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National
Boy who is blind, with autism, meets Santa; photos go viral
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Boy who is blind, with autism, meets Santa; photos go viral

Blind Child With Autism “Sees” Santa For First Time

Boy who is blind, with autism, meets Santa; photos go viral

A boy from Texas found the true meaning of Christmas and Santa.

Matthew, who is blind and has autism, met Santa for the first time, KDFW reported.

Matthew’s interest in Santa started a few weeks ago when he found a Santa Claus figure in the store. Then he heard “Silent Night” playing on the radio. He was confused, asking his mother, Misty Wolf, if Christmas was for Santa’s birthday or for Jesus’ birthday, KDFW reported.

Wolf then took her 6-year-old son to a local store that was hosting a Santa meet and greet. 

Wolf whispered to the man in the chair about her son’s blindness and autism, and said he was interested in  Santa, KXAS reported.

Santa put Wolf at ease, telling her, “Say no more,” KXAS reported.

Matthew got close to Santa’s and started touching the big man’s beard. 

Courtesy: Misty Wolf/Facebook
Matthew, 6, who is blind and has autism met Santa recently. The photos of the encounter are going viral.
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Boy who is blind, with autism, meets Santa, photos go viral

Photo Credit: Courtesy: Misty Wolf/Facebook
Matthew, 6, who is blind and has autism met Santa recently. The photos of the encounter are going viral.

The magic happened when a photo showed how comfortable Matthew was with the jolly elf. His parent said it showed the trust her little boy had in Santa that normally is only shown at home, KDFW reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Santa encouraged Matthew’s interest, inviting him to pull his beard, feel his hat and even touch a reindeer. 

Wolf said that her son’s favorite book is “T’was the Night Before Christmas” but  he didn’t know what a twinkle in Santa’s eye really was.

“It never occurred to me, but Matthew didn’t really know what a twinkle was. He wanted to know what eyes that twinkle were,” Wolf told KDFW.

Santa allowed the little boy to find out, by touching one of Santa’s eyes.

And what did Matthew ask Santa for during their meeting?

Water.

“He’s not like other kids who want toys. He’s not into that. He’d rather have the experience and find out what Santa is,” Wolf told KDFW.

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