ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
73°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 89° L 69°
  • cloudy-day
    73°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 89° L 69°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    85°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 89° L 69°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    81°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 86° L 67°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

More Trending Stories

    Residents at Aspire Lenox Park Apartments in Atlanta are wondering what it will take to stop the recent spike in car break-ins at their complex. Nearly 30 cars were broken into overnight Saturday. In many cases, the doors were locked and nothing of value was visible. Victims still ended up with shattered windows.  “It’s not like they’re breaking into unlocked cars. They’re all locked cars, and it’s just -- there’s no rhyme or reason,” resident Bailey Beckham said. >> Read more trending news  Atlanta police told WSB 28 cars were targeted, mostly in the parking deck. “I hadn’t heard that number. I know there were eight the other weekend, but 28 is a lot,” resident Alex King said. 'It's kind of scary because we don’t know why or what's going on or how we're going to stop it. It’s just nerve-racking,” Beckham said. The break-ins have been especially frustrating for victims like Ryan Colley, who had nothing visible in his car and nothing taken. “It’s devastating and it hurts because we had to pay out of pocket. Our deductible, of course, and the insurance is $500, and anything below that you have to pay out of pocket,” Colley said.  Residents said they received emails about increased patrols and security, but there are mixed opinions on the results so far. “They say they’re going to hire some security. I haven’t seen anything yet,” Colley said. “I guess that's helpful, but I just don’t know how we’re going to stop it if we don't know how many people or where or when,” Beckham said. “Maybe setting up cameras in the area, so if they don’t catch the people and this continues to happen, at least they have cameras and can find them a little easier,” King said.  Residents told WSB they are clearing out their cars but are still on edge because it has not stopped the break-ins.
  • The family of a high school senior from Floyd County, Georgia, is planning his funeral just days before they were planning to see him graduate. >> Read more trending news His family told WSB-TV they're overwhelmed by the support they've received. Blue ribbons are everywhere near Model High School, even on the school itself, to honor Caleb Keller, 18. 'He was a very special kid,' said his mother, April Helton. 'He said, 'I'm going to make it, I'm going to walk across that stage,' and we are all just so excited.' But four days before graduation, the high school senior died in a two-car crash on the way to take his finals. Floyd County authorities said Keller crashed his car into another truck at Mango Road and Wayside Road at around 10:30 a.m. He died Tuesday morning. His family said he was on his way to school to take his finals, but the road was wet. 'The road right there is a gravel road, and it had washed, and he just lost control,' said his father, Clint Helton. His family said the community has placed hundreds of blue ribbons for Keller all across the county, including some at his high school. They are thankful and hopeful that Caleb's friends can still enjoy the graduation ceremony. 'We want this to be bright and happy for them because that's what Caleb would want,' April said. His parents want everyone to know through their pain and their heartbreak, they feel incredibly proud of their beloved son. 'Even though Caleb's not going to be there to walk with them, he's just as much a part, and he's there,' April said. The other driver involved was released from a hospital after the crash with minor injuries.
  • From now through July 4, U.S. veterans and up to three guests can get free admission to SeaWorld Orlando, Busch Gardens Tampa Bay as well as other SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment properties across the U.S. >> Read more trending news SeaWorld said in a news release that this new offer joins the ongoing Waves of Honor program that offers complimentary admission to any U.S. active duty military, activated or drilling reservist, or National Guardsman once per year, for the military personnel and as many as three direct dependents. Veterans must redeem their complimentary single-day ticket(s) online at www.WavesofHonor.com. The free tickets are available online only, not available at the front gate for each park. In addition to SeaWorld Orlando and Busch Gardens Tampa Bay, the free admission offer is available at SeaWorld San Antonio, SeaWorld San Diego, and Busch Gardens Williamsburg. Active military and veterans can always receive discounted admission tickets through MWR and ITT offices on U.S. military bases as well as www.WavesofHonor.com. These offers are available year-round. Each park may have various discounted admission products throughout the year that are also available online at www.WavesofHonor.com. 
  • A Georgia woman left her Rottweiler in her car for five hours while she was in court at the Gwinnett County Jail, causing the dog’s death, sheriff officials said. >> Read more trending news  Connie Wright Gomez, 46, has been charged with aggravated animal cruelty. Gomez went to the jail as a “court visitor” around 1:30 p.m. Wednesday afternoon, leaving her dog, Rambo, in her car, she told deputies. She left the windows open about an inch. Around 6:30 p.m., deputies heard Gomez mention she had left her dog in the car. One of the deputies went with Gomez to the car to check on the dog because the weather had been warm all day, with a high temperature of 82 degrees. When they arrived at the car, Rambo was dead. Related: Dog dies after being left in Animal Control officer’s truck When temperatures outside range from 80 degrees to 100 degrees, the temperature inside a car parked in direct sunlight can quickly climb to between 130 to 172 degrees, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Gomez was arrested and booked into jail. She is being held on a $16,700 bond. Gwinnett County Sheriff Butch Conway expressed dismay at the case. Conway started the Operation Second Chance “jail dogs” program, which matches jail inmates with adoptable dogs and cats. The inmates train and socialize the animals.  “I hope this poor dog’s horrific death reminds pet owners to make responsible choices for their pets,” Conway said. 
  • The opioid epidemic has now made its way into marine life in Washington’s Puget Sound. Scientists who track pollution have for the first time, discovered traces of oxycodone in mussels. >> Read more trending news  But scientists say those mussels don’t end up on your plate.  The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, or WDFW, gets clean mussels from Penn Cove on Whidby Island and puts them into areas they want to test for water contamination – like in urban waters. And they’ve discovered there’s enough oxycodone in Elliot Bay for mussels to test positive.  “What we eat and what we excrete goes into the Puget Sound,” said Jennifer Lanksbury, a biologist at the WDFW.  Scientists deposit mussels in cages in 18 locations. They teamed up with the Puget Sound Institute to analyze the data and discovered that three locations were positive for trace amounts of oxycodone - two near Bremerton’s shipyard and Elliot Bay near Harbor Island. “It’s telling me there's a lot of people taking oxycodone in the Puget Sound area. The contamination is likely coming from wastewater treatment plants,” Lanksbury said.  >> Trending: Sunken treasure worth $17 billion on 300-year-old shipwreck discovered off Colombian coast After people consume oxycodone, some of it ends up in the toilet, and it goes into wastewater. The water gets filtered, but King County Wastewater Management said although their system can catch a lot of contaminants, it can't specifically filter out drugs.  >> Trending: Great Pacific Garbage Patch 16 times larger than estimates: 87,000 tons of plastic and growing And opioids, antibiotics, drugs for depression - mussels are testing positive for all of it.  “Those are definitely chemicals that are out there in the nearshore waters and they may be having an impact on the fish and shellfish that live there,” Lanksbury said. Again, Lanksbury says people have nothing to worry about when it comes to eating mussels from a restaurant or shop because they come from clean locations. “They’re clean and healthy and delicious. We love to eat mussels from the Puget Sound. We use them for our food and we use them for contaminant analysis,” Lanksbury said.  But the study shows it’s another sign of what's ending up in the water and harming marine life.  “People should be wary,” Lanksbury said. “Hopefully our data shows what’s out there and can get the process started for cleaning up our waters.”  >> Trending: Your bottled water is probably contaminated with tiny plastic particles, health experts say This was a one-time study for prescription drugs, but Fish and Wildlife officials will seek more funding to continue testing and tracking what happening to in the water over time. 
  • North Korean leader Kim Jong-un said he is still willing to meet with President Donald Trump, after Trump abruptly canceled a summit Thursday, which was scheduled for June 12 in Singapore. >> Read more trending news 'We express our willingness to sit down face-to-face with the U.S. and resolve issues anytime and in any format,' North Korea’s Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye-gwan said in the statement, according to South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency. He also said the North was frustrated with the cancellation because they had been preparing for the meeting with Trump. 'Despite all of this, the U.S.' unilateral decision to scrap the talks causes us to reconsider whether all of the efforts and the path we have taken is really the right one or not,' he said in the statement. Yonhap also reported that Kim said the sudden cancellation of the summit next month underscores the urgent need for a meeting between Trump and Kim In canceling the summit, Trump also left open the possibility that the meeting could be rescheduled (Previous story) President Donald Trump said Thursday that he remains open to meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, hours after he canceled their planned summit in Singapore in a letter released by White House officials.  “I believe that this is a tremendous setback for North Korea and, indeed, a setback for the world,” Trump said Thursday at a news conference. “I hope that Kim Jong Un will ultimately do what is right not only for himself, but perhaps most importantly what is right for his people, who are suffering greatly and needlessly.” He added that “our military ... is ready,” should North Korean officials respond to Thursday’s cancellation with a show of force. Japanese and South Korean officials have also vowed to respond if “foolish or reckless acts be taken by North Korea,” Trump said. Still, the president didn’t rule out the possibility of meeting with Kim. “A lot of things can happen, including the fact that, perhaps, it’s possible the existing summit could take place or a summit at some later date,” Trump said. “Nobody should be anxious. We have to get it right.” The president wrote in his letter to Kim that his decision to cancel the planned June 12 meeting came “based on the tremendous anger and open hostility” displayed in a recent statement from North Korea. >> From Jamie Dupree: President Trump scraps summit meeting with Kim Jong Un In the statement, the North Korean government referred to Vice President Mike Pence as a 'political dummy' and said it is just as ready to meet in a nuclear confrontation as at the negotiating table. “I feel it is inappropriate, at this time, to have this long-planned meeting,” Trump wrote. “Please let this letter serve to represent that the Singapore summit, for the good of both parties but to the detriment of the world, will not take place.” Senior North Korean diplomat Choe Son Hui told North Korea’s state-run news agency on Thursday that, “Whether the U.S. will meet us at a meeting room or encounter us at nuclear-to-nuclear showdown is entirely dependent upon the decision and behavior of the United States,” The Associated Press reported. >> Reports: North Korea demolishes nuclear test site Trump responded to the comment in his letter Thursday, telling Kim that, “You talk about your nuclear capabilities, but ours are so massive and powerful that I pray to God they will never have to be used.” The letter was released just hours after reports surfaced that North Korea had demolished a nuclear test site in the country's northeast region. The closing of the testing site had been announced as a step leading up to the summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un, the Associated Press reported. Trump earlier this month announced that a historic meeting between him and Kim would take place in Singapore in June. Read the full letter released Thursday by White House officials: Check back for updates to this developing story. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein is set to turn himself in to authorities on Friday to face charges related to sexual abuse allegations in New York, according to multiple news reports. >> Read more trending news Weinstein is expected to face first-degree rape and third-degree rape charges in one case, and a first-degree criminal sex act charge in another case, law enforcement officials told The New York Times. The Times is reporting that the sex act charge is related to an incident with Lucia Evans, who told the New Yorker and investigators that Weinstein assaulted her during a casting meeting. It’s unclear which of Weinstein’s many victim over two decades may be at the center of the rape case. (Previous story) Two unidentified law enforcement officials told The New York Times on Thursday that Weinstein is expected to surrender to authorities Friday morning. The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office is expected to bring charges against Weinstein one day after a grand jury convened to hear evidence in connection to allegations of sexual abuse that have been levied against the well-known producer, according to WNBC.  Dozens of women came forward to accuse Weinstein of sexual harassment and misconduct after the Times published a report last year detailing complaints of sexual harassment made against Weinstein over nearly three decades. Weinstein, who co-founded entertainment company Miramax, was ousted from his position at The Weinstein Company in the wake of the Times report.  New York police opened an investigation into Weinstein in 2015, after Filipina-Italian model Ambra Battilana Gutierrez told officers that she was groped by Weinstein without consent. Authorities outfitted Gutierrez with a wire and had her meet with the producer. In an audio recording of the meeting obtained by The New Yorker, Weinstein could be heard apologizing after he’s confronted about the alleged assault. >> Harvey Weinstein recording was not enough to charge him, DA says Despite the recording, no charges were filed against Weinstein. Prosecutors said that they were never consulted about the New York Police Department’s plan to get Weinstein to admit to the assault on tape and that the tape was not enough evidence to convict the 65-year-old. Police defended their actions, saying that the recording was one of multiple bits of evidence collected by officers and presented to the Manhattan District Attorney for prosecution. >> Harvey Weinstein investigations launched in New York, London New York City police said last year that they were working to learn of any additional complaints against Weinstein. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • The Transportation Security Administration recently shared some of the prohibited items it discovered in passengers’ carry-on bags at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. >> Read more trending news Here’s some of what they found: In this video, a TSA supervisor talks about the variety of tools and weapons on display from passengers’ carry-on bags, including some that are cleverly disguised: The TSA also posted on Instagram about the Freddy Krueger glove it found in a passenger’s carry-on. By the way, there is also an entry on TSA’s website dedicated to throwing stars.
  • Are men or women better navigators? It’s the guys, according to a new report. >> Read more trending news Researchers from the University of California at Santa Barbara recently conducted a study, published in the Memory & Cognition journal, to determine which group is better at directions.  To do so, they conducted two small studies. In the first one, they asked 68 participants to find their way through a computer maze to reach designated locations. They were also required to answer questions about their sense of direction, navigation strategies and whether they played video games.  In the second one, 72 participants were given a slightly different maze. Unlike the first one, this one did not include “distal landmarks,” such as trees or mountains. However, these subjects were still asked to complete a questionnaire. After analyzing the results, they found that “men were significantly more efficient than women, even after controlling for the effects of strategy,” the researchers said in a statement.  The analysts discovered that men were more likely to take shortcuts to reach their destination, while women were more likely to follow learned routes and wander. They said wandering suggested that someone does not have enough information about a certain area.  However, they did note their results were based on the average performance between men and women, and some women were just as good at directions as men.  Although the researchers are still exploring why there are differences between the sexes, they said it “may be related to the difference in the ability to learn the layout of an environment with a given amount of experience.” They also listed video games as a possible factor.  “It is also possible that the sex difference in efficiency is due in part to facility with the interface or navigation in virtual environments, as men tend to spend more time playing video games,” they wrote. They now hope to continue their investigations to examine how people navigate real environments versus virtual ones. 
  • At least eight women have accused actor Morgan Freeman of inappropriate behavior, according to a report from CNN. The women said the behavior happened on and off movie sets. >> Read more trending news  Freeman is an Academy Award-winning actor, but he's also a business owner in Clarksdale, Mississippi. Two blocks around the corner from Ground Zero, the blues club Morgan Freeman owns, WHBQ-TV met with Celia Bobo. Bobo and  Morgan Freeman have been friends for two decades, and she said she does not believe the accusations. 'I find it hard to believe. I mean, I have known Morgan for many years,' Bobo said. 'Morgan has been nothing but a southern gentleman in my presence and the presence of my three daughters,' she said A number of Freeman's accusers said he 'repeatedly (behaved) in ways that made women feel uncomfortable at work. Two even said they were subjected to unwanted touching, according to the CNN report. Bobo told WHBQ she believes Morgan Freeman might actually be the victim in this case. 'With the current situation of the sexual harassment, I think it has become easier for a lot of people to say they have been sexually abused or harassed,' Bobo said. She said she believes the women who are accusing Morgan Freeman of misconduct are doing it to “show out.” 'He is a great guy, and I have been around him in many different circumstances.' >> Related: Morgan Freeman apologizes after 8 women accuse him of inappropriate behavior In a statement released Thursday, Morgan Freeman apologized. 'Anyone who knows me or has worked with me knows I am not someone who would willingly offend or knowingly make anyone feel uneasy,' Freeman said in the statement. 'I apologize to anyone who felt uncomfortable or disrespected -- that was never my intent.
  • Under growing pressure from the House to change how lawmakers deal with workplace harassment claims and damage awards, the Senate on Thursday approved a package of reforms that would not allow members to use taxpayer funds to pay any legal settlements, and change the process for Congressional employees to bring complaints against lawmakers. “This is an incredibly important moment,” said Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), who joined with Senators in both parties to forge a compromise that was approved on a voice vote. “We are completely overhauling the sexual harassment policies of the Congress,” Klobuchar said on the Senate floor. The Senate just passed bipartisan reforms to fix Congress's broken process for reporting sexual harassment, and finally end taxpayer-funded harassment settlements. This is a big step in the right direction towards transparency and accountability. — Kirsten Gillibrand (@SenGillibrand) May 24, 2018 “These reforms are commonsense,” said Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), who had been more and more vocal in recent days about the lack of action on a similar measure passed by the House. Along with streamlining the process for employees to bring a complaint – and then have it evaluated by Congressional officials – the plan would force members to personally pay for any legal settlement, and not have taxpayers foot the bill. “Hardworking taxpayers should not foot the bill for a Member’s misconduct, and victims should not have to navigate a system that stands in the way of accountability,” said Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO). The extra protections for employees would also be extended to unpaid staffers on Capitol Hill, including interns, legislative fellows, and detailees from other executive branch offices. As the Senate approved the plan, the leaders of the House Ethics Committee confirmed that ex-Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-PA) had reimbursed taxpayers for a $39,000 settlement involving a former female staffer in his office. “We understand he sent that reimbursement payment to the Treasury. We welcome that action,” said ethics chair Rep. Susan Brooks (R-IN), and the top Democrat on the panel, Rep. Ted Deutch (D-FL), in a joint statement. “There is overwhelming bipartisan consensus in the House that Members should be personally accountable for settlements paid with public funds to resolve claims against them alleging sexual harassment,” Brooks and Deutch wrote in a statement. But what about when lawmakers leave the Congress? The ethics leaders said even then – they should still have to pay up. Ethics committee writes in new letter they believe “any proposal to reform the CAA should include provisions to ensure that Members remain personally liable for their own conduct with respect to discrimination and retaliation & that they remain liable even if they leave Congress” — Alex Moe (@AlexNBCNews) May 24, 2018 Brooks and Deutch also noted that ex-Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-TX) – who had resigned without following through on a promise to pay off an $84,000 settlement – was a perfect example of why the system needs to be changed. “Farenthold publicly promised to reimburse the U.S. Treasury for $84,000 in funds paid to settle the lawsuit brought against him for claims of sexual harassment, gender discrimination and retaliation,” they wrote. “Last week, he announced that he would not do so,” the two added. The House and Senate must still hammer out a compromise measure between the bills passed by each chamber – but the Senate vote gives a new shot of energy to the effort, though there are House members who feel the Senate plan is not strong enough, especially in dealing with lawmakers. “I’m optimistic that we can finish the job and get this bill signed into law,” Gillibrand added.
  • The opioid epidemic has now made its way into marine life in Washington’s Puget Sound. Scientists who track pollution have for the first time, discovered traces of oxycodone in mussels. >> Read more trending news  But scientists say those mussels don’t end up on your plate.  The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, or WDFW, gets clean mussels from Penn Cove on Whidby Island and puts them into areas they want to test for water contamination – like in urban waters. And they’ve discovered there’s enough oxycodone in Elliot Bay for mussels to test positive.  “What we eat and what we excrete goes into the Puget Sound,” said Jennifer Lanksbury, a biologist at the WDFW.  Scientists deposit mussels in cages in 18 locations. They teamed up with the Puget Sound Institute to analyze the data and discovered that three locations were positive for trace amounts of oxycodone - two near Bremerton’s shipyard and Elliot Bay near Harbor Island. “It’s telling me there's a lot of people taking oxycodone in the Puget Sound area. The contamination is likely coming from wastewater treatment plants,” Lanksbury said.  >> Trending: Sunken treasure worth $17 billion on 300-year-old shipwreck discovered off Colombian coast After people consume oxycodone, some of it ends up in the toilet, and it goes into wastewater. The water gets filtered, but King County Wastewater Management said although their system can catch a lot of contaminants, it can't specifically filter out drugs.  >> Trending: Great Pacific Garbage Patch 16 times larger than estimates: 87,000 tons of plastic and growing And opioids, antibiotics, drugs for depression - mussels are testing positive for all of it.  “Those are definitely chemicals that are out there in the nearshore waters and they may be having an impact on the fish and shellfish that live there,” Lanksbury said. Again, Lanksbury says people have nothing to worry about when it comes to eating mussels from a restaurant or shop because they come from clean locations. “They’re clean and healthy and delicious. We love to eat mussels from the Puget Sound. We use them for our food and we use them for contaminant analysis,” Lanksbury said.  But the study shows it’s another sign of what's ending up in the water and harming marine life.  “People should be wary,” Lanksbury said. “Hopefully our data shows what’s out there and can get the process started for cleaning up our waters.”  >> Trending: Your bottled water is probably contaminated with tiny plastic particles, health experts say This was a one-time study for prescription drugs, but Fish and Wildlife officials will seek more funding to continue testing and tracking what happening to in the water over time. 
  • An idea to help police patrol under area bridges is approved by the Tulsa City Council. The new ordinance gives police the authority to patrol under bridges that were previously considered state property. The plan is designed to help the City of Tulsa deal with damage under bridges. Leaders with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation say sometimes fires started by people living in homeless camps can do damage. ODOT has also paid for environmental agencies to clean out drug paraphernalia and human waste.
  • A Portland, Oregon, family contacted Amazon to investigate after they say a private conversation in their home was recorded by Amazon's Alexa – the voice-controlled smart speaker – and the recorded audio was sent to the phone of a random person in Seattle, who was in the family’s contact list. >> Amazon announces kids-friendly version of Echo 'My husband and I would joke and say, 'I'd bet these devices are listening to what we're saying,'' said Danielle, who did not want KIRO-TV to use her last name. Every room in her family home was wired with the Amazon devices to control her home's heat, lights and security system. But Danielle said that two weeks ago, the family's love for Alexa changed with an alarming phone call. 'The person on the other line said, 'Unplug your Alexa devices right now,'' she said. ''You're being hacked.'' >> Amazon working on home robot, report says That person was one of her husband's employees, calling from Seattle. 'We unplugged all of them and he proceeded to tell us that he had received audio files of recordings from inside our house,' she said. 'At first, my husband was, like, 'No, you didn't!' And the (recipient of the message) said, 'You sat there talking about hardwood floors.' And we said, 'Oh gosh, you really did hear us.'' Danielle listened to the conversation when it was sent back to her, and she couldn't believe someone 176 miles away heard it, too. 'I felt invaded,' she said. 'A total privacy invasion. Immediately, I said, 'I'm never plugging that device in again because I can't trust it.'' >> Amazon’s Alexa’s random laugh is creeping users out Danielle says she unplugged all the devices, and she repeatedly called Amazon. She says an Alexa engineer investigated. 'They said, 'Our engineers went through your logs, and they saw exactly what you told us; they saw exactly what you said happened, and we're sorry.' He apologized like 15 times in a matter of 30 minutes, and he said, 'We really appreciate you bringing this to our attention; this is something we need to fix!'' But Danielle says the engineer did not provide specifics about why it happened or if it's a widespread issue. 'He told us that the device just guessed what we were saying,' she said. Danielle said the device did not audibly advise her it was preparing to send the recording, something it’s programmed to do. >> Read more trending news  When KIRO-TV asked Amazon questions, the company sent this response: “Amazon takes privacy very seriously. We investigated what happened and determined this was an extremely rare occurrence. We are taking steps to avoid this from happening in the future.' Amazon offered to “de-provision” Danielle’s Alexa communications so she could keep using its 'Smart Home' features. But Danielle is hoping Amazon gives her a refund for her devices, which she said representatives have been unwilling to do. She says she’s curious to find out if anyone else has experienced the same issue. 'A husband and wife in the privacy of their home have conversations that they're not expecting to be sent to someone (in) their address book,' she said.
  • After days of increasingly bellicose statements from Pyongyang, President Donald Trump on Thursday pulled the plug on a scheduled June 12 summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, but left the door open to future negotiations over efforts to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula. “If and when Kim Jong Un chooses to engage in constructive dialogue and actions, I am waiting,” the President said at the White House. Mr. Trump’s remarks came several hours after he sent a letter to Kim Jong Un, calling off their summit, as U.S. officials laid the blame directly on the North Koreans. “While many things can happen and a great opportunity lies ahead, potentially, I believe that this is a tremendous setback for North Korea and, indeed, a setback for the world,” the President said. I have decided to terminate the planned Summit in Singapore on June 12th. While many things can happen and a great opportunity lies ahead potentially, I believe that this is a tremendous setback for North Korea and indeed a setback for the world… pic.twitter.com/jT0GfxT0Lc — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 24, 2018 Both in his letter to Kim, and in his public remarks, the President edged back toward some of the tougher rhetoric that had characterized the Kim-Trump relationship of last year, when the two men lobbed threats of possible military action. “Hopefully, positive things will be taking place with respect to the future of North Korea. But if they don’t, we are more ready than we have ever been before,” Mr. Trump said. His letter was even more direct. “You talk about your nuclear capabilities, but ours are so massive and powerful that I pray to God they will never have to be used,” Mr. Trump wrote, labeling the cancelled summit a ‘missed opportunity.’ On Capitol Hill, lawmakers asked the Secretary of State – who happened to be at a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee – what would happen next, as Secretary Mike Pompeo said the U.S. would continue with the “maximum pressure” campaign of economic sanctions against Pyongyang, and wait for the response of Kim Jong Un. Pompeo on what's next: 'It's Kim's choice. We welcome that call, that outreach.' Sounding somewhat dejected: 'In some ways, situation normal. The pressure campaign continues.' — Michelle Kosinski (@MichLKosinski) May 24, 2018 “I am hopeful that we can continue to have conversations so that we can put his back on track,” Pompeo said, though he admitted it was not clear why the North Koreans suddenly went from being willing partners to not answering phone calls. “I don’t really know I want to speculate why they took those actions, because I don’t think we know,” Pompeo added. “In some ways, it’s situation normal,” Pompeo said to one question. “The pressure campaign continues.” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the US wants the complete denuclearization of North Korea https://t.co/ZvF0b8XHpG https://t.co/LNKUmWLNww — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) May 24, 2018 Pompeo sparred with several Senate Democrats during the hearing, as he rejected assertions that the U.S. had rushed into a summit with Kim, and wasn’t really prepared to deal with a North Korean leader who is known for sudden course changes. “Unfortunately, it seems that our chief diplomat is negotiating war,” said Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) of Pompeo. “From the beginning, when Trump impulsively decided that he would meet with Kim Jong Un, it has been clear that the summit involved very little preparation,” said Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT). “We cannot return to the name-calling and saber-rattling of the last year,” said Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA).