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State and Regional News

    The winning numbers in Wednesday evening's drawing of the 'Lotto America' game were: 01-05-09-15-33, Star Ball: 5, ASB: 2 (one, five, nine, fifteen, thirty-three; Star Ball: five; ASB: two) Estimated jackpot: $3.74 million
  • The winning numbers in Wednesday evening's drawing of the 'Powerball' game were: 01-05-25-63-67, Powerball: 3, Power Play: 2 (one, five, twenty-five, sixty-three, sixty-seven; Powerball: three; Power Play: two) Estimated jackpot: $100 million ¶ ___ ¶ Online: ¶ Multi-State Lottery Association: http://www.powerball.com/
  • Brooks 10-17 5-5 30, Anderson 3-6 1-1 7, Jackson Jr. 6-17 4-4 18, Jones 7-13 2-2 16, Allen 1-5 4-4 6, Hill 2-3 0-0 6, Jackson 0-3 0-0 0, Caboclo 3-4 3-4 10, Rabb 4-6 2-5 10, Plumlee 1-3 0-0 2, Guduric 3-7 1-2 7, Watanabe 2-5 4-5 8, Konchar 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 44-94 26-32 124. Nader 2-9 2-2 8, Gallinari 3-12 7-8 16, Adams 6-9 0-2 12, Schroder 3-9 0-0 8, Gilgeous-Alexander 7-13 3-4 17, Bazley 2-8 3-4 7, Muscala 5-7 3-3 17, Patton 2-5 0-0 4, Hall 6-9 4-4 19, Burton 3-5 0-0 6, Dort 2-3 0-0 5, Gaddy 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-89 22-27 119. 3-Point Goals_Memphis 10-29 (Brooks 5-9, Hill 2-2, Jackson Jr. 2-8, Caboclo 1-1, Anderson 0-1, Rabb 0-1, Guduric 0-1, Konchar 0-1, Allen 0-2, Jackson 0-3), Oklahoma City 15-37 (Muscala 4-6, Hall 3-6, Gallinari 3-7, Schroder 2-4, Nader 2-5, Dort 1-2, Burton 0-1, Patton 0-2, Gilgeous-Alexander 0-2, Bazley 0-2). Fouled Out_Jackson Jr.. Rebounds_Memphis 49 (Jackson Jr., Konchar 10), Oklahoma City 48 (Gallinari 10). Assists_Memphis 23 (Anderson 5), Oklahoma City 21 (Bazley, Schroder 6). Total Fouls_Memphis 23, Oklahoma City 23.
  • These Oklahoma lotteries were drawn Wednesday: 05-26-28-30-31 (five, twenty-six, twenty-eight, thirty, thirty-one) 01-05-09-15-33, Star Ball: 5, ASB: 2 (one, five, nine, fifteen, thirty-three; Star Ball: five; ASB: two) Estimated jackpot: $3.74 million Estimated jackpot: $71 million 5-3-3 (five, three, three) 01-05-25-63-67, Powerball: 3, Power Play: 2 (one, five, twenty-five, sixty-three, sixty-seven; Powerball: three; Power Play: two) Estimated jackpot: $100 million
  • The winning numbers in Wednesday evening's drawing of the Oklahoma Lottery's 'Cash 5' game were: 05-26-28-30-31 (five, twenty-six, twenty-eight, thirty, thirty-one)
  • The winning numbers in Wednesday evening's drawing of the Oklahoma Lottery's 'Pick 3' game were: 5-3-3 (five, three, three)
  • Efforts to settle thousands of lawsuits related to the nation's opioid epidemic intensified Wednesday ahead of the scheduled start of arguments in the first federal trial over the crisis. A person with knowledge of the negotiations told The Associated Press that three major drug distributors plus two manufacturers were working on the outlines of a settlement. It would include $22 billion in cash over time plus up to $15 billion worth of overdose antidotes and treatment drugs, with distribution of those drugs valued at another $14 billion — a calculation of how much a distributor could charge for them. Under the proposal, the distributors AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson would pay a total of $18 billion over 18 years. Johnson & Johnson would pay $4 billion over time. Drugmaker Teva would contribute the drugs, but not cash. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the talks were ongoing and said the details of the deal could change. A $50 billion framework was first reported Wednesday by The New York Times. Samantha Fisher, a spokeswoman for the Tennessee attorney general's office, confirmed to the AP that that report 'appears to be correct on the details of the tentative settlement framework.' It's not clear whether states and local governments will accept the deal. 'We await the fine print of the settlement framework so that we can work alongside the 2,600 communities we represent to determine the best path forward,' the lead lawyers for local governments said in a statement Wednesday. 'Our priority when assessing settlement proposals is to ensure they will provide urgently-needed relief in the near term and that these resources will be directed exclusively toward efforts to abate the opioid epidemic.' The lawyers said the aim is 'to secure funds that will aid law enforcement officers, medical professionals, and treatment facility staff around the country for the decades-long recovery process ahead.' Drug companies and other state attorneys general who are leading the talks either did not return messages or comment. The talks are picking up as a jury is being selected in Cleveland for a trial on claims against some companies in the drug industry being brought by the Ohio counties of Cuyahoga and Summit. They claim the companies engaged in a conspiracy that has damaged their communities should be held accountable. Jury selection began Wednesday and could wrap up Thursday, with opening arguments scheduled Monday. Johnson & Johnson has already settled with the two counties. If the other companies settle, too, it would leave only the pharmacy chain Walgreens — in its role as a distributor to its own stores — and the smaller distributor Henry Schein as defendants. It's not clear whether the trial would go on in that case. The defendants in the Cleveland trial include Actavis and Cephalon, drug companies now owned by Teva. All the companies say they complied with the law and supplied only drugs that doctors prescribed. While the case concerns only claims for the two counties, it is a bellwether intended to show how legal issues might be resolved in more than 2,000 other lawsuits over the opioid crisis. In court Wednesday, lawyers for the defendants argued that the trial should be postponed in case potential jurors saw any of the coverage and would be tainted when learning of the massive amount of money possibly being discussed. U.S. District Court Judge Dan Polster said he didn't believe many of the potential jurors would have been exposed to the stories but that he would question them to determine whether they were aware of the coverage. A delay, he said, could push the trial into next year. The other major question was how to select a dozen jurors for a trial over opioids in a region hit particularly hard by addictions and overdoses. Questionnaires were sent to potential jurors in nine northeast Ohio counties, including Cuyahoga, which along with neighboring Summit County was chosen as the first plaintiff in a trial in what could become the most complicated class action lawsuit in U.S. history. Cuyahoga County is home to Cleveland, and Summit to the city of Akron. The questionnaire asked potential jurors to answer questions about their and immediate family members' experiences with prescription painkillers and the crisis itself. They were asked to check off whether they had ever used 11 different prescription opioids. Had they or family members ever used heroin or illicit fentanyl? Have they ever been prescribed painkillers after surgery? Have they or a family member ever been treated for addiction? Have they ever overdosed? Those with close connections to the crisis are expected to be excluded from serving on the jury. Counting prescription drugs and illegal ones such as heroin and illicitly made fentanyl, opioids have been blamed for more than 400,000 deaths in the U.S. since 2000. ___ Mulvihill reported from Cherry Hill, New Jersey. ___ Associated Press writers Jonathan Mattise in Nashville, Tennessee, and Julie Carr Smyth in Columbus, Ohio, contributed to this report.
  • The former top lawyer for the Oklahoma State Department of Health has pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor counts over sending bogus threatening emails to herself. Julia Ezell was pretending to be the target of an angry marijuana advocate. She pleaded guilty Wednesday to misdemeanor counts of using a computer to violate the law and falsely reporting a crime. Ezell, who's 38, was initially charged in July 2018 with two felonies and a misdemeanor for allegedly sending the threats and then lying to investigators about it. At the time, Ezell was helping the agency draft rules on medical marijuana that had just been approved by Oklahoma voters. Under a deferred-sentence plea deal, Ezell received five years of probation and was ordered to pay restitution for the cost of the criminal investigation.
  • The appeal of an Oklahoma death row inmate convicted of the shooting deaths of two men in 2006 has been rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court. The Oklahoman reports that the nation's highest court Tuesday declined to review the case of 39-year-old Kendrick Simpson, whose appeal was previously rejected by state and federal appeals courts. Simpson was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to die in the deaths of 20-year-old Glen Palmer and 19-year-old Anthony Jones following a confrontation at an Oklahoma City nightclub. Investigators say Simpson fired as many as 25 shots at the men. Simpson alleged in his appeal that his lawyer was ineffective during his trial. Oklahoma has not put an inmate to death since executions were halted in 2015 following a series of bungled lethal injections. ___ Information from: The Oklahoman, http://www.newsok.com
  • Colorado officials said Wednesday they want the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn an appeals court ruling that presidential electors can vote for the candidate of their choice and aren't bound by the popular vote in their states. The August decision by the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver puts 'our country at risk,' Secretary of State Jena Griswold said at a news conference attended by Attorney General Phil Weiser. Griswold has decried the ruling as a violation of the one person, one vote principle. Weiser said the decision threatens to put presidential elections 'in the hands of a few unaccountable presidential electors.' Four of the nine high court justices must agree to accept a case for it to be heard. Griswold and Weiser announced they'd filed their petition Wednesday, The Colorado Sun reported. Presidential electors almost always vote for the popular vote winner, and some states have laws requiring them to do so. Under the Electoral College system, voters who cast a ballot for president are choosing electors who are pledged to that presidential candidate. The electors then choose the president at the Electoral College. Colorado's political parties nominate the state's nine electors. In a split decision, the three-judge federal appeals panel said the Constitution allows electors to cast votes at their own discretion. The panel ruled in the case of Colorado elector Micheal Baca, who refused to vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton, the presidential winner in Colorado in 2016. Baca crossed out Clinton's name on his ballot and wrote in John Kasich, the Republican governor of Ohio, who also ran for president. Following state law, then-Secretary of State Wayne Williams removed Baca as an elector and replaced him with another who voted for Clinton. The 10th U.S. Circuit blocked a bid by two other Colorado electors to cast their ballots that year for someone other than Clinton. Those bids were blocked before the three-judge panel issued its decision in the Baca case. Baca said in a written statement that he looked forward to having the Supreme Court 'resolve the issue of elector freedom before the 2020 election.' Jason Harrow, chief counsel with the nonprofit group Equal Citizens who represents Baca, said he welcomed the chance for a full hearing before the high court. Equal Citizens also has asked the Supreme Court to take up a Washington case in which three electors were fined for refusing to vote for Clinton, the popular vote winner there. They cast their ballots for Republican Colin Powell. The Denver appeals court ruling in the Baca case applies to Colorado and five other states in the 10th Circuit: Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah and Wyoming. ___ This story has been corrected to show Baca's first name is spelled Micheal. ___ Information from: The Colorado Sun, http://coloradosun.com
  • A man was robbed in broad daylight in Brookside on Monday, Tulsa Police say, by a suspect who had a weird choice in weapons: a drill bit. Anthony Anson is accused of threatening the man with the drill bit and taking his phone. But police say the man got to a different phone and called police, who quickly spotted Anson. Anson then tried to claim that HE was the one who had been robbed, police say. “Officer didn't buy it, found that he had the phone is his pocket, and our victim was able to unlock the phone with his code to show that it was his phone,” said Tulsa Police Officer Danny Bean. Anson was arrested.
  • The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation released more details Wednesday on the victims from Tuesday night’s murder-suicide in Miami. Agents says 11-year-old Kayla Billings was shot and killed by her father, 39-year-old David Billings before he turned the gun on himself. Investigators say Wallace also shot his ex-wife and her boyfriend. Melissa Wallace and James Miller were found wounded outside of Miller’s home. Wallace and Miller were taken to a Tulsa hospital in critical condition. Wallace is pregnant. No word on the condition of the unborn child.
  • Angered by the outbreak of violence and a Turkish military invasion in areas of northern Syria held by U.S. forces until just last week, members of both parties joined in the House on Wednesday to deliver a clear rebuke of President Trump as lawmakers easily approved a resolution denouncing the policy change. 'This is one of those rare moments in Congress where we see both sides coming together,' said Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), as the House voted 354-60 for the resolution. The plan decried 'an abrupt withdrawal of United States military personnel from certain parts of Northeast Syria,' saying the resulting change 'is beneficial to adversaries of the United States government, including Syria, Iran, and Russia.' 'President Trump's decision to pull hastily out of Syria has caused a humanitarian disaster, endangers our Kurdish allies, and could cause the resurgence of ISIS,' said Rep. David Trone (D-MD). 'The President has demonstrated complete disregard for the harmful implications that his erratic decision-making will have on our troops,' tweeted Rep. Joe Neguse (D-CO). Even among GOP lawmakers who don't like these type of overseas deployments for the U.S. military, there was the overwhelming sense that the President had hastily decided to withdraw, leaving a vacuum which only benefits Russia and its Syrian allies, along with the Islamic State. After the vote, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi lumped additional criticism on the White House, when a briefing for lawmakers on the situation in Syria was scrapped. 'I am deeply concerned that the White House has canceled an all-Member classified briefing on the dangerous situation the President has caused in Syria, denying the Congress its right to be informed as it makes decisions about our national security,' Pelosi said. In the Senate it was much the same, as lawmakers in both parties spent much of Wednesday expressing their outrage over the President's decision, baffled that he would unravel years of work with a minimal number of U.S. troops to hem in Syria and the Islamic State - while partnering with Kurdish forces in the region. 'Withdrawal of U.S. troops gave Turkey a green light to go into Syria,' said Rep. Ben McAdams (D-UT). At the White House, the President denied that he had given Turkish leaders the green light - but a White House statement issued when Mr. Trump's withdrawal was announced clearly stated that the U.S. expected Turkey to move forces into Northern Syria. 'I want to get out of the Middle East,' the President said on Wednesday. Not long after the vote, members of both parties met with President Trump about Syria - as the meeting quickly turned sour, with Democrats raising objections to the President's moves in withdrawing U.S. troops from Syria, and the President pushing back. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats left the meeting, and told reporters that Mr. Trump had a 'meltdown.' Republican leaders and the White House denied that version of events.
  • NASA is moving up the first all-female spacewalk to this week because of a power system failure at the International Space Station. Astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir will now venture out Thursday or Friday, instead of next Monday, to deal with the problem. It will be the first spacewalk by only women in more than a half-century of spacewalking. A critical battery charger failed over the weekend, prompting the change, NASA officials said Monday. The women will replace the broken component, rather than install new batteries, which was their original job. Last week, astronauts conducted the first two of five spacewalks to replace old batteries that make up the station’s solar power network. The remaining spacewalks — originally scheduled for this week and next — have been delayed for at least another few weeks so engineers can determine why the battery charger failed. It’s the second such failure this year. The devices regulate the amount of charge going to and from each battery. One didn’t kick in Friday night, preventing one of the three newly installed lithium-ion batteries from working. The balky charger is 19 years old; the one that failed in the spring was almost as old. Only three spares remain available. “It’s absolutely a concern at this point when you don’t know what’s going on,” said Kenny Todd, a space station manager. “We’re still scratching our heads looking at the data. Hopefully, we can clear that up in relatively short order.”
  • Again endorsing the efforts by his personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, to seek out corruption in Ukraine involving the 2016 elections, President Donald Trump on Wednesday again pressed a conspiracy theory that a DNC computer server hacked by Russia somehow is now in the hands of a company in Ukraine. 'The server - they say - is held by a company whose primary ownership individual is from Ukraine,' the President told reporters in the Oval Office.  Mr. Trump has been pushing the idea that a company brought in by the Democratic National Committee to examine evidence of hacks by Russian intelligence - Crowdstrike - had ties to Ukraine, darkly hinting that Ukraine, and not Russia, may have been behind the DNC hacks in 2016. 'I think it's very important to see the server,' the President said again on Wednesday, even though there is no evidence to support the idea that the DNC server is in Ukraine. During a July phone call with the leader of Ukraine, President Trump made a specific request that Ukraine help track down the DNC server. 'I would like you to find out what happened with this whole situation with Ukraine, they say Crowdstrike,' the President said according to notes released by the White House.  'I guess you have one of your wealthy people... The server, they say Ukraine has it,' the transcript states. 'I would like you to get to the bottom of it,' the President is quoted as telling the Ukraine President in that July 25 call. A former top national security aide to President Trump, Thomas Bossert, has sharply criticized the President and top aides in recent weeks for pushing the idea that the DNC server is in Ukraine. 'It's not only a conspiracy theory, it is completely debunked,' Bossert told ABC News in late September. In an interview, Bossert blamed Giuliani and other aides for continuing to talk to the President about the unproven Ukraine involvement in the 2016 hacking, which U.S. Intelligence and the Mueller probe has pinned on Russia. 'I am deeply frustrated with what (Giuliani) and the legal team are doing, in repeating that debunked theory to the President,' Bossert said. 'Let me repeat again, that theory has no validity,' Bossert added.

Washington Insider

  • Angered by the outbreak of violence and a Turkish military invasion in areas of northern Syria held by U.S. forces until just last week, members of both parties joined in the House on Wednesday to deliver a clear rebuke of President Trump as lawmakers easily approved a resolution denouncing the policy change. 'This is one of those rare moments in Congress where we see both sides coming together,' said Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), as the House voted 354-60 for the resolution. The plan decried 'an abrupt withdrawal of United States military personnel from certain parts of Northeast Syria,' saying the resulting change 'is beneficial to adversaries of the United States government, including Syria, Iran, and Russia.' 'President Trump's decision to pull hastily out of Syria has caused a humanitarian disaster, endangers our Kurdish allies, and could cause the resurgence of ISIS,' said Rep. David Trone (D-MD). 'The President has demonstrated complete disregard for the harmful implications that his erratic decision-making will have on our troops,' tweeted Rep. Joe Neguse (D-CO). Even among GOP lawmakers who don't like these type of overseas deployments for the U.S. military, there was the overwhelming sense that the President had hastily decided to withdraw, leaving a vacuum which only benefits Russia and its Syrian allies, along with the Islamic State. After the vote, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi lumped additional criticism on the White House, when a briefing for lawmakers on the situation in Syria was scrapped. 'I am deeply concerned that the White House has canceled an all-Member classified briefing on the dangerous situation the President has caused in Syria, denying the Congress its right to be informed as it makes decisions about our national security,' Pelosi said. In the Senate it was much the same, as lawmakers in both parties spent much of Wednesday expressing their outrage over the President's decision, baffled that he would unravel years of work with a minimal number of U.S. troops to hem in Syria and the Islamic State - while partnering with Kurdish forces in the region. 'Withdrawal of U.S. troops gave Turkey a green light to go into Syria,' said Rep. Ben McAdams (D-UT). At the White House, the President denied that he had given Turkish leaders the green light - but a White House statement issued when Mr. Trump's withdrawal was announced clearly stated that the U.S. expected Turkey to move forces into Northern Syria. 'I want to get out of the Middle East,' the President said on Wednesday. Not long after the vote, members of both parties met with President Trump about Syria - as the meeting quickly turned sour, with Democrats raising objections to the President's moves in withdrawing U.S. troops from Syria, and the President pushing back. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats left the meeting, and told reporters that Mr. Trump had a 'meltdown.' Republican leaders and the White House denied that version of events.
  • Again endorsing the efforts by his personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, to seek out corruption in Ukraine involving the 2016 elections, President Donald Trump on Wednesday again pressed a conspiracy theory that a DNC computer server hacked by Russia somehow is now in the hands of a company in Ukraine. 'The server - they say - is held by a company whose primary ownership individual is from Ukraine,' the President told reporters in the Oval Office.  Mr. Trump has been pushing the idea that a company brought in by the Democratic National Committee to examine evidence of hacks by Russian intelligence - Crowdstrike - had ties to Ukraine, darkly hinting that Ukraine, and not Russia, may have been behind the DNC hacks in 2016. 'I think it's very important to see the server,' the President said again on Wednesday, even though there is no evidence to support the idea that the DNC server is in Ukraine. During a July phone call with the leader of Ukraine, President Trump made a specific request that Ukraine help track down the DNC server. 'I would like you to find out what happened with this whole situation with Ukraine, they say Crowdstrike,' the President said according to notes released by the White House.  'I guess you have one of your wealthy people... The server, they say Ukraine has it,' the transcript states. 'I would like you to get to the bottom of it,' the President is quoted as telling the Ukraine President in that July 25 call. A former top national security aide to President Trump, Thomas Bossert, has sharply criticized the President and top aides in recent weeks for pushing the idea that the DNC server is in Ukraine. 'It's not only a conspiracy theory, it is completely debunked,' Bossert told ABC News in late September. In an interview, Bossert blamed Giuliani and other aides for continuing to talk to the President about the unproven Ukraine involvement in the 2016 hacking, which U.S. Intelligence and the Mueller probe has pinned on Russia. 'I am deeply frustrated with what (Giuliani) and the legal team are doing, in repeating that debunked theory to the President,' Bossert said. 'Let me repeat again, that theory has no validity,' Bossert added.
  • Buoyed by the decisions of a series of witnesses to ignore requests by the Trump Administration not to testify before Congress, House Democratic leaders said Tuesday evening that they would push ahead with their impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump, seeing no need to hold an official vote now to authorize a formal probe. 'They can't defend the President, so they're going to process,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in a news conference at the U.S. Capitol.  'There's no requirement that we have a vote,' Pelosi pointed out accurately about the rules of the House - though Congress in the past has held such votes to officially launch such an investigation. 'What a SCAM,' said Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA), as Republicans complained bitterly about closed door depositions, and their inability to control the narrative about the investigation - a reminder that elections do matter, as Democrats are able to run this probe simply because they won control of the House in 2018. Democrats emerged from a closed door meeting in no hurry to have a vote on the House floor, as some lawmakers worried that voters would not be able to divine the difference between launching an investigation, and actually casting a vote on impeachment. Coming out of a closed door meeting, House Democrats were a loose group, not feeling any pressure to force a vote - arguing it would be a meaningless exercise. 'It seems to me that every day they get more information,' said Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA), who said there should be no rush to any vote. 'I don't think it matters at this point,' said Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL). 'An inquiry is ongoing.' There were some Democrats who were still withholding judgment. 'I'm not talking, I'm not saying anything,' said Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), who has steadfastly refused to take a position on the impeachment of President Trump. Republicans denounced the effort. 'They know they cannot win at the ballot box with these out of touch ideas, so they are trying to impeach,' said Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC). Republicans have focused mainly on the closed door aspect of depositions, arguing they undermine the credibility of the impeachment investigation. But GOP lawmakers routinely used closed door questioning during their own investigations of the Russian interference in the 2016 elections, and with controversies like Uranium One - where GOP lawmakers interviewed a man who supposedly held bombshell evidence about wrongdoing involving Hillary Clinton. The Q&A was done in secret; no transcript was ever relased. And the GOP never issued any details of what was said to lawmakers.
  • On a day when another Trump Administration official refused to follow the directive of the President to not cooperate with a U.S. House impeachment investigation, President Donald Trump's personal lawyer told Democrats that he would heed Mr. Trump's call, and refuse to turn over documents and other information to Congress. 'Mr. Giuliani will not participate because this appears to be an unconstitutional, baseless, and illegitimate 'impeachment inquiry,'' wrote Giuliani's own counsel, John Sale. Those words echoed a missive from the White House last week, in which the President's White House Counsel declared that the Executive Branch would not cooperate with the House impeachment investigation. 'In addition, the subpoena is overbroad, unduly burdensome, and seeks documents beyond the scope of legitimate inquiry,' the Giuliani letter continued, as Democrats look for more information on what Giuliani was doing in Ukraine in recent months. Democrats had asked for 'text messages, phone records, and other communications' about his work in Ukraine in a September 30 letter which set Monday as the deadline to produce information. 'He’s solely focused on obstructing the Impeachment Inquiry,' tweeted Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN) about President Trump. 'The White House has engaged in stonewalling and outright defiance of Congressional prerogatives,' said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer. Republicans meanwhile complained that Democrats were running an unfair investigation, echoing attacks from the White House. 'The American people are not participants in this process,' said Rep. Mike McCaul (R-TX), as Republicans said a series of closed door depositions should be made public. As lawmakers in Congress returned from a two week break, some Republicans were reminded of their past statements about figures who refused to honor subpoenas during investigations. Meanwhile, as questioning continued behind closed doors for another State Department witness, an interesting break was developing in this investigation - while high profile witnesses like Giuliani were defying subpoenas, former Trump Administration and State Department officials were not. On Tuesday, George Kent, a State Department official who specializes in Ukraine policy was answering questions, even though he had been directed not to answer any. Wednesday is expected to bring testimony from a former top aide to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Michael McKinley abruptly resigned from his State Department post earlier this month.
  • WOKV Washington Insider Jamie Dupree took a short break from covering news on Capitol Hill to receive the Radio Television Digital News Association award for innovation. The national award was the latest mark in what has been a years-long personal battle for Dupree.  Following an illness in 2016, Dupree found himself unable to speak in more than a few words at a time. He eventually received a diagnosis of a rare neurological disorder, tongue protrusion dystonia.  The veteran reporter, who has been staple on WOKV and other Cox Media Group news and talk radio stations, continued to work off the radio by sending stories featuring local lawmakers and writing stories in his Washington Insider Blog.  Then in June of 2018, listeners were able to hear Jamie’s voice once again, as Jamie Dupree 2.0 debuted.  Cox Media Group partnered with Scotland-based tech company CereProc to produce a text-to-speech program that compiles years of Jamie’s actual voice.  “The listeners obviously knew something was very wrong when I disappeared from the radio, and I felt it was important to let them know what was going on – and especially important to let them know that I wasn’t dying,” said Dupree.  The RTDNA said Dupree’s story is innovative not only in multiplatform storytelling, but in the use of technology at the heart of the story.  “Since its initial version, the digital Jamie Dupree 2.0 has been improved to sound more natural and less electronic, and regular listeners have gotten used to it. But not all the feedback has been positive. “In today’s world of social media, I routinely get nasty messages each week from people who celebrate the loss of my voice, tell me that I should lose my job, and more. One of the weirdest things has been the accusations by people that since I lost my real voice, I’ve become biased. I think that’s just a sign of the current political times we are in right now,” said Dupree.”.   Dupree’s condition has not changed much, but he has found ways to innovate in the way he communicated with his wife and kids, as well as colleagues and lawmakers on Capitol Hill.  “Yes, I would much rather be able to speak – but it was great to get this kind of recognition for the work done by our company to find a way to keep me on the radio”, said Dupree.