, police said. “At this stage, we are treating this as a terrorist incident and the Met's Counter Terrorism Command is now leading the investigation,” the news release said. Authorities are requesting anyone with photos, videos or information about the incident to contact police. Read more here. Original report: London’s Counter-Terrorism Command is leading the probe into a Tuesday morning crash outside the U.K. Houses of Parliament, The Associated Press is reporting. Police said a man driving a car slammed into security barriers in the area about 7:37 a.m., hurting pedestrians. None of the injured “are in life-threatening condition,” the AP reported. Police arrested the man. Metropolitan police tweeted that authorities are “keeping an open mind” about the investigation. In March 2017, four people were killed in a terror attack in the same area, the AP reported. – The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • The Polish government says a first round of voting in local elections this fall will take place on Oct. 21, with a runoff Nov. 4. The elections for local assemblies and mayors will be the first major test at the ballot box for the conservative-nationalist Law and Justice party since it swept to power in 2015. The party's victory was part of a global rejection of old political elites and an embrace of nationalist and populist movements. The party has been in conflict with the European Union over a shakeup of Poland's judicial system. Critics say Law and Justice has destroyed the independence of Poland's judiciary. However it remains Poland's most popular party, partly thanks to increased social spending, and argues it has an electoral mandate to reform an inefficient court system.
  • Police are investigating two threatening letters containing a white powder that were sent to the American and Israeli embassies in the German capital, authorities said Tuesday. Police spokeswoman Heidi Vogt said the two letters, sent last month, were analyzed by experts and the powder was determined to be a harmless substance. She said police are focusing on a suspect known to them as the sender of both of the letters, but would give no further details due to the ongoing investigation. The suspect is being investigated on two counts of disturbing the peace by threatening a crime but no arrests have been made. The Israeli Embassy received the first letter on July 24 and the U.S. Embassy the second on July 26, said police spokeswoman Kerstin Ismer. Neither embassy had any immediate comment, saying in general they do not comment on security issues.
  • The Latest the collapse of a bridge in Italy (all times local): 3 p.m. French President Emmanuel Macron has offered Italy his country's help after a bridge collapsed in the Italian city of Genoa. The president's office said that Macron, who is currently staying at a presidential residence in southern France, had a phone call with Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte. In French and Italian, Macron wrote on Twitter: 'Our thoughts go to the victims, their relatives and all the Italian people. France stands by Italy in that tragedy and is ready to provide all necessary support.' The disaster occurred on a major highway that connects Italy to France and other vacation resorts. ___ 2:20 p.m. The Italian news agency ANSA citing the Interior Ministry says that 11 people are confirmed dead in the collapse of a highway bridge in the port city of Genoa. ANSA reported Tuesday that five people are injured and in serious condition. The Interior Ministry press office could not immediately confirm the fatalities. An official with Italian firefighters, Amalia Tedeschi, told RAI state TV that some 20 vehicles, including cars and trucks, had been involved in the collapse. She confirmed that two people had been extracted alive from vehicles, with injuries. Tedeschi said that sniffer dogs are at work in the rubble looking for more injured and victims. In addition, heavy equipment was being moved in so they could lift pieces of the bridge. Tedeschi said the part of the bridge that collapsed was about 80 meters (yards) in length. Media reports had earlier put it at 200 meters. ___ 1:30 p.m. Italian news agency ANSA says one person has been extracted alive from the rubble of the bridge collapse near the northern city of Genoa and is being transported by helicopter to a hospital. ANSA says Italian rescue workers have identified at least 10 vehicles involved the bridge collapse. There was no immediate word on overall deaths or injuries. Maria Luisa Catalano of the highway police in Genoa said work was ongoing, adding, 'we don't know numbers of victims/injured yet.' Interior Minister Matteo Salvini said some 200 fire fighters are responding to the accident. On Twitter he says 'we are following minute by minute the situation of the bridge collapse in Genoa.'   The bridge is an important interchange between the northern regions of Lombardy and Piedmont and the beaches of Liguria, and to the main highway heading westward into France.  ___ 12:55 p.m. Italian authorities say that about 10 vehicles were involved when a raised highway collapsed during a sudden and violent storm in the northern port city of Genoa. Private broadcaster Sky TG24 said that a 200-meter section of the Morandi Bridge collapsed Tuesday over an industrial zone, and firefighters told The Associated Press that there are concerns about gas lines. Police on Twitter said the collapse occurred during a sudden, violent storm, while firefighters said vehicles were involved, indicating the likelihood of fatalities. Photos published by the ANSA news agency on its website showed a huge gulf between two sections of the highway. Video captured the sound of a man screaming: 'Oh god, oh, god.' Other images showed a green truck that had stopped just meters (yards) short of the gaping hole in the bridge. ___ 12:30 p.m. The Italian news agency ANSA says a raised highway has partially collapsed in the northern port city of Genoa. There was no immediate word on deaths or injuries. ANSA said that authorities suspected that a structural weakness caused the collapse on Tuesday. Images circulating on Italian media show the highway through the city with a large section missing. Emergency vehicles were responding.
  • A bridge on a main highway linking Italy with France collapsed Tuesday in the Italian port city of Genoa during a sudden, violent storm, sending vehicles plunging 90 meters (nearly 300 feet) into a heap of rubble below. The Interior Ministry said at least 11 people were killed and five seriously injured. Amalia Tedeschi, a firefighter, told RAI state TV that some 20 vehicles, including cars and trucks, had been involved in the collapse of a stretch of bridge some 80 meters (260 meters) in length. She said two people had been pulled alive from vehicles in the rubble, which fell into an industrial area below the bridge. Officials said they were being transported by helicopter to a hospital. The Interior Ministry confirmed reports by the Italian news agency ANSA that 11 people were killed and five injured, adding that the number could increase. The private broadcaster Sky TG24 said a 200-meter (over 650-foot) section of the Morandi Bridge collapsed over an industrial zone, sending tons of twisted steel and concrete debris onto warehouses below. Firefighters told The Associated Press they were worried about gas lines exploding in the area from the collapse. Photos published by ANSA on its website showed a huge gulf between two sections of the bridge. Video captured the sound of a man screaming: 'Oh God! Oh, God!' Other images showed a green truck that had stopped just short of the gaping hole in the bridge and the tires of a tractor trailer in the rubble. ANSA said authorities suspected that a structural weakness had caused the collapse, but there was no immediate explanation by authorities for why they might have thought that or what had happened. Italy's transport minister, Danilo Toninelli, called the collapse 'an enormous tragedy.' News agency ANSA said Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte will travel to Genoa later Tuesday. Interior Minister Matteo Salvini said some 200 firefighters were responding to the accident. 'We are following minute by minute the situation of the bridge collapse in Genoa,' Salvini said on Twitter. The disaster occurred on a highway that connects Italy to France, and northern cities like Milan to the beaches of Liguria. It came on the eve of a major Italian summer holiday on Wednesday called Ferragosto, which means traffic was heavier than usual as Italians traveled to beaches or mountains. The Morandi Bridge is a main thoroughfare connecting the A10 highway that goes toward France and the A7 highway that continues north toward Milan. Inaugurated in 1967, it is 90 meters (295 feet) high, just over a kilometer (.6 miles) long, with the longest section between supports measuring 200 meters (over 650 feet). The collapse of the bridge comes eight days after another major accident on an Italian highway, one near the northern city of Bologna. In that case, a tanker truck carrying a highly flammable gas exploded after rear-ending a stopped truck on the road and getting hit from behind itself. The accident killed one person, injured dozens and blew apart a section of a raised eight-lane highway. ___ This story corrects the height of the bridge to 90 meters (295 feet). ____ Simone Somekh contributed from Rome.
  • Officials in southern France made impassioned pleas Tuesday to a so-far-silent French government to allow docking access to a ship carrying 141 migrants that it rescued last week in the Mediterranean Sea, stressing humanitarian concerns. Officials in the French island of Corsica said the Aquarius should be allowed to dock there after Italy's new anti-migrant government and Malta both refused to take it. The vessel, currently between Malta and the Italian island of Lampedusa, is operated by French aid groups who say the health of those rescued in two operations Friday is stable but that many are weak and malnourished. 'Simply, there's a necessity today to get help to this ship,' Jean-Guy Talamoni, president of Corsica's local assembly, told BFM-TV. 'It's time (Europe) wakes up and that everyone takes their share of responsibility. In the meantime, there are emergency situations, and you have to deal with them,' he added. Corsica's executive council head, Gilles Simeoni increased the pressure on Tuesday with a tweet: 'Corsica and its ports remain available for emergency humanitarian aid.' Simeoni added that Europe needs a real European policy on the migrant issue in the Mediterranean sea. In the coastal town of Sete near Montpellier in southern France, the port director also said he was ready to accept the Aquarius. 'My proposition, I'm insistent on this, it has only a humanitarian dimension in respect of international maritime law. It's an obligation of help to people in danger,' Jean-Claude Gayssot, a non-elected official, told Europe-1. 'There have already been 800 deaths since the beginning of the year. The Mediterranean (sea) has become a graveyard,' Gayssot said. The comments serve to raise the pressure on the French government and on President Emmanuel Macron — who ultimately decides if the vessel will be accepted by France Macron has not yet commented. ___ This story has been corrected to reflect that Gayssot spoke to Europe-1 and Talamoni to BFM-TV, not the other way around.
  • The Dutch government is honoring the outgoing U.N. human rights chief with one of its most prestigious awards. The Foreign Ministry said in a statement Tuesday that it will present Zeid Ra'ad Al-Hussein the Human Rights Tulip award at a ceremony next month. Zeid, a Jordanian diplomat and member of the country's royal family, has served four years as the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights. His term ends Aug. 31. He has faced criticism for calling out human rights violators, but Dutch Foreign Minister Stef Blok said Zeid's 'independent, critical stance was necessary because human rights are under great pressure in many places around the world.' Former Chilean President Michelle Bachelet has been appointed to succeed Zeid. The award ceremony will be held Sept. 3 in The Hague.
  • Turkey's president appeared to escalate a dispute with the United States that has helped foment a Turkish currency crisis, claiming Tuesday that his country will boycott U.S.-made electronic goods. Behind the scenes, however, diplomats resumed contact to ease tensions. Addressing a conference of his ruling party faithful in the capital, Recep Tayyip Erdogan added fuel to the spat with the U.S., even as local business groups called on his government to settle the dispute through talks. Investors seemed to look through the fiery rhetoric, pushing the lira off record lows on confirmation that Turkish and U.S. government officials met on Monday. 'We will implement a boycott against America's electronic goods,' Erdogan told the conference. He suggested Turks would buy local or Korean phones instead of U.S.-made iPhones, though it was unclear how he intended to enforce the boycott. The move is seen as retaliation for the United States' decision to sanction two Turkish ministers over the detention of an American pastor on terror-related charges, and to double tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum imports. Behind the scenes, however, diplomatic dialogue appears to have resumed. Turkey's state-run news agency and U.S. officials say U.S. National Security adviser John Bolton had met with the Turkish ambassador to Washington on Monday. That helped ease the turmoil in financial markets, with the Turkish lira stabilizing near record lows. It was up 5 percent on Tuesday, at about 6.55 per dollar, having fallen 42 percent so far this year, with most of those losses coming in recent weeks. Investors are worried not only about Turkey's souring relations with the U.S., a longtime NATO ally, but also Erdogan's economic policies and the country's high debt accumulated in foreign currencies. Independent economists say Erdogan should let the central bank raise interest rates to support the currency, but he wants low rates to keep the economic growth going. In a joint statement issued Tuesday, the industrialists' group TUSIAD and the Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges called on the government to allow the central bank to raise interest rates to help overcome the currency crisis. The business groups also urged diplomatic efforts with the United States and an improvement in relations with the European Union, which is Turkey's major trading partner. The finance chief is due to address hundreds of foreign investors on Thursday in a teleconference, the state-run Anadolu Agency said. Meanwhile, the lawyer representing Andrew Brunson, the American pastor at the center of the dispute, renewed an appeal for his release from house arrest and for a travel ban imposed on him to be lifted. It was not clear when the court would consider the appeal. Brunson, 50, is being tried on espionage and terror-related charges, which he and the U.S. government vehemently deny. Although he was released to home detention, he faces a prison sentence of up to 35 years if he is convicted at the end of his ongoing trial. Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov voiced support for Turkey during a joint news conference with his Turkish counterpart in Ankara, saying that the United States' increased use of sanctions will erode the dollar's role as the top reserve currency. Lavrov said the wide use of sanctions reflect Washington's desire to win domination and secure unilateral advantages for its businesses. He said that Russia and Turkey have set a goal to switch to national currencies in mutual trade. Independent economists caution it would be difficult to unseat the dollar as the top reserve currency as it is used widely in the global economy, for example to trade in oil and for commercial deals. 'We view the policy of sanctions as unlawful and illegitimate, driven mostly by a desire to dominate everywhere and in everything, dictate policies and call shots in international affairs,' Lavrov said. 'Such policy can't be a basis for normal dialogue and it can't last long.' 'Such rude abuse will erode the U.S. dollar role and prompt an increasing number of countries, including those not affected by sanctions yet, to rely on currencies issued by more reliable partners,' he said.   Erdogan on Tuesday again maintained that Turkey's economy was under attack and that the currency turmoil did not reflect the economy's strength. He renewed a call on Turkish citizens to convert their dollars into the local currency. 'Believe me, if we divert our money to foreign currency ... then we will be in the position of having surrendered to the devil,' Erdogan said. A group of small business owners earlier gathered in front of a currency exchange office in Ankara to change dollar bills they held in their hands in a show of support for Erdogan, local media reports said. In Istanbul, 35-year-old Sukru Gumus, one of millions of Turks grappling with the country's economic crisis, said the crisis was raising costs for his business. The owner of a store that sells goods for brides-to-be said the lira's devaluation against foreign currencies has affected his ability to import goods. 'Most of the products we sell come from abroad, the raw materials... That's why we are directly impacted in an extreme way.' __ Associated Press writers Ayse Wieting in Istanbul and Vladimir Isachenkov in Moscow contributed.
  • Masked youths torched dozens of cars overnight in Sweden and threw rocks at police, prompting an angry response from the prime minister, who denounced an 'extremely organized' night of vandalism. Police spokesman Hans Lippens said Tuesday that initial reports indicate that about 80 cars were set ablaze overnight, chiefly in Sweden's second largest city, Goteborg, and nearby Trollhattan, an industrial city. Fires were also reported on a smaller scale in Malmo, Sweden's third largest city. In Trollhattan, northeast of Goteborg, where at least six cars were burned, rocks were also thrown at police and roads were blocked. Goteborg is 400 kilometers (250 miles) southwest of Stockholm. Lippens said that because the fires started within a short period of time, 'we cannot exclude that there is a connection between the blazes.' Photos posted by Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet showed black-clad men torching cars on a parking lot near Goteborg. Sweden's news agency TT said witnesses had seen 'masked youngsters' running away. Lippens said several youths that police met at the scene have been identified. 'We have spoken with them but we cannot conclude they started the fires. We also have spoken with their parents,' he told local media. He was not available for further comments. Two people, aged 16 and 21 and living in the Goteborg suburb of Frolunda where some the fires took place, were detained for questioning, police said. More suspects likely could be detained. Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven lashed out at the perpetrators, asking them: 'What the heck are you doing?' In an interview on Swedish radio, he said he was 'really getting mad' and that 'society must react in a tough manner.' He said the fires seemed to be 'extremely organized.' No injuries have been reported. However, the fires occupy police and rescue officials and frighten residents. 'You damage residential areas and ruin it for your neighbors,' Lofven said. 'I am speechless. This so terrible, it's destructive and it's pure evil,' Jonas Ransgaard, a member of the Goteborg City council, told local daily Goteborgs-Posten.
  • The Latest on a crash outside the House of Parliament in London (all times local): 1:10 p.m. U.S. President Donald Trump has called a crash outside Britain's Parliament 'another terrorist attack in London.' Trump tweeted: 'These animals are crazy and must be dealt with through toughness and strength!' Three people were hurt when a speeding car struck pedestrians and cyclists before crashing into a barrier at Parliament on Tuesday morning. British police say the crash appears to be deliberate they are treating is as an act of terrorism, but they have yet to determine the driver's motive. Trump has a history of tweeting about violence, or alleged violence, in London. He angered many when he said a London hospital was like a war zone because of knife violence. ___ 12 noon London police say an incident in which a car was driven into a barrier near the Houses of Parliament appears to be a deliberate act.  London Assistant Police Commissioner Neil Basu say the motorist who slammed into pedestrians and cyclists near Britain's Houses of Parliament was arrested on suspicion of terrorist offenses.  The suspect is not cooperating with police. Basu says no other suspects have been identified and there is no 'intelligence' of further danger to London. ___ 11:45 a.m. Britain's government will be holding a session of its emergency committee following what it described as a suspected terrorist incident near the Houses of Parliament.    The session of the COBRA committee was called after a motorist slammed into pedestrians and cyclists before hitting a barrier near the House of Lords on Tuesday. Two people were hurt, but authorities said none of the injuries is life-threatening. Prime Minister Theresa May has offered her praise for the emergency services for their 'immediate and courageous response,' following the incident. ___ 10:30 a.m. London's Metropolitan Police say that they are treating the crash outside of Parliament as a terrorist incident. Authorities said in a statement Tuesday that a man in his 20s was arrested on suspicion of terrorist offenses after the silver Ford Fiesta collided with a number of cyclists and pedestrians before crashing into the barriers during the morning rush hour. He is in custody. No one else was in the car, which is being searched at the scene of the accident. Two people were hurt, but authorities said none of the injuries were life-threatening. ___ 9:35 a.m. London's Metropolitan Police say that the Counter-Terrorism Command is leading the investigation after a car crashed into security barriers outside the Houses of Parliament. There were a number of people injured in Tuesday's incident, though none are in life-threatening condition. The police force says it is keeping an open mind about the incident, which comes only a year after Khalid Masood ploughed a car into crowds on Westminster Bridge, killing four people. Masood abandoned his car then stabbed and killed a police officer before being shot in a courtyard outside Parliament. ___ 8:55 a.m. London's Metropolitan Police say no one is in a life-threatening condition following a car crash outside the Houses of Parliament. Armed police have swooped on the area, cordoning off streets around Parliament Square, Millbank and Victoria Tower Gardens. Sky News video showed a man being arrested after the incident on Tuesday.  The car slammed into barriers that had been extended following the Westminster Bridge attack in March 2017 when Khalid Masood ploughed a car into crowds on Westminster Bridge, killing four people. ___ 8:15 a.m. London police say that a car has crashed into barriers outside the Houses of Parliament and that there are a number of injured. Police said that the driver of car, a man, was arrested at scene after the incident which took place at 7:37 a.m. Tuesday in London. No other details were immediately available, but Metropolitan Police said on Twitter that they will issue more information when they have it.
  • London police say investigators are treating a Tuesday morning crash outside the Houses of Parliament as a “terrorist incident.” Here are the latest updates: Update 5:46 a.m. EDT Aug. 14: A man in his late 20s has been arrested “on suspicion of terrorist offenses” in connection with the crash that left “a number of people” injured, London police said in a news release. The injuries are not believed to be life-threatening. The man, who was driving a silver Ford Fiesta, struck cyclists and pedestrians before hitting security barriers in the area, police said. The car was not carrying any passengers, police said. “At this stage, we are treating this as a terrorist incident and the Met's Counter Terrorism Command is now leading the investigation,” the news release said. Authorities are requesting anyone with photos, videos or information about the incident to contact police. Read more here. Original report: London’s Counter-Terrorism Command is leading the probe into a Tuesday morning crash outside the U.K. Houses of Parliament, The Associated Press is reporting. Police said a man driving a car slammed into security barriers in the area about 7:37 a.m., hurting pedestrians. None of the injured “are in life-threatening condition,” the AP reported. Police arrested the man. Metropolitan police tweeted that authorities are “keeping an open mind” about the investigation. In March 2017, four people were killed in a terror attack in the same area, the AP reported. – The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • With less than three months until the mid-term elections for the U.S. House and Senate, four more states hold primaries today for the Congress, but the roster of races is unlikely to produce the news associated with last week’s tight race in a special U.S. House election in Ohio, which amplified questions about whether the GOP can maintain control of Capitol Hill after November. Primaries take place on Tuesday in four states: Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont and Wisconsin. No sitting incumbents in the Congress are on upset alert at this point – though there could always be some out-of-the-blue defeat that no one saw coming; but really, this is more about setting the roster for the final races in November. At this point in time, the Congressional change for November is 57 seats in the House, and 3 in the Senate. (Please note that various news organizations calculate these numbers differently.) As you can see from the data, the total change is already equal to that for the House in the 2016 election cycle, as a large amount of turnover continues in the Congress. Most people don’t realize that currently in the U.S. House, almost 200 of the 435 seats are held by lawmakers who were elected since 2012 – that number will grow substantially after the 2018 elections. In the Senate, fully half of Senators have less than eight years in office, just over one term. The primaries for 2018 are rapidly coming to an end – next Tuesday brings Alaska and Wyoming; Arizona and Florida vote on August 28. Then, after Labor Day, Massachusetts, Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island finish out the primaries for the 2018 mid-term elections for Congress. November is not that far away.
  • The Wagoner County Sheriff’s Office is focusing on busting sex offenders who fail to register. Wagoner County deputies say they recently discovered that Raymond Bryant was registering at his parent’s home near Coweta, but had not lived there in years.  Investigators learned that Bryant has was self-employed doing lawn care jobs.  They set up a meeting last Wednesday to discuss a job at a convenience store in Coweta.  When Bryant arrived, he was taken into custody for his outstanding warrant without incident.   Bryant was transported to the Wagoner County Detention Center and was booked in on a 10,000 bond. Sheriff Chris Elliott said, “We will continue to aggressively pursue any offender that does not register as a sex offender when they are required to do so.”
  • Embarking on a mission that scientists have been dreaming of since the Sputnik era, a NASA spacecraft hurtled Sunday toward the sun on a quest to unlock some of its mysteries by getting closer than any object sent before. If all goes well, the Parker Solar Probe will fly straight through the wispy edges of the sun’s corona, or outer atmosphere, in November. In the years ahead, it will gradually get within 3.8 million miles of the surface, its instruments protected from the extreme heat and radiation by a revolutionary new carbon heat shield and other high-tech wizardry. Altogether, the Parker probe will make 24 close approaches to our star during the seven-year, $1.5 billion journey. “Wow, here we go. We’re in for some learning over the next several years,” said Eugene Parker, the 91-year-old astrophysicist for whom the spacecraft is named.  It was Parker who accurately theorized 60 years ago the existence of solar wind — the supersonic stream of charged particles blasting off the sun and coursing through space, sometimes wreaking havoc on electrical systems on Earth. This is the first time NASA has named a spacecraft after a living person.
  • The 'Queen of Soul,' legendary singer and songwriter Aretha Franklin, is gravely ill, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news Family members confirmed the news Monday to WDIV-TV after a report from entertainment site Showbiz411 claimed Franklin, 76, was being surrounded by friends and family in Detroit. Tom Joyner, a nationally syndicated radio host and friend of Franklin’s, said Monday that Franklin has been in hospice care for a week, according to The Detroit News.  Franklin had announced plans to retire from touring in February 2017 to focus on her family and a few select projects, the News reported. 'I feel very, very enriched and satisfied with respect to where my career came from, and where it is now,” Franklin told WDIV in 2017. “I'll be pretty much satisfied, but I'm not going to go anywhere and just sit down and do nothing. That wouldn't be good either.” Franklin has canceled several concerts this year due to health issues, Fox13Memphis reported. According to The Associated Press, “she was ordered by her doctor to stay off the road and rest up.” She performed  in her hometown of Detroit in June 2017, the Detroit Free Press reported. She ended the concert with an appeal for those in the crown to, “Please keep me in your prayers,” according to the newspaper. >> Photos: Aretha Franklin through the years She last performed in November at Elton John’s AIDS Foundation gala in New York City, the News reported. Franklin was born March 25, 1942, in Memphis, Tennessee. Her family moved to Detroit when she was young, according to Fox13Memphis. Franklin started singing when she was young, with encouragement from her mother, Barbara, and her father, the Rev. C.L. Franklin. She started out singing gospel but launched a career in secular music after she turned 18. She rose to fame after signing in 1967 with Atlantic Records. Franklin’s career, spanning six decades, has spawned hits including “Respect,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and “Chain of Fools.” She’s considered one of the best-selling artists of all time, selling more than 75 million albums worldwide. Franklin was inducted in 1987 to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. She’s earned 18 Grammy Awards and a Presidential Medal of Freedom for her work. In 2005, then-President George W. Bush described Franklin as “a woman of achievement, deep character and a loving heart.” Check back for updates to this developing story.