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National News

    A group of teens hitting the hoops near Baton Rouge are going viral for a simple gesture of respect. They stopped their basketball game in Franklinton, Louisiana, on Friday to take a knee, paying respects to the recently departed during a funeral procession, WAFB reported. >> Read more trending news  Lynn Bienvenu and Johannah Stroud attended the funeral for their cousin, Velma Kay Crowe. They were the ones who saw the teens stop their game and pause as the cars went past, WAFB reported.  Bienvenu posted the photo to Facebook where it is getting noticed. Bienvenu said of the teens, “They took a knee not out of respect but honor. There was not an adult in sight to tell them to stop playing. This meant a great deal to our family. May God bless each one as I feel they will achieve greatness.” >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  She told WAFB that one teen contacted her on social media to give his condolences for the loss of Crowe, whom the teens did not know personally. This is not the first time the teens have paused their game. Others have told Bienvenu that they have been seen doing the same thing for other funeral processions. Many residents told WAFB that coaches and teachers at Franklinton Junior High School have repeatedly told students that they should show respect when a funeral procession drives by.
  • A man reportedly was shot and killed Sunday night outside an Arkansas Walmart as bystanders, including kids, looked on. >> Waffle House shooting: 4 dead after nude gunman opens fire in Tennessee; victims identified According to KAIT, police said the slaying began as a domestic dispute at the front of the store in Trumann about 9:15 p.m. CDT. Police arrived and negotiated with an armed man who walked out of the store with a woman. The man then shot and killed a second man who 'tried to intervene,' KAIT reported. The armed man eventually surrendered to police and was arrested. Police did not release the names of the people involved in the incident, but officers said the slain man was likely connected to the woman and armed man. >> Read more trending news  Dozens of shoppers were nearby when the man was shot, police said. 'A lot of people witnessed something tonight that they should have never seen,' Trumann police Chief Chad Henson told KAIT. 'We're going to have to go through a lot of healing from here on out. It was just a terrible day.' Read more here.
  • The sprawling network funded by the billionaire Koch brothers is having a very good run with President Donald Trump in the White House and Republican control of Congress. Tax cuts are now signed into law. A conservative judge is seated on the Supreme Court. And many governmental regulations, including those on labor and environmental practices, are facing rollbacks. That success is starting to get attention. Democrats are increasingly questioning how far the network's influence extends into the White House, casting the groups' backing by industrialists Charles and David Koch as puppeteers behind Trump's agenda and hoping to rouse their own donors to fight back. The network in turn is ratcheting up its focus on areas where it aligns with Democrats— most notably immigration legislation — and reviving calls for bipartisanship. 'We've come off one of the most successful years in our network's history,' said James Davis, executive vice president of Koch-backed Freedom Partners and a spokesman for the Seminar Network, the broader organization of groups and donors. 'And we're going to turn up the heat on both parties to drive forward.' But there's another outcome, too: Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., and other senators recently fired off letters to the administration asking for a detailed accounting of the network's role at various government offices including the Environmental Protection Agency, the Labor Department and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The senators name more than a dozen individuals working in the administration with ties to the groups. On Monday, the lawmakers will launch a series of Senate floor speeches turning a spotlight on the influence. 'Americans have a right to know if special interests are unduly influencing public policy decisions that have profound implications for public health, the environment, and the economy,' wrote Whitehouse with Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass.; Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev.; Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.; Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.; and Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M. The influence of the Koch-backed groups is somewhat surprising. They are an array of organizations and include Americans for Prosperity, Freedom Partners and Concerned Veterans for America, whose donors include some of the wealthy attendees of the twice-a-year Seminar Network conferences. The groups took a pass on donating to Trump's presidential bid. But they have managed to influence policy through several top allies in key jobs sprinkled across the administration. Among those in the Koch orbit with ties to the administration, perhaps the most prominent is Marc Short, the White House director of legislative affairs, who is a past president of Freedom Partners, the network's chamber of commerce-styled group. Short plays a key policy-making role and is a Capitol Hill fixture of legislative battles. The senators mention several others with top policy roles, including Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to the president. Koch groups have been central to Trump policies Democrats oppose — among them tax cuts for the wealthy, loosening of environmental regulations, and expanding private-sector health care for veterans. Trump's first-year regulatory rollbacks were drafted by one of the Koch-backed groups and became a ready blueprint for action in Congress. The network, however, doesn't just toe the Trump line. On Monday, the group is stepping up its effort to push Congress not to let up on legislating as lawmakers turn to focus instead on campaigning for midterm elections. Two groups in the network are releasing a letter to congressional leaders of both parties, urging them to take up a bipartisan compromise to help young immigrants, known as Dreamers, who have been living in the U.S. illegally since childhood. They want Congress to pass a deal that was on the table earlier this year — a path to citizenship for 1.8 million Dreamers and $25 billion for border security. Because most Americans want a solution that would allow the Dreamers to avoid deportation, the group says Trump and Congress should be able to come up with a solution. 'There is no reason to continue to delay action on the Dreamers,' wrote officials from Freedom Partners and the LIBRE Institute, two network groups. 'What are we waiting for?' The group is also pushing Congress to take up criminal justice reform, another issue with bipartisan support that has lagged. Republicans have little appetite to engage on big-ticket items as they struggle to keep control of their majority in the House, and try to pick off Democratic incumbents up for re-election in the Senate from conservative Trump-won states. And Democrats, while saying they are willing to engage with the Koch-backed groups, are at times envious of their operation and eager to pound on their influence, which includes chapters that mimic traditional party apparatus in many battleground states. It doesn't help build bipartisanship when much of the advocacy the Koch groups undertake, unleashing their army of volunteers and spending sums on advertising, ends up going against Democratic senators in Missouri, Wisconsin, North Dakota and others in tough election battles. ___ Follow Lisa Mascaro on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LisaMascaro
  • Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, formerly known as Kate Middleton, was admitted to St. Mary’s Hospital in London and is in the “early stages of labor,” Kensington Palace tweeted Monday. >> MORE ROYAL FAMILY COVERAGE: Photos: Royal baby watch: Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, in labor | Hospital begins preparations for Will, Kate and new baby | Photos: William, Kate and their growing family | Photos: Prince William through the years | Photos: Kate Middleton through the years | Photos: Queen Elizabeth II celebrates 92nd birthday | Royal Wedding: Everything to know before Prince Harry marries Meghan Markle | More trending news 
  • Faced with hundreds of demonstrators rallying against a crowd of neo-Nazis in Newnan, Georgia, authorities turned to a little-known Georgia law adopted in 1951 to combat the Ku Klux Klan. >> Tension, arrests at neo-Nazi rally in metro Atlanta The law, which makes it illegal to wear a mask at most public events, was cited in several of the arrests of counterdemonstrators who joined a protest Saturday against white supremacists. And the irony was not lost upon the organizers of the counterdemonstration, who were fuming Sunday that a law aimed at weakening white supremacists was used to arrest protesters who opposed a neo-Nazi rally. “They were trying to stop us, and we were trying to dial down the racist stuff,” said Jeremy Ortega, a 19-year-old who was among the counterprotesters charged with a misdemeanor for wearing a mask. He said many of the demonstrators wore masks to avoid being identified and threatened by white power groups. “We were peacefully protesting, yet they put guns in our faces and told us to take our masks off,” said Ortega, who added that he is considering filing a civil lawsuit. “It made no sense.” State and local authorities did not comment on specific allegations of abuse on Sunday. But Georgia Bureau of Investigation Director Vernon Keenan said the overwhelming security – nearly 700 law enforcement officers were on hand – helped prevent the clashes from escalating. “Making arrests in a volatile situation is never going to be pretty,” Keenan said. No one from the white supremacist group was arrested on Saturday, and they largely avoided confrontations with police or the counterdemonstration group. The two dozen white supremacists who attended the rally were separated from the group by an 8-foot fence – and hundreds of armed officers. ‘Remove your mask’ On Sunday, a coalition of counterprotest groups planned a vigil at the Coweta County Jail to criticize what they said was excessive violence by police. The Huffington Post reported that a contingent of officers approached a group of 50 counterdemonstrators before the rally and demanded they remove their masks or face arrests. The news outlet wrote that officers then “grabbed those who were still masked, tossing them to the ground and handcuffing them.” A video posted on social media by freelance journalist Daniel Shular appeared to show authorities scuffling with counterdemonstrators. Authorities demanded that the counterprotesters remove their masks, and the footage showed an officer raising his rifle at demonstrators. “Remove your mask, or you will be arrested,” said an officer in the video, which shows a ring of demonstrators standing with their hands raised aloft. Several are chanting “hands up, don’t shoot.” An Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter who attempted to report on the confrontation during the rally was obstructed by authorities. Several other counterdemonstrators faced violations that have nothing to do with the anti-mask law. Daniel Hanley was charged with obstruction of a pedestrian roadway after he said he nonviolently resisted a police officer who confronted him. He said he believes he was arrested because he was wielding a megaphone and leading chants against the white supremacists. “They were trying to find any pretext to shut us down,” Hanley, 36, said of the authorities. “The moment we stepped foot there, they intimated us and strategically tried to target people.” ‘Absolutely satisfied’ State law bans the wearing of masks, hoods or other devices that conceal a person’s identity if they’re on public property or on private property where the owner has not consented. It includes exceptions for holidays, theatrical productions, civil emergencies and sporting events. The laws have been adopted by about a dozen states, most aimed at weakening the KKK in the middle of the 20th century. The Georgia Supreme Court in 1990 upheld the state’s ban after a Klansman donned a hood on the Lawrenceville Square, citing his First Amendment rights. The law has mostly been used to target KKK demonstrations, though it has also been employed before to arrest demonstrators who are objecting to white power groups. At a 2016 rally, the law was used to arrest eight demonstrators protesting a white supremacist rally at Stone Mountain Park. In a strange turn, it also was invoked ahead of a press conference last year at the Gold Dome, when supporters of Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle threatened to hire performers in circus masks to interrupt a rival’s event. The clowns never showed up. >> Read more trending news  Authorities said they were intent on enforcing that law and others as they studied how law enforcement officials handled white supremacist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017 to prepare for the Newnan event. In Charlottesville, officers remained largely passive as bloody clashes raged around them, and the event soon spiraled out of control. One person was killed and dozens more were injured in the violence. “You have to have adequate resources and the intent to enforce the law,” Keenan said. “We had both.” He said officers made clear to both groups that masks and some weapons were not allowed. He said authorities found an abandoned backpack with smoke bombs at one checkpoint. State law allows demonstrators to carry firearms if they are licensed; on Saturday, several were spotted sporting firearms. “We maintained security. We would not let there be disorder. We didn’t have civil disorder, property damage. And we had just a few arrests,” Keenan said. “We are absolutely satisfied.” MORE COVERAGE FROM AJC.COM:  >> Reports from Newnan as the rally and counterprotest were underway >> How social media reacted >> In-depth look at how protest was contained 
  • Elmore Bolling defied the odds against black men and built several successful businesses during the harsh era of Jim Crow segregation in the South. He had more money than a lot of whites, which his descendants believe was all it took to get him lynched in 1947. He was shot to death by a white neighbor, according to news accounts at the time, and the shooter was never prosecuted. But Bolling's name is now listed among thousands on a new memorial for victims of hate-inspired lynchings that terrorized generations of U.S. blacks. Daughter Josephine Bolling McCall is anxious to see the monument, located about 20 miles from where her father was killed in rural Lowndes County. The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, opening Thursday, is a project of the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative, a legal advocacy group in Montgomery. The organization says the combined museum and memorial will be the nation's first site to document racial inequality in America from slavery through Jim Crow to the issues of today. 'In the American South, we don't talk about slavery. We don't have monuments and memorials that confront the legacy of lynching. We haven't really confronted the difficulties of segregation. And because of that, I think we are still burdened by that history,' said EJI executive director Bryan Stevenson. The site includes a memorial to the victims of 4,400 'terror lynchings' of black people in 800 U.S. counties from 1877 through 1950. All but about 300 were in the South, and prosecutions were rare in any of the cases. Stevenson said they emphasized the lynching era because he believes it's an aspect of the nation's racial history that's discussed the least. 'Most people In this country can't name a single African-American who was lynched between 1877 and 1950 even though thousands of African Americans were subjected to this violence,' Stevenson said. The organization said a common theme ran through the slayings, which it differentiates from extrajudicial killings in places that simply lacked courts: A desire to impose fear on minorities and maintain strict white control. Some lynchings drew huge crowds and were even photographed, yet authorities routinely ruled they were committed by 'persons unknown.' McCall, 75, said her father's killing still hangs over her family. The memorial could help heal individual families and the nation by acknowledging the painful legacy of racial murders, she said. 'It's important that the people to whom the injustices have been given are actually being recognized and at least some measure — some measure — of relief is sought through discussion,' said McCall. Combined, the memorial and an accompanying museum a few miles away at the Equal Justice Initiative headquarters tell a story spanning slavery, racial segregation, violence and today's era of swollen prison populations. With nearly 7 million people behind bars or on parole or probation nationwide - a disproportionate number of them minorities - the NAACP says blacks are incarcerated at a rate five times that of whites. E.M. Beck, who studied lynching for 30 years and has written books on the subject, said the memorial might actually understate the scope of lynching even though it lists thousands of victims. 'I think it's an underestimate because the number and amount of violence in early Reconstruction in the 1870s will probably never be known. There was just an incredible amount of violence taking place during that period of time,' said Beck, sociology professor emeritus at the University of Georgia. The memorial's design evokes the image of a racist hanging, featuring scores of dark metal columns suspended in the air from above. The rectangular structures, some of which lie flat on the ground and resemble graves, include the names of counties where lynchings occurred, plus dates and the names of the victims. The goal is for individual counties to claim the columns on the ground and erect their own memorials. Not all lynchings were by hanging. The Equal Justice Initiative says it scoured old newspapers, archives and court documents to find the stories of victims who were gunned down, drowned, beaten and burned alive. The monument is a memorial to all of them, with room for names to be added as additional victims are identified. The monument's April 26 opening will be marked by a two-day summit focusing on racial and social justice, to be followed by an April 27 concert featuring top acts including Common, Usher, the Dave Matthews Band and The Roots. McCall plans to view the memorial with her five living siblings. She says they suffered more than she did, since she was only 5 when their father was slain. A newspaper account from the time said the 39-year-old Bolling, who owned a store and trucking company and farmed, was shot seven times on a road near his store by a white man, Clarke Luckie, who claimed Bolling had insulted his wife during a phone call. McCall, who researched the slaying extensively for a book about her father, said it's more likely that Luckie, a stockyard employee, resented her father, who had thousands of dollars in the bank, three tractor-trailer rigs and employed about 40 people. 'He was jealous and he filled him with bullets,' she said. Luckie was arrested, but a grand jury issued no indictment and no one was ever prosecuted. McCall believes the white people who controlled the county at the time purposely covered for the killer, who died decades ago. One of Alabama's oldest black congregations, Old Ship A.M.E. Zion Church, sits across the street from the memorial. Its pastor plans to offer prayer and conversation to help visitors who are shaken by the experience of visiting the site. Church members have mixed feelings about the memorial, she said. They want to acknowledge and honor the past, McFadden said, but some are wondering how they'll personally react to visiting the memorial the first time. 'It's something that needs to be talked about, that people need to explore. But it's also something that has the potential to shake people to the core,' said Rev. Kathy Thomas McFadden.
  • Across the street from the Colorado Capitol rises an 11-story building emblazoned with The Denver Post's logo. No reporters work out of the building any more, only executives of Digital First Media, whose cuts at the Post triggered an unusual plea from the paper's own editorial page to be sold to another owner. Five hundred miles to the west, the Salt Lake Tribune newsroom takes up one floor of the building that bears its name, overlooking snow-capped mountains and the arena where the Utah Jazz play. Once a Digital First property that dealt with staff reductions and feared closure, the paper was sold to a prominent local family in 2016. Since then, its reporters received their first raise in a decade and won a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting. Though its home city is less than one-third the size of Denver, the Tribune's newsroom staff of about 90 is larger than the Post's roughly 60, who work out of leased offices in an industrial area northeast of the city. 'Denver is such a big, vibrant community to have a staff that is smaller than ours -- that's just a mockery,' said Mike Gorrell, a veteran Tribune reporter. As Colorado's civic community tries to mount a journalistic rescue mission and buy the Post, it is looking to Salt Lake City and other cities like Boston, Minneapolis and Philadelphia that have seen wealthy residents keep their newspapers viable. What happens in Denver could be a signal to a battered newspaper industry, reeling from dwindling ad revenues, of what the future looks like. 'You've got a better shot when there's a local owner -- there's going to be pressure on that person to keep that asset vibrant,' said former Denver Post editor Greg Moore, who contributed a column to the Post's April 9 editorial package. 'If Denver's future was like Salt Lake's and they had a local owner with deep pockets who cared, that'd be the best outcome.' That was the hope of the Post's editorial page when it published its rebellious call for a sale with the headline: 'As vultures circle, The Denver Post must be saved.' Editorial Page Editor Chuck Plunkett did not inform the newspaper's editor or owners of the editorial and accompanying columns slamming Digital First and the New York-based Hedge Fund that owns it, Alden Global Capital, which the editorial called 'vulture capitalists.' 'The smart money is that in a few years The Denver Post will be rotting bones,' the editorial warned. Digital First and Alden did not reply to requests from The Associated Press for comment. The chain owns more than 80 newspapers and is known for cutting deeply. Critics say it vacuums up the profits from the reduced newsrooms and funnels them into other ventures. In the days after the Post editorial, the editor of the Bay Area News Group, also owned by Digital First and reeling from heavy cuts, published a sympathetic column . Last week, the editorial page editor of the Boulder Daily Camera, another Digital First property, self-published his plea for a buyer, saying his bosses would not allow it in their newspaper. It's unclear if the Post is even for sale, and there's no guarantee of a buyer surfacing in Denver. Colorado's civic scene does not have a dominant family like the one in Utah who purchased the Tribune, the Huntsmans, which includes the recently deceased Jon Huntsman Sr., who founded an $11 billion industrial company. His son is Jon Huntsman Jr., the former governor of the state who is now the U.S. ambassador to Russia. Colorado billionaire Phil Anschutz has long been rumored as a possible buyer, but he also owns the rights to the name of the shuttered Rocky Mountain News, and has explored reviving that paper in the past instead. Anschutz owns the Colorado Springs Gazette and has built a political vertical to compete with the Post's coverage. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper says he's been talking with local leaders about assembling possible buyers. Potential contributors include Colorado billionaires like John Malone, chairman of the board of Liberty Media, and Pat Stryker, a major liberal political donor. One group of philanthropists is traveling to Philadelphia to study how charities there bought the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News in 2016, according to Bruce DeBoskey, a Denver philanthropic adviser. The only group to surface publicly is a consortium in Colorado Springs that pledged $10 million toward purchase of the newspaper. 'We still believe in print,' said John Weiss, publisher of an alternative newspaper in Colorado Springs and six other small newspapers, who is part of the group. J.B. Holston, dean of the University of Denver's school of engineering and computer science, has been convening meetings about the Post, but said some in the group lean toward starting a new, largely or entirely digital newsroom to bind the fast-growing city together. But newspaper analyst Ken Doctor warned there's no proven substitute for a local newspaper. 'In this whole debacle of American journalism and especially with what Alden's done, we haven't seen anyone enter the scene with a real replacement,' Doctor said.
  • A massive hunt to capture the man wanted in connection with the shooting deaths of four people at a Waffle House in Antioch, Tennessee, outside Nashville, continues. >> Watch the news report here >> Waffle House shooting: 4 dead after nude gunman opens fire in Tennessee; victims identified Travis Reinking, 29, is now on the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Top 10 Most Wanted List, and law enforcement said he is armed, dangerous and hiding, WHBQ's Greg Coy reports.  >> Who is Travis Reinking, the person of interest in the Waffle House shooting? Police said Reinking returned to his apartment after opening fire at the Waffle House. Reinking, who reportedly was nude at the time of the shooting, put on pants and then ran into the woods, police said. >> Waffle House 'hero' disarmed shooter, tossed rifle over counter Neighbor Johnny Green said another neighbor noticed Reinking and called police.  >> Who is James Shaw Jr., the man who disarmed the Waffle House shooter? 'My mom saw him,' Green added. Coy asked, 'What did she say about him?' 'He just seemed weird,' Green replied.  >> Read more trending news  Police said they hope the rain and cooler temperatures will draw Reinking out of hiding. Police said Reinking's options are limited because the crime and social media attention have made him an international fugitive. >> Please visit Fox13Memphis.com for the latest on this developing story
  • As an intensive manhunt continued Monday for a half-naked man suspected in the slayings of four people at a Waffle House restaurant, authorities shared reports of previous efforts to contain the gun-loving man with paranoid delusions. More than 80 Nashville police officers continued to search for Travis Reinking early Monday, authorities said. Agents with the FBI, the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and troopers with the Tennessee Highway Patrol joined the manhunt. He was also added to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Top 10 Most Wanted list. Reinking was nearly naked, wearing only a green jacket and brandishing an assault-style rifle when he opened fire in the parking lot and then stormed the restaurant, police say. Four people were killed and four others were injured before a quick-thinking customer wrestled the gun away, preventing more bloodshed. Metropolitan Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson said at a news conference that Reinking, 29, was last seen Sunday around a wooded area near an apartment complex where he lived, wearing only pants and no shirt or shoes. Anderson said it's not clear why Reinking opened fire on restaurant patrons with an assault weapon, though he may have 'mental issues.' He may still be armed, Anderson said, because he was known to have owned a handgun authorities have not recovered. 'He's on foot,' Anderson said. 'Unless he's been picked up by a car, he would be fairly close. We don't want to alarm people, but certainly, everybody should take precautions. It could be he's in an unoccupied house. We want everybody to be concerned. Neighbors should check on each other.' Nashville public schools will go into 'lock-out' mode if Reinking isn't found in time for class Monday, officials said. That means students will be free to move about the building, but no guests or visitors will be allowed to enter. As the search continued, authorities in Illinois shared past reports suggesting multiple red flags about a disturbed young man with paranoid delusions who liked firearms. In May 2016, Reinking told deputies from Tazewell County, Illinois, that music superstar Taylor Swift was stalking him and hacking his phone, and that his family was also involved, according to a report released Sunday. Another sheriff's report said Reinking barged into a community pool in Tremont, Illinois, last June, and jumped into the water wearing a pink woman's coat over his underwear. Investigators believed he had an AR-15 rifle in his car trunk, but it was never displayed. No charges were filed. Last July, Reinking was arrested by the U.S. Secret Service after he crossed into a restricted area near the White House and refused to leave, saying he wanted to meet President Donald Trump. Reinking was not armed at the time, but at the FBI's request, state police in Illinois revoked his state firearms card and seized four guns from him, authorities said. The AR-15 used in the shootings was among the firearms seized. Then, in August, Reinking told police he wanted to file a report about 20 to 30 people tapping into his computer and phone and people 'barking like dogs' outside his residence, according to a report. Reinking agreed to go to a local hospital for an evaluation after repeatedly resisting the request, the report said. 'There's certainly evidence that there's some sort of mental health issues involved,' Tazwell County Sheriff Robert Huston said. But he said deputies returned the guns to Reinking's father on the promise that he would 'keep the weapons secure and out of the possession of Travis.' Nashville Police spokesman Don Aaron said that Reinking's father 'has now acknowledged giving them back' to his son. After the shooting, police recovered three of the four guns originally taken from Reinking, officials said. They believe he still has at least one handgun. Phone calls to a number listed for the father, Jeffrey Reinking, went unanswered. It is not clear why Reinking moved recently from Morton, Illinois, to Nashville and if it had anything to do with being near Swift. Police say he was employed in construction for a while, and there would have been enough work in the booming city for him. Police say Reinking drove into the Waffle House parking lot in his gold Chevy Silverado pickup early Sunday and sat there for about four minutes before opening fire outside the restaurant. The victims fatally shot in the parking have been identified as Taurean Sanderlin, 29, of Goodlettsville, and Joe Perez, 20, of Nashville. Sanderlin was an employee at the restaurant. Perez's mother posted a picture of her son on Facebook and asked for prayers, saying it was the hardest day of her life. 'Me, my husband and sons are broken right now with this loss,' Trisha Perez said in the post. 'Our lives are shattered.' Reinking then went inside the restaurant and opened fire, police said. One of the fatally wounded inside was DeEbony Groves, a 21-year student at Nashville's Belmont University. She was remembered as an exceptional student who made the Dean's list, and a tenacious basketball player. 'She was a brilliant young lady, very, very intelligent and a very hard worker,' Gallatin High School basketball coach Kim Kendrick told The Tennessean. Akilah Dasilva was also killed inside the restaurant. The 23-year-old from Antioch was a rap artist and music video producer who had such skills behind the camera that he was a favorite among many of Music City's independent musicians and recording labels, The Tennessean reported. 'Music is my life and I will never stop until I achieve my dreams,' Dasilva said on his Twitter account. Dasilva's mother told CBS News that her son was a student at Middle Tennessee State University and aspired to be a music engineer. He was at the restaurant with his girlfriend, 21-year-old Tia Waggoner, the paper reported. Waggoner was wounded and is being treated at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dasilva's family said she underwent surgery and doctors were trying to save her leg. Police say Sharita Henderson, 24, of Antioch, was wounded and is being treated at VUMC. Also wounded was James Shaw Jr., a 29-year-old restaurant patron who burned his hand grabbing the hot muzzle of the assault weapon as he wrestled the gun away. A Nashville native who works as a wireless technician for AT&T, Shaw said he was no hero — despite being hailed as one by Nashville Mayor David Briley. Shaw said he pounced on the suspect out of self-preservation, after making up his mind that 'he was going to have to work to kill me.' ___ Associated Press writers John Raby in Charleston, West Virginia; Ed White in Detroit; and Justin Pritchard in Los Angeles contributed to this report.
  • President Donald Trump's nominee for secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, is facing serious opposition before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which may not have enough votes to recommend him for confirmation because all Democrats, and at least one Republican, have said they will oppose him. The full Senate is still expected to consider Pompeo's nomination later this week. But the rare rebuke expected from the panel Monday, even after Pompeo's recent visit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, would be the first time in years that a nominee for the high-level Cabinet position did not receive a favorable committee vote. Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., the chairman of the committee, blamed partisan politics for opposition to Pompeo, now the CIA director, saying Pompeo is just as qualified as past secretaries of state nominees Hillary Clinton or John Kerry, both of whom received overwhelming support. 'We are in an era where somebody like this, who is qualified, unfortunately, is likely to be voted out without recommendation or with a negative recommendation,' Corker said Sunday on 'State of the Union' on CNN. 'It's just sad that our nation has devolved politically to this point.' Pompeo's confirmation before the full Senate now hangs in balance, with the votes of just a handful of senators determining whether he becomes the nation's top diplomat after Trump fired Rex Tillerson last month. Key Democrats, including some who had voted for Pompeo as CIA director last year, are peeling away, and Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky remains opposed, despite personal overtures from the president. Pressure is mounting on senators from both sides. White House allies are unloading ad campaigns against Democrats from Trump-won states, including North Dakota, Indiana and Missouri, to vote for the president's nominee. But progressive groups are pounding senators' offices in opposition to Pompeo's hawkish foreign policy views and negative comments about gay marriage and Muslims. As soon as Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., announced her support last week, one group called on her to switch. 'I don't agree with every position he's taken or every word he has spoken,' Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, said Sunday on 'Meet the Press' on NBC. 'But I believe he has an extensive knowledge of world affairs that has been enhanced by his time at the CIA.' Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., who met with the nominee last week, 'has concerns about Mr. Pompeo's nomination to serve as secretary of state,' said spokesperson Ricki Eshman. The senator 'is reviewing his record before making a final decision.' In the committee, the opposition has been building ahead of Monday's session. Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., who was among the last Democrats on the panel to announce his no vote, said he's is concerned that Pompeo 'will embolden, rather than moderate or restrain' Trump's 'most belligerent and dangerous instincts.' 'I do not make this decision lightly or without reservations,' Coons said in a statement Friday. 'However, I remain concerned that Director Pompeo will not challenge the President in critical moments. On vital decisions facing our country, Director Pompeo seems less concerned with rule of law and partnership with our allies and more inclined to emphasize unilateral action and the use of force.' Rather than allow an unfavorable vote on the panel, where Republicans have a one-seat majority, senators could choose not to issue a recommendation if Pompeo cannot find enough backing. The committee action won't necessarily stall Pompeo's confirmation before the full Senate, but it would be an unusual setback not seen since the panel took a pass on John Bolton, President George W. Bush's pick for ambassador to the United Nations. Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., who has been among Pompeo's most vocal champions in the Senate, lambasted his colleagues ahead of voting. 'Democrats, especially on the Foreign Relations Committee, are really engaged in shameful political behavior,' Cotton said Sunday on CBS' 'Face the Nation.' But several Democratic senators who supported Pompeo for CIA director say Pompeo's views are not reflective of those they want in the top diplomat. ___ Follow Mascaro on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LisaMascaro
  • A 14-year-old girl was transported in serious condition on Saturday following a stabbing in Owasso. The scene happened near 103rd and 92nd Street North. Officers at the scene report the victim and another juvenile female were fighting.  During this time, a knife was introduced into the equation. The victim was stabbed multiple times.  Her name hasn’t been released.   KRMG's told the suspect fled the scene. No word if that person has been found and arrested.
  • A lot like Saturday, the forecast could ruin your outdoor plans in Tulsa today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Brad McGavick says conditions will be wet and cooler than normal. “We’re still expecting a pretty good chance of showers around during the day” McGavick said.  “The bigger story will probably be the continued cool conditions.” NWS is reporting the high will only reach around 60 degrees.  For reference, the normal high for this time of year in Tulsa is 73 degrees.   The rain is expected to stop Sunday night and we’ll mainly see cloudy skies.  Temperatures will drop to a low close to 51 degrees.  
  • It was a busy and emotional day on Friday in the courtroom during the Michael Bever trial. The 911 call was played and jurors heard from the surviving sister. Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler says the sister was able to testify from a separate courtroom and the jurors heard the testimony through a television. “I was very grateful to the court for the arrangements she had made to try and it make it easier on this young lady,” Kunzweiler said.  “I’m just glad that she’s been able to get through it.” During her testimony, Michael was seen crying on several occasions and putting his hands over his face. KRMG will continue to update the story as more information comes into the newsroom.  
  • If you have outdoor plans for today, bring an umbrella and be prepared to get wet. National Weather Service Meteorologist Brad McGavick says we'll see plenty of rain in Tulsa. “We’re expecting widespread showers, isolated thunderstorms,” McGavick said.  “The chance of rain is 100 percent.” It’s also going to be cooler than normal.  NWS is reporting the high will only reach around 57 degrees.   For reference, the normal high for this time of year in Tulsa is closer to 73 degrees.   Keep that umbrella handy Saturday night as well.  There is an 80 percent chance for rain and the low will be near 49 degrees.