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National
Georgia mom faces murder charge after dropping baby during fight, police say
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Georgia mom faces murder charge after dropping baby during fight, police say

Police: Mom Faces Murder Charge After Dropping Baby During Fight

Georgia mom faces murder charge after dropping baby during fight, police say

A South Georgia mother is accused of dropping her 3-month-old during a fight with another woman in Moultrie, leading to the baby’s death Saturday, according to several media reports.

>> Read more trending news

Karen Lashun Harrison, 26, faces felony murder, first-degree child cruelty, second-degree child cruelty, simple battery and affray charges after the incident, police told Albany-based news station WALB-TV.

She told police that the child fell from a family friend’s arms, and the friend, 26-year-old Carneata Clark, told them the same story, the news station reported. However, surveillance video revealed Harrison and another woman were in a fight Friday at Thomas Beauty Supply off First Avenue, and Harrison was the person to drop the child, police said.

The other woman does not face charges as of Monday evening, which is why AJC.com is not identifying her. Clark has been charged with false statements and obstruction, WALB-TV reported.

The baby was taken to Colquitt Regional Medical Center the next day for a head injury, where the child later died, the news station reported. The child’s body was sent for an autopsy.

This is an ongoing investigation, and police said more arrests are possible. AJC.com has reached out to Moultrie police for more information on the investigation.

Moultrie is the Colquitt County seat, and it is about 40 miles southeast of Albany and 200 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta.

AJC.com has also reached out to the Colquitt County Sheriff’s Office for more information on both suspects’ custody.

– Please visit AJC.com for the latest on this developing story.

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  • Officials say they seized $2.3 million worth of marijuana mixed in with a shipment of jalapeño peppers at a Southern California port. A Customs and Border Protection K-9 unit alerted officers to a shipment of peppers Thursday at the Otay Mesa cargo facility in San Diego. A CBP news release says officers discovered more than 7,500 pounds of marijuana in the peppers’ pallets. Acting CBP Commissioner Mark Morgan congratulated the officers on Twitter and noted it was the second large seizure of marijuana there within days. Authorities seized more than 10,600 lbs of marijuana in a shipment of plastic auto parts at the port Tuesday.
  • The New York Police Department on Monday announced the dismissal of Officer Daniel Pantaleo for his role in the 2014 death of Eric Garner. >> Read more trending news  New York Police Commissioner James O'Neil announced the decision Monday morning at a news conference. 'I served for nearly 34 years as a NYC cop before becoming a police commissioner,' O'Neil said. 'I can tell you that had I been in Officer Pantaleo's position, I might have made some of the same mistakes.'Police suspended Office Daniel Pantaleo late last month after a judge recommended he be fired for his role in Garner's death. The judge determined Pantaleo used a banned chokehold to subdue Garner, 43, who had been suspected of selling loose cigarettes in Staten Island, NPR reported. The judge did not find Pantaleo guilty of intentionally restricting Garner's breathing, according to NPR.Police unions have previously accused officials of using Pantaleo as a scapegoat while Garner's family members have questioned'This has been a long battle; five years too long,' said Garner's daughter, Emerald Snipes Garner, according to the Times. 'And finally, somebody has said that there's some information that this cop has done something wrong.'The president of New York City's largest police union, the Police Benevolent Association, called the decision to recommend Pantaleo's firing one of 'pure political insanity.'If it is allowed to stand, it will paralyze the NYPD for years to come,' PBA President Patrick J. Lynch said. 'The only hope for justice now lies with Police Commissioner (James) O'Neill. He knows the message that this decision sends to every cop: we are expendable, and we cannot expect any support from the city we protect.'The recommendation came two weeks after U.S. Attorney General William Barr last month declined to pursue a federal indictment against Pantaleo on civil rights charges, The New York Times reported.Videos of the July 17, 2014, encounter taken by bystanders showed Garner, who was unarmed and black, telling officers, 'I can't breathe' nearly a dozen times before he became unconscious. The medical examiner's office determined a chokehold contributed to Garner's death, the Associated Press reported.Videos of the incident spurred protests nationwide, turning 'I can't breathe' into a rallying cry against police brutality and violence. Pantaleo was stripped of his gun and put on desk duty after the incident but continued to draw a hefty salary since Garner’s death, with his pay peaking at more than $120,000 in 2017, according to city payroll records.A grand jury in Staten Island declined to indict Pantaleo on state charges in December 2014. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • With the runaway success of Susan Cain's 'Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking,' far more introverts started believing they should be proud — though maybe not loud.  >> Read more trending news  Creativity plus an ability to forge connections and overcome challenges are just a few enviable introvert traits, according to Psychology Today. On the job, introverts also outperform extroverts when it comes to being team players, sharp observers and good writers. Want to play to these strengths? Beyond specific job strengths, there are entire job descriptions where introverts thrive. Here are five jobs where introvert employees are the most likely to hear, 'Well done.' 1. Database administrator Potential job openings—93,000 Median annual pay—$90,070 The Trade Schools, Colleges and Universities blog grouped its job picks based on four types of introvert: social, thinking, anxious or inhibited. The blog said database administrator would be a top job for the 'social introvert,' someone who would 'prefer to socialize with just a few people at a time.' This type of introvert isn't shy but prefers to be alone and feels very little anxiety in social situations. 'A lot of social introverts find that working from home aligns with their personalities. And many others try to steer clear of settings that are crowded, noisy, full of interruptions, or don't offer much privacy,' TSCU added. 2. Aerospace engineer Potential job openings—46,000 Median annual pay—$115,220 Aerospace engineer was TSCU's top pick for the 'thinking introvert,' one who they say can 'handle most social events just fine' but is still quite thoughtful and, well, introspective. 'They are often able to think outside the box, recognize the big picture, and synthesize varying ideas into new innovations,' TSCU said. 'Plus, many of them are known for being good listeners and showing respect for other people's ideas. That's why fields like engineering, technology, and art and design are full of great jobs for introverts in the thinking category.' 3. Graphic designer Potential job openings—260,000 Median annual pay—$50,370 With its appealing combination of creativity and independence, graphic designer was one of Fairygodboss' top choices for introverts. 'Leveraging your creative skills to create custom digital artwork calls for tons of alone time with your computer and favorite design program,' Fairygodboss explained. 'Sure, you might work with a small team and juggle a few clients at a time, but as a graphic designer, you'll have tons of opportunities throughout the day to escape back into your latest design project.' 4. Private chef  Potential job openings—203,000 (for all chefs and head cooks) Median annual pay—$66,069 This was another creative/introspective job choice for the social introvert. Fairygodboss also recommended the broader job niche for introverts, including chef, pastry chef and line cook. 'Sure, chefs spend a decent amount of time interacting with kitchen and wait staff, and occasionally make an appearance at the request of a delighted diner, but they also spend hours cooking up new menu options, prepping ingredients or perfecting flavorful dishes,' Fairygodboss added. 'This line of work can be intense, but should also allow enough time for an introvert to recharge on their own.' 5. Physicist Potential job openings—17,000 Median annual pay—$121,770 Someone best described as an 'inhibited introvert' would excel as a physicist because they 'are generally not afraid to ponder hard questions in order to find the truth and get to the heart of big challenges,' according to TSCU. 'That's why a lot of them find success and fulfillment in fields such as science, counseling, and other vocational areas that require keen analytical and big-picture thinking abilities.
  • As President Donald Trump returned to the White House following a summer break at his golf retreat in New Jersey, the President teed off on Fox News, expressing aggravation again with Fox News polls that showed him trailing some of the top Democrats running for President. 'My worst polls have always been from Fox,' the President told reporters on Sunday. 'There's something going on at Fox, I'll tell you right now.' 'Fox is a lot different than it used to be,' Mr. Trump added, taking aim at their news division, but not the stable of conservative talk show hosts who have stood by him over the last three years. Asked about the most recent poll from Fox News - which showed him trailing the top tier of 2020 candidates for President - Mr. Trump was succinct. 'I don't believe it,' he said. 'Despite all of the Fake News, my Poll Numbers are great,' the President tweeted on Monday morning, as he blasted one of his former aides, Anthony Scaramucci, who had just been on CNN talking about finding someone to challenge Mr. Trump.  The President hasn't always been sour on polls from Fox News - as when the Fox polls have good numbers, then they are fine, and absolutely correct. 'Fox Poll say best Economy in DECADES!' the President tweeted in July. 'New Fox Poll: 58% of people say that the FBI broke the law in investigating Donald J. Trump,' Mr. Trump tweeted back in May. But sometimes the numbers just aren't good enough. 'President Trump’s Approval Rating on Economy is at 52%, a 4 point jump,' Mr. Trump tweeted about a Fox Poll in July. 'Shouldn’t this be at 100%?' he added. The latest Fox News poll also had some challenging findings for the President and Republicans on the issue of guns. 'In the wake of two mass shootings, overwhelming and bipartisan majorities of voters favor background checks on gun buyers and taking guns from people who are a danger to themselves or others, according to the latest Fox News Poll,' the network wrote in describing the poll's findings. On Sunday, the President appeared to threaten Fox News over their poll findings, and the network's place in any 2020 Presidential debates. 'I think Fox is making a big mistake. Because, you know, I'm the one that calls the shots on that -- on the really big debates,' Mr. Trump said.

Washington Insider

  • As President Donald Trump returned to the White House following a summer break at his golf retreat in New Jersey, the President teed off on Fox News, expressing aggravation again with Fox News polls that showed him trailing some of the top Democrats running for President. 'My worst polls have always been from Fox,' the President told reporters on Sunday. 'There's something going on at Fox, I'll tell you right now.' 'Fox is a lot different than it used to be,' Mr. Trump added, taking aim at their news division, but not the stable of conservative talk show hosts who have stood by him over the last three years. Asked about the most recent poll from Fox News - which showed him trailing the top tier of 2020 candidates for President - Mr. Trump was succinct. 'I don't believe it,' he said. 'Despite all of the Fake News, my Poll Numbers are great,' the President tweeted on Monday morning, as he blasted one of his former aides, Anthony Scaramucci, who had just been on CNN talking about finding someone to challenge Mr. Trump.  The President hasn't always been sour on polls from Fox News - as when the Fox polls have good numbers, then they are fine, and absolutely correct. 'Fox Poll say best Economy in DECADES!' the President tweeted in July. 'New Fox Poll: 58% of people say that the FBI broke the law in investigating Donald J. Trump,' Mr. Trump tweeted back in May. But sometimes the numbers just aren't good enough. 'President Trump’s Approval Rating on Economy is at 52%, a 4 point jump,' Mr. Trump tweeted about a Fox Poll in July. 'Shouldn’t this be at 100%?' he added. The latest Fox News poll also had some challenging findings for the President and Republicans on the issue of guns. 'In the wake of two mass shootings, overwhelming and bipartisan majorities of voters favor background checks on gun buyers and taking guns from people who are a danger to themselves or others, according to the latest Fox News Poll,' the network wrote in describing the poll's findings. On Sunday, the President appeared to threaten Fox News over their poll findings, and the network's place in any 2020 Presidential debates. 'I think Fox is making a big mistake. Because, you know, I'm the one that calls the shots on that -- on the really big debates,' Mr. Trump said.
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  • In the aftermath of the mass shootings this month in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee will meet in early September to act on a series of gun control measures, including ten round limits on ammunition magazines, red flag laws, and adding new reasons for blocking someone from buying a firearm. 'For far too long, politicians in Washington have only offered thoughts and prayers in the wake of gun violence tragedies,' said Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY), the Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. 'Democrats in the House will continue to make good on our promise to work to keep our communities safe,' Nadler added, trying to put more pressure on Senate Republicans to act on gun bills approved by the House. 'House Democrats are serious about protecting our communities from the epidemic of gun violence,' said Rep. Dina Titus (D-NV). 'All of these gun violence prevention bills would save lives, and it’s really important that the House is taking action,' said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). 'We must act now to end the epidemic of gun violence in our country and keep our kids safe,' said freshman Rep. Joe Negeuse (D-CO). Democrats also tried to turn up the heat on GOP leaders in the Senate, where a bill to expand background checks to all private gun sales has been languishing for months. 'The Majority Leader should call the Senate back to Washington to debate and vote on gun violence legislation,' said Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA). Some Democrats also want to force a vote on banning certain assault weapons - Congress approved such a measure back in 1994, but the expired after ten years. While the Congress isn't back for votes until the week of September 9, the announcement by the House Judiciary Committee will bring lawmakers back just after Labor Day for committee work - with the goal of votes on the various gun bills in the House later that month. 'Our community is relying on us to pass gun safety legislation, which is why we need a federal red flag policy to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people,' said Rep. Lucy McBath (D-GA). Some Republicans quickly made clear their opposition to some of the gun plans from Democrats. 'The problem with Red Flag laws is you’re guilty until proven innocent,' said Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH). President Donald Trump has held talks with some Democrats on the issue of expanding background checks, but his language at a campaign rally on Thursday night in Manchester, New Hampshire did not signal any compromise on guns, as he focused more on the issue of mental health. “It's not the gun that pulls the trigger. It's the person holding the gun,” the President said. The bills on the schedule in September before the House Judiciary Committee include: + H.R. 1186, the Keep Americans Safe Act. This bill would ban high capacity ammunition magazines. + H.R. 1236, the Extreme Risk Protector Order Act, designed to help states formulate 'Red Flag' laws. + H.R. 3076, the Federal Extreme Risk Protection Order Act, which would allow people to go into federal court to take a firearm away from a mentally unstable person. H.R. 2708, the Disarm Hate Act, which would add misdemeanor hate crimes to the list of items disqualifying someone from buying a weapon, under the current background check system. H.R. 1112, the Enhanced Background Checks Act, which stems from the mass shooting at a black church in Charleston, South Carolina. In that case, the shooter was able to buy his firearms - even though he would have failed the background check - because the feds did not conduct a check within three business days. = Click here to read more stories from Jamie Dupree.
  • A day after the Israeli government refused to allow two Democrats in Congress to visit that nation this weekend, Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) rejected a separate offer to visit her 90 year old grandmother on the West Bank, because Israeli officials would not allow her to speak out against the policies of the Netanyahu government during that trip. 'I have decided that visiting my grandmother under these oppressive conditions stands against everything I believe in - fighting against racism, oppression & injustice,' Tlaib wrote Friday morning on Twitter. 'Silencing me & treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me. It would kill a piece of me,' Tlaib said. The decision by the Michigan Democrat came a day after Tlaib and Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) had been blocked by Israel from an official visit - but then, the Israeli government allowed Tlaib to visit, only if she did not voice her support for efforts to boycott Israel. In the end, Tlaib backed out. In order to visit the West Bank, Tlaib had to promise not to engage in criticism of the Israeli government. 'I will respect any restrictions and will not promote boycotts against Israel during my vist,' Tlaib wrote in a letter to the Israeli Interior Minister on Thursday. But in the end, Tlaib could not stomach those restrictions, even as she said, 'This could be my last opportunity' to see her aging grandmother. - Click here to read more stories from Jamie Dupree.
  • Offering no evidence to support a charge of major election fraud in the 2016 elections, President Donald Trump again claimed on Thursday that he lost the state of New Hampshire to Hillary Clinton because of widespread illegal voting, which he said involved 'thousands and thousands' of people coming in from other states to cast ballots against him. 'New Hampshire was taken away, it was taken away from us,' the President said at a campaign rally in Manchester, New Hampshire.  'We should have won New Hampshire,' he told the crowd. Before flying to New Hampshire, the President made the same claim - again without any evidence - as he stood on the tarmac before boarding Air Force One. 'New Hampshire should have been won last time, except we had a lot of people come in at the last moment,' as the President once again repeated a conspiracy theory that voters from Massachusetts and other states came en masse to New Hampshire to vote against him in 2016. Granite State officials said last year there was no evidence to support Mr. Trump's claim of fraud. Back in 2018, Mr. Trump told reporters that Massachusetts voters came 'by the hundreds' in buses to vote against him - this time, he said it was in the 'thousands.' 'Thousands and thousands of people, coming in from locations unknown,' the President added, as he ignored questions from reporters about where the illegal voters were from. In 2018, New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner undertook a full review of the votes cast in New Hampshire in the 2016 election - flagging 142 cases of possible fraud, not the 'thousands' President Trump has talked about. The New Hampshire Attorney General's office in 2018 found there were examples of buses with out-of-state license plates transporting voters to the polls - but no evidence that the voters on board those buses were from actually from Maine, Vermont, or Massachusetts. During his time in office, President Trump has repeatedly raised questions about voter fraud, claiming in February of 2019 that there was widespread evidence in California of illegal voting. 'They found a million fraudulent votes,' the President told reporters at the White House, after being asked about a GOP election fraud case which invalidated a Congressional race won by Republicans in North Carolina. But instead of fraudulent votes being cast, California has been removing over 1 million 'inactive' voters from the rolls - people who were registered to vote, but who had not cast a ballot in several elections. Just this week, the President re-tweeted a claim from a conservative activist, Charlie Kirk, that said the state of California has more people registered than the number of eligible voters. But the facts don't back that up. 'I'll retweet this stupidity and debunk it, only because the President retweeted it,' said elections expert Tom Bonier on Tuesday, as he showed how Kirk was talking about 'inactive' registered voters. 'Inactive, meaning they haven't voted (and often their mail ballots have been returned as undeliverable),' Bonier tweeted.