ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
91°
Sunny
H 99° L 78°
  • clear-day
    91°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 99° L 78°
  • clear-day
    95°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 99° L 78°
  • clear-day
    79°
    Morning
    Sunny. H 98° L 76°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

National News

    President Donald Trump plans to nominate lawyer Eugene Scalia, son of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to serve as his next labor secretary, according to an announcement posted Thursday on Twitter. >> Read more trending news  Scalia, 55, is a partner in the Washington office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, where he specializes in administrative law and handles cases related to labor and employment, according to The Washington Post and NPR. He previously served as solicitor of the U.S. Department of Labor under President George W. Bush. He also served as special assistant to Attorney General William Barr during his previous tenure as Bush's attorney general. 'I am pleased to announce that it is my intention to nominate Gene Scalia as the new Secretary of Labor,' Trump wrote Thursday in a Twitter post.  'Gene has led a life of great success in the legal and labor field and is highly respected not only as a lawyer, but as a lawyer with great experience working with labor and everyone else.'  Scalia has long represented companies that have pushed back against unions and strengthening labor laws, The New York Times reported. In 2005, he was hired by Walmart after former employees sued the company, claiming they had been illegally fired for whistle-blowing, according to NPR. His nomination is likely to get some pushback from Democrats, though he's expected to be easily confirmed in the Republican-controlled Senate, according to the Times and the Post. If confirmed, Scalia will replace outgoing Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, who announced his resignation last week amid criticism of his handling of a secret 2008 plea deal with Jeffrey Epstein. The deal, which came under renewed scrutiny after federal authorities revealed new sex trafficking charges against Epstein last week, allowed the 66-year-old to avoid significant jail time and federal prosecution after he was accused of molesting teenage girls. Acosta's deputy, Patrick Pizzella, will serve as acting secretary of labor after his resignation goes into effect Friday. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • The U.S. government will expand its policy requiring asylum seekers to wait outside the country to one of Mexico's most dangerous cities. The Department of Homeland Security said Friday it will implement its 'Migrant Protection Protocols' in Brownsville, Texas, across the border from Matamoros, Mexico. DHS says it anticipates the first asylum seekers will be sent back to Mexico starting Friday. Thousands of people are already camped in Matamoros, at the eastern edge of the U.S.-Mexico border. An official waiting list to seek asylum has more than 1,000 people. Matamoros is in Mexico's Tamaulipas state, which the U.S. government warns citizens not to visit due to violence and kidnappings. The city is also near where a Salvadoran father and his 23-month-old daughter were found drowned in the Rio Grande, in photos that were shared around the world.
  • A grandmother was in the spotlight at a recent wedding, and it was the request of the bride to have a special place for her grandmother.  Brenna Leman wanted her 83-year-old grandmother, who goes by the name 'Grandma,' to announce her arrival before the walk down the aisle as the wedding's flower girl during the April nuptials, ABC News reported. >> Read more trending news  Leman admits she didn't come up with the idea totally on her own. As an intensive care unit nurse, she was taking care of a patient who told the bride she was a flower girl in her own granddaughter's wedding, Leman recounted for ABC News. Grandma was decked out a maroon dress and proper pearls, and she did her job perfectly, throwing flower petals in the air for her granddaughter. When guests saw Grandma, they smiled and cheered. Grandma was also emotional. >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 'She got a little teary-eyed ... she said she wanted to make sure that she did everything OK for my day,' Leman told 'Good Morning America'. Grandma actually researched the job to make sure she was doing it right and so as to not disappoint her granddaughter.
  • President Donald Trump is marking the 50th anniversary of the first human steps on the moon with a meeting Friday with former Apollo 11 astronauts . The White House says Buzz Aldrin, Mike Collins and the family of mission commander Neil Armstrong will be greeted by Trump in the Oval Office. Armstrong, who died in 2012, and Aldrin made history when they landed on the moon 50 years ago Saturday, as Collins orbited overhead in their command module. Vice President Mike Pence is set to mark the anniversary Saturday with a visit and speech at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.
  • A man in Philadelphia was able to make a harrowing escape from a fire by scaling down the side of a 19-story apartment building. The escape was captured on video by several local media outlets. The unnamed man made it down the side of the building in about three minutes, unharmed, WCAU-TV reported. NATIONAL NEWS: Florida man makes sign after panhandler rejects his job offer 'He climbed about 200 feet down on what looked like basically chain link fencing and then the railings of each apartment building,' said WCAU-TV helicopter pilot Jeremy Haas. Why the man chose to evacuate the building in this manner is unclear. Firefighters responded to the apartment building, known as Holden Tower, around 9:30 p.m. Thursday, WPVI-TV reported. The fire is believed to have started in a trash chute. The building was evacuated. MORE: Deer photobombs romantic beach proposal Four residents and three police officers were hospitalized for smoke inhalation, KYW-TV reported. The fire was contained by 11 p.m. Residents were allowed back in the building early Friday.
  • New York state parks are keeping their pools open longer to help people deal with a hot spell. Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the extended hours will begin Friday and continue through Sunday at more than 30 parks statewide. Temperatures are expected to climb into the 90s around much of the state Friday as much of the nation deals with high heat. High temperatures are expected to linger through the weekend. Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont is also urging residents there to prepare for hot weather. The combination of heat and humidity could make it feel like 112 degrees. In Arkansas, officials say former New York Giants offensive lineman Mitch Petrus died of apparent heat stroke . He was 32. A coroner says he had worked outside all day at his family shop.
  • The United States is targeting a senior operative of the Iran-backed Hezbollah militant group with sanctions as part of its pressure campaign against Tehran. The government is also issuing a $7 million reward for information leading to the capture of the operative, Salman Rauf Salman. The action by the Treasury Department falls on the 25th anniversary of an attack Salman is said to have coordinated on a Jewish center in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The attack killed 85 people and wounded hundreds of others. The Treasury Department's action freezes all assets that Salman has within U.S. jurisdiction. Treasury says Salman is also accused of planning other terror attacks abroad from a base in Lebanon. On Thursday, Argentina's government branded Hezbollah a terrorist organization and froze its assets.
  • A Florida sheriff launched an internal investigation Friday into wealthy financer Jeffrey Epstein's time spent out of jail after he was convicted of sexually abusing underage girls. The inquiry will focus on whether deputies assigned to monitor Epstein violated any rules or regulations while he was out on work release, Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw said in a statement. Under a 2008 plea deal, Epstein was allowed to spend most of his days at the office of his now-defunct Florida Science Foundation, which doled out research grants, rather than in the county jail. 'All aspects of the matter will be fully investigated to ensure total accountability and transparency,' Bradshaw said. Epstein, 66, was convicted of prostitution-related charges in the Florida case, which involved dozens of underage teenage girls. He served a 13-month sentence, registered as a sex offender and paid restitution to the victims. The deal also included a formerly secret nonprosecution agreement that helped Epstein avoid more serious federal charges that could have landed him in prison for life. Federal prosecutors in New York have charged Epstein with sex trafficking involving underage victims. If convicted, he could be sentenced to up to 45 years in prison. He has pleaded not guilty, but a judge denied him bail on Thursday after determining he was a flight risk and posed a danger to the community. Epstein was allowed to spend most days at his office after a little more than three months in the county jail, according to Palm Beach County sheriff's records released to The Associated Press. Sex offenders are not eligible for Florida's work release program, but officials say Epstein was able to participate because he wasn't a registered sex offender until after he had already served his time. Under his 2008 plea deal, Epstein had his own driver to take him to and from his office, and he was allowed to be out of jail from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., six days a week. Deputies were assigned to the office to monitor who his visitors were. Logs show many visits from attorneys, paralegals and others involved in his legal cases. It wasn't clear if all visitors registered, however. Epstein was not allowed to leave the office unless he was returning to jail. Bradshaw said determining whether Epstein's wealth and high-powered legal team resulted in favoritism from the sheriff's department would be a key part of his investigation and a question that would be taken 'very seriously.' The New York charges against Epstein led to the resignation of President Donald Trump's labor secretary, Alex Acosta, who was Miami U.S. attorney when the nonprosecution agreement was signed. Two victims filed a federal lawsuit asking for the plea deal to be thrown out. The suit claims prosecutors did not consult with victims as required by law, and a federal judge earlier this year agreed there was a violation. _____ Follow Curt Anderson Twitter: http://twitter.com/Miamicurt
  • Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies? Scientists are expected to explore those and other fundamental questions about the universe when they peer deep into the night sky using a new telescope planned for the summit of Hawaii's tallest mountain. But the Thirty Meter Telescope is a decade away from being built. And Native Hawaiian protesters have tried to thwart the start of construction by blocking a road to the mountain. They say installing yet another observatory on Mauna Kea's peak would further defile a place they consider sacred. Activists have fought the $1.4 billion telescope but the state Supreme Court has ruled it can be built. The latest protests could be the final stand against it. Here's a look at the telescope project and some of the science it's expected to produce. WHY WOULD THE TELESCOPE BE MORE POWERFUL? The large size of the telescope's mirror means it would collect more light, allowing it to see faint, far-away objects such as stars and galaxies dating back as long as 13 billion years. The telescope gets its name from the size of the mirror, which will be 30 meters (98 feet) in diameter. That's three times as wide as the world's largest existing visible-light telescope. Adaptive optics would correct the blurring effects of the Earth's atmosphere. The telescope would be more than 200 times more sensitive than current telescopes and able to resolve objects 12 times better than the Hubble Space Telescope, said Christophe Dumas, head of operations for the Thirty Meter Telescope. WHAT RESEARCH WOULD THE TELESCOPE DO? — Distant planets. During the past 20 years, astronomers have discovered it is common for planets to orbit other stars in the universe. But they don't know much about what those planets — called extrasolar planets or exoplanets — are like. The new telescope would allow scientists to determine whether their atmospheres contain water vapor or methane which might indicate the presence of life. 'For the first time in history we will be capable of detecting extraterrestrial life,' Dumas said. Dumas said the new telescope would use special optics to suppress the light of stars. He compared the technique to blocking a bright street light in the distance with your thumb then seeing insects circling in the fainter light below. — Black holes. Black holes at the center of most galaxies are so dense that nothing, not even light, can escape their gravitational pull. Andrea Ghez, a University of California, Los Angeles physics and astronomy professor who discovered our galaxy's black hole, said scientists believe black holes play a fundamental role in how galaxies are formed and evolve. But so far astronomers have only been able to observe this dynamic in detail in the Milky Way because the next galaxy is 100 times farther away. The Thirty Meter Telescope would enable scientists to study more galaxies and more black holes in greater detail. It may also help them understand gravity. Those who doubt the importance should note that GPS-enabled maps on cellphones rely on Einstein's theories about gravity. 'We think of these things as esoteric. But in fact, in the long run, they have profound impacts on our lives,' Ghez said. —Dark matter and dark energy. Humans see only about 4 percent of all matter in the universe, Dumas said. Dark energy makes up about three-quarters and dark matter the rest. Neither can be seen. 'We have no idea what dark matter is and no idea what dark energy is. That's a big dilemma in today's world,' Dumas said. Because mass deforms space and light, Dumas said the new telescope would make it possible to measure how dark matter influences light. It could do this by studying light from far-away galaxies. The light would take different paths to the telescope, generating different images of the same object. WHY MAUNA KEA? The weather at the summit of Mauna Kea tends to be ideal for viewing the skies. At nearly 14,000 feet, its peak is normally above the clouds. Being surrounded by the ocean means air flows tend to be smoother and it has the driest atmosphere of any of the candidate sites. The mountain is already home to 13 other telescopes. Ghez used the Keck Observatory there to find our galaxy's black hole. Other discoveries credited to those sites over the years include the first images of exoplanets and the detection of 'Oumuamua, the first object from interstellar space, which turned out to be a comet from a distant star system. NEXT GENERATION TELESCOPES Two other giant telescopes are being built in Chile, which also has excellent conditions for astronomy. The European Extremely Large Telescope will have a primary mirror measuring 39 meters, or 128 feet, in diameter. The Giant Magellan Telescope's mirror will be 24.5 meters, or 80 feet, in diameter. The Thirty Meter Telescope is the only one expected to be built in the Northern Hemisphere. Because different spots on Earth look out on different parts of the sky, the next-generation ground telescopes will ensure scientists are able to see the entire universe. The universities and national observatories behind the Thirty Meter Telescope have selected Spain's Canary Islands as a backup site in case they are unable to build in Hawaii.
  • A cruise line worker is accused of trying to smuggle himself out of the U.S. in a case that spans from Port Canaveral to the Canadian border. >> Read more trending news  Investigators said Kenyan national Fuwad Nassir was barely on the job two weeks when he jumped ship. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement said Nassir told Canadian officials he was seeking asylum. Nassir saw a judge Thursday afternoon, but it's not clear who will prosecute this case. It could be the Brevard or Seminole State Attorney's Office or the statewide prosecutor. With a half-million-dollar bond, Nassir isn't likely to be going anywhere anytime soon. Nassir was in a Brevard County courtroom Thursday, facing a charge of conspiracy to commit human smuggling after investigators said he deserted his position aboard the Carnival Liberty at Port Canaveral back in October in violation of his visa. FDLE said he then caught a ride with an in-law who flew into Florida from Utah to pick him up and drove him to New York state, where he attempted to cross into Canada by way of the Rainbow Bridge point of entry.  Officials there refused him entry and turned Nassir over to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. He remained in federal detention until his return to Brevard County.  Carnival Cruise Lines officials said the company would not comment specifically on this case. 
  • Tulsa police and city water crews are asking drivers to avoid the intersection at 21st and 129th East Avenue.  A-36-inch water line burst there around three Friday morning, bringing officers and a repair crew to the scene.  “First step they said was to get the water shut off but then (workers) said the intersection is still going to be torn up for a considerable amount of time after that,” TPD Cpl. Matt Arnold said.  Power was shut off to the area for worker safety. We're told the intersection will be a mess until repairs can be made.
  • Registration opens for the Owasso city-wide block party. This year's event will be held Sept. 14. The city says these block parties are a great way to meet your neighbors, which could lead to a safer community. The deadline to register is August 28, 2019.
  • The 53rd Annual Porter Peach Festival is happening until Saturday night.  Bad weather damaged 90-percent of the crop last year, forcing growers to bring in peaches from Texas.  The festival features live music, local art and a parade Saturday morning. Porter is located at 201 Street South and North 4200 Road.
  • After a high profile confrontation in the first set of Democratic debates in the 2020 race for the White House, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris will be paired together again on the same debate stage, as Democrats will gather in Detroit July 30-31. The makeup of the two debates were announced after a draw live on CNN, as the network randomly placed the 20 qualifying candidates for the second pair of Democratic debates. While Biden and Harris headline the second night, the debates will kick off with three of the top five Democrats on stage for the first debate:  Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.
  • An accident is under investigation affecting the eastbound lanes of the Turner Turnpike at the Tulsa gate.  The accident happened around 8 p.m. Thursday and involved two vehicles, including an SUV.  We're told a FedEx truck at the scene may have had hazardous material on board.  Sapulpa police say one person died in the SUV that was involved in the collision. The driver was traveling in the wrong direction on the roadway. One eastbound lane at the bridge was opened for traffic at 4:30 a.m.

Washington Insider

  • After a high profile confrontation in the first set of Democratic debates in the 2020 race for the White House, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris will be paired together again on the same debate stage, as Democrats will gather in Detroit July 30-31. The makeup of the two debates were announced after a draw live on CNN, as the network randomly placed the 20 qualifying candidates for the second pair of Democratic debates. While Biden and Harris headline the second night, the debates will kick off with three of the top five Democrats on stage for the first debate:  Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.
  • With GOP lawmakers in Congress publicly expressing their concerns about a campaign rally chant aimed at Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), President Donald Trump on Thursday made clear he did not endorse the 'Send her back' call, as Democratic leaders expressed fears for Omar's security. 'I wasn't happy with that message that they gave last night,' the President told reporters at the White House. Asked several times by reporters why he didn't stop the chant, Mr. Trump said it was a 'packed arena,' very specifically saying he did not endorse the message against Omar. 'I was not happy with it,' the President added. 'I didn't like that they did it.' Here was the moment the chant started during his rally, in response to his criticism of four minority women Democratic House members, including Omar: On Capitol Hill, a number of Republicans expressed their concern about the message from the Trump crowd. 'No American should ever talk to another American that way,' said Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK). 'That's a very inappropriate sentiment in this country,' Cole told reporters just off the House floor. “The tweet was wrong & the chant last night grotesque,” wrote Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) on Twitter. “What I’m hearing from Capitol Police is that threats are up across the board for all members,” said Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC), who expressed his concern about the ‘send her back’ chant just a few hours after the rally had ended. As for Omar, she met on Thursday morning with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, as reporters pressed her to respond to the chant. “We have said this President is racist,” Omar said as she walked from the Capitol back to her House office. Democrats said they were concerned about Omar’s safety and possible threats against her. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), the head of the House Democratic Caucus, encouraged lawmakers and the Capitol Police to quickly share any information about threats to police back in their home districts. “We got to make sure every single person, Democrat, Republican, progressive, conservative, the left and the right, get through it together,” Jeffries said.
  • Pressing ahead with one of their main agenda items in the 116th Congress, Democrats are poised to push a bill through the House on Thursday which would more than double the federal minimum wage over the next six years, taking it from the current level of $7.25 an hour, and pressing it up to $15. 'This is a fair and overdue adjustment,' argued Rep. Joseph Morelle (D-NY), as debate started Wednesday on the floor of the House.  'American workers haven't had the benefit of a federal minimum wage increase in over a decade, while the prices of everything have gone up,' said Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-OH). House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pressed Democrats to stick together on the minimum wage bill, arguing it 'lifts 1.3 million Americans out of poverty.' But for most Republicans, the idea of raising the wage would be a giant economic mistake, hurting rural areas, and younger Americans looking for work. 'When Congress should be focused on pro-growth policies, this bill would be detrimental to American families, workers, and entrepreneurs,' said Rep. Michael Burgess (R-TX). Republicans have pointed repeatedly to a recent Congressional Budget Office report, which estimated that the $15 minimum wage could cause job losses of 1.3 million - with a high estimate over 3.7 million. 'That's like firing the entire population of the state of Oklahoma,' said Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), in a line that's been used by a number of GOP lawmakers in recent weeks. The original plan was to raise the minimum wage in five steps over five years - but because of resistance among some Democrats - the plan was changed to make it a six year increase. The bill would raise the wage in steps, first to $8.45 an hour, then $9.50 a year after that, followed by a jump to $10.60, then $11.70 an hour, $12.80 an hour, $13.90, and lastly to $15 an hour. After that, the minimum wage would be indexed to rise along with median wage growth in the United States. While Democrats will certainly celebrate the passage of the plan - the bill seems unlikely to get a vote in the Republican-led Senate.
  • Accusing the Trump Administration of intentionally withholding documents and information about the failed effort by President Donald Trump to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, the House on Wednesday voted along party lines to find the Attorney General and Secretary of Commerce in Contempt of Congress. 'Neither of the Departments have provided the documents we have asked for,' said Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), as the House resolution targeted both Attorney General William Barr, and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. 'I even asked Secretary Ross to meet with me personally,' Cummings said on the House floor. 'He refused.' It was the second time Barr had been held in contempt by the current Congress; the first was a civil contempt citation passed by the full House for ignoring a subpoena for his testimony about the Russia investigation and the Mueller Report. Democrats said it was nothing but a cover-up by the White House. Just before the vote, Barr and Ross sent a letter to Democrats asking that the contempt vote be delayed, as Republicans argued that the Trump Administration has been cooperating with requests for documents - something Democrats say just isn't true. 'It is unfortunate that the House has scheduled a vote to hold two sitting members of the President's Cabinet in contempt of Congress given the clear record of cooperation,' Barr and Ross wrote, as they said 'any contempt vote is, at best, premature.' 'This is all about a show,' said Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX), as Republicans rallied around a message that Democrats were pursuing political attacks on the President, while ignoring major issues on Capitol Hill. 'Don't play politics with contempt,' said Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC). 'We're better than that.' Democrats countered that the courts have already shown that the Trump Administration didn't tell the truth about why the citizenship question was being pursued - as Democrats argued that the feds had held back information to Congress about the Census citizenship question. 'Wilbur Ross lied. William Barr lied,' said Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY). In a defiant statement sent out just after the vote, the White House denounced the House action. “Today’s vote by Speaker Pelosi and House Democrats to hold Attorney General Barr and Secretary Ross in contempt is ridiculous and yet another lawless attempt to harass the President and his Administration,” the statement read.
  • Next summer will mark forty years since I drew my first paycheck on Capitol Hill as a Page in the House of Representatives. Between working for the Congress, and then covering lawmakers as a reporter, I've seen lawmakers almost come to blows, watched Speakers angrily denounce their critics, seen lawmakers block the doors to the House floor to keep lawmakers from leaving, and all sorts of other legislative mischief. But I have never seen what happened on Tuesday, when Rep. Emmanuel Cleaver (D-MO) did what amounted to a 'gavel drop,' as he refused to read a parliamentary ruling against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and simply walked away. 'I abandon the Chair,' Cleaver said, after getting my attention by clearly not reading the script in front of him, and speaking in the first person from the Speaker's Chair. Maybe it's happened before in the almost 230 years that the House and Senate have been at work - but what Cleaver did on Tuesday was something that left my jaw on the floor. In his off-the-cuff remarks, Cleaver seemed to indicate that he had given a pass to Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI), who during debate on a resolution condemning President Trump, had denounced a group of minority women Democrats as 'anti-American.' When one Democrat rose to ask that Duffy's words be 'taken down' and scrubbed from the Record, Cleaver brushed off the complaint. And he evidently thought the same should have been done for Speaker Nancy Pelosi, when she referred to the President's 'racist tweets,' directly going against precedents of the House which clearly state that such speech is against the rules. In a statement, Cleaver said he was simply frustrated at what was going on before his eyes. 'I have spent my entire life working with people of all faiths and stripes in an effort solve real-world problems with concrete solutions, but never have we been this divided and this unwilling to listen to countering opinions or accept objective truths,' the Missouri Democrat said. 'However, a house divided against itself cannot stand, regardless of how strong the foundation,' Cleaver added. Some of my colleagues were just as surprised at the turn of events. The rules rebuke of Pelosi was historic as well - it was the first time a Speaker had words 'taken down' in 35 years, since a famous floor spat between Speaker Tip O'Neill, and future Speaker Newt Gingrich (though not many people at the time would have predicted Gingrich's ascension to that leadership post).