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National News

    In the battle of two very different sequels at the box office this weekend, Denzel Washington's action pic 'The Equalizer 2' has narrowly won out over the ABBA jukebox musical 'Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again.' Studios on Sunday estimate that the R-rated Denzel Washington joint grossed $35.8 million from North American theaters over the weekend. It's Washington's first ever sequel. Second place went to Universal Pictures' 'Mamma Mia 2,' which took in $34.4 million after a stronger start on Friday. The first film grossed more than $600 million 10 years ago. In its second weekend, 'Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation' came in third with $23.2 million. 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' took fourth place with $16.1 million in its third weekend, and 'Incredibles 2' came in fifth with $11.5 million.
  • Michelle Williams posted a quick update for fans Friday after a report emerged that she checked herself into a mental health facility for depression. >> Read more trending news  Entertainment Tonight reported that the former Destiny’s Child singer tweeted, “Progress not Perfection!” along with a screenshot from her Instagram story that read, “I feel the (heart emoji)! I just wanted to let you guys know I’m better (praying hands emoji)!” On Tuesday, TMZ reported that Williams checked into a mental health facility. Although Williams has not explicitly confirmed the website’s report, she made a post on social media about seeking help when needed that same day. Related: Destiny’s Child singer Michelle Williams checks in to mental health facility, reports say “For years I have dedicated myself to increasing awareness of mental health and empowering people to recognize when it’s time to seek help, support and guidance from those that love and care for your wellbeing,” Williams wrote. “I recently listened to the same advice I have given to thousands around the world and sought help from a great team of healthcare professionals.” After her post, Williams was met with support from friends and fellow musicians, including Beyonce’s mother, Tina Knowles Lawson, and sister, Solange Knowles. Missy Elliot also expressed support, tweeting, “I want to lift our sis up in prayer because there are so many people battling this & many trying to deal with it alone. Please No jokes this is REAL & as human beings let’s keep the ones who are openly dealing with it uplifted & be encouraging to them! Love u.”
  • U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw appeared conflicted in early May on whether to stop families from being separated at the border. He challenged the Trump administration to explain how families were getting a fair hearing guaranteed by the Constitution, but also expressed reluctance to get too deeply involved with immigration enforcement. 'There are so many (enforcement) decisions that have to be made, and each one is individual,' he said in his calm, almost monotone voice. 'How can the court issue such a blanket, overarching order telling the attorney general, either release or detain (families) together?' Sabraw showed how more than seven weeks later in a blistering opinion faulting the administration and its 'zero tolerance' policy for a 'crisis' of its own making. He went well beyond the American Civil Liberties Union's initial request to halt family separation — which President Donald Trump effectively did on his own amid a backlash — by imposing a deadline of this Thursday to reunify more than 2,500 children with their families. Unyielding insistence on meeting his deadline, displayed in a string of hearings he ordered for updates, has made the San Diego jurist a central figure in a drama that has captivated international audiences with emotional accounts of toddlers and teens being torn from their parents. Circumstances changed dramatically after the ACLU sued the government in March on behalf of a Congolese woman and a Brazilian woman who were split from their children. Three days after the May hearing, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the zero tolerance policy on illegal entry was in full effect, leading to the separation of more than 2,300 children in five weeks. Sabraw, writing in early June that the case could move forward, found the practice 'arbitrarily tears at the sacred bond between parent and child.' It was 'brutal, offensive, and fails to comport with traditional notions of fair play and decency.' David Martin, professor emeritus at the University of Virginia School of Law, said, 'It's probably not the first judge who seemed more deferential and then got much more active when he or she thought the government was not being responsive or had taken a particularly objectionable stance. Childhood separation clearly had that kind of resonance.' 'The intrusion into the family is so severe, the judicial reaction has been just like much of the public's reaction: 'This is an extraordinary step, you shouldn't have done it, you better fix it as quickly as possible,'' said Martin, a Homeland Security Department deputy general counsel under President Barack Obama. Sabraw, 60, was born in San Rafael, near San Francisco, and raised in the Sacramento area. His father was stationed in Japan during the Korean War, where he met his mother. The judge has said prejudice against Japanese growing up made their housing search difficult. 'In light of that experience, I was raised with a great awareness of prejudice,' he told the North County Times newspaper in 2003. 'No doubt, there were times when I was growing up that I felt different, and hurtful things occurred because of my race.' While studying at University of the Pacific's McGeorge School of Law, he met his wife, Summer Stephan, who was elected San Diego County district attorney in June. He told the Federal Bar Association magazine in 2009 that his wife and three children, then teenagers, kept him 'running from one activity to another, and grounded in all that is good and wonderful in life.' Republican President George W. Bush appointed Sabraw to the federal bench in 2003 after eight years as a state judge. By virtue of serving in San Diego, his caseload is heavy with immigration and other border-related crimes. In 2010, he oversaw a settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over allegations that San Diego officials misled investors about city pension liabilities. In 2014, he favored Apple Inc. in a closely watched patent infringement case against the tech behemoth. In 2016, he sided with the state of California in refusing to block a law requiring school vaccinations. Robert Carreido, a criminal defense attorney who estimates having 20 to 30 cases before the judge, was a little surprised how hard Sabraw came down on separating families because he hews pretty closely to the government's sentencing recommendations. 'He rarely will go above what we've negotiated (in plea agreements), but he doesn't usually go much lower than what the government recommends,' Carreido said. 'In my experience, I would consider him in the middle.' Sabraw's reputation for a calm, courteous demeanor and running an efficient calendar has been clear in his highest-profile case so far. He has kept hearings to about 90 minutes, telling attorneys he doesn't want to get too 'in the weeds' on logistics of reunifying families. 'My general view is if the court has to raise its voice, or threaten sanction, then we've lost control,' Sabraw told the Daily Journal, a Los Angeles legal publication, last year. 'I never want to be in that position. Usually, almost always, court is almost like a place of worship.' His patience wore thin one Friday afternoon when the government submitted a plan to reunite children 5 and older that excluded DNA testing and other measures. The government said 'truncated' vetting was needed to meet Sabraw's deadline, despite considerable risk to child safety. The judge quickly summoned both sides to a conference call at 5:30 p.m. to say the plan misrepresented his instructions and was designed to pin blame on him if anything went wrong. The government, which never showed serious consideration of an appeal, submitted a revised plan two days later that restored DNA testing if red flags arose. Jonathan White, a senior Health and Human Services Department official and the plan's architect, authoritatively answered questions in court the next day, prompting the judge to tell him he had 'every confidence that you are the right person to do this.' The revised plan, he said, was a 'great start to making a large number of reunifications happen very, very quickly.
  • President Donald Trump asserted without evidence Sunday that newly released documents relating to the wiretapping of his onetime campaign adviser Carter Page 'confirm with little doubt' that intelligence agencies misled the court that approved the warrant. But lawmakers from both political parties said that the documents don't show wrongdoing and that they even appear to undermine some previous claims by top Republicans on the basis for obtaining a warrant against Page. Visible portions of the heavily redacted documents, released Saturday under the Freedom of Information Act, show the FBI telling the court that Page 'has been collaborating and conspiring with the Russian government.' The agency also told the court that 'the FBI believes Page has been the subject of targeted recruitment by the Russian government.' The documents were part of officials' application for a warrant to the secretive foreign intelligence surveillance court, which signed off on surveilling Page. Trump tweeted Sunday on the documents: 'As usual they are ridiculously heavily redacted but confirm with little doubt that the Department of 'Justice' and FBI misled the courts. Witch Hunt Rigged, a Scam!' The release appears to undercut some of the contentions in a memo prepared by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes earlier this year. Nunes, R-Calif., and other Republicans had said that anti-Trump research in a dossier prepared by former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele and paid for by Democrats was used inappropriately to obtain the warrant on Page. While the documents confirm that the FBI relied, in part, on information from Steele to obtain the initial warrant, they also show how the FBI informed the court of his likely motivation. A page-long footnote in the warrant application lays out the FBI's assessment of Steele's history and the likely interest of his backer, adding that despite the political concern, the bureau believed at least some of his report to be 'credible.' Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, a ranking member on the House Intelligence Committee, said the documents detail 'just why the FBI was so concerned that Carter Page might be acting as an agent of a foreign power.' 'It was a solid application and renewals signed by four different judges appointed by three different Republican presidents,' Schiff said on ABC's 'This Week.' Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida also broke with Trump, saying he didn't think the FBI did anything wrong in obtaining warrants against Page. 'I have a different view on this issue than the president and the White House,' Rubio said Sunday on CBS' 'Face the Nation.' ''They did not spy on the campaign from anything and everything that I have seen. You have an individual here who has openly bragged about his ties to Russia and Russians.' On Sunday, Page said on CNN's 'State of the Union': 'I've never been the agent of a foreign power.' In a 2013 letter, Page had described himself as an 'informal adviser' to the Kremlin but now said 'it's really spin' to call him an adviser. Page has not been charged with a crime, but he has been interviewed by the FBI and congressional investigators about his ties to Russia. White House officials have argued that Page, announced by the president in early 2016 as a foreign policy adviser, played only a minor role in the Trump campaign. Another former campaign policy aide, George Papadopoulos, pleaded guilty last year to charges brought by special counsel Robert Mueller alleging he had lied to the FBI about his Russia contacts. He is now cooperating with Mueller's expansive probe. The documents released Saturday include the FBI's October 2016 request to surveil Page and several renewal applications. It marks the first time in the more than 40-year history of the highly-secretive court that underlying documents for a warrant have been released.
  • A gunman who got into a deadly shootout with police, then took dozens of people hostage at a Los Angeles supermarket has been arrested on suspicion of murder, authorities said Sunday. Gene Evin Atkins, 28, was being held Sunday morning on $2 million bail, according to Officer Drake Madison, a Los Angeles police spokesman. It wasn't clear if he had an attorney and a message left at a number listed for Atkins in public records wasn't immediately returned. A woman was shot and killed when Atkins ran into the Trader Joe's supermarket in Los Angeles' Silver Lake section on Saturday, but no hostages were seriously hurt before the man handcuffed himself and surrendered about three hours later, police said. Coroner's officials identified the woman Sunday as 27-year-old Melyda Corado. Her brother, Albert Corado, said on Twitter that she worked at Trader Joe's. 'I'm sad to say she didn't make it. My baby sister. My world,' he tweeted. Investigators have not confirmed if her death sparked Atkins' arrest on a murder charge. Atkins' grandmother was hospitalized in critical condition after the shooting and police had no update on her condition Sunday. Authorities said Atkins shot his grandmother seven times and wounded another woman, whom he forced into a car, at a South Los Angeles home around 1:30 p.m., police said. Officers tracked the car, gave chase and exchanged gunfire with the man, who crashed into a pole outside the supermarket and then ran inside, they said. The unidentified woman, who suffered a graze wound earlier, was taken out of the car by police. Frightened customers and workers dove for cover as police bullets fired at the man shattered the store's glass doors. Some people inside the supermarket climbed out windows, and others barricaded themselves in rooms as scores of police officers and firefighters and 18 ambulances converged on the scene and prepared for mass casualties. Heavily armed officers in riot gear stood along the side of the store and used mirrors to look inside as hostage negotiators tried to coax the man into freeing his 40 to 50 hostages and surrendering. At around 6:30 p.m., Atkins agreed to handcuff himself and walked out the front door, surrounded by four of the hostages. He was immediately taken into custody. Mayor Eric Garcetti congratulated police and firefighters for their work and mourned the loss of life at the Trader Joe's, where he and his wife regularly shopped when they lived in the neighborhood. 'The heroism that was shown today was second to none, and the teams that were able to respond, secure the perimeter and engage in conversation with the suspect no doubt saved lives today,' he said. Among those who survived the harrowing afternoon was 91-year-old Don Kohles, who lives in the neighborhood and was walking into the supermarket when he saw 'two police cars coming like a bat out of hell' and the man crashed into the pole. The driver got out, and police started firing at him as he ran toward the supermarket. Kohles hurried inside, and he and others took cover as the man ran in. 'Those bullets went right over the back of me as he was running right down the main aisle,' Kohles said. Christian Dunlop, a real estate agent and actor who lives nearby and frequents Trader Joe's, was on a corner near the store when he saw four people run out. One person, an employee, was dragging an injured woman by the hands. 'She appeared lifeless,' Dunlop said. He then saw five employees hang out a second-floor window and drop to the ground and around 15 others run to safety from the back of the store. Among them was a police officer carrying a small child, he said. Police Chief Michel Moore said the gunman made a 'series of demands' during the standoff but crisis negotiators believed they could persuade him to surrender peacefully. Officers had tracked the car using a stolen-vehicle tracking system and tried to stop the man in Hollywood, but he refused to pull over, Moore said. During the chase, the man fired at officers, shooting out the back window of his car. Outside the store, the man exchanged gunfire with police again and that's when Corado was shot and killed, Moore said. It was unclear if she died from police gunfire or was killed by the gunman. Fire officials said six people, ranging in age from 12 to 81, were taken to the hospital. None had been shot, and all were in fair condition. ___ Associated Press writer Terry Tang in Phoenix contributed to this report.
  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood, affecting millions of American children annually, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. >> On AJC.com: Does my child have ADHD? Things to know about the condition While the causes and risk factors of the disorder are unknown, researchers are studying how brain injury, exposure to lead and other environmental factors during pregnancy, alcohol/tobacco use during pregnancy, premature delivery and low birth weight may be linked to ADHD. But new research published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests frequent technology use among teens may also lead to common ADHD symptoms. >> On AJC.com: Number of young women using ADHD medicine up by 700 percent, CDC says The new study out of the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of Southern California features data on 2,587 15- and 16-year-olds in 10 Los Angeles County high schools. Researchers assessed the students’ self-reported high-frequency use of 14 different digital media activities, such as social media, texting, video streaming or online chatrooms during a 24-month follow-up. Approximately 9.5 percent of the children who reported frequent use of half of the platforms and 10.5 percent who reported using all 14 platforms frequently showed new signs and symptoms of ADHD. >> Read more trending news  Compared to others, students who reported using multiple types of digital media multiple times a day were about twice as likely to report new ADHD symptoms over the 24-month follow-up. Still, about 4.6 percent of the students who were not frequent users of any digital activity also showed symptoms. “Among adolescents followed up over 2 years, there was a statistically significant but modest association between higher frequency of digital media use and subsequent symptoms of ADHD,” researchers concluded.  But that doesn’t necessarily mean digital media use causes ADHD. “Further research is needed to determine whether this association is causal,” study authors wrote. Read the full study at jamanetwork.com.
  • The agency that supervises the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile would essentially lose direct Cabinet oversight under legislation that Congress is negotiating. The little-noticed provision in a defense policy bill is opposed by the Trump administration and senior lawmakers from both parties, but efforts to scrap it have not overcome resistance from staffers on the Senate Armed Services Committee. At issue in the Senate-approved bill is whether the National Nuclear Security Administration remains under the direct control of the Energy Department, where it's been since its creation in 2000. The bill would empower that agency to act nearly on its own, freed from what a report by the Senate committee calls a 'flawed DOE organizational process' that has led to 'weak accountability ... insufficient program and budget expertise and poor contract management.' That report cites series of delays and cost overruns at the agency, including a now-canceled project to reprocess weapons-grade plutonium and uranium into fuel for commercial reactors. The cost of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility in South Carolina has ballooned from $1.4 billion in 2004 to more than $17 billion, completion is decades away and the state is mounting a legal challenge to the federal government's decision to end the project. The White House and Energy Secretary Rick Perry strongly oppose the reorganization, saying it would usurp Perry's authority to set policy in crucial areas and make the nuclear agency's general counsel independent of the Energy Department's legal division. The White House said in a statement that the bill would block the energy secretary from directing civil and national security functions at the agency and 'degrade' the secretary's ability to protect the health, safety and security of employees and the public. A Perry spokeswoman, Shaylyn Hynes, called the plan 'misguided' and said it would 'weaken national security efforts by limiting DOE's critical role in managing America's nuclear weapons capabilities.' 'It is in the best interest of the safety and security of all Americans to remove this provision from the bill and continue NNSA to be represented by a Cabinet-level official, allowing DOE and NNSA's complementary relationship to remain strong,' Hynes said. The leaders of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee said the plan was 'a major step backward.' 'To reduce the secretary's authority in such a sweeping way .... raises serious questions about the long-term consequences,' Sens. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., said in a letter to the Senate Armed Services Committee. Murkowski and Cantwell supported Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, as he tried unsuccessfully to remove the provision during Senate debate on the defense bill last month. A later Cruz effort also failed on procedural grounds. Criticism of the nuclear agency isn't new. A congressional commission led by a former Army undersecretary and retired Navy admiral concluded in 2014 that it had failed in its mission and relied too heavily on private contractors that had turned it into a massive jobs program with duplicative functions and a 'dysfunctional management and operations relationship.' The commission, however, did support the current oversight arrangement. A Senate aide familiar with the reorganization plan contended it was 'a straight-up power grab' by staffers at the nuclear agency and the Senate Armed Services Committee. Agency staffers, frustrated by delays that occur as the Energy Department's general counsel and other officials review their work, took their case to Senate committee staffers, according to the aide, who spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss internal deliberations. The committee chairman, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has been away from the Capitol since December as he fights brain cancer. Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., has led the committee in McCain's absence but has not played a role in the nuclear agency dispute. In its staff-written report, the committee said the proposal was not 'an indictment of the current Energy secretary' but rather an effort to 'address a number of structural impediments' that have 'damaged the NNSA's ability to carry out its mission.' A committee spokeswoman declined to comment, as did representatives for Inhofe and Rhode Island Sen. Jack Reed, the committee's top Democrat. Spokesmen for the chairman of House Armed Services, Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, and the committee's top Democrat, Rep. Adam Smith of Washington, also declined comment. Perry told Congress earlier this year that there have been 'historically questionable expenditures of dollars' on the MOX project and other NNSA contracts, but said officials were working to ensure taxpayers 'are getting a good return on our investment.' 'We will give good oversight,' Perry told the House Science, Space and Technology Committee in May, pledging to make the NNSA and other DOE agencies 'as transparent as we can and try to get us the results that this committee wants.' Greg Mello of the Los Alamos Study Group, a New Mexico-based watchdog group, said the proposed changes would begin 'dismantling civilian control over the nuclear weapons enterprise.' Corporate contractors 'have already captured NNSA. These changes would gut remaining what oversight and external control there is,' Mello said. ___ Online: National Nuclear Security Administration: https://www.energy.gov/nnsa/national-nuclear-security-administration
  • Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema says Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency that some in her party are clamoring to abolish, is performing an 'important function.' She recently joined House Republicans to ease restrictions on banks. And she offered a decidedly nonpartisan comment on conservative Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court. The third-term congresswoman has come a long way from her days as a Green Party activist as she tries to become the first Democrat to represent Arizona in the Senate in 30 years. It's a notable strategy in an election year in which many Democrats see a path to victory by tapping into the outrage of the party's base in the Trump era. In neighboring Nevada, for instance, Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen is aiming to flip another GOP-held Senate seat and she seized on the high court vacancy to highlight the threat to abortion rights. Some Arizona Democrats are frustrated that the 42-year-old Sinema hasn't taken similarly aggressive stances. Ken Wixon, a lifelong Democrat, said he planned to back Sinema's Democratic opponent, Phoenix activist Deedra Abboud, in the Aug. 28 primary. 'I supported (Sinema) before, but she's too easily influenced,' Wixon said after attending a recent political meeting in suburban Phoenix where Abboud spoke. 'She seems to roll over too easily.' Sinema said her shift to the right is the result of learning to work with others in a hyper-partisan Congress. 'What I'm really proud of is my ability and willingness to learn and grow as a political leader,' she told The Associated Press recently when asked if her moderate profile would turn off Democrats. 'That's allowed me to learn new opinions and change as I've gotten new information.' Sinema is favored to win the primary and is seen as a competitive Democratic candidate in a general election that could hinge on how voters feel about President Donald Trump and his policies. That's why some Democrats are willing to back her even if her liberalism has limits. 'I have some serious questions,' said Steven Slugocki, Democratic chairman in Maricopa County, Arizona's most populous. 'That's not to say I won't support her. The alternative is far worse.' That alternative, to Slugocki, is any of the Republicans vying to succeed retiring, one-term Republican Sen. Jeff Flake, a persistent Trump critic. The GOP field includes former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, a crusader against illegal immigration who was convicted for contempt of court related to racial profiling practices and later pardoned by Trump, and Kelli Ward, a state senator endorsed last year by former Trump adviser Steve Bannon. The third GOP candidate, Rep. Martha McSally, has been viewed as a moderate in the vein of Arizona's senior GOP senator, John McCain. But as the primary approaches, she has sharpened her stance on immigration, removing her name as a co-sponsor of legislation backing a path to citizenship for some young immigrants in the country illegally. Immigration politics are central to Arizona's politics today. In 2016, the influx of Latino voters contributed to Democrat Hillary Clinton's narrow loss to Trump here. Clinton lost Ohio, for instance, by nearly twice as much as she lost Arizona. A Democratic victory in the Senate race would suggest the state could be up for grabs in 2020. Bill Clinton was the last Democratic presidential nominee to carry Arizona in 1996. And yet Sinema remains controversial among Arizona Democrats. She drew complaints among liberals last year as one of two dozen House Democrats to join majority Republicans backing a measure to sharply increase penalties for people deported more than three times, more sharply for those with a criminal record. Likewise, she was one of a handful of Democrats who backed a measure giving federal officials authority to detain and deport noncitizens who live in gang territory. While Latino voter advocates groan at some of Sinema's positions, they note her support for allowing a path to citizenship for some young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children. 'The most important thing we can do right now is elect candidates who will serve as a check on Donald Trump,' said Cristobal Alex, president of Latino Victory, a national political advocacy group active in several states this year. 'She's the only viable choice for our community in this election.' One important sign of Sinema's viability, albeit with the election still more than three months away, is that she reported having more than $5.3 million in her campaign account at the end of June. That's many times more than what Arpaio, McSally and Ward had. Recent polls also show Sinema leading all three Republican prospects in potential head-to-head contests. Some Arizona Democrats acknowledge murmurs of discontent, but say Sinema reflects her politically-mixed southwest Phoenix-area district, home to Arizona State University in Tempe and Republican-leaning residential areas in Scottsdale and Chandler. 'There are some grumblings,' said state Sen. Lela Alston, who served alongside her in the Legislature before Sinema's election to Congress in 2012. 'While there are some individuals who would never vote for her, more say — even though they wish she was voting more to the left — they are going to embrace her candidacy, given their choices.' Sinema's little-known Democratic opponent, Abboud, said she thinks both candidates have a shot to get votes from moderates or disaffected Republicans. 'You have people that want something different,' Abboud said. 'They want to vote on their values.' Such grumblings boiled over in May when some Democrats in Pima County, which abuts the U.S. border with Mexico, proposed condemning some of Sinema's votes with the Republican majority. The motion was ultimately defeated, a sign that voters are seeking pragmatism, said Jo Holt, who leads the party in Pima County. 'Some of these folks on the left will say in one breath they don't like a vote she took, but that they'll support her because things in the country have gotten so bad,' Holt said. 'In another political environment, these votes might hurt her more.' Sinema's resilience has not been lost on some Republican operatives in Arizona, increasingly anxious about their party's chances of holding the seat. 'She has benefited from being able to stake out a centrist approach,' said strategist Jon Seaton, 'and really hasn't paid much of a price for it.
  • An Arizona mother is in jail after police said she went to work and left her 1-year-old son alone in their apartment, where he was found dead 10 hours later. >> Missing baby found dead near slough after 5-day search According to court documents obtained by KTVK, Donielle Joyce King, 32, of Phoenix, was arrested and charged with child abuse after first responders found the boy unresponsive Tuesday afternoon.  King told investigators that she left the baby at home about 6:20 a.m. Tuesday before dropping off her other children at day care and going to work, the probable cause statement said. She claimed the baby could not go to day care because he 'had open sores,' court documents said. She also reportedly told investigators that a friend was supposed to babysit but never showed up. >> Read more trending news  King said she came back home at 4:15 p.m. and found the baby unresponsive on a mattress, investigators said. She said she performed CPR on the child as her daughter called 911, court documents said. The baby, who reportedly had several bruises, was pronounced dead about 4:47 p.m., court documents said. King is being held on a $50,000 bond. Read more here.
  • A Texas woman is behind bars after police say she tried to send meth to a convicted killer. According to KFDX, Sara Elizabeth Russell, 29, of Katy, was charged Thursday with one count of prohibited substance in a correctional facility after mailroom employees at the James V. Allred Unit prison found methamphetamine – and instructions on how to hide it – inside a card.  >> Read more trending news  Authorities said Russell was trying to send the drugs to inmate Jason Burkett, who was convicted of murder for his part in the 2001 deaths of a Texas woman and two teens, the Houston Chronicle reported.  KFDX reported that investigators believe Burkett 'mailed the card to Russell with pre-arranged directions to put meth in it, then have it returned to him.' Burkett reportedly told investigators that he sent the card to Russell but didn't ask her to send the drugs. Russell is being held on $10,000 bond.  Read more here or here.
  • A duck boat accident on Table Rock Lake in Branson, Missouri, killed 17 people Thursday night, including the boat’s driver and nine members of an Indiana family, according to authorities. Fourteen other people were injured. >> Read more trending news  Update 12:50 p.m. EDT July 22: The 17 people killed in the duck boat accident have all been identified, according to The Associated Press. They are: Indiana family members 45-year-old Angela Coleman, 1-year-old Arya Coleman, 69-year-old Belinda Coleman, 76-year-old Ervin Coleman, 7-year-old Evan Coleman, 40-year-old Glenn Coleman, 70-year-old Horace Coleman, 2-year-old Maxwell Coleman, and 9-year-old Reece Coleman. Missouri natives 69-year-old William Asher, 68-year-old Rosemarie Hamann, 63-year-old Janice Bright, 65-year-old William Bright, and 73-year-old Bob Williams. Arkansas natives 53-year-old Steve Smith and 15-year-old Lance Smith. Illinois native Leslie Dennison, 64. Update 8:45 a.m. EDT July 21: The Stone County coroner confirmed to KSDK that William Asher, 69, and his girlfriend, Rose Hamann, were among those killed in Thursday night's duck boat accident in Missouri. The news station reported that the couple lived in St. Louis County, Missouri. They were visiting Branson to celebrate Hamann’s birthday, which was on Monday, according KSDK. Todd Dennison’s mother, 64-year-old Leslie Dennison, was also killed in the boat accident, the Kansas City Star reported. In an emotional and brief interview Friday, Todd Dennison told the newspaper that his mother was visiting Branson with his 12-year-old daughter, Alicia, and that they were together for less than an hour before they boarded the duck boat. He told the Star that while in the hospital on Thursday night, his daughter told him that she could feel her grandmother pushing her upward from below while the boat was sinking.“She said her grandmother saved her,” Todd Dennison told the Star. Update 1:30 a.m. EDT July 21: Authorities have identified more victims in the duck boat accident. Steve Smith and his teenage son, Lance Smith, from Osceola, Arkansas, were among those killed in the crash. Steve Smith was a pastor and Lance Smith was preparing to open his own church in less than a week, according to CNN, first reported by The Christian Chronicle.  Steve Smith’s daughter, Loren Smith, suffered a concussion during the accident but survived. Smith’s wife, Pam Smith, opted to stay behind and was not on the boat. William and Janice Bright from Higginsville, Missouri, near Kansas City, were also identified as victims in the crash. WDAF reports that the couple had three children, 16 grandchildren and had been married for 45 years. “My great nieces and nephews now have no grandparents,” Karen Abbott, William Bright’s sister, told WDAF. Update 11:00 p.m. EDT July 20: A summer vacation ended in tragedy for nine members of an Indiana family, along with eight other tourists, killed when a duck boat capsized Thursday evening on a lake in Branson, Missouri. The Coleman family had traveled to Branson for their annual road trip, according to The New York Times, which interviewed Carolyn Coleman. Coleman said she lost two of her brothers-in-law and that three generations of the family died in the accident, including four young children, the Times reported. “We just lost some wonderful people,” she said. The Indianapolis Star reported that the four children killed in the accident were all under the age of 10. 'They were very loved,' Ingrid Coleman Douglas said in a telephone interview with the Star. Coleman Douglas said the victims included two of her uncles, cousins and their children. 'It’s a huge family on all sides. It’s unimaginable. I would never have thought I would have lost this number of people this way,' she said. Coleman Douglas identified the victims as her uncles Horace 'Butch' Coleman and Irving Raymond Coleman; Horace Coleman's wife, Belinda Coleman; her cousins, Angela Coleman and Glenn Coleman; Angela's 2-year-old son Maxwell; Glenn's two sons Evan and Reece; and his 1-year-old daughter, Arya. Glenn's wife, Tia Coleman, and Angela's older son, whose name has not been released, survived the accident, the Star reported. Update 5:15 p.m. EDT July 20: Stone County authorities now say all 17 of the victims in the duck boat accident have been accounted for and that nine of the victims were from the same family, according to Gov. Mike Parson’s office. Two members of the family, identified by local news outlets as the Coleman family, survived. Officials said the victims range in age from 1 to 70 years old. Meantime, mourners are putting flowers on the victims’ cars in the Ride the Ducks parking lot, and the community of Branson, Missouri, is holding several candlelight vigils Friday night in memory of those killed.  One of the vigils is scheduled at Table Rock Lake where the accident happened, according to KY3-TV. Update 4:30 p.m. EDT July 20: Family and friends are mourning the staggering loss of life on Table Rock Lake Thursday evening. One woman lost nine members of her family, USA Today reported, citing Gov. Mike Parson’s office. Update 2:20 p.m. EDT July 20: Branson Mayor Karen Best told The Associated Press that Bob Williams, the man who was driving the Ride the Ducks boat that sunk Thursday in a southwest Missouri lake, was a “great ambassador for Branson” who “was at every event.” Seventeen people died, including Williams, and 14 others were injured Thursday when the duck boat capsized in Table Rock Lake, according to authorities. Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said earlier Friday that the boat’s captain survived. In a statement posted on Facebook, employees of Ride the Ducks Branson said the business would be closed “while we support the investigation, and to allow time to grieve for the families and the community.” “This incident has deeply affected all of us. Words cannot convey how profoundly our hearts are breaking,” the statement said. “Thank you for your support, and we ask that your thoughts and prayers be with the families during this time.” Update 11:40 a.m. EDT July 20: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said Friday morning that authorities recovered four more bodies after a duck boat capsized in southwest Missouri, KSMU reported, bringing the death toll from Thursday’s incident to 17. Rader said 14 people were taken to hospitals after the incident. He said the driver of the Ride the Ducks boat died. The captain survived. Update 11:20 a.m. EDT July 20: Nearly two decades ago, the National Transportation Safety Board issued a warning about boats with overhead canopies like the one that sank Thursday on Table Rock Lake after a deadly accident claimed 13 lives in Arkansas, according to the Kansas City Star. The Miss Majestic duck boat was carrying 21 passengers when it sank in 1999 in Lake Hamilton, the Star reported. Authorities found seven dead passengers trapped inside the boat when they recovered it, four of which were pinned to the underside of the canopy, according to the Star. “Contributing to the high loss of life was a continuous canopy roof that entrapped passengers within the sinking vehicle,” NTSB officials said in an accident report. Authorities continued searching Friday for four people who are presumed dead after Thursday’s accident in southwest Missouri. Officials said 13 other people have been confirmed dead in the incident. Update 10:25 a.m. EDT July 20: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said divers are going back in the water Friday in search of four people who remain missing and are presumed dead after Thursday’s duck boat accident on Table Rock Lake. Rader said the search had shifted to “recovery mode for the bodies that are still missing,” at a news conference Friday morning. 'It's been a long night,” Rader said. “It's been a very trying night.” Rader said the driver of the Ride the Ducks boat died but that the captain survived. Update 10:05 a.m. EDT July 20: Authorities are expected to provide an update on the investigation into Thursday's deadly duck boat accident in Missouri at a news conference Friday. Update 9:55 a.m. EDT July 20: President Donald Trump shared sympathies Friday to the families and friends of the people involved in Thursday’s deadly duck boat accident in southwest Missouri. “Such a tragedy, such a great loss,” the president wrote Friday in a tweet. “May God be with you all!” Update 8:15 a.m. EDT July 20: Officials with the State Highway Patrol said Friday that two more bodies have been found after Thursday’s duck boat accident in southwest Missouri, bringing the death toll to 13.  >> On AJC.com: Bahamas boating tragedy brings vacation safety to the forefront State Highway Patrol Sgt. Jason Pace said four other people remained missing. Original report: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said 14 people were taken to hospitals after the incident. Seven were being treated early Friday, he said. The boat capsized after a strong line of thunderstorms moved through the area around 7 p.m. Thursday. Rader said weather “was a factor” in the incident. Authorities said the boat had 31 people on board, including children, when it capsized.  The boat had life jackets on board, according to CNN. The news network reported that other boats on the water docked before the bad weather hit. The National Transportation Safety Board has sent a team to investigate and are asking anyone who witnessed the accident to come forward. A dive team and rescue officials worked through the night to find survivors. They ended the search around 11 p.m., according to KY3. Emergency responders set up a staging area overnight on the lakeshore near the Showboat Branson Belle, local media reported, although the Belle was not involved in the accident. Branson officials opened an emergency shelter inside city hall for the victims. National Weather Service meteorologist Steve Linderberg said a top wind speed of 63 mph was measured around 7 p.m. Thursday at Branson Airport.  “There’s nothing to slow down winds in an open area,” he said. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson is watching the developments. DUKW, known as duck boats, are six-wheel-drive amphibious vehicles that were used by the U.S. military during World War II and the Korean War.  Since then, duck boat tours have become popular and are offered on lakes and rivers around the United States, including Missouri, Wisconsin, Massachusetts and Alabama. Ripley Entertainment acquired the Ride The Ducks in Branson in late 2017 from Ride the Ducks International, a subsidiary of Norcross, Georgia-based Herschend Family Entertainment Corp. Ride the Ducks International manufactures amphibious vehicles and licenses them for tours at affiliates. It also operates duck tours at Stone Mountain Park in Georgia. The company formerly operated tours in several other cities, including Baltimore, San Francisco and Philadelphia. But in recent years it ended operations following deadly accidents.  In 2015, a Ride the Ducks tour bus collided with a charter bus carrying student on the Aurora bridge in Seattle. Five students were killed and several others injured. The Associated Press and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution contributed to this report.
  • Tulsa detectives are investigating an early Sunday morning homicide. The fatal shooting happened around 2:18 a.m. outside of a club near Apache and Yale. Sgt. Dave Walker says everything started with a disturbance at another bar. “The disturbance carries over into this parking lot where he ends up shot several times,” Walker said.   It’s believed the shooter wasn’t involved in the disturbance at the bar.  Instead, Walker states the suspect may have been called to the club parking lot to play the role of cavalry.   So far, the shooter is still on the loose. Police are interviewing witnesses downtown.   Anyone with information regarding the shooting is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.  
  • A man is said to have non-life threatening injuries after getting shot in the shoulder late Saturday night. The shooting happened around 11 p.m. outside of a QuikTrip near 41st and Memorial. An officer at the scene reports an altercation occurred between four people in a champagne colored car and two people inside of a truck. “One of the individuals kicked the back of the truck,” the officer said.  “Another one gets out with a pistol and fires one round into the truck, striking the driver in the shoulder.” The shooter then jumped back in the car and took off down the road. A female inside the truck wasn't hurt. Police have not released a description of the shooter.  We do know investigators have plenty of witnesses and surveillance video from the store.   Anyone with information regarding the shooting is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.
  • It didn't take Tulsa investigators long to find a stabbing suspect on Saturday.  That's because Leon Davis called police to report he had stabbed the victim in self-defense and the knife was in his pocket.  He apparently made the call after leaving the scene.   The stabbing allegedly happened around 3:43 p.m. at the Cove Apartments near 11th Memorial. A police supervisor reports the victim was stabbed in the abdomen and it's believed his injuries are non-life threatening.  After speaking with detectives, Davis was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon. “The suspect's claim of self-defense was not supported by the evidence and his statement to detectives,” the supervisor said.   Davis has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.  
  • The Federal Bureau of Investigation on Saturday released a highly redacted copy of the application made by the bureau to a special intelligence court, asking to establish surveillance in the fall of 2016 on Carter Page, a one-time foreign policy adviser to President Donald Trump’s campaign, showing officials feared that Page was working with Russia to undermine the Presidential election. “The FBI believes Page has been the subject of targeted recruitment by the Russian Government,” the document states – interrupted by redactions – but then continues, “undermine and influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election in violation of criminal law.” The FBI released an unclassified version of the FISA application document after requests under the Freedom of Information Act. At one point, the 412 page document states that “the FBI believes that the Russian Government’s efforts are being coordinated with Page and perhaps other individuals associated with Candidate #1’s campaign.” “Page has established relationships with Russian Government officials, including Russian intelligence officers,” the documents states, before additional evidence was redacted, in order to protect intelligence sources and classified information.