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    Thomas Silverstein, who served a longer period in solitary confinement than any other inmate in a federal prison, has died, The Denver Post reported. He was 67. >> Read more trending news  Silverstein, who had been held in solitary for 35 years, died May 11 at a hospital in Lakewood, Colorado, the newspaper reported. He was admitted to the hospital in February, according to Dan Pruett, Jefferson County’s chief deputy coroner. Silverstein was being held at the United States Penitentiary Administration Maximum Facility -- also known as “Supermax” -- in Florence, Colorado. He had been serving time at the Colorado facility since 2005, the Post reported. Silverstein was serving three consecutive life terms in connection with the Oct. 22, 1983, slaying of two fellow prisoners and a guard, The New York Times reported. The prison guard, Merle Clutts, was fatally stabbed at the maximum security federal prison in Marion, Illinois, the Post reported. Silverstein was originally sent to prison in 1975, convicted for armed robbery, the Times reported. Because there was no federal death penalty at the time, the Bureau of Prisons put Silverstein into indefinite solitary confinement, according to the Post. Through the years, Silverstein was incarcerated in Marion; Leavenworth, Kansas; Atlanta; and in Colorado, the Post reported.
  • A 14-year-old DeKalb County girl just became the youngest student to ever be admitted to Spelman College! Sydney Wilson, whose birthday was just last week, will start her freshman year at Spelman this fall as the youngest student in the college's history. But what got Wilson into college at such a young age? WIlson has been a standout student all of her life. By the time she hit second grade, she knew she was different than other students in her class. Many of them teased her for being too smart.  Wilson didn't let it bother her. 'I just stayed on my path,' Wilson said. 'I didn't really feel like I needed to be popular ... because, I mean, I like myself.'  Wilson's parents knew they had to do something different, so they enrolled her in Wilson Academy in Lithonia. That's where she started taking high school classes at age 10.  >> Read more trending news  >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  Just a few months ago, at just 13 years old, she applied to Spelman College. The school sent her dad an email saying his daughter was accepted.  Wilson reacted to the news like most teens: by posting the special moment on social media.  'So, he calls me in and he says, 'Look at the computer!' So I looked at it, and I just melt,' Wilson said. 'I was screaming and I was crying. I ran out to tell my family, and we took a bunch of pictures and posted it on Instagram and everything.' Wilson plans to live on campus like the other students, but she's not worried about the age gap.  'I’ve been with the older kids all my life, so socially, I don’t think it will be a problem for me,' Wilson said.  Wilson plans to major in biology and pursue medical research.
  • A Kentucky student was diagnosed with dyslexia and held back in second grade, but in two weeks she will graduate as one of her high school’s 10 valedictorians. >> Read more trending news  Kendahl Broyles, a senior at J. Graham Brown School in Louisville, will attend Western Kentucky University’s Honors College in the fall, WAVE reported. “I’m looking into maybe nursing or education,” Broyles told the television station. Broyles said she had trouble adjusting at Brown when she was in kindergarten. “In kindergarten, in first grade, school was supposed to be something fun for you to learn but it was really hard for me and it really wasn’t enjoyable,” she told WAVE. Broyles’ fortunes changed after she was diagnosed with dyslexia. She was left back in the second grade and transferred to a private school. Then, she returned to Brown because “It’s always been like a home to me.” Brown began excelling in her work, learning a second language. In middle school she began tutoring younger students, WAVE reported. “Sometimes I think ‘Kendahl, I want to be like you when I grow up,'' Spanish teacher Heather Anderson told the television station. “She’s amazing.” “I enjoy school now because I’ve taught myself, I can do anything I put my mind to -- it just might take me a little longer,” Broyles told WAVE. “The thing I’m most proud of isn’t even really school related. It’s being able to show people like you can do anything and even if it is harder for you, you can still do it.”
  • Police body camera video shows the gripping moments when officers worked to save a man threatening to jump off a 150-foot-high bridge. The video shows a man leaning from a wire along an Athens railroad trestle, threatening to step off the edge. But thanks to some courageous police officers, the man came down safely. For Athens-Clarke County Officer Cody Nix, a routine nighttime patrol turned to a lifesaving mission for him and his partners. Nix spotted the man high above leaning off the North Avenue train trestle in Athens. “How are we going to do this safely, get him off the trestle, get him the help he needed?' Nix said is what was running through his head as the situation unfolded. “Just lean back. Stay where you are. We are going to help you,” Nix’s body camera video showed him yelling to the man. >> Read more trending news  Officer Brendan Branning played the role of negotiator, speaking from a loudspeaker on a patrol car, working to gain the man's trust. “I knew the subject had recently lost a loved one,” Branning said. As Branning kept the man's attention, Nix and Sgt. Von Anderson made it to the top of trestle. “I'm not interested in gymnastics, dude,” Anderson said talking to the man. Anderson took the lead in trying to calm the man and get him to step back from the edge. 'Listen to me. The only reasons we're here is because we are worried about you. I ain’t interested in hurting you or putting you in jail. You ain't done nothing,' Anderson told the man. Body camera video shows how the two officers inched closer to the man and at the right moment, grabbed him from the edge of the bridge and pulled him to safety. “'He was very erratic. He was upset, had some stuff going on. We just held onto him so he calmed down some more,” Nix told Regan. “At the end of the day, it’s all about safety for us and the citizens,' Branning said. The man was taken to a nearby hospital for evaluation. The officers said their 40 hours of crisis intervention training is a lifesaver in these situations.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May announced her resignation Friday morning. >> Read more trending news In an announcement from 10 Downing Street, May said her resignation would become effective June 7. May had been under pressure to resign after a backlash by her own party against her latest Brexit plan, the BBC reported. This is a developing story.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May announced her resignation Friday morning, effective June 7. >> Read more trending news Update 6:15 a.m. EDT May 24: Most observers believe a new leader could replace Theresa May as Britain’s prime minister by the end of July, The New York Times reported. Former foreign secretary Boris Johnson appears to be the favorite. Other possibilities include former Brexit secretary Dominic Raab and Andrea Leadsom, who resigned from May’s cabinet this week, The Washington Post reported. Jeremy Hunt, the foreign secretary, and Sajid Javid, the home secretary, have also been mentioned as candidate, the Times reported. Update 5:55 a.m. EDT May 24: Theresa May became prime minister of Britain after a June 2016 referendum, when the country voted to leave the European Union, The Washington Post reported. May tried three times to get Parliament to pass the Brexit withdrawal but the House of Commons rejected it each time, the newspaper reported.  That led to her resignation Friday. 'I will shortly leave the job that it has been the honor of my life to hold,” May said outside 10 Downing Street. “The second female prime minister, but certainly not the last.'I do so with no ill will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love.' Boris Johnson, who once said his chances of becoming prime minister were “about as good as the chances of finding Elvis on Mars,” is now the favorite to become Britain’s 77th prime minister, according to the Post. Update 5:35 a.m. EDT May 24:  Prime Minister Theresa May’s voice shook with emotion as she announced her resignation Friday morning, saying she had “done my best” to try to get Britain out of the European Union, the BBC reported. May said she would step down as leader of the Conservative party on June 7, but will remain prime minister until a successor is chosen, The New York Times reported. “I believe I was right to persevere, even when the odds against success seemed high,” May said. “But it is now clear to me that it is in the best interests of the country for a new prime minister to lead that effort.” May will still be in office when President Donald Trump arrives in Britain on June 3 for a state visit, which will coincide with events marking the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II. May had been under pressure to resign after a backlash by her own party against her latest Brexit plan, the BBC reported.
  • A North Carolina high school student, less than three months from earning his high school diploma, won’t see it after dying in his sleep March 19. >> Read more trending news  But Philip Moore’s parents say he earned it and they are now engaged in a fight with the school he attended since the sixth grade. His father, Benjamin Moore, said Cochrane Collegiate Academy offered a certificate, but his parents say that’s not enough. “And I think, 'No I know he deserved that high school diploma,'” said Moore's mother, Yvonne Moore. “Phillip didn’t ask to die. He had excellent grades. Never been suspended from school from kindergarten through the 12th grade.” According to Moore’s parents, school officials said he didn’t meet the requirements. As to how he died, Moore’s parents say they still don’t know. The results of an autopsy aren’t due back until July.
  • After four decades, Sylvester Stallone still likes to show off his pet turtles. >> Read more trending news  The actor posted a photo of himself on Instagram with Cuff and Link, the two turtles that originally appeared in Stallone’s 1976 film, “Rocky,” People reported. The animals made their film comeback in Stallone’s 2018 movie, “Creed II,” the magazine reported. “In ‘Creed 2’ with my original buddies from the first Rocky ... Cuff and Link, now about 44 years old!” Stallone wrote in his May 5 post. >> ‘Beautiful Philadelphia day’: Sylvester Stallone on set of ‘Creed 2’ In “Rocky”, Stallone introduced the turtles to Adrian Pennino (Talia Shire) as, “the exotic animals I was telling you about. These are my friends, Cuff and Link,” Entertainment Weekly reported.  >> Sylvester Stallone buys replica of statue used in ‘Rocky III’ “I sold them to ya,” Pennino tells Rocky Balboa, reminding him she was working at a pet shop when the film’s star bought the turtles.
  • Street artist Banksy has taken his political statements to Italy. >> Read more trending news  The British-based artist showed up unannounced at the Venice Biennale and said he set up a stall, calling it “Venice in Oil,” the BBC reported. “Despite being the largest and most prestigious art event in the world, for some reason I’ve never been invited,” Banksy wrote on his verified Instagram account. In the video, a man is shown with a series of paintings depicting a large cruise ship in the Italian city, CNN reported. At the end of the video, police appear to be evicting the man from the piazza. The paintings refer to the controversy of large cruise ships docking in Venice’s canals, the BBC reported. Banksy’s identity has never been officially revealed. He is noted for a series of satirical graffiti pieces that appeared on buildings in the United Kingdom, the BBC reported. >> Banksy artwork self-destructs, sheds after sale at Sotheby’s  In October, Banksy’s painting “Girl With Balloon,” was sold at a Sotheby’s auction Friday night in London for more than $1 million, the BBC reported. But as soon as the winning telephone bid had been verified, the painting suddenly passed through a shredder that was installed in the frame. >> Banksy confirms he created artwork on Wales wall In December, Banksy confirmed he created a piece of graffiti that appeared on a wall in a south Wales town, with the caption, “Seasons greetings.” The image depicts a child with his arms outstretched with what appears to be snow falling on him, but the other side of the wall reveals a fire spewing ash.
  • Residents in a Houston neighborhood said they are worried about a man who puts strips of duct tape on his face and follows people on a jogging trail, KTRK reported.  >> Read more trending news  'We refer to him as 'duct tape dude,'' Middlebrook resident Linda Sansing told the television station. 'When you start chasing the residents and you're wearing duct tape on your face, it just sounds like something is not right.' While Sansing admitted she has not seen the man, she said she has kept up with a neighborhood message board that has documented several encounters with the man. According to KTRK, posters on the board have written the man “Wears duct tape on his face and acts very strange,' and 'He wore duct tape with sunglasses on his face.' There are more than 100 comments on the message board, the television station reported. 'It's quite unusual to be staring at people walking and jogging, and wearing that kind of stuff on your face,' Houston Police Clear Lake Division Sgt. Paulino Lozano told KTRK. 'It's a little frustrating because the citizens want more and expect more, but there's only so much that we can do. So we definitely want to get ahead of it and see what his intentions are.' Despite the creepiness of the “duct tape dude,” Lozano said the man has not broken any laws. Lozano did suggest vigilance, however. 'A lot of people like wearing those ear buds and not pay attention while they're jogging,' Lozano told KTRK. 'Just be aware of what's going on. Try to walk in pairs or in groups.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May announced her resignation Friday morning. >> Read more trending news In an announcement from 10 Downing Street, May said her resignation would become effective June 7. May had been under pressure to resign after a backlash by her own party against her latest Brexit plan, the BBC reported. This is a developing story.
  • The journey of two barges on the Arkansas River has captivated many across the state and the nation. The loose barges reached the dam in Webbers Falls Thursday with little damage to the dam. The barges sank into the river.  Muskogee County Emergency Management spokeswoman Tricia Germany says the barges were carrying a total of about 3,800 pounds of fertilizer.  Germany says the concern was that the barges would block the water flow through the dam. The two barges got stuck in rocks overnight but somehow broke loose this morning as crews tried to secure them.  Residents of Webbers Falls were evacuated on Wednesday. 
  • An escalating trade war between the U.S. and China could mean higher prices on a broad array of products from toys to clothing. But some retailers will be less equipped to handle the pain than others, leaving consumers to carry the load. Analysts say big box giants like Target and Walmart who marked their latest quarter with strong performance are best positioned to absorb the higher costs because of their clout with suppliers. They’re also taking a judicious approach to price increases to lessen the impact. The losers will be the ones that have been struggling all along — the mall-based clothing stores and others that sell commoditized products like basic sweaters or that don’t have the financial wherewithal to absorb extra costs. Consumers, as well as most retailers, had been left largely unscathed by the first several rounds of tariffs that the U.S. imposed on China because they mostly focused on industrial and agricultural products. But that began to change when items like furniture saw an increase in tariffs to 25% two weeks ago. Retailers will absorb the extra costs when those products arrive in U.S. ports in June. But now the Trump administration is preparing to extend the 25% tariffs to practically all Chinese imports not already hit with levies, including toys, shirts, household goods and sneakers. Cowen & Co. estimates shoppers could see as much as 10% to 15% in price increases across all goods imported from China, which would mean an incremental cost of $100 billion or more.
  • The storms caused two barges to detach in a navigation channel near Webbers Falls in Muskogee County Wednesday night. Muskogee County Emergency Management leaders are asking residents to evacuate. The evacuation order also includes nearby areas west of the river. Troopers with the Oklahoma Highway patrol say the problem is possible debris flying from the dam. A shelter is set up in Warner. All lanes of SH-100 and I-40 are closed over the Arkansas River near the Muskogee/Sequoyah County line until further notice.  Drivers can expect significant delays and should avoid the area and seek an alternate route if possible.

Washington Insider

  • Ending months of wrangling over billions of dollars in aid for victims of hurricanes, floods, and wildfires, Congress struck a deal Thursday with President Donald Trump on a $19.1 billion aid package, which includes extra relief money for Puerto Rico, but not several billion for border security efforts sought by the President. 'We have been working on this package for several months, and I am pleased to say that help is finally on the way,' said Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), as the Senate voted 85-8 to approve the plan, and send it back to the House for final action. The plan includes $600 million in food aid for Puerto Rico, along with an additional $304 million in housing assistance for the island, as President Trump backed off his opposition to extra aid for the island. 'Puerto Rico has to be treated fairly - and they are,' Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer told reporters. The compromise plan also includes over $3 billion to repair military bases in Florida, North Carolina and Nebraska which were damaged by disasters, and over $3 billion for the Army Corps of Engineers to repair damaged waterways infrastructure. The details of the final agreement were just slightly different from a disaster aid package approved earlier in May by the House - that $19.1 billion plan was opposed by President Trump and a majority of GOP lawmakers. 'Now, let's get this bill to the President's desk ASAP,' said Rep. Cindy Axne (D-IA), whose home state has been hit hard by flooding. Ironically, the vote took place in the Senate as a severe storm rolled through the city, setting off alarms inside the Capitol, as police told tourists, reporters, and staffers to shelter in place. After the vote, Republicans praised the agreement, and the work of the President.  “For Florida, this is a big day,” said Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL), as the bill included $1.2 billion to help rebuild Tyndall Air Force Base, which was leveled last year by Hurricane Michael. “I just want to tell you how grateful I am to the President,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-GA), as Republicans repeatedly said Mr. Trump had 'broken the logjam' on the disaster bill. Democrats saw it much differently, as they argued if the President had stayed out of the negotiations, the disaster aid would have been agreed to long ago. “He's an erratic, helter-skelter, get nothing done President,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer.   “If he stays out of it and lets us work together, we might get some things done.” The eight Senators who voted against the bill were all Republicans - Blackburn (TN), Braun (IN), Crapo (ID), Lee (UT), McSally (AZ), Paul (KY), Risch (ID), and Romney (UT). The bill would also extend the life of the National Flood Insurance Program, giving lawmakers several more months to consider reforms to the program, which has run up close to $40 billion in losses in the last 15 years. The bill also has specific language to force the Trump Administration to release $16 billion in already approved funding for disasters, but which has been withheld by the White House for months - it includes $4 billion for Texas, and over $8 billion for Puerto Rico. The compromise bill still needs a final vote in the House - that could take place either on Friday, or might have to wait until early June when lawmakers return from a Memorial Day break, as the House had already left town when the disaster deal was struck.
  • In the midst of an escalating trade fight with China which has caused financial pain for many American farmers, the Trump Administration announced on Thursday that $16 billion in trade relief payments would be given to farm producers starting this summer, to help farmers deal with economic impacts of foreign retaliation for U.S. tariffs. 'The plan we are announcing today ensures farmers do not bear the brunt of unfair retaliatory tariffs imposed by China and other trading partners,' said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. The $16 billion would be in addition to $12 billion in trade relief offered last year by the President to U.S. farmers, who have endured lost markets, lower commodity prices, and financial losses as a result of China and other countries retaliating against tariffs authorized by President Trump. Perdue said it would be better to have a trade agreement with China to remove the need for these trade payments, but such an agreement does not seem to be on the horizon. 'We would love for China to come to the table at any time,' Perdue said, adding that President Trump will meet with the Chinese Premier in June. 'It's really in China's court,' Perdue added. The funding for the latest farm bailout would come through the Commodity Credit Corporation, but Perdue and other USDA officials said the increase in revenues from tariffs would offset the cost. 'The President feels very strongly that the tariff revenue is going to be used to support his program, which will come back out and replenish the CCC,' Secretary Perdue said. Those tariff duties are not paid by China - but rather by companies in the United States importing items from the Chinese, as those businesses can either eat the extra import costs, or pass them on to American consumers. Democrats in Congress have grabbed on to the issue of rising costs for consumers in criticizing the President's trade policies - even though many Democrats do support the idea of being much more tough on Beijing over trade matters. Caught in the middle are farmers, who have been more readily - and publicly - voicing their concerns in recent months with the President's trade policies. 'The Farm Bureau believes in fair trade,' said American Farm Bureau Federal chief Zippy Duval. 'Eliminating more tariffs and other trade barriers is critical to achieving that goal.”  A recent poll by the Indiana Farm Bureau found 72 percent of farmers surveyed in that state felt a 'negative impact on commodity prices' because of the current trade dispute between the U.S. and China. Farm County is also mainly Republican - and the continuing pressure on farmers has filtered through in recent polling. The collateral damage for U.S. farmers could increase even more in coming months if there's no deal between the U.S. and China. President Trump has already threatened to raise tariffs on an additional $325 billion in imports from China, which could draw even more trade retaliation from Beijing - with U.S. agriculture being the most obvious target.
  • For the second time in three days, a federal judge rejected arguments by lawyers for President Donald Trump, refusing to block subpoenas issued by a U.S. House committee for financial records held by U.S. banks which did business with the President's companies. 'I think the courts are saying that we are going to uphold the rule of law,' said Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), Chairman of the House Oversight Committee, which has subpoenaed information from the Mazars USA accounting firm. Wednesday's ruling from federal Judge Edgardo Ramos, put on the bench by President Barack Obama, related to subpoenas by two other House panels to Deutsche Bank and Capital One, for records related to Mr. Trump's businesses. Lawyers for the President, the Trump Organization, and Mr. Trump's family had asked that the subpoenas be quashed - the judge made clear that wasn't happening, and also rejected a request to stay his ruling to allow for an appeal. As in investigative matters involving the President's tax returns, and other subpoenas from Democrats, Mr. Trump's legal team argued that there is a limit on the investigative power of the Congress. 'Congress must, among other things, have a legitimate legislative purpose, not exercise law-enforcement authority, not excess the relevant committee's jurisdiction, and not make overbroad or impertinent requests,' the President's lawyers wrote in a brief filed last week. But as with a case in federal court in Washington earlier this week, that argument failed to sway Judge Ramos, who said Deutsche Bank can turn over in the information sought by the House Financial Services Committee and the House Intelligence Committee. In the halls of Congress, Democrats said the legal victories were clear evidence that the resistance of the White House to Congressional investigation could only succeed for so long. 'The White House has attempted to block Congressional oversight, but the law is on our side,' said Rep. Joe Courtney (D-CT). And Democrats also were pleased by the quick action of both judges this week, amid worries that multiple legal challenges by the President could cause lengthy delays. 'We should not be slowed down in our work simply by a clock that goes through judicial processes,' said Rep. Madeleine Dean (D-PA). The legal setback for President Trump came several hours after he cut short a White House meeting with top Democrats on infrastructure, saying he would not work with them on major legislation until the House stopped a variety of investigations. 'Get these phony investigations over with,' the President told reporters in the Rose Garden. Mr. Trump seemed especially aggravated by statements earlier on Wednesday by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who accused the President of resisting subpoenas and other document requests for a reason. 'And we believe the President of the United States is engaged in a cover-up, in a cover-up,' Pelosi told reporters at the Capitol.
  • Angered by investigative efforts in Congress pressed by House Democrats, President Donald Trump on Wednesday cut short an Oval Office meeting with Democratic leaders on an infrastructure bill, walking into the Rose Garden to tell reporters that he would not work with Democrats on major legislative initiatives until Congress ends investigations related to the Russia probe and more. 'Get these phony investigations over with,' the President said, clearly aggravated by comments made earlier in the day by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who accused Mr. Trump of engaging in a 'cover-up' by ignoring subpoenas and refusing to turn over documents in a series of investigations led by Democrats. 'I don't do cover-ups,' Mr. Trump said with a distinct note of frustration in his voice, as he again said the Mueller Report should have been the last word on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. 'As President Trump has always said: No Collusion. No Obstruction,' the White House tweeted soon after his impromptu Rose Garden remarks. Returning to the Capitol from the White House, Democrats said the scene seemed like a set up. 'It's clear that this was not a spontaneous move on the President's part,' said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, as Democrats accused the President of doing everything he could to avoid bipartisan agreements on issues like infrastructure, which was the subject of today's sit down at the White House. “I pray for the President,” Speaker Pelosi said afterwards. Just last night, Mr. Trump had sent Democrats a letter asking that infrastructure efforts be delayed until after approval of the US-Mexico-Canada free trade agreement - which still has not even been submitted to the Congress for a vote.
  • Facing pressure within Democratic Party ranks to open an official impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday vowed to 'follow the facts' of any investigations related to the President and his administration, bluntly accusing Mr. Trump of doing all he can to block oversight related to the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 elections. 'We believe it’s important to follow the facts. We believe that no one is above the law including the President of the United States,' Pelosi said after a closed door meeting of House Democrats. 'And we believe the President of the United States is engaged in a cover-up, in a cover-up,' Pelosi told reporters. Pelosi's advice to her House Democratic Caucus has been to hold off on starting any official impeachment effort, and instead focus on holding hearings, getting documents, sending out subpoenas, taking their document fights to the courts, and increasing the pressure on the President with those actions. The Speaker touted the success of one of those efforts on Wednesday, as she noted that the House Intelligence Committee - after using its subpoena power - pressured the Justice Department into providing the panel with more counter intelligence information which was generated by the Russia investigation. 'The Intelligence Committee talked about the documents that the Justice Department is now willing to convey,' Pelosi said, using that as one example of how Democrats are slowly getting information from the Trump Administration - without the need to take a step towards impeachment hearings. 'We have to be patient as we plow along,' said Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA), a member of the House Judiciary Committee, who said now is not the time to start an impeachment effort by that panel. 'We've got to have evidence,' Johnson told me. 'We can't just take the Mueller Report.' But Democrats have encountered numerous hurdles set up by the President and the White House in terms of getting the underlying evidence of the Mueller Report, getting testimony from Mueller, hearing from former White House Counsel Don McGahn, and more. 'The potential reasons to cite impeachment have been growing,' said Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY). 'I believe the facts fully justify an impeachment inquiry,' said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA), who was joined by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) in calling for a start to official proceedings against the President. For now, Speaker Pelosi is still resisting that course - but making it very plain that she agrees with fellow Democrats about what they are seeing. 'It was a very positive meeting; a respectful sharing of ideas,' Pelosi said.