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State and Regional News

    The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the 'Lotto America' game were: 02-17-22-30-37, Star Ball: 8, ASB: 5 (two, seventeen, twenty-two, thirty, thirty-seven; Star Ball: eight; ASB: five) Estimated jackpot: $4.02 million
  • The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the 'Powerball' game were: 16-29-43-45-56, Powerball: 25, Power Play: 2 (sixteen, twenty-nine, forty-three, forty-five, fifty-six; Powerball: twenty-five; Power Play: two) Estimated jackpot: $40 million ¶ ___ ¶ Online: ¶ Multi-State Lottery Association: http://www.powerball.com/
  • These Oklahoma lotteries were drawn Saturday: 10-11-12-26-28 (ten, eleven, twelve, twenty-six, twenty-eight) 02-17-22-30-37, Star Ball: 8, ASB: 5 (two, seventeen, twenty-two, thirty, thirty-seven; Star Ball: eight; ASB: five) Estimated jackpot: $4.02 million Estimated jackpot: $212 million 4-0-4 (four, zero, four) 16-29-43-45-56, Powerball: 25, Power Play: 2 (sixteen, twenty-nine, forty-three, forty-five, fifty-six; Powerball: twenty-five; Power Play: two) Estimated jackpot: $40 million
  • The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the Oklahoma Lottery's 'Pick 3' game were: 4-0-4 (four, zero, four)
  • The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the Oklahoma Lottery's 'Cash 5' game were: 10-11-12-26-28 (ten, eleven, twelve, twenty-six, twenty-eight)
  • The Latest on the crude oil leaking after a train derailment in northwest Iowa (all times local): 4:10 p.m. A railroad official says 14 of 32 derailed oil tanker cars in the northwest corner of Iowa dumped an estimated 230,000 gallons (870,619 liters) of crude oil into floodwaters, with some making its way to nearby rivers. BNSF spokesman Andy Williams confirmed the details Saturday. He says nearly half the spill had been contained with booms near the derailment site and an additional boom placed approximately 5 miles (8.05 kilometers) downstream. Williams had earlier said 33 oil cars derailed. Williams says oil will be removed from that containment site with equipment to separate the oil from the water. The railroad will focus on environmental recovery. Williams says 'ongoing monitoring is occurring for any potential conditions that could impact workers and the community and, so far, have found no levels of concern.' ___ 2 p.m. Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds is set to visit the site of an oil train derailment and oil spill in the northwestern corner of the state. Reynolds' office says in a news release that she plans to survey the site Saturday afternoon. The governor is also spending the day touring other areas hit by flooding in recent days. The derailment of 32 oil tanker cars Friday just south of Doon has caused concern for towns and cities downstream, as far south as Omaha, Nebraska, about 150 miles from the derailment site. Omaha's public water utility — Metropolitan Utilities District — is monitoring pumps it uses to pull drinking water from the Missouri River. The spill reached the Rock River, which joins the Big Sioux River before merging into the Missouri River at Sioux City. Rock Valley, Iowa, just southwest of the derailment, shut off its water wells within hours of the accident. __ This item has been corrected to show 32 oil cars derailed, not 33 cars ___ 1:10 p.m. Crews are working to clean up a BNSF oil train derailment in Iowa that dumped crude into floodwaters, while officials seek to get a handle on the extent of the spill and its cause. BNSF spokesman Andy Williams says 32 oil tanker cars derailed Friday just south of Doon, leaking oil into surrounding floodwaters from the swollen Little Rock River. He said Saturday that the cause of the derailment hasn't been determined. The amount spilled also isn't yet known. Williams says crews have been skimming oil from floodwaters. They're also building a road parallel to the tracks to try to get to the derailed and partially-submerged oil cars. The train was carrying tar sands oil from Canada to Oklahoma for ConocoPhillips. ConocoPhillips spokesman Daren Beaudo says each tanker can hold more than 25,000 gallons. __ This item has been corrected to show 32 oil cars derailed, not 33 cars
  • An estimated 230,000 gallons (870,619 liters) of crude oil spilled into floodwaters in the northwestern corner of Iowa following a train derailment, a railroad official said Saturday. BNSF spokesman Andy Williams said 14 of 32 oil tanker cars just south of Doon in Lyon County leaked oil into surrounding floodwaters from the swollen Little Rock River. Williams had earlier said 33 oil cars had derailed. Nearly half the spill — an estimated 100,000 gallons (378,530 liters) — had been contained with booms near the derailment site and an additional boom placed approximately 5 miles (8.05 kilometers) downstream, Williams said. Skimmers and vacuum trucks were being used to remove the oil. Crews will then use equipment to separate the oil from the water. 'In addition to focusing on the environmental recovery, ongoing monitoring is occurring for any potential conditions that could impact workers and the community and so far have found no levels of concern,' Williams said. Officials still hadn't determined the cause of Friday morning's derailment, but a disaster proclamation issued by Gov. Kim Reynolds for Lyon and three other counties placed the blame on rain-fueled flooding. Reynolds visited the derailment site Saturday afternoon as part of a tour of areas hit by recent flooding. Some officials have speculated that floodwaters eroded soil beneath the train track. The nearby Little Rock River rose rapidly after heavy rain Wednesday and Thursday. A major part of the cleanup work includes building a temporary road parallel to the tracks to allow in cranes that can remove the derailed and partially-submerged oil cars. Williams said officials hoped to reach the cars Saturday. The train was carrying tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada, to Stroud, Oklahoma, for ConocoPhillips. ConocoPhillips spokesman Daren Beaudo said each tanker can hold more than 25,000 gallons (20,817 imperial gallons) of oil. Beaudo said Saturday that the derailed oil cars were a model known as DOT117Rs, indicating they were newer or had been retrofitted to be safer and help prevent leaks in the event of an accident. The derailment also caused concern downstream, including as far south as Omaha, Nebraska, about 150 miles (240 kilometers) from the derailment site. The spill reached the Rock River, which joins the Big Sioux River before merging into the Missouri River at Sioux City. Omaha's public water utility — Metropolitan Utilities District — said it was monitoring pumps it uses to pull drinking water from the Missouri River. Rock Valley, Iowa, just southwest of the derailment, shut off its water wells within hours of the accident. It plans to drain and clean its wells and use a rural water system until testing shows its water is safe. ___ For the latest information about the derailment: https://bit.ly/2K1wIAZ ___ This story has been corrected to show that 32 oil tanker cars derailed, not 33.
  • A veteran in Oklahoma whose life and business were disrupted when his lawn equipment was stolen no longer needs to face acres of grass using a push mower. The Tulsa World reports Cody Nichols on Friday received $15,000 worth of new lawn-mowing equipment through the nonprofit group Soldier's Wish. The Tulsa-based organization works to meet the needs of military veterans. Nichols, who served in the Marines, operates Our Troops Services. The small business hires veterans for landscaping, fencing and construction jobs. The theft occurred early May 20. Nichols arrived to discover all of the equipment was gone. He tried to get by with a couple of donated push mowers, but fell behind. Nichols now has a commercial riding mower thanks to Friday's presentation at Bloss Equipment. ___ Information from: Tulsa World, http://www.tulsaworld.com
  • Oklahoma State athletic director Mike Holder has received a three-year contract extension with his annual pay boosted to $950,000. The deal was approved Friday by the Oklahoma State University/A&M Board of Regents. The new agreement with the 69-year-old Holder, who's been athletic director since 2005, begins July 1 and runs through June 2021. Holder was making $640,000 this year at OSU, which won 49 conference championships in 11 sports with six NCAA championships under his guidance. OSU President Burns Hargis says Holder's salary has been well below market for years. Hargis credited Holder with improvements in facilities and performance of athletes. Holder, a 1970 OSU graduate, coached the school's golf team for 32 years before being named AD.
  • Danny Daniels, an evangelical Christian in the rural Oklahoma town of Lindsay, is reliably conservative on just about every political issue. The 45-year-old church pastor is anti-abortion, voted for President Donald Trump and is a member of the National Rifle Association who owns an AR-15 rifle. He also came of age during the 1980s and believed in the anti-drug mantra that labeled marijuana as a dangerous gateway drug. But his view on marijuana changed as his pastoral work extended into hospice care and he saw patients at the end of their lives benefiting from the use of cannabis. 'Some people said I couldn't be a pastor and support medical marijuana, but I would say most of the people I know, including the Christians I pastor, are in favor of it,' said Daniels, pastor of Better Life Community Church in downtown Lindsay, a rural agricultural and energy industry town about 50 miles (80.5 kilometers) south of Oklahoma City. Daniels is among a growing group of traditionally conservative Republican voters in Oklahoma who have shifted their position on the topic. Their support for a medical marijuana measure on Tuesday's ballot could ensure Oklahoma joins the growing list of states that have legalized some form of pot. It's the first medical marijuana state question on a ballot in 2018, and Oklahoma's vote precedes elections on marijuana legalization later this year in Michigan and Utah. Michigan voters will decide whether to legalize recreational pot while Utah is considering medical marijuana. Among the reddest states in the country, Oklahoma has for decades embraced a tough-on-crime philosophy that includes harsh penalties for drug crimes that has contributed to the state now leading the nation in the percentage of its population behind bars. But voters' attitudes are changing. Two years ago Oklahomans voted to make all drug possession crimes misdemeanors over the objection of law enforcement and prosecutors. When one GOP senator discussed adding exceptions after the public vote, he faced an angry mob at a town-hall meeting. Oklahoma's State Question 788, the result of an activist-led signature drive, would allow physicians to approve medical marijuana licenses for people to legally grow, keep and use cannabis. The proposal outlines no qualifying medical conditions to obtain a license, and an opposition group that includes law enforcement, business, political and faith leaders launched a late, half-million-dollar campaign to defeat it, saying it's too loosely written. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, who typically defers from commenting on pending state questions, recently expressed reservations about the question, saying it's so broadly worded it would essentially allow recreational use of marijuana. If approved, Fallin said she intends to call the Legislature back to a special session so that a statutory framework could be approved to further regulate sale and use. Bill Shapard, a pollster, said support for medical marijuana has been consistently strong during the five years he's surveyed likely Oklahoma voters. Not surprisingly, Shapard said young people, Democrats and independents overwhelmingly support it. But he said about half of self-identified evangelicals, churchgoers and those over 65 also endorse medical cannabis. 'When you can get a large majority of the Democrats and independents and a third to a half of Republicans to support you, you can get anything passed in Oklahoma,' Shapard said. Joanna Francisco, a longtime Republican voter and self-described evangelical, said the issue of medical cannabis 'should appeal to everyone who calls themselves a pro-life conservative.' 'If you're a conservative, you should also be opposed to the state spending exorbitant amounts of money on prosecutors and law enforcement to keep this medicine out of the hands of people who might need it,' said Francisco, 49, who holds regular Bible studies in her Tulsa home. At Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 382 in El Reno, a conservative suburb 30 miles (48.3 kilometers) west of Oklahoma City, many of the regulars don't like the idea of legalizing marijuana, even for medical reasons. But attitudes are changing, said 73-year-old Bill Elkins, a disabled Vietnam veteran who volunteers at the post. 'I've got mixed thoughts on that,' said Elkins, a Republican who said his daughter benefited from taking cannabidiol oil, a non-intoxicating form of cannabis, for nerve pain. 'Right now I'm on the fence.' Jack Hodgkinson, 71, a Vietnam veteran and supporter of Trump, said he doesn't have a problem with the medical use of marijuana and plans to vote for it. 'I've never messed with any drugs, marijuana or anything like that,' Hodgkinson said. 'But if it helps people who need it, I'm all for it.' ___ Follow Sean Murphy at www.twitter.com/apseanmurphy
  • A male pedestrian was hit and killed Saturday night while crossing the street in Tulsa. An officer at the scene tells KRMG the auto-pedestrian collision happened around 11:10 p.m. in the westbound lanes of 71st Street near Trenton Avenue. “A black truck comes through and strikes him,” the officer said.  “Then continues on westbound and we were not able to get a good description of the vehicle.” The pedestrian was transported to a nearby hospital where he was later pronounced dead.  As of early Sunday morning, the victim hasn't been identified. KRMG’s told the scene was closed to traffic until around 2 a.m. Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.  
  • You may have heard the storms overnight in and around the Tulsa area.   The possibility of storms continues on Sunday.  This is especially true during the morning hours.   “We’ll probably start the morning with lingering storm chances,” National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Lacy said.  “Those storm chances will gradually go away during the afternoon.” The high for Sunday will be close to 91 degrees.   The Tulsa area will have more chances for storms Sunday night.  NWS is reporting the low will be near 77 degrees.   There is a severe thunderstorm watch in effect for Tulsa and surrounding counties until 10 a.m.
  • A 37-year-old Broken Arrow man faces a long list of sexual-related charges in connection with having an alleged sexual relationship with a 15-year-old girl.  Court records show Larado Smith was charged on Friday with 12 counts of second-degree rape and three counts of forcible sodomy.  Tulsa World reports the sexual acts apparently happened at the girl's home when her parents were not home.  When police found out about what was going on, a sting was set up. They posed as the girl over social media.    Smith showed up at the teenager's home and was arrested.  He has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.  
  • Today may not be the best day for outdoor activities. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Teague says to keep an umbrella handy.  This is especially true during the afternoon hours.   “We are still holding on for a chance of showers and thunderstorms during the day,” Teague said.  “Again, another chance of showers and thunderstorms late into the evening.” The high is expected to reach around 86 degrees. There is better news for Sunday.  The sun is expected to come out, storm chances are low and the high will be close to 93 degrees.  
  • As President Donald Trump this week threatened $200 billion in new tariffs on Chinese imports, and then warned Europe that he would slap a 20 percent tariff on imported automobiles, members of both parties Congress accused the administration of starting a trade war which could cause collateral economic damage across the United States. The differences were on display at a hearing Wednesday with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who took a bipartisan tongue lashing on a recent round of tariffs levied on imported steel and aluminum from Canada, Mexico and Europe. “We’re picking winners and losers,” argued Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA), who said those tariffs were already hurting businesses in his home state. “Probably resulting – in my view – in far more jobs being lost than being gained,” Toomey told Ross, citing a very well-known Pennsylvania company that could find it less expensive to move jobs from the U.S. to Canada. Sen. @PatToomey tells Ross that $KHZ moved some @HeinzKetchup_US manufacturing to Pennsylvania from Canada – but could move back now that Canada plans to tax American ketchup as retaliation for steel and aluminum tariffs. — Kayla Tausche (@kaylatausche) June 20, 2018 Almost every Senator on the panel had a story of a small business that was feeling the pinch due to Trump Administration tariffs, impacting all sorts of agricultural products, as well as manufacturing, big and small. “Do you think we’re in a trade war right now?” asked Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA). “Because I do,” as Cantwell rattled off farm products that were losing markets because of retaliatory tariff measures. Ross downplayed the cost of higher imported steel and aluminum, basically making the case that economic hardships were being overplayed. “It’s a fraction of a penny on a can of Campbell’s soup, it’s a fraction on a can of Budweiser, it’s a fraction on a can of Coke,” Ross said. That did not please the Senator from the state of Coca-Cola. “Although a couple of pennies on a can is not much, a couple pennies times a billion is lots,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA). “We’re hit harder than any other state by the Canadian retaliatory tariffs,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), warning the Trump Administration against tariffs on imported automobiles, as GOP Senators labeled such actions a tax on consumers. “Steel prices are going up – not just for foreign steel subject to tariffs, but also for U.S. steel,” complained Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). “Mexico’s buying their wheat from Argentina and their corn from Brazil,” said Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS), as he told Ross that Kansas wheat exports were encountering troubles because of new retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports, bringing bad economic news on the farm report. Ross simply told Senators if other countries put new tariffs on U.S. exports, that was out of his control. “We have no control over what another country does in retaliation,” Ross said. The bipartisan complaints clearly had no impact, as by Friday, President Trump was on Twitter, issuing new threats against European auto imports. Based on the Tariffs and Trade Barriers long placed on the U.S. & its great companies and workers by the European Union, if these Tariffs and Barriers are not soon broken down and removed, we will be placing a 20% Tariff on all of their cars coming into the U.S. Build them here! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 23, 2018 As Democrats registered their opposition, they also couldn’t help but note the oddity of a Republican President going against what’s been a bedrock belief of the GOP. “I feel like I’ve gone down a rabbit hole,” said Sen. Clare McCaskill (D-MO), who said she found it hard to believe the party of free trade now had a President in office who was doing the exact opposite. “In a chaotic and frankly incompetent manner, you’re picking winners and losers,” McCaskill told Ross. But for the President, this is about re-setting trade deals, which he says were tilted against the United States. #President #Trump #speaking in #Duluth, #Minnesota: We want fair & reciprocal #trade not stupid trade that we've had for years. We've been ripped off by all of our friends. And frankly the do a much better job than our enemies. #MAGA #economy #POTUS #TrumpTrain — Leanne Howard Kenney (@neeneebucket) June 21, 2018 “As far as trade is concerned with other countries, we want fair and reciprocal trade, we don’t want stupid trade like we had for so long,” the President said at a rally in Minnesota. “Remember the world reciprocal,” Mr. Trump said. “We have been ripped off by almost every country on Earth, our friends and our enemies.” “But those days are over,” the President said to cheers from the crowd. But while they’re cheering Mr. Trump on the stump, at the U.S. Capitol, they’re worried about a trade war. “We’re getting into a war that’s going to cost lots of billions of dollars,” Isakson warned.