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    A 59-year-old man is in jail Wednesday after allegedly assaulting an 18-year-old girl in what police are calling a case of road rage. >> Read more trending news Brent Clark was booked on an assault charge after police say he punched a teenager around 6 p.m. Tuesday in Miamisburg, Ohio. Clark became frustrated at the speed the victim, Savannah Johnson, was driving, according to a Miamisburg police report. After initiating a series of hand gestures, police say Clark got out of his car at a stoplight and punched Johnson through an open window. During an interview Wednesday, Johnson said she had recently picked up her younger siblings from day care when Clark attacked her.  “I stopped at a red light, (he) got out of his car, and my windows were down, and he started punching me and attacking me,” Johnson said. “Then he tried to grab my neck and pull me out of the car.”  “While he was beating me, my siblings kept saying ‘please stop hitting my sister,’” Johnson said.  Johnson was able to take a photo of the suspect’s car, which led police to Clark. “I followed him for five minutes, (and) when he saw I was following him, he put his car in reverse and tried to hit me,” Johnson said.  Johnson, a freshman at Wright State University, said she has a concussion from the incident and will need physical therapy for injuries to her neck and back.  According to the Miamisburg police report, Clark works at West Chester Hospital.  Online jail records show Clark in custody, with bail set at $20,000. He’s due back in court May 31.
  • With her wedding just two months away, Icilma Cornelius arrived at the office of Dr. Windell Boutte in metro Atlanta to prepare for her special day. >> Read more trending news  The 54-year-old bride-to-be came to the doctor’s full-service medical spa and cosmetic surgery center for Botox and another anti-wrinkle treatment. While there, the staff recommended cosmetic surgery that could give her a flat stomach before she married. Cornelius agreed to the surgical makeover by Boutte, whose website promotes the doctor as “nationally and internationally known” and a “doctor to the stars!” Cornelius never got her perfected body. She never got to get married, either. After eight hours of surgery in Boutte’s medical office, Cornelius’ heart stopped and a chaotic scene developed. The office wasn’t equipped to handle the emergency and had to call 911. Paramedics got the patient’s heart going, but getting her in the ambulance was delayed. Worried about possible infection from open incisions, Boutte and an employee sutured Cornelius’ skin, and then, because the stretcher wouldn’t fit in the elevator, paramedics had to carry it down stairs. Cornelius made it to the hospital, but her injuries were catastrophic: Permanent brain damage, caused by lack of oxygen, left Cornelius unable to do almost anything for herself.  >> Related: Georgia medical board easy on opioid violators Every surgery comes with risks, but the risks can increase when a facility doesn’t have the equipment, protocols and staff to handle emergencies. In lawsuits over Boutte’s care of Cornelius and two other patients, an attorney said Boutte routinely cuts corners, uses unqualified staff, misleads patients about the surgeries they will receive, and subjects them to an office that is not safe for the types of surgeries performed. “Dr. Boutte and her staff are more concerned about increasing profits versus a focus on patient safety, which should be of foremost concern,” said Susan Witt, the attorney. The case is just the latest to raise questions about the safety of cosmetic surgeries in Georgia. In 2013, two patients died during in-office liposuction procedures by a Cobb County physician, Nedra Dodds. Nathaniel Johnson was criminally charged last year for performing cosmetic surgeries, even though his medical license was revoked. A patient of his died in 2010 during liposuction. A physician reported Boutte to Georgia’s medical licensing board in 2016, but she continues to practice, still promoting herself as “Atlanta’s leading cosmetic surgeon,” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and its investigative partner WSB-TV found in a joint examination of the case. ‘Nurse manager’ not a nurse Through an attorney, Boutte declined an interview. Her website says she has “over 100,000 satisfied patients” and the site is loaded with testimonials from patients. The site describes her Premiére Aesthetic Center as a “state-of-the-art building” where patients can pick from a huge buffet of services, including Brazilian butt lifts, tummy tucks and liposuction. Boutte also advertises that she is “board certified in both surgery and dermatology.” The AJC found, though, that while she is a board-certified dermatologist, she is not a board-certified plastic surgeon or general surgeon. >> Related: Secrecy rules at Georgia medical board And Boutte’s surgery suite was not an accredited operating room or licensed surgery center. During Cornelius’ surgery, it didn’t have the monitoring equipment to quickly detect changes in respiration, the lawsuit alleged. Lawsuits also have raised questions about whether Boutte allowed unqualified staff to do too much. Depositions revealed that a “nurse manager” wasn’t a nurse at all. And Boutte’s surgical assistant, who went to medical school in Peru but is not a licensed doctor here, was doing parts of procedures without Boutte staying in the same room and overseeing everything he did. “It’s absolutely outside the bounds of what he’s allowed to do,” Witt said. In depositions, Boutte stood by her use of her staff and portrayed Cornelius’ result as something beyond her control, possibly the result of an allergic reaction. But Witt, the attorney, and former patients say Boutte’s practice is a dangerous one that medical regulators have done nothing to rein in. “The medical board’s failure to take action in the two and a half years they have known about Ms. Cornelius’ case, among others, amounts to gross negligence,” Witt said. At least seven malpractice lawsuits have been filed against Boutte, counting the three filed by Witt. Boutte’s public medical board profile lists two malpractice settlements, including one for $900,000. Witt said the Cornelius case was recently settled for an amount that is confidential, but she said that settlement is not yet listed on Boutte’s board profile. Witt said Boutte’s lack of professionalism was apparent in videos she produced and posted online showing her dancing to music while making incisions or preparing to operate with patients’ nude backsides exposed. The videos were introduced in another malpractice case. The Georgia Composite Medical Board is barred from discussing individual cases and won’t comment. Few rules for office surgeries In Georgia, doctors may set up an in-office cosmetic surgery shop and do all sorts of procedures. The medical board has safety guidelines for office-based surgeries, but they are guidelines, not rules. Those guidelines recommend accreditation of in-office surgery suites, which would set safety standards for the facility and staff, but Boutte did not go through that process, according to a deposition. Dr. Carmen Kavali, a board-certified plastic surgeon, noted that a medical license allows a doctor to do almost any treatment or procedure that the doctor sees fit to undertake. Some doctors will take a weekend course on liposuction and then start offering it in an office setting. Hospitals are more restrictive, using credentialing to limit what a doctor can do at their facilities. >> Related: How a doctor convicted in drugs-for-sex case returned to practice Kavali said she does short in-office surgeries with patients who are awake and able to speak. That would include minor liposuction, a scar revision or an upper eyelid procedure. Anything more than that, Kavali said, she and most other surgeons would do in a hospital because it’s safer. “We’re fully-trained board-certified plastic surgeons,” Kavali said. “We do not have to cheat and keep people in the office.” Boutte also didn’t follow a board guideline for office-based surgery that says adverse events — defined as an incident that leads to a patient death or transport to a hospital — should be reported. In a deposition, Boutte explained why she didn’t report the Cornelius case to the board. “I believe she had an adverse event that was not caused by the surgery,” the doctor said. Sisters file lawsuits Without stronger rules, Georgia patients are left to sort out on their own whether a doctor is qualified and the office is well-equipped, the AJC and Channel 2 examination found. Patients rarely know to ask about a facility’s accreditation or what board has certified their doctor. When two sisters decided they both wanted liposuction, they found Boutte through online research and felt confident. “Her reviews were just stellar,” said Mitzi McFarland, one of the sisters. McFarland said she was just 135 pounds and exercised. But after her third child, she said she could never get rid of the “muffin top.” She felt confident about something called SmartLipo because it was less invasive and had a short recovery. Boutte advertises SmartLipo, and her prices were lower than other doctors, McFarland said. Plus, the office was beautiful and the qualifications Boutte posted appeared top-notch, she said. The two sisters didn’t end up posting the next glowing reviews. Both have lawsuits pending against the doctor. >> Related: He was caught on video, but Georgia doctor kept his medical license McFarland said she ended up with results that horrified her — her abdomen was bumpy and appeared disfigured. Boutte agreed to do a “revision” surgery, but that didn’t go as planned, either. McFarland said she was supposed to be able to drive home, but she woke up disoriented, with a hamburger in her hand, in a hotel room that she had no memory of checking into. She would find out from a text message from the doctor that Boutte had taken her to the hotel after the procedure. McFarland said her family had no idea where she was. An expert who examined McFarland’s care for the lawsuit concluded that Boutte breached care standards. Later, the sisters found out they had had conventional liposuction instead of the SmartLipo they wanted. After learning through her lawsuit about the lack of safety measures, the reality of Boutte’s training and the qualifications of her staff, McFarland wondered how the doctor had not been reined in. “It feels like there is no oversight,” she said. “She hasn’t even had her hand slapped.”
  • Police in Battle Creek, Michigan, are investigating what they say is a homicide after a man’s body was found in the trunk of a car. The Battle Creek Enquirer reported Monday that the body of Diabulo White, 43, was found in the trunk of a four-door Toyota Camry, that was being towed by Tiger's Towing. >> Read more trending news  Battle Creek police Lt. James Martens said the towing company towed the car after police said the car was on private property. The homeowner said the car was left on the property sometime during the night. A body was found by the female owner of the car once she was contacted by Tiger’s and arrived at the towing company’s lot. She opened the trunk of her car, which was locked, and found the body. Detective Sgt. Todd Elliott said police think White was killed by a gunshot wound to the head, but not in the car or where the car was located. “We believe the intent was to hide the body and cover the crime,” Elliott said. The car was moved to the police department. The death is still being investigated.
  • Twenty-five students at Wekiva High School in Apopka, Florida, had to be treated Monday after a student deployed pepper spray during a fight, according to Orange County Sheriff’s Office deputies.  >> Read more trending news Deputies said three female students between the ages of 15 and 17 were involved in a fight when one of the girls used pepper spray.  Two of the students will be charged with aggravated battery, deputies said.  Three of the students who were exposed to the pepper spray were taken to the hospital as a precaution, while the others were treated at the scene. 
  • The brother of a man accused of driving his car into a North Carolina restaurant and killing two family members Sunday said there is nothing to forgive. >> Read more trending news  'I didn't need to forgive him. I never was angry at him, and I know what he did wasn't him,' Monty Self said. Police have charged Roger Self with first-degree murder after they say he intentionally drove his Jeep into the Surf and Turf Lodge in Bessemer City just after noon, killing two family members. But Monty Self said the brother he loves didn't commit that deadly act. He said Roger Self is mentally ill, and the demons deep inside got the best of him and brought out the worst. At a news conference Monday, the Self family's pastor also blamed the incident on severe mental illness. Austin Rammell, pastor at Venture Church, said 'there is no way the man I've known for 16 years could do this.' Roger Self’s daughter, 26-year-old Katelyn Self, a Gaston County sheriff’s deputy, was killed when the Jeep crashed through the wall of the restaurant. The other victim was identified as Amanda Self, Roger Self's daughter-in-law, who worked as an emergency room nurse at CaroMont Regional Medical Center. Other family members were also injured. Roger Self's wife Diane was badly hurt and is in critical condition. His son Josh Self - a Gaston County police officer - was also injured, along with Amanda Self’s 13-year-old daughter. They are expected to recover. >> Related: Man intentionally drove through restaurant, killed 2, including deputy daughter Wait staff told WSOC-TV’s partners at the Gaston Gazette that Self took his family into the restaurant and had them seated. He then excused himself, went out to his vehicle and drove it at a high rate of speed into the area where they were sitting. 'It was like a battle zone in a movie,' Monty Self said. Self said during a jail visit he told his brother what happened. 'He was numb. He was numb. He kept saying this was crazy,' Self said in describing his conversation with his brother. >> Trending: Court orders man to pay $2M in child support in 'bizarre' case involving identity theft He became concerned about the health of the people who survived the crash that he caused. 'He was distraught,' Self said. 'Tragic, tragic loss of life,” Gaston County Sheriff Alan Cloninger said. “I'm asking people just to keep the family in your prayers, and the sheriff's office, because we're suffering right now.' Rammell said he saw the entire family in church Sunday morning, just a couple of hours before the horrific attack. “I'm just trying to encourage them,” Rammell said. “This was not a conscious act by their father and they know that.” Rammell said Roger Self has been dealing with mental illness, including anxiety, depression, and mental breakdowns, in recent months and has sought medical help. >> Trending: Milwaukee teen beaten to death in 'senseless act of violence,' family says “Family has been loving him through this,” Rammell said. “He's been taking precautions. He had all the guns removed from his house, so he was taking steps that were rational steps,” the family’s pastor said. Rammell said he was set to officiate at Katelyn Self’s wedding to her fiance, Alex, in September. 'There's nobody in the world Roger loved more than those people and they know that,” Rammell said. “Even in the most chaotic, senseless, moment like this, they at least cling to the confidence that they know where Kate and Amanda are.' Rammell said that within hours of the tragedy, church members gathered at Venture Church for a vigil for the family. Caleb Martin, a 14-year-old who buses tables at the restaurant, witnessed the car crash through the building. 'I walked over to my station and I heard a loud boom,” he said. “It went straight through. There's a doorway. There is a wall and he drove in another room.' >> Trending: Man charged in 1987 double murder found using Golden State Killer genealogy technique Caleb was dazed by the carnage he saw. He said that, for a moment, he didn't know what to do but then he sprang into action. 'The one guy I could help in back, he was pretty hurt,” Martin said, “I helped paramedics move tables off this dude and I moved debris out of the way so they could get to him.' Officials said Roger Self is a private investigator who worked for the Gastonia Police Department years ago. “He was a regular and we haven't seen him in a while, so when he came back, it was kind of sad,” Martin said. Area law enforcement agencies offer condolences Law enforcement agencies from across the area expressed their condolences on social media. Katelyn Self was a corporal at the Gaston County Sheriff’s Department. 'Thoughts and prayers for the Gaston County Sheriff's Office and Deputy Self's family and friends.' The Huntersville Police Department posted on Twitter, “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the Gaston County Sheriff's Office and the family and friends of Corporal Katelyn Self. Corporal Self was senselessly killed today while off duty.
  • Exposure to air pollution in the womb can lead to higher blood pressured in children, a new study suggests. >> Read more trending news  “What we found was that air pollution exposure during the third trimester in particular was associated with higher blood pressure in children,' study author Dr. Noel Mueller, from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, told CBS News. The research by Mueller and his team, which was published last week in the journal Hypertension, studied 1,239 mothers and their children aged three to nine in the Boston area. When the children were sorted into three categories (from highest to lowest exposure to pollution in the womb), the results showed that those in the highest exposure group were 61 percent more likely to have higher blood pressure than those in the lowest exposure group. >> Related: One woman in 14 still smokes while pregnant — and these states have the highest rates To gauge the levels of pollution in the areas where the women lived during their third trimester, the researchers looked at readings from nearby Environmental Protection Agency monitors. The children in the 'high-risk' category were exposed to levels at least twice as high as the 'acceptable' amount set by the EPA. Mueller said exposure to pollution 'causes an inflammatory response that alters genetic expression and fetal growth and development, on the pathway to high blood pressure in childhood,' The Independent reported. “We know that blood pressure tracks through life. Children who have elevated blood pressure in childhood have a higher probability of having hypertension later in life and cardiovascular diseases.” >> Related: Study: Men’s depression could lower chances of pregnancy for couples While the study only demonstrates a correlation between pollution and higher blood pressure and does not confirm causation, pregnant woman should be aware, researchers said. Dr. Melissa Smarr, an assistant professor at the Department of Environmental Health in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, said there are steps pregnant women can take to avoid air pollution. >> Related: Is your medical provider taking your blood pressure all wrong? Experts say probably 'Spending a limited amount of time near major roadways or heavily trafficked areas is one way to lessen air pollution exposure,' she told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Mueller also suggested pregnant women can avoid exercising outdoors in areas with bad air pollution. Local and national governments should also work towards improving air quality, Mueller added. He explained that regulations are necessary 'not only for the health of our planet but also for the health of our children.' >> Related: Ibuprofen use linked to male infertility, study finds 'The conceptualization and implementation of strategic initiatives to minimize air pollution can be furthered through continued partnerships between research institutions and local, state, and national government,' Smarr said. An increased risk of high blood pressure isn't something to be taken lightly, she warned. “High blood pressure that goes untreated in childhood may increase the risk of developing high blood pressure and/or cardiovascular disease as an adult,' she said. 'Left untreated, high blood can adversely affect various organs in the body, ultimately reducing the overall quality of life.' >> Related: Study: Death of loved one during pregnancy may impact mental health of child According to Smarr, the research is an important contribution to the understanding of children’s environmental health “as it highlights the significance of exposure to air pollution during pregnancy as it pertains to offspring health during early childhood, which has potential implications for adult health.” 'I am hopeful that these findings will encourage the design of larger future studies that are able to estimate personal maternal exposure to air pollution in the context of children's blood pressure measured multiple times throughout childhood,” she said.
  • The 2018 Miss USA competition is being held in Shreveport, Louisiana, on the 20th anniversary of the pageant’s first appearance in the city.  The annual beauty pageant seeks to crown the woman who will become the American entrant in the Miss Universe pageant. It will be held at George’s Pond at Hirsch Coliseum. >> Read more trending news  Here’s what to know about the 2018 competition. When: May 21 at 8 p.m. EDT. What channel: Fox Who is hosting: Vanessa Lachey and Nick Lachey How to watch: The pageant can be watched live on Fox on TV or online if you have a cable subscription.
  • A police officer was shot and killed Monday while investigating a report of suspicious activity in Baltimore County, Maryland, according to Gov. Larry Hogan. >> Read more trending news “We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of a Baltimore County police officer after she was shot in the the line of duty,” Hogan said on Twitter. “Our prayers got out to this brave officer’s family, Baltimore County police and fire and the Baltimore County community,” he said.  Hogan said the suspect is still on the loose as a manhunt continues. The officer has not yet been publicly identified. She died after she was shot in the head while investigating a report of “suspicious activity,” according to WBAL-TV. Baltimore County Councilman David Marks wrote in a Twitter post that the officer was shot in Perry Hall, near Belair and Lausmier roads. Police warned residents to shelter in place as they continued to investigate Monday's shooting.  Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • May the 21st be with you, yes?  Thirty-eight years ago, on May 21, 1980, the world was introduced to a little green Einstein-looking puppet with terrible grammar named Yoda.  Today, people are still naming their pugs and french bulldogs after him. Thanks to George Lucas, it is, hmmm? >> Read more trending news  National Talk Like Yoda Day celebrates the anniversary release of 'Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back,' the movie where Luke Skywalker meets Yoda in the swamps of the planet Dagobah. To talk like Yoda, but “do or do not, there is no try.” Just switch around your sentence structure. Speak in object-subject-verb instead of the normal subject-verb-object. Add 'yes' and 'hmmm' to the end of your sentences for a bonus.  Love it, your coworkers will. More 'Star Wars' is coming at you this week with 'Solo: A Star Wars Story' premiering Friday, May 25.
  • Investigators in Washington state last week made an arrest in a 31-year-old double homicide, tracking the suspect down using the same genealogy techniques used to capture the suspected Golden State Killer.  William Earl Talbott II, 55, of the Seattle-Tacoma area, was booked Thursday with one count of first-degree murder in the November 1987 death of Tanya Van Cuylenborg, 18, of British Columbia, Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office officials said Friday in a news conference.  Van Cuylenborg and her boyfriend, 20-year-old Jay Cook, vanished Nov. 18, 1987, on an overnight trip to Seattle to buy furnace parts for Cook’s family’s business.  They were reported missing when they failed to return home. A man found Van Cuylenborg’s body Nov. 24 near Bellingham in Skagit County. She had been bound with plastic zip ties, sexually abused and shot in the head, the Toronto Star reported.  Cook’s body was found two days later, battered and wrapped in a blue blanket that did not belong to the couple, about 75 miles away under a bridge near Monroe, which is in Snohomish County. Cook had been beaten and strangled.  “It's been 31 years since this horrific crime took place,” Skagit County Sheriff Will Reichardt said Friday. “Today, we are one step closer for justice for Jay Cook and Tanya Van Cuylenborg.” Investigators from Skagit and Snohomish counties worked the three-decades-long case together.  Talbott’s arrest comes just five weeks after Snohomish County Sheriff Ty Trenary released composite drawings of a possible suspect that were made using DNA believed to have been left behind by the killer. The images showed a white man with light hair and green or hazel eyes.  The killer’s DNA, which was found at the scene of Van Cuylenborg’s slaying, was also uploaded to a genealogy website and used to create family trees with people who shared significant amounts of DNA with the unknown suspect, officials said.  CeCe Moore, the genealogist who worked on the case, said Friday that she traced the suspected killer’s DNA to his great-grandparents, then used “reverse genealogy” to fill in the blanks on the branches.  “This led me to two descendants of the great-grandparents of the original matches who married, thus tying the two families together,” Moore said.  The couple had one son -- Talbott.  Once Talbott was identified as a potential suspect, detectives obtained his DNA from a cup he used and threw out.  Reverse genealogy made headlines around the world earlier this year when investigators looking for the Golden State Killer, a serial killer and rapist believed to be responsible for 12 homicides, more than 50 rapes and about 100 burglaries across California in the 1970s and 1980s, arrested Joseph James DeAngelo Jr., 72, after they said they matched his DNA to that of the killer.  Trenary on Friday thanked the investigators who never gave up on solving the slayings of the young Canadian couple.  “It’s a difficult thing for us, but candidly, this is what we do our job for,” Trenary said.  Reichardt said it was the forensic work that detectives did in 1987, which preserved the DNA evidence, that ultimately led to Talbott’s arrest.  “The next step is prosecution,” Reichardt said.  Cook and Van Cuylenborg left their Saanich homes bound for Victoria, where they were planning to take the Port Angeles ferry to Seattle. The couple made the ferry and were spotted buying snacks along the way to Seattle in Hoodsport and Allyn, both located in Mason County, Washington, according to Snohomish County officials.  They were last seen alive buying tickets for the 11:35 p.m. Bremerton-to-Seattle ferry the night they vanished. KIRO 7 News in Seattle reported that Van Cuylenborg was found six days later, partially clothed, in a ditch. Cook’s van was found the next day, locked and abandoned, in a Blue Diamond parking lot in Bellingham, located in Whatcom County.  Cook’s body was found the day after the van.  The victims’ families last month offered a $50,000 reward to anyone who could provide information before the end of the year that would lead to a positive match to the DNA in the case, KIRO reported.  Members of the Cook and Van Cuylenborg families were at Friday’s news conference. They expressed a mix of emotions at the news of Talbott’s arrest.  “Yesterday, the killer had his last sleep in his own bed, his last coffee break, his last day of freedom,' Cook’s sister, Laura Baanstra, said. “It’s hard to put into words the relief, joy and great sorrow this arrest brings.” “They were both gentle souls, caring and trusting kids, and they were betrayed,” Van Cuylenborg’s brother, John, said. “Hopefully, this is a start of some justice for them.” Talbott has not yet been charged with Cook’s slaying, but investigators continue to process evidence and interview witnesses related to that portion of the case. Detectives are asking anyone who knew Talbott or his activities in 1987 or 1988 to come forward. Talbott, who was 24 years old at the time of the slayings, was living with his parents in Woodinville, about seven miles from where Cook’s body was found.  Detectives are hoping to find witnesses who saw Talbott with Cook’s van in November 1987 or with a 35mm Minolta camera that Van Cuylenborg had with her at the time she was slain.  The camera’s lens was recovered in 1990 and traced to a pawn shop in Portland, Oregon, police officials said. The body of the camera remains missing.  They are also looking for anyone who knows anything about the blanket Cook’s body was found wrapped in.  Anyone with information related to the case should call the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office tip line at 425-388-3845.
  • National Weather Service meteorologists were is out surveying the storm damage in Fairfax on Monday. Saturday’s storm in Osage County toppled trees and powerlines. The meteorologists believe straight line winds reached up to 90 m.p.h. Damage was reported at the post office, fire department and at a cemetery.  No injuries have been reported. FOX23 and NEWS102.3 KRMG Chief Meteorologist James Aydelott says there’s a chance for storms nearly every day this week in Green Country. Tune to NEWS102.3 and AM740 KRMG for the latest weather information.  You can also get weather alerts sent to your phone by downloading the KRMG app.     
  • A day after President Donald Trump demanded an investigation into how the FBI dealt with investigations during the 2016 campaign, the White House accepted a plan from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to expand an ongoing review of the probe into Russian interference in the elections, and how it touched on the Trump Campaign. “Based on the meeting with the President, the Department of Justice has asked the Inspector General to expand its current investigation to include any irregularities with the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s or the Department of Justice’s tactics concerning the Trump Campaign,” read a statement issued by the White House. “It was also agreed that White House Chief of Staff Kelly will immediately set up a meeting with the FBI, DOJ, and DNI together with Congressional Leaders to review highly classified and other information they have requested,” the statement added, referring to an ongoing battle between Republicans in Congress and the feds for documents about the Russia probe. The outcome of the meeting between Mr. Trump, the Deputy Attorney General, the FBI Director, and the Director of National Intelligence – which was not listed on the President’s public schedule – was less explosive than what President Trump had seemingly threatened on Sunday, when he said he would demand a full investigation into whether the feds had “infiltrated or surveilled the Trump Campaign for Political Purposes.” Mr. Trump and Congressional Republicans have been playing up the issue in recent days, arguing that initial FBI efforts to find out what Russia was doing with relation to the Trump Campaign, was actually an effort to undermine Mr. Trump’s bid for the White House. But Democrats say what’s going on now is an effort by Mr. Trump and his allies in the Congress to undermine the current investigation, by allowing the President’s lawyers to see what evidence the Special Counsel’s office – and maybe U.S. Intelligence – had been able to gather during the 2016 campaign. Giuliani removes all doubt – the White House effort to force DOJ to give investigatory materials to Congress is really about the defense team getting their hands on them. If the President is charged with a crime, he has a right to see the evidence. Not before. https://t.co/HfzzdZ894d — Adam Schiff (@RepAdamSchiff) May 21, 2018 The Monday meeting at the White House came as Republicans stepped up demands for documents about the investigation, as Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA), asked the Justice Department for information on contacts between officials and former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele, who put together a controversial ‘dossier’ on the President, funded by Democratic sources. In a letter to Rosenstein, Grassley zeroed in Monday on Associate Deputy Attorney General Bruce Ohr, and his contacts with Steele. “Accordingly, please provide all records related to Mr. Ohr’s communications about these matters, including: (1) emails from Mr. Ohr’s personal and work accounts, (2) phone logs, (3) handwritten notes, and (4) text messages from personal and work accounts,” Grassley wrote in a letter.
  • Days after Friday’s deadly school shooting at Santa Fe High School, school districts in the Houston area are re-evaluating their policies and are increasing security. Aldine Independent School District told KTRK medal detectors and ID scans will be used at single entry points at all of its schools. The district also has cameras at every campus and drills are held throughout the year. At Bay City ISD, backpacks will be banned this week and will have increased security, KTRK reported. Many districts, like Clear Creek ISD, Pearland ISD and Cy-Fair ISD,  will increase police presence at campuses and other buildings. >> Read more trending news  Cy-Fair is also outlawing trench coats and other heavy clothing that could conceal weapons, KTRK reported. Texas City School District has asked that students don’t bring bags or purses to school if they don’t have to, and the bags that are brought could be searched. District officials have also asked parents to monitor their child’s social media accounts. If students see a post that could be suspicious, officials ask them to tell a parent or trusted adult, KTRK reported. For more on what other districts that surround Santa Fe ISD are doing, click here.
  • The National Rifle Association’s incoming president has linked school shootings and other violence to using medications such as Ritalin. Retired Lt. Col. Oliver North told “Fox News Sunday” that perpetrators of school violence “have been drugged in many cases” and “many of these young boys have been on Ritalin since they were in kindergarten.” He also blamed a “culture where violence is commonplace,” pointing to TV and movies. North’s comments followed the attack Friday at Santa Fe High School outside Houston that left eight students and two teachers dead. Investigators have given no indication that they believe the 17-year-old suspect, Dimitrios Pagourtzis, used Ritalin, which treats attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or other drugs. Pagourtzis’ attorney, Nicholas Poehl, said Sunday that he was not aware that his client was on any specific medication. He said he was surprised that someone with North’s experience with the criminal justice system would “make those kind of generalizations with a case that’s less than 48 hours old.” An NRA spokesman, Andrew Arulanandam, confirmed North was speaking on the organization’s behalf and said “there are others who share this viewpoint.”
  • An “explosive eruption” happened at Kilauea's summit on Hawaii's Big Island early Monday, prompting officials to warn residents to protect themselves from ash fallout as the Kilauea volcano eruption continues into its third week. >> Read more trending news More than 40 structures have been destroyed in the eruption that started May 3. It has since inundated almost 325 acres around Kilauea with lava and lead to concerns about laze, a toxic mixture of lava and haze that forms when hot lava hits ocean waters. Update 12:35 p.m. EDT May 21: Officials with the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said early Monday that a small explosion happened just before 1 a.m. local time at the Halemaumau crater at Kilauea's summit. The explosion shot ash about 7,000 feet into the air. 'Additional explosive events that could produce minor amounts of ashfall downwind are possible at any time,' USGS officials said. The Hawaiian County Civil Defense Agency warned residents to be aware of ashfall after the 'explosive eruption.' Update 12:38 p.m. May 20: Lava from the Kilauea volcano has crossed Highway 137 and entered the Pacific Ocean, the Hawaii County Civil Defense said Sunday. A second lava flow is about 437 yards from the highway, the Star Advertiser of Honolulu reported. Big Island residents may now have to contend with laze -- a mixture of lava and haze -- that forms when hot lava hits the ocean, CNN reported. After making contact with the water, the laze sends hydrochloric acid and volcanic glass particles into the air. Laze can lead to lung, eye and skin irritation, CNN reported. 'This hot, corrosive gas mixture caused two deaths immediately adjacent to the coastal entry point in 2000, when seawater washed across recent and active lava flows,' the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory wrote on its website. Officials have told people to avoid areas where lava meets the ocean, CNN reported. Powerful eruptions accompanied by thunderous booms punctuated the air Friday around Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island. The volcano spewed lava bombs the size of cows as molten rock flowed from several of the 22 fissures that have opened around the volcano.  Update 2 a.m. EDT May 19: Fast-moving lava isolated about 40 homes in a rural subdivision, forcing at least four people to be evacuated by county and National Guard helicopters, the Star-Advertiser of Honolulu reported. According to the Hawaii County Civil Defense, police, firefighters and National Guard troops were stopping people from entering the area. Update 11:30 p.m. EDT May 18: Hawaiian authorities have sent the National Guard, police and fire units into the East Rift Zone in Puna, according to the Hawaii Civil Defense Agency. “There are approximately 40 homes in the area that are isolated. Officials are gaining access by helicopter to the area to assess how many people are there and if they need assistance. All persons in that area are asked to stay where they are and wait for further instructions,” the agency said on its website. The Hawaii Volcano Observatory has confirmed another fissure opened on Friday, bringing the total number of fissures to 22.  Thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes as Kilauea continues its violent eruptions. Update 8:30 a.m. EDT May 18:  More lava is spewing  from the Kilauea volcano as the 21st fissure opened Thursday, CNN reported. Meanwhile, state officials have been handing out masks to protect people who live near Kilauea, ABC News reported. About 18,000 masks have been distributed, CNN reported. The safety measure protects residents from breathing in pieces of rock, glass and crystals that fall as the volcano continues to erupt, ABC News reported. Update 10:45 p.m. EDT May 17: Lava is erupting from points along the fissure system on Kilauea volcano, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, but the agency is calling it a “low-level eruption” at this point.  Although lava is still spattering from Fissure 17, the flow has not advanced significantly over the past day, the USGS said. There are currently 18 fissures that have opened due to seismic activity on Kilauea’ over the past two weeks.  Volcanic gas emission are still elevated throughout the area and residents are urged to remain on alert.  “This eruption is still evolving and additional outbreaks of lava are possible. Ground deformation continues and seismicity remains elevated in the area,” the USGS reported late Thursday.  Rain on the Big Island Thursday helped the situation with the ashfall, but volcano experts are warning the situation on Kilauea is  still very dynamic. Original report: Several schools were closed as ash continued to fall Thursday due to elevated sulfur dioxide levels. Officials warned people in the area to take shelter and protect themselves from the falling ash. >> Here's how to help victims of Hawaii volcano, earthquakes 'The resulting ash plume will cover the surrounding area,' officials with the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency said in a 5 a.m. alert. In a subsequent update, USGS officials said the ash plume was moving to the northeast. The plume could be seen in an image taken from a webcam at the USGS’ Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. 'Driving conditions may be dangerous so if you are driving pull off the road and wait until visibility improves,' the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency warned. Michelle Coombs, of the Hawaii Volcano Observatory, told Hawaii News Now that the situation remained “very, very active and very dynamic,” on Thursday. “The potential for larger explosions is still there,” she said. Officials with the USGS warned Tuesday that an eruption of Kilauea's volcano appeared 'imminent.' >> Red alert declared on Hawaii’s Big Island; major Kilauea eruption ‘imminent’ The eruption on Kilauea began May 3. It has since forced thousands of people from their homes, destroyed nearly 40 structures -- including dozens of homes -- and created more than two dozen fissures in the ground surrounding the volcano. Check back for updates to this developing story.