ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
56°
Sunny
H 71° L 40°
  • clear-night
    56°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 71° L 40°
  • clear-day
    59°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 71° L 40°
  • clear-night
    57°
    Evening
    Clear. H 66° L 43°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

State and Regional News

    The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the 'Lotto America' game were: 10-18-22-25-32, Star Ball: 4, ASB: 2 (ten, eighteen, twenty-two, twenty-five, thirty-two; Star Ball: four; ASB: two)
  • The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the 'Powerball' game were: 16-54-57-62-69, Powerball: 23, Power Play: 2 (sixteen, fifty-four, fifty-seven, sixty-two, sixty-nine; Powerball: twenty-three; Power Play: two) ¶ ___ ¶ Online: ¶ Multi-State Lottery Association: http://www.powerball.com/
  • These Oklahoma lotteries were drawn Friday: 09-10-18-28-29 (nine, ten, eighteen, twenty-eight, twenty-nine) 15-23-53-65-70, Mega Ball: 7, Megaplier: 2 (fifteen, twenty-three, fifty-three, sixty-five, seventy; Mega Ball: seven; Megaplier: two) Estimated jackpot: $1.00 Bill,ion 7-7-9 (seven, seven, nine) Estimated jackpot: $430 million
  • The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the Oklahoma Lottery's 'Cash 5' game were: 09-17-18-24-34 (nine, seventeen, eighteen, twenty-four, thirty-four)
  • The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the Oklahoma Lottery's 'Pick 3' game were: 5-8-3 (five, eight, three)
  • When Arkansas freshman quarterback Connor Noland trotted off the field after throwing an interception on the first drive, Razorbacks coach Chad Morris didn't have to say much to make sure his first-time starter stayed confident. This was the moment kids across Arkansas (2-6) dream of, especially ones like Noland — an Arkansas native and fan his entire life. Morris stuck with his quarterback, and the move paid off in a 23-0 victory over Tulsa on Saturday. 'I just kind of patted him on the head and said, 'Hey, hang in there. It'll be all right.'' Morris said. 'If you play football long enough, you're going to have some things that go against you. It's really just about the response.' Aside from that negative play, there were a lot of positives to choose from with Noland. He went 10-of-16 passing for 124 yards and scored his first career touchdown. On the scoring play, which came late in the first half, Noland found sophomore Grayson Gunter from 7 yards out after the rushing attack, led by sophomore Rakeem Boyd, opened up the play-action passing game. 'I tried not to (think about the situation),' Noland said. 'You grow up watching the Hogs play, and to be out there and get my first start meant a lot to me. It was a big moment, but I just tried to downplay that a little bit and focus on the game.' The start marked Noland's first in-game action since the North Texas game Sept. 15, a day that could be considered Arkansas' lowest point in the season. In that game, the freshman was inserted late when the Mean Green already had an insurmountable lead and he didn't get a chance to compete with meaningful snaps. Against Tulsa, the Razorbacks' defense stepped up and gave the program its first shutout since 2014. 'When you get the ball on the 40-yard line a couple times, that definitely helps,' Noland said. Boyd nearly eclipsed the 100-yard rushing mark for the third-straight game, but he finished just shy with 99 yards on 22 carries. Freshman Maleek Williams picked up his biggest workload of the season, carrying the ball nine times for 23 yards and a score. On the other side, Tulsa's (1-6) offense had abysmal numbers in the second half until freshman quarterback Seth Boomer completed a 65-yard strike to sophomore receiver Keylon Strokes on the team's final drive. The scrambler was 8-of-25 passing through the air for 127 yards and a pick. 'I didn't see our guys give up. that's not in our DNA,' Tulsa coach Philip Montgomery said. 'The only way he's gonna get better is if he continues to go through some of the things he's going through right now.' For Arkansas, the victory — which was the program's 19th straight over Tulsa — ended a six-game losing skid that began after the season-opening victory over Eastern Illinois on Sept. 1. 'We're going to continue to fight, and we're going to continue to put one foot in front of the other,' Morris said. 'Everyone is staying positive. We knew that something was gonna happen our way if we continued to get back up, and these guys did it.' THE TAKEAWAY Although Arkansas' offense didn't put up the 476 yards it did against Ole Miss with Storey at the helm, Noland showed his ability to lead a Southeastern Conference offense. The dual-threat gunslinger also made his presence felt in the ground game, carrying the ball five times for 20 yards. It marked the first time a true freshman quarterback started a game for the Razorbacks since Mitch Mustain did so against Utah State on Sept. 9, 2006. THIRD-QUARTER WOES After putting up a respectable 145 yards in the first half, the Golden Hurricanes fell apart after coming out of the locker room for the third quarter. They managed only 12 yards on 18 total plays in the third_good for a negative average. Prior to the shutout, Tulsa was averaging 24.3 points per game. LIMPERT'S STRONG SEASON Razorback junior kicker Connor Limpert was 3-for-3 on field goals, and he's now made 15 of 18 attempts for the season. The Texas native hasn't missed a kick 30 yards or fewer all year. UP NEXT Arkansas hosts SEC East opponent Vanderbilt next on Saturday. The Golden Hurricanes will play Tulane on Saturday. ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/tag/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Kyler Murray and the Oklahoma offense piled up yards and scored points like they have been all season. Kenneth Murray and the Sooners defense did their part as well as ninth-ranked Oklahoma bounced back from its only loss, winning 52-27 at TCU on Saturday in the first game since defensive coordinator Mike Stoops was fired. 'It's real important,' said Murray, the linebacker who had a game-high 11 tackles. 'It felt like we came out there, flew around, great effort.' While TCU was held to 275 total yards and got its only two offensive touchdowns in a three-minute span after a quarterback switch, Sooners dual-threat quarterback Murray completed 19 of 24 passes for 213 yards and four touchdowns . Kennedy Brooks and Trey Sermon both had 100-yard rushing games with scores. The Sooners (6-1, 3-1 Big 12) won their 18th consecutive true road game, never trailing after touchdowns on each of their first four drives. They lost their previous game two weeks ago, 48-45 to Texas, despite scoring three consecutive touchdowns in a six-minute span for a tie before the Longhorns won on a last-second field goal. 'It was just perfect how the game unfolded, we came out and played like we were capable of, carrying over some momentum we had,' coach Lincoln Riley said. Brooks ran for 168 yards on 18 carries with an early 21-yard TD on a fourth-and-1 play. Sermon ran 17 times for 110 yards and scored twice before walking gingerly off the field after being tended to by trainers for a lower leg injury with about 8½ minutes left. Riley indicated the injury wasn't serious, saying things 'looked promising.' This was a rematch of the Big 12 Conference championship game last December, when Oklahoma won three weeks after beating TCU in the regular season. The Sooners have scored at least 38 points in their last four meetings against Gary Patterson's defense, which entered this game tops in the league allowing only 20 per game. But so much focus was on the Sooners defense with Ruffin McNeill, Riley's assistant head coach, in his first game as interim defensive coordinator. 'We played much closer to what we're capable of,' Riley said. 'I was proud of how the players reacted to that transition,' McNeill said. 'It was very physical, and very different for them. They handled it with grace, honor and pride. To see them keep their poise when things get tight was great.' The Frogs (3-4, 1-3) were within 31-27 midway through the third quarter when Cole Bunce kicked his second 41-yard field goal but didn't score again. TCU trailed 28-7 midway through the second quarter when former Penn transfer Michael Collins replaced ineffective starter Shawn Robinson. The Horned Frogs had only 25 total yards before the quarterback switch, and their only score was KaVontae Turpin's 99-yard kickoff return . 'I'm not going to make it about a quarterback controversy,' Patterson said. Collins threw TDs on consecutive passes soon after entering the game. Turpin turned a short throw into a 41-yard touchdown and Jalen Reagor's 33-yard score came after Oklahoma went three-and-out and punted from its own 9 after a sack and two penalties. 'I thought he came in, managed the game pretty good for a guy that hadn't been in that much, and that's a high-level team that he played against,' Patterson said. THE TAKEAWAY Oklahoma: The Sooners haven't lost consecutive games in the regular season since 1999, and they still control their path to getting back in the Big 12 championship game — and maybe the College Football Playoff. TCU: The quarterback situation is now interesting. Patterson for weeks had brought up the idea of Collins playing more, though offensive coordinator Sonny Cumbie made the call for the in-game switch. Collins started 4-of-5 passing for 89 yards and the two TDs, but after halftime he was only 3 for 12 for 53 yards and an interception. Robinson was 3 for 8 for 21 yards and gained nothing on his two carries. HEAVY HEARTED Playing days after his mother died, Oklahoma sophomore cornerback Tre Brown had four tackles and two pass breakups. 'Going out there and playing for him was definitely something that was on my mind,' Kenneth Murray said. 'Every time I made a play, I gave a quick gesture up to the sky, because I knew he was going through a lot with his mom and that is something that is tough.' POLL IMPLICATIONS The Sooners will still be a top-10 team. UP NEXT Oklahoma is home for the first time in nearly a month to play Kansas State next Saturday. TCU is on the road next Saturday to play Kansas. ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/tag/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Jon Rios traces his ancestry to the Pima people of Arizona, but he has no tribal enrollment card and lives hundreds of miles away in Colorado. He has no interest in meeting any federally imposed requirements to prove his connection to a tribe. If anyone asks, he says he's Native American. 'I'm a little bit like Elizabeth Warren. I have my ancestral lineage,' Rios said, referring to his affiliation with the Pima, also known as Akimel O'odham. The clash between the Massachusetts Democratic senator and President Donald Trump over her Native American heritage highlights the varying methods tribes use to determine who belongs — a decision that has wide-ranging consequences. Some tribes rely on blood relationships, or 'blood quantum,' to confer membership. Historically, they had a broader view that included non-biological connections and whether a person had a stake in the community. The 573 federally recognized tribes have a unique political relationship with the United States as sovereign governments that must be consulted on issues that affect them, such as sacred sites, environmental rules and commercial development. Treaties guarantee access to health care and certain social services but they can be treated differently when involved in a federal crime on a reservation. Within tribes, enrollment also means being able to seek office, vote in tribal elections and secure property rights. For centuries, a person's percentage of Native American blood had nothing to do with determining who was a tribal member. And for some tribes, it still doesn't. Membership was based on kinship and encompassed biological relatives, those who married into the tribe and even people captured by Native Americans during wars. Black slaves held by tribes during the 1800s and their descendants became members of tribes now in Oklahoma after slavery was abolished. The Navajo Nation contemplated ways Mexican slaves could become enrolled, according to Paul Spuhan, an attorney for the tribe. Degree of blood became a widely used standard for tribal enrollment in the 1930s when the federal government encouraged tribes to have written constitutions. The blood quantum often was determined in crude ways such as sending anthropologists and federal agents to inspect Native Americans' physical features, like hair, skin color and nose shape. 'It became this very biased, pseudo-science racial measurement,' said Danielle Lucero, a member of Isleta Pueblo in New Mexico and a doctoral student at Arizona State University. Many tribes that adopted constitutions under the Indian Reorganization Act, and even those that did not, changed enrollment requirements. Blood quantum and lineal descent, or a person's direct ancestors, remain dominant determinants. A 1978 U.S. Supreme Court case, Santa Clara v. Martinez, upheld the authority of tribes to define their membership based on cultural values and norms. Some tribes also have used that authority to remove members. 'Historically, we have very fluid understandings of relatedness,' said David Wilkins, a University of Minnesota law professor who is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. 'It was more about your value, orientation and whether or not you acted like a good citizen and a good person, and if you fulfilled your responsibilities. It didn't matter if you had one-half, one-quarter or 1/1,000th, whatever Elizabeth Warren had.' The Navajo Nation, one of the largest tribes in the Southwest, has a one-fourth blood quantum requirement. The Lumbee Tribe requires members to trace ancestry to a tribal roll, re-enroll every seven years and take a civics test about prominent tribal leaders and historical events, Wilkins said. DNA alone is not used to prove a person's Native American background. The tests assess broad genetic markers, not specific tribal affiliations or connectedness to a tribal community. The Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma uses a roster of names developed near the start of the 20th century to determine membership, regardless of the degree of Indian blood. In that era, federal agents also ascribed blood quantum to Native Americans for purposes of land ownership, Spruhan wrote. Warren, who grew up in Norman, Oklahoma, and is seen as a presidential contender in 2020, recently released results of a DNA test that she said indicated she had a distant Native American ancestor. The test was intended to answer Trump, who has repeatedly mocked her and called her 'Pocahontas.' She has said her roots were part of 'family lore,' and has never sought membership in any tribe. Patty Ferguson-Bohnee works to protect sacred sites, culture camps and language immersion for her small Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribe in southern Louisiana. The tribe also is seeking federal recognition. 'It's not just about money, it's about how do we protect our cultural heritage?' said Ferguson-Bohnee, who oversees the Indian Legal Program at Arizona State University. Nicole Willis grew up hours away from the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation in the Pacific Northwest, which she calls home. She traveled often from Seattle for cultural events and to spend summers with her grandmother. To her, being Native American means her family is part of a distinct, interconnected community that has existed since ancient times. Her tribe requires citizens to be one-quarter Native American, with a grandparent or parent enrolled in the tribe, but she said 'theoretically, it shouldn't matter.' 'We should identify with the nation that we feel a part of,' she said. 'Because of the way the government dealt with us, we don't have the benefit of ignoring the numbers aspect.' Back in Greeley, Colorado, Rios tries to maintain traditions passed down through his father's side and his identity by gathering medicinal plants, giving thanks for food and to his creator, sitting with family around an open fire and passing knowledge on to his daughters. 'It's important for me and especially our people, always being respectful and trying to maintain that balance,' he said.
  • The Oklahoma Department of Health says an increasing number of parents in the state are seeking exemptions from immunizations for their school-age children. A survey of kindergarten students last year found that the exemption rate increased by three-tenths of 1 percent from the previous year. The state's overall exemption rate is 2.2 percent, equal to the national median rate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than 90 percent of children enter Oklahoma public schools with up-to-date vaccinations although the rate for private schools is below 85 percent. The rate for children with measles, mumps and rubella vaccinations is 92.6 percent, below the national average of 94.3 percent. Oklahoma's epidemiologist, Dr. Kristy Bradley, says there's a risk of vaccine preventable disease outbreaks unless children entering school are immunized.
  • KRMG has previously told you about the Gathering Place banning firearms. Gerry Bender, Tulsa’s Litigation Division manager, recently told the Tulsa World police won't arrest people who violate the park's gun policy. This is reportedly because of concerns such an action would be legally challenged. Under state law, firearms are allowed to be carried on property designated by a governmental authority as a park, recreational area or fairgrounds. “TPD has had a presence at the Gathering Place since its opening and will continue to do so in order for the citizens of Tulsa to enjoy the park in a safe environment,” a Tulsa police statement reads.  “We maintain the legal authority to enforce all ordinances and State laws applicable to private spaces open to the public.” Do you believe people should be allowed to have firearms at the Gathering Place?  Let us know in the comments.  
  • You can put away your umbrella in the Tulsa area today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Chuck Hodges says we have a beautiful fall day ahead of us. “Fog should be clearing out,” Hodges said.  “We should have plenty of sun.  We are looking at highs probably in the lower 70’s.” The normal high for Tulsa this time of year is in the mid-70’s.   If you have outdoor plans Saturday night, bring a heavy coat.  The low will be close to 37 degrees.
  • This Saturday marks the 45th anniversary of the infamous ‘Saturday Night Massacre,’ when an embattled President Richard Nixon fired the special Watergate prosecutor, but only after both the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General refused to carry out the President’s orders, and resigned from their positions. The move by President Nixon came during an ongoing legal dispute over the release of the Watergate tapes – recordings made in the Oval Office by a secret taping system that the President had installed – which ultimately contained evidence that forced Nixon from office. Special Watergate Prosecutor Archibald Cox wanted all the tapes for his investigation, but even with the backing of a federal court order, President Nixon refused to turn them over, instead offering summaries, an offer that Cox refused to accept. “I’m not looking for a confrontation,” Cox told an October 20, 1973 news conference at the National Press. “I’m certainly not out to get the President of the United States.” Several hours later, Nixon ordered that Cox be fired. The President first asked Attorney General Elliot Richardson to fire Cox. Richardson refused and quickly resigned. The same request the went to Deputy Attorney General Williams Ruckleshaus. Like Richardson, Ruckleshaus also refused and quit. Finally, the firing of Cox was carried out by Solicitor General Robert Bork. It’s a scenario that some have focused on, wondering if President Donald Trump might try to end the investigation of Special Counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. In an op-ed in August of 2018, Ruckleshaus drew parallels between Watergate and the current battle over the Russia investigation. “President Trump is acting with a desperation I’ve seen only once before in Washington,” Ruckleshaus wrote. “45 years ago when President Richard M. Nixon ordered the firing of special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox.” “Nixon was fixated on ending the Watergate investigation, just as Trump wants to shut down the Mueller investigation,” Ruckleshaus added. It took until late July of 1974 for the U.S. Supreme Court to finally order Nixon to turn over the tapes – in a unanimous 8-0 ruling. Nixon resigned soon after, on August 8, 1974.
  • Federal prosecutors in New York announced the arrest on Friday of a man who allegedly threatened to murder and assault a pair of U.S. Senators for their support of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, as police say the suspect placed a series of threatening telephone calls in which the man threatened to shoot the Senators if they supported the Kavanaugh nomination. In court documents unsealed on Friday, a special agent with the U.S. Capitol Police detailed a number of voice mails left by the suspect, identified as Ronald DeRisi of Smithtown, on Long Island in New York. The expletive-filled messages came during the final stages of debate on the Kavanaugh nomination, some as Kavanaugh testified for a second time before the Senate Judiciary Committee, on the same day as a woman who accused him of sexual misconduct back when they were in high school. “The male caller, who did not identify himself on the recording, stated in relevant part, that he had a “present” for Senator-1, specifically: “It’s a nine millimeter,” court documents stated. “He’s a dead man! Nine millimeter, side of the f—ing head!” police quoted the phone threats. More voice mails were allegedly left by DeRisi after Kavanaugh had been confirmed by the Senate, as he called a second Senator’s office and left threatening messages. “I’m gonna get you,” police quoted the message. “Don’t you know that guy’s a sex offender?” At one point, the suspect allegedly read off the home address of the second Senator; it was not immediately clear from the court documents what two Senators had been targeted by the phone calls. Court documents show that DeRisi pled guilty in 2015 to making threatening phone calls, and that police compared the telphone evidence from the two cases.