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    Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the border, about 2,000 Central American migrants swam or rafted across a river separating that country from Guatemala, re-formed their mass caravan in Mexico and vowed to resume their journey toward the United States. The migrants, who said they gave up trying to enter Mexico legally because the asylum process was too slow, gathered on Saturday at a park in the border city of Ciudad Hidalgo. They voted by a show of hands to continue north en masse, then marched to the bridge crossing the Suchiate River and urged those still on it to come join them. 'We are going to reach the United States,' said Erasmo Duarte, a migrant from Honduras, despite warnings to turn back this week from President Donald Trump.
  • Friends say Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was a proud Arab who wanted to set up a base in his ancestral homeland of Turkey, contributing to the growing community of exiled Arabs who have taken refuge there. For Khashoggi, a history lover, the growing Arabic community and Turkey's power in the region echoed aspects of the Ottoman empire, when Istanbul was at the center of a rich and multicultural Middle East. With millions of Arab exiles who fled their homes because of wars or oppression, Turkey has become a fertile ground for talent and ideas, a place where Khashoggi might be able to pursue his own projects, including a pro-democracy group, a media watch group, a forum to translate economic studies and launching online magazines. Khashoggi was planning to marry his Turkish fiancée on Oct. 3, a day after he walked into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to get his divorce from a previous marriage confirmed. He had bought a home in Istanbul and friends said he planned to split his time between there and Virginia, where he had owned a condo since 2008. He never emerged from the consulate. Saudi authorities said Saturday that he died in a brawl involving visiting officials, an account that has drawn widespread skepticism. Turkish pro-government media say a Saudi hit squad traveled to Turkey to kill the columnist for The Washington Post which has called for an investigation led by a U.N.-appointed panel to determine what happened. Khashoggi's killing sent a chilling message to the many exiled Arabs who have taken refuge in Turkey. Several anti-government Arab TV stations broadcast from Turkey and Istanbul's Arab Media Association has about 800 members. Turkey has also welcomed thousands of members of Egypt's now-outlawed Muslim Brotherhood group, after its then-President member was ousted from power by the military in 2013. Many Syrian groups opposed to President Bashar Assad have also unsurprisingly converged in neighboring Turkey, where nearly 3 million Syrians have fled to escape the war back home. Eiad Alhaji, a Syrian filmmaker who was working with Khashoggi on a video about an Ottoman military figure central to Arab-Turkish relations, described their time together after work and interviews. 'We used to go together to sit and talk, two strangers outside our country and society, about what is happening with the Arabs in Turkey and in America. Me as a Syrian, and him as a Saudi Arabian,' said Alhaji. 'He was pained to be living in exile but at the same time, he was glad to be free in his opinion and new life.' Another companion, Fatih Oke, of Istanbul's Arab Media Association, said Khashoggi was an important adviser to the group and 'we had plans to establish some projects.' In his last interviews, Khashoggi declared his support for Turkey's policy toward Syria, while criticizing his own government's stance. Saudi Arabia has grown closer to the U.S. policy in Syria, openly supporting Kurdish-led forces in eastern Syria that Turkey sees as a threat. Khashoggi had criticized his country's rift with Turkey, arguing that an alliance between the two regional powerhouses should come more naturally than a U.S.-Saudi partnership. Khashoggi, once a Saudi royal family insider, grew critical of the kingdom's rulers following their crackdown on opposition, their war on neighboring Yemen and the severing of ties with the small Gulf state of Qatar. Khashoggi found a 'welcoming place' in Istanbul, said Azzam Tamimi, a British-Palestinian. 'In Istanbul you don't feel like a stranger, the people, the food, the habits,' Tamimi said. 'Also, Turkey's current political authority has been the closest to Arabs since the fall of the Ottoman Empire a hundred years ago. Erdogan and his party opened up to the Arabs.' Turkey has itself faced criticism for jailing more journalists during a crackdown after an attempted coup in 2016. Khashoggi's ancestors lived in what is today central Turkey. The family's name means spoon maker and its Turkish spelling is 'Kasikci.' Alhaji, the filmmaker, said Khashoggi was an 'encyclopedia' of the region's history. Alhaji worked with Khashoggi on a documentary on the life of Fakhreddine Pasha, the last Ottoman governor and military commander in al-Medina who defended the city in modern day Saudi Arabia against an Arab revolt during World War I. The siege signaled the fall of the Ottoman Empire and the birth of new Arab states. Khashoggi's family was displaced during the fighting — some fled to Izmir, in modern Turkey, including his father, while others went to Damascus. The legacy of Fakhreddine, who fought against the birth of new nation states to preserve Ottoman influence, is a deeply divisive issue between Gulf leaders and Turkey. Last year, Gulf rulers, critical of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, compared the two, accusing Fakhreddine of robbing them of their heritage by taking manuscripts out of al-Madina to Istanbul as he left. Ankara, which sided with Qatar, responded by naming the street in Ankara of the Emirati embassy after Fakhreddine. 'This period is a turning point for the future of all Arab countries and Middle East,' said Alhajji on what he believed Khashoggi hoped to convey with their project. 'We (should) not be focused on Fakhreddine as a biography but we should deal with the history of this period.
  • Congo's health minister called it a 'dark day' for everyone fighting the deadly Ebola outbreak after rebels shot and killed two medical agents with the Congolese army who had been assisting health officials. It appeared to be the first time health workers have been killed by rebels in this outbreak, which is taking place in what has been compared to a war zone. Multiple rebel groups are active in Congo's far northeast. The health ministry statement late Saturday said Mai Mai rebels surged from the forest and opened fire on the unarmed agents with the army's rapid intervention medical unit at an entrance to Butembo city. The daytime attack appeared premeditated, with civilians present left unharmed, the statement said. The medical agents had been placed in 'dangerous zones' to assist national border health officials. Health workers in this outbreak have described hearing gunshots daily, carrying out Ebola containment work under armed escort and having to end their work by sundown to lower the risk of attack. The number of confirmed Ebola cases has now reached 200, including 117 deaths. Aid groups expressed alarm after the insecurity and sometimes hostile community resistance led the rate of new cases to more than double this month. Congo's health ministry has reported 'numerous aggressions' against health workers, and two Red Cross volunteers were severely injured in one confrontation with wary community members in a region traumatized by decades of fighting and facing an Ebola outbreak for the first time. 'Health agents are not a target for armed groups,' Health Minister Oly Ilunga said Saturday. 'Our agents will continue to go into the field each day to fulfill the mission entrusted to them. They are true heroes and we will continue to take all necessary measures so that they can do their job safely.' A deadly rebel attack against civilians in Beni late last month forced the suspension of Ebola containment efforts for days, and the effects are still being seen. Many of the new confirmed cases this month, including six reported on Saturday, have been in Beni, which is where most of the Ebola work in this outbreak is based. On Wednesday, the World Health Organization said it was 'deeply concerned' by the ongoing outbreak but that the situation does not yet warrant being declared a global emergency. To warrant being declared a global emergency, an outbreak must be 'an extraordinary event' that might cross borders, requiring a coordinated response. Confirmed cases in this outbreak have been found near the heavily traveled border with Uganda. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • Nigeria's government says 55 people have been killed in the latest eruption of communal violence in north-central Kaduna state. A spokesman says President Muhammadu Buhari condemns the fighting that led to Thursday's killings in Kasuwan Magani and that 'frequent resort to bloodshed by Nigerians over misunderstandings that can be resolved peacefully is worrisome.' Kaduna's governor cites the state police commissioner as saying that more than 20 people have been arrested. The governor urges 'peace and harmony despite ethnic and religious diversity.' Central Nigeria has seen bouts of deadly communal violence that some blame on ethnic and religious differences and others blame on tensions over increasingly scarce resources in Africa's most populous nation. Nigeria is about equally divided between a largely Christian south and Muslim north.
  • The official Saudi statements on the fate of journalist Jamal Khashoggi have changed several times since he mysteriously disappeared after entering his country's consulate in Istanbul earlier this month. The latest announcement on Saturday, declaring that Khashoggi had died in a 'fistfight' with officials that came to see him there, increased criticism over Saudi's handling of the case and concern over the kingdom's possible complicity in the killing of the prominent Washington Post columnist. Here is a look at the Saudi narrative regarding Khashoggi, as it developed. ___ Oct. 2: Khashoggi enters the Saudi consulate in a leafy neighborhood in Istanbul at 1.14 p.m. on Tuesday. He had left his mobile phones with his Turkish fiancée, who waited for him outside the consulate. She calls friends hours later to tell them that Khashoggi never emerged from the consulate. Oct. 3: In a wide-ranging interview, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman tells Bloomberg he understands that Khashoggi left the consulate after 'a few minutes or one hour.' Bin Salman says his kingdom's authorities are in talks with the Turkish government to determine what happen. He insists Khashoggi is no longer inside the consulate and says Turkish authorities are welcome to search the diplomatic mission. 'We have nothing to hide,' says the crown prince. Oct. 4: On Twitter, the Saudi consulate in Istanbul says it is following up on media reports of Khashoggi's disappearance 'after he left the building' of the consulate. Oct. 4: Turkey summons the Saudi ambassador. Oct. 6: Saudi Arabia says it has dispatched a team to 'investigate and cooperate' with Turkish officials over Khashoggi's case. Oct. 7: Turkish officials say Khashoggi has been killed at the consulate. A Saudi government statement describes the Turkish allegations as 'baseless.' Oct. 9: Turkey says it will search the consulate. Oct. 11: Turkey says it has agreed with Saudi Arabia to form a joint group to shed light on the disappeared journalist's fate. The Saudi team arrives in Istanbul a day later. Oct. 13: Saudi Arabia's interior minister describes claims in the media that there were 'orders to kill (Khashoggi)' as 'lies and baseless allegations.' Turkish media quote officials as saying Khashoggi has been killed and dismembered inside the consulate. Oct. 14: Turkey's Foreign Ministry renews calls on Saudi Arabia to allow investigators to search the consulate. Oct. 15: Nearly two weeks after Khashoggi's disappearance, teams of Turkish investigators enter the consulate to start their search. Oct. 15: A Saudi-owned satellite news channel says the 15-member team referred to by Turkish media as Khashoggi's 'hit squad' were 'tourists' visiting Turkey. Oct. 16: Without warning, the Saudi consul in Istanbul, a key witness in the case, leaves Turkey to Saudi Arabia. Oct. 17: Turkish authorities begin searching the consul's residence in Istanbul. Oct. 19: In an announcement early Saturday, Saudi Arabia's public prosecutor says preliminary investigations show an 'altercation' and 'fistfight' led to Khashoggi's death shortly after he arrived at the consulate. He adds that 18 Saudi nationals were detained. A Saudi foreign ministry official says the kingdom is investigating the 'regrettable and painful incident of Jamal Khashoggi's death' and forming a committee to hold those responsible accountable.
  • Are you ready to make your mark on Atlanta’s film and TV industry? Are you the next Tyler Perry? ATL is in need of young stars. Check out the Peach City’s latest casting call for your chance at fame.  » RELATED: 9 big movies filming in Georgia in 2017 ‘Sextuplets’ The Netflix series “Sextuplets” stars Marlon Wayans as a man who’s embarking on a journey to meet his birth mother before his first child is born, according to Deadline. He meets his brother and learns he was born a sextuplet, and they set out on a road trip to find the rest of the family. Wayans portrays all the siblings.  What are they looking for? The following roles are available: An African-American female in her 20’s or 30’s with a car that is not silver, red or white A male in his 50’s to 70’s with a slim build to portray a clerk » RELATED: 10 reasons to seek a job in Atlanta’s TV and film industry When are they filming? Filming is in the Fairburn area on Oct. 24-26. You must be available all three nights. How much does it pay? Pay is to be determined. How do I submit? Send an email to SextupletsExtras@gmail.com with “3 DAY CUSTOMER” or “3 DAY CLERK” in the subject line. Include a recent photo and your contact information. » RELATED: Take these classes and workshops to break into Georgia's film and TV industry
  • Former Dutch Prime Minister Wim Kok, a trade unionist-turned-politician who inspired a new breed of pragmatic Social Democratic leaders who swept to power in Europe in the 1990s, has died at 80. Current Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said Kok, who died Saturday, 'was a man to look up to — if only for his long service and great importance for our country.' Labor Party leader Lodewijk Asscher called Kok a 'model of integrity.' Kok hitched his Dutch Labor Party to the right-wing Liberal Party and to the centrist Democrats 66 to form two ruling coalitions that steered the Netherlands to unprecedented economic success from 1994 to 2002. Ahead of Kok's second election victory in 1998, British Prime Minister Tony Blair praised him as 'one of the greatest people in politics today.' Kok's middle-of-the-road policies were also praised by former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and former French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin. Dutch King Willem-Alexander, his wife Queen Maxima and former queen Beatrix issued a statement Saturday praising Kok for his 'integrity and talent for making complex problems manageable.' Kok defused public unease about the royal couple's marriage by persuading Maxima's father, Jorge Zorreguieta, not to attend the 2002 wedding. Zorreguieta had served as agriculture minister for two years during the 1976-83 dictatorship of Argentine President Jorge Videla. Later that year, Kok resigned as prime minister along with his entire government following a critical report of the administration's handling of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre in Bosnia, when Dutch U.N. peacekeepers failed to prevent the slaughter of some 8,000 Muslim men and boys by Bosnian Serb forces. A government-commissioned report harshly criticized Kok's administration for sending Dutch soldiers into a danger zone without a proper mandate or the weapons needed to protect about 30,000 refugees who had fled to the Dutch base in eastern Bosnia. Rutte said 'it was no secret that the Srebrenica tragedy weighed him down until the very end.' One of Kok's strongest selling points in a nation that nurtures a strong distrust of authority was his image as an ordinary man made good — a trustworthy, down-to-earth realist. During the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Kok and his wife Rita decided to see more of the United States. Turning down the Secret Service's offer of 24-hour protection, the Koks rented a Winnebago and struck out on their own. Their only concession to the security-conscious American authorities was to call the CIA daily from a sheriff's office to tell them where they were. 'Small-town sheriffs would begin telling their friends about the tourist who pretended to be the Dutch prime minister,' said Erica Terpstra, a former Dutch sports official. 'Kok laughed out loud about it.' Kok, the son of a Dutch carpenter, will be remembered as one of the founding fathers of the 'Polder Model.' It refers to the uniquely Dutch brand of consensus politics in which the government, employers and trade unions got together to thrash out pay deals. The policy saw unions agree to belt-tightening measures in harsh economic times as long as employees were allowed to share in the profits when things were going well. A left-wing leader of the most powerful Dutch union before he moved into national politics, Kok shifted to the right of the political spectrum during his time in government. Despite that, his reputation for political honesty remained unscathed. 'Personally, he drifted from far left to fairly right,' Christian Democrat Bert de Vries, a former colleague, said in a 1998 interview. 'I couldn't pull that off, but he believes in it. He is a survivor.' After his political career, Kok was a non-executive board member at Dutch multinationals, including Shell and KLM. A self-made man from a working-class background, Kok studied at the country's prestigious Nijenrode Business School. After spending the early part of his career working for trade unions, Kok was elected to parliament's lower house in 1986, serving as parliamentary leader of the left-wing Labor Party. Three years later, he became finance minister in the third government of ex-Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers. He became prime minister in 1994, when the Labor Party won 37 seats in the 150-seat Parliament, knocking Lubbers' Christian Democrats out of power for the first time in the party's history. Kok is survived by his wife Rita and three children. Funeral arrangements were not immediately announced.
  • Hundreds of history buffs have re-enacted the 19th-century Battle of Leipzig, which saw the defeat of Napoleon I's army by combined forces from Prussia, Austria, Russia and Sweden. Enthusiasts from across Europe, dressed in period costumes, fired muskets and cannons at each other Saturday as spectators looked on near Germany's eastern city of Leipzig. The Battle of Leipzig took place from Oct. 16-19, 1813. It pitted hundreds of thousands of soldiers against each other and is considered one of the bloodiest battles in European history.
  • The assassination of Afghan leaders in Kandahar province won't lessen U.S. support for the war in Afghanistan or deter local security forces in the fight against the Taliban, the top U.S. military commander in the Middle East said Saturday. Gen. Joseph Votel said the U.S. was 'pretty confident that the Afghans will be able to maintain the situation down' in Kandahar. The Taliban said Thursday's attack, which killed an influential police chief, targeted the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan. But U.S. military officials have said Army Gen. Scott Miller was not in the line of fire, and he escaped unharmed. The attack just before Saturday's parliamentary elections, where violence marred some balloting, was as a stark reminder of the formidable task the Trump administration faces as it tries to extricate America from its longest war. Votel expressed confidence in the ability of the Afghan forces to provide security for the election and into the future. 'My assessment is the Afghans are resilient to this,' he said. 'I don't consider it to be something that will change the security situation.' The Kandahar shooting, he said, won't diminish 'our will or on us going forward.' Votel's comment to reporters traveling with him at Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar echoed the sentiment expressed by U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis on Friday. 'We remain absolutely committed to an Afghan-led Afghan reconciliation,' Mattis told reporters Friday at an Asian security conference in Singapore. 'Right now, we're going toward the election and we will continue to defend the Afghan people.' But the timing of the attack makes U.S. goals seem ever more distant. It came just a week after reported U.S. back-channel talks with the Taliban and as the administration steps up efforts to kick-start peace negotiations between the militant group and the Afghan government to end the war, now entering its 18th year. There are about 14,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan on a mission to train and assist Afghan government forces in taking the fight to the Taliban, which controls or contests close to half the districts in the country. Violence is rising, claiming the lives of hundreds of civilians every month. There have been seven U.S. combat deaths so far this year. U.S. Army Col. David Butler, who was near where the shooting occurred after Miller met Afghan officials, disputed the Taliban and said the target was Kandahar police chief Abdul Raziq, one of the three officials killed. But even their claim that they were going after Miller cast doubt on whether the militants are indeed willing to negotiate. The recent appointment of former U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan Zalmay Khalilzad as envoy for Afghan reconciliation was intended to energize the U.S. peace effort and coax the Taliban into direct talks with the government of Ashraf Ghani. The Taliban said its political representatives in Qatar met with Khalilzad a week ago, during his first multination trip since he took up his new post. The State Department did not confirm the Oct. 12 meeting, but did not deny it either, which was widely viewed in Washington as tacit acknowledgement it happened. A similar scenario played out in July, when the Taliban reported a meeting with the senior U.S. diplomat for South and Central Asia, Alice Wells. The risk of such back-channel talks is that could alienate the Afghan government. The Taliban claimed the two sides discussed finding a way to withdraw foreign forces from Afghanistan — an issue that the Afghan government would demand a say in as it would be key to any peace settlement. Because U.S. officials haven't confirmed that the meeting happened, they have not been able to publicly deny the Taliban's account of the meeting. The Taliban have condemned the elections, calling them a U.S.-manipulated event to further their hold on the country, and pledged to disrupt them. The election for the 249-seat lower house is already three years overdue. The U.S. committed nearly $80 million in aid for U.N.-led support of Afghan election authorities. Voting in southern Kandahar province was been postponed for a week because of Thursday's attack and wasn't taking place at all in Ghazni because of insecurity there. ____ Baldor reported from Doha, Qatar. Associated Press writers Deb Riechmann in Washington and Robert Burns in Singapore contributed to this report.
  • Two tropical storms are swirling in the Pacific Ocean off Mexico, and one is forecast to become a hurricane and approach the country's west coast late next week. Tropical Storm Willa is the 21st named storm of the eastern Pacific hurricane season. It was about 280 miles (450 kilometers) south-southwest of the port city of Manzanillo on Saturday afternoon with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph (95 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center said it was likely to remain well off the coast through Wednesday, when it could approach Mexico's west-central mainland as a hurricane. Tropical Storm Vicente formed Friday off the coast of the southern state of Chiapas. Its core was about 135miles (215 kilometers) southeast of Salina Cruz, Mexico. It had maximum sustained winds of 50 mph (85 kph). The center said it could produce 3 to 6 inches of rain along Mexico's southern Pacific coast and parts of Guatemala.
  • KRMG has previously told you about the Gathering Place banning firearms. Gerry Bender, Tulsa’s Litigation Division manager, recently told the Tulsa World police won't arrest people who violate the park's gun policy. This is reportedly because of concerns such an action would be legally challenged. Under state law, firearms are allowed to be carried on property designated by a governmental authority as a park, recreational area or fairgrounds. “TPD has had a presence at the Gathering Place since its opening and will continue to do so in order for the citizens of Tulsa to enjoy the park in a safe environment,” a Tulsa police statement reads.  “We maintain the legal authority to enforce all ordinances and State laws applicable to private spaces open to the public.” Do you believe people should be allowed to have firearms at the Gathering Place?  Let us know in the comments.  
  • You can put away your umbrella in the Tulsa area today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Chuck Hodges says we have a beautiful fall day ahead of us. “Fog should be clearing out,” Hodges said.  “We should have plenty of sun.  We are looking at highs probably in the lower 70’s.” The normal high for Tulsa this time of year is in the mid-70’s.   If you have outdoor plans Saturday night, bring a heavy coat.  The low will be close to 37 degrees.
  • This Saturday marks the 45th anniversary of the infamous ‘Saturday Night Massacre,’ when an embattled President Richard Nixon fired the special Watergate prosecutor, but only after both the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General refused to carry out the President’s orders, and resigned from their positions. The move by President Nixon came during an ongoing legal dispute over the release of the Watergate tapes – recordings made in the Oval Office by a secret taping system that the President had installed – which ultimately contained evidence that forced Nixon from office. Special Watergate Prosecutor Archibald Cox wanted all the tapes for his investigation, but even with the backing of a federal court order, President Nixon refused to turn them over, instead offering summaries, an offer that Cox refused to accept. “I’m not looking for a confrontation,” Cox told an October 20, 1973 news conference at the National Press. “I’m certainly not out to get the President of the United States.” Several hours later, Nixon ordered that Cox be fired. The President first asked Attorney General Elliot Richardson to fire Cox. Richardson refused and quickly resigned. The same request the went to Deputy Attorney General Williams Ruckleshaus. Like Richardson, Ruckleshaus also refused and quit. Finally, the firing of Cox was carried out by Solicitor General Robert Bork. It’s a scenario that some have focused on, wondering if President Donald Trump might try to end the investigation of Special Counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. In an op-ed in August of 2018, Ruckleshaus drew parallels between Watergate and the current battle over the Russia investigation. “President Trump is acting with a desperation I’ve seen only once before in Washington,” Ruckleshaus wrote. “45 years ago when President Richard M. Nixon ordered the firing of special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox.” “Nixon was fixated on ending the Watergate investigation, just as Trump wants to shut down the Mueller investigation,” Ruckleshaus added. It took until late July of 1974 for the U.S. Supreme Court to finally order Nixon to turn over the tapes – in a unanimous 8-0 ruling. Nixon resigned soon after, on August 8, 1974.
  • Federal prosecutors in New York announced the arrest on Friday of a man who allegedly threatened to murder and assault a pair of U.S. Senators for their support of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, as police say the suspect placed a series of threatening telephone calls in which the man threatened to shoot the Senators if they supported the Kavanaugh nomination. In court documents unsealed on Friday, a special agent with the U.S. Capitol Police detailed a number of voice mails left by the suspect, identified as Ronald DeRisi of Smithtown, on Long Island in New York. The expletive-filled messages came during the final stages of debate on the Kavanaugh nomination, some as Kavanaugh testified for a second time before the Senate Judiciary Committee, on the same day as a woman who accused him of sexual misconduct back when they were in high school. “The male caller, who did not identify himself on the recording, stated in relevant part, that he had a “present” for Senator-1, specifically: “It’s a nine millimeter,” court documents stated. “He’s a dead man! Nine millimeter, side of the f—ing head!” police quoted the phone threats. More voice mails were allegedly left by DeRisi after Kavanaugh had been confirmed by the Senate, as he called a second Senator’s office and left threatening messages. “I’m gonna get you,” police quoted the message. “Don’t you know that guy’s a sex offender?” At one point, the suspect allegedly read off the home address of the second Senator; it was not immediately clear from the court documents what two Senators had been targeted by the phone calls. Court documents show that DeRisi pled guilty in 2015 to making threatening phone calls, and that police compared the telphone evidence from the two cases.