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    Three leaders of Hong Kong's 2014 pro-democracy protests and six others are being tried for their involvement in the 'Occupy Central' movement that paralyzed the city's financial district for more than two months. The trial for the nine defendants opened Monday. They include two professors and a pastor who spearheaded the campaign to press for free elections of Hong Kong's top leader. Protesters laid siege to government headquarters for 79 days but failed to win any concessions. Three university students prosecuted in 2016 for their leadership role in the protests received community service. Judges are under pressure from Beijing to hand down harsher sentences to deter future protests. Some fear that central government meddling will erode judiciary independence and the city's standing as a business capital.
  • In a rare admission of fault, President Donald Trump said on “Fox News Sunday” that he made a mistake and regretted missing the Veterans Day services at Arlington National Cemetery last week. >> Read more trending news    “I should have done that. I was extremely busy on calls for the country. We did a lot of calling,” Trump told host Chris Wallace, who pressed the president on why he didn’t take a quick trip across the river to attend ceremonies honoring America’s war dead. “I probably, ah, you know, in retrospect I should have, and I did last year and I will virtually every year, but we came in very late at night and I had just left, literally, the American cemetery in Paris, and I really probably assumed that was fine.” Trump had just returned from ceremonies in France commemorating the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, where he also missed a service for American veterans buried in France. “I was extremely busy because of affairs of state, doing other things,” he said. >> Related: Former Fox News executive Bill Shine accepts post in Trump White House, reports say During the interview, Trump also doubled down on calling journalists “the enemy of the people,” and he criticized a retired Navy SEAL who commanded the mission that resulted in the death of Osama bin Laden. Trump said it took too long to get bin Laden, and he complained that Pakistan didn’t help at all.  
  • Asian shares were mostly higher Monday after a buying spree on Wall Street kept up investor optimism into a new week, despite continuing worries about trade tensions. KEEPING SCORE: Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 rose 0.5 percent to 21,784.87, while Australia's S&P/ASX 200 fell 0.7 percent to 5,693.30 in early trading. South Korea's Kospi gained 0.3 percent to 2,099.45. Hong Kong's Hang Seng added 0.6 percent to 26,331.84, while the Shanghai Composite stood at 2,693.93, also up 0.6 percent. Shares were mostly higher in the rest of Asia, with benchmarks rising in Taiwan and Indonesia. WALL STREET: The S&P 500 index rose 6.07 points, or 0.2 percent, to end the week at 2,736.27. The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 123.95 points, or 0.5 percent, to 25,413.22. The Nasdaq composite slid 11.16 points, or 0.2 percent, to 7,247.87. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies picked up 3.41 points, or 0.2 percent, to $1,527.53. But the S&P 500, which finished higher for the second straight day, ended the week with a loss of 1.6 percent. TRADE WORRIES: The Trump administration has imposed a 10 percent tariff on $200 billion of Chinese goods over complaints Beijing steals or pressures foreign companies to hand over technology as the price of market access. That tariff is set to rise to 25 percent in January. Another $50 billion of Chinese goods already is subject to 25 percent duties. Beijing has responded with penalty duties on $110 billion of American goods. Washington and Beijing have resumed talks over their spiraling trade dispute. JAPAN TRADE: Japan reported a trade deficit for October but has seen a recovery in exports after getting slammed by natural disasters in September. Data from the Ministry of Finance showed exports grew 8.2 percent from the same month the previous year. In September, exports fell 1.2 percent from the previous year in the first decline for the world's third-largest economy since 2016. Imports in October grew 19.9 percent on-year. ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude oil added 83 cents to $57.51 a barrel. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gained 74 cents to $67.50. CURRENCIES: The dollar fell to 112.69 yen from 113.26 yen late Friday. The euro strengthened to $1.1410 from $1.1339. ___ Yuri Kageyama is on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyama On Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/yurikageyama/?hl=en
  • Japan is reporting a trade deficit in October but is seeing a recovery in exports after getting slammed by natural disasters in September. Japan's Ministry of Finance said Monday exports grew 8.2 percent from the same month the previous year. In September, exports fell 1.2 percent from the previous year in the first decline for the world's third-largest economy since 2016. Imports in October grew 19.9 percent on-year. Worries are continuing over trade tensions after President Donald Trump imposed penalty tariffs on billions of dollars' worth of Chinese exports. Weaker U.S.-China trade generally hurts the export-dependent Japanese economy. Trump has also complained about Japanese auto imports. Bilateral trade talks are expected next year. Monday's data showed Japan racked up a trade deficit of 449 billion yen ($4 billion).
  • Kim Porter’s oldest son, Quincy Taylor Brown, broke his silence Sunday on his mother’s death last week, posting a tribute on Instagram to the 47-year-old former model and longtime girlfriend of music mogul Sean “Diddy” Combs. >> Read more trending news   'I am broken ... & the only thing that makes sense right now is that you were way too good for this silly world we live in. I love you so much MOMMY. Please give Mee-Maw the biggest hug and kiss for me,' he said. Brown is Porter’s son from her relationship with singer-songwriter Al. B. Sure, whose real name is Albert Joseph Brown III. A 911 call was placed from her home in Toluca Lake, California, where she was later found dead. A cause of death has not been revealed. >> Related: Kim Porter, former model, ex-girlfriend of Diddy, dead at 47 Combs, who had two daughters and a son with Porter, also released a tribute to the mother of his children on Sunday, publicly addressing her death by posting a 2006 video that shows a pregnant Porter and Combs in a loving photo shoot for Essence magazine.
  • LeBron James scored 51 points against his former club and the Los Angeles Lakers beat the Miami Heat 113-97 on Sunday night. James had 19 points in the first quarter to set the tone, the Lakers led by as many as 21 and never trailed. The 51 points were a season high for James, and the most he's scored against Miami; he had 47 against the Heat twice. His last shot was a 32-footer with 16 seconds left, capping the 13th 50-point game of his career — including playoffs — and he threw the ball skyward at midcourt when time expired. It was James' first time winning against Miami since he left the Heat after the 2014 NBA Finals. He was 0-4 when facing the Heat since; his teams were 0-7, when including the three Cleveland-Miami games that he sat out for various reasons. Wayne Ellington scored 19 points for Miami (6-10), which has dropped four straight home games and is off to its second-worst start in the last 12 years. The Heat were 5-11 at this point of the 2016-17 season, the only other time they've been worse after 16 games in that span. Josh Richardson scored 17 points before getting ejected in the fourth quarter after throwing one of his sneakers about 15 rows deep into the crowd, while he was arguing about what he thought should have been a foul call that didn't come his way. Tyler Johnson also had 17 points for the Heat, while Rodney McGruder added 14. Goran Dragic missed the game for Miami because of a right knee problem, one that will be further evaluated Monday. Dwyane Wade missed his seventh consecutive game for the Heat because of the birth of his and wife Gabrielle Union-Wade's daughter; it's possible that Wade returns to the Heat this week. Miami hasn't forgotten James, obviously — he still gets loud cheers when introduced in his former home arena — but just in case anyone in attendance needed a reminder of what's in his skillset, he put on a show. He made eight of his first nine shots and had the whole arsenal working; dunks in transition, stepback 3-pointers, turnarounds from the baseline. But the biggest shot for the Lakers might have come from Brandon Ingram with 3:46 left. Miami had clawed within eight and the shot clock was about to expire on the Lakers, but Ingram connected on a long jumper from the left wing to make it 104-94. From there, the only drama was whether James would get 50. And he did. TIP-INS Lakers: This game is part of a long weekend of sorts in Miami for the Lakers, who arrived Saturday night after playing in Orlando and aren't scheduled to fly to Cleveland until Tuesday. ... Kentavious Caldwell-Pope scored 19 points, Kyle Luzma scored 15 and Ingram finished with 13. Heat: The last time Miami lost four straight at home was early in the 2014-15 season, which was actually a five-game slide. ... Miami had the rare five-shot possession in the third quarter, with three missed layups and a missed jumper, all of them rebounded by the Heat, before Ellington made a 3-pointer. ... The Heat fouled 3-point shooters twice in the first half, after doing so only twice — total — in the season's first 15 games. CONSISTENT LEBRON Whenever James changes teams — Cleveland to Miami in 2010, Miami to Cleveland in 2014, Cleveland to the Lakers this past summer — the same thing always happens: His new team starts 9-7. The Lakers surely hope the other thing that happens when James changes teams holds true, since the 2010-11 Heat and 2014-15 Cavs both went to the NBA Finals. HEAT HELP James Johnson played for the first time this season after finally being declared good to go following offseason sports hernia surgery. He had four fouls in the first half and finished with eight points. UP NEXT Lakers: Visit Cleveland on Wednesday. The Lakers are 2-11 in their last 13 trips to Cleveland. Heat: Host Brooklyn on Tuesday. The Heat defeated the Nets 120-107 in Brooklyn last week. ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/tag/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Sunday he's donating $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, to boost financial aid for low- and middle-income students. The Baltimore university said the contribution — the largest ever to any education institution in the U.S. — will allow Johns Hopkins to eliminate student loans in financial aid packages starting next fall. The university will instead offer scholarships that don't have to be repaid. University President Ronald Daniels said Bloomberg's contribution will also let the institution permanently commit to 'need-blind admissions,' or the principle of admitting the highest-achieving students, regardless of their ability to pay for their education. 'Hopkins has received a gift that is unprecedented and transformative,' he said in a statement, noting the prestigious school was founded in 1876 by a $7 million gift from Baltimore merchant Johns Hopkins that was, similarly, the largest gift of its kind at the time. By way of comparison, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched the Gates Millennium Scholars program in 1999 with a $1 billion commitment over 20 years. The Chronicle of Higher Education listed it as the largest private donation to a higher-education institution in the U.S. earlier this month. Bloomberg said he expects the money will allow Hopkins to offer more generous scholarships and ease the debt burden for graduates. 'America is at its best when we reward people based on the quality of their work, not the size of their pocketbook,' he said in a statement. 'Denying students entry to a college based on their ability to pay undermines equal opportunity.' The 76-year-old founder of the global finances services and media company, Bloomberg L.P., is among the world's richest people. He graduated from Hopkins in 1964, served as New York mayor from 2002 to 2013 and has for years weighed running for president — including in 2020.
  • Shareholders on Monday gave final approval to the merger of television network Nine Entertainment and newspaper publisher Fairfax Media into an Australian media giant to be known only as Nine despite one shareholder's late bid to stop the deal. Antony Catalano, a former chief executive of the online real estate listings portal Domain Group which is majority-owned by Fairfax, said he will ask the Federal Court on Nov. 27 to stop the merger. Catalano, who owns shares in both Domain and Fairfax, wrote to Fairfax chairman Nick Falloon late Sunday offering to buy 19.9 percent of Fairfax and asking for Monday's Fairfax shareholders meeting to be delayed. The Fairfax board said in a statement on Monday that it remained unanimously behind the merger with Nine. 'The letter contains no actual proposal that could be considered by Fairfax shareholders as an alternative to the proposed scheme of arrangement with Nine Entertainment,' the statement said. The merger was supported by 81.5 percent of Fairfax shareholders representing 88.6 percent of shares. The deal had needed the support of at least 60 percent of shareholders representing at least 70 percent of shares. Falloon said that subject to court approval, the merger would occur on Dec. 7 and the new entity would begin trading on the Australian share market on Dec. 10. The merger would give Nine shareholders 51.1 percent of the combined entity and make Nine chief executive Hugh Marks leader of the new company. Fairfax shareholders would own the remaining 48.9 percent of the company, which will become Australia's largest media player. The Fairfax family name which has been part of the Australian media landscape for 177 years appears set to disappear.
  • Kyle Busch and Kevin Harvick combined to win 16 races, lead 3,459 laps and each were considered a heavy favorite to win a second NASCAR championship. They let the race they needed slip away, and champion Joey Logano pounced. Busch, Harvick and Martin Truex Jr. comprised NASCAR's 'Big Three' this season, but it was a Big 0 for the trio in the Cup finale Sunday at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Harvick, dominant in the No. 4 Ford all year, lagged on the speed charts all weekend. The Joe Gibbs Racing' pit crew flubbed two stops for Busch — the blunders cost him six and four spots off pit road — that denied one of NASCAR's biggest career winners a second title. 'We were so bad tonight on the racetrack and on pit road that nothing was kind of going our way,' Busch said. 'It was just not all there the way that we needed it to.' Busch's stops for the No. 18 Toyota were the pits. At the end of the first stage, lug nuts were not properly secured to the right front tire that slowed the stop and cost Busch key track position. On a stop later in the race, the air hose got stuck under the front of the car as the pit crew worked on the left side. Front tire changer Cam Waugh — wearing a firesuit as green as the M&M'S paint scheme — played a pivotal role in both mistakes. With his firesuit stripped to his waist, Waugh trudged through the garage and apologized to a JGR official back at the hauler. Waugh tossed his gear into a locker and angrily shouted 'No!' when asked for comment on the over-the-wall crew's performance. Gibbs, the Super Bowl and NASCAR champion, was diplomatic about the errors. 'We were just off today. Tough day for us,' Gibbs said. 'I don't think you ever really know why. I think you've got to study all that. It was kind of small things here that slowed us down. But when we had to have a great pit stop, we had a great pit stop.' Busch's crew did atone late in the race with a flawless stop in the No. 1 pit stall gifted to him when teammate and pole winner Denny Hamlin surrendered the spot. By then, it was too late, and Busch had nothing left on a late restart. The botched pit stops compounded the team's lack of speed. 'You can always have stops where things don't go your way,' Gibbs said. 'That's part of life. Those guys turned around and had the stop of the night to give us a chance to maybe win a race. That's just their world.' Busch, who had career highs in top-fives (22) and top-10s (28), won the race en route to the title in 2015 and finished fourth Sunday. Harvick, who tied Busch with a series-high eight wins, finished third behind Logano and Truex. Harvick was nailed with a cheating violation in a win at Texas that cost him his automatic berth into the championship race. Harvick made the final round with a stout effort last week at Phoenix and seemed poised to win a title to pair with his 2014 championship. He led 58 laps early in the race — with interim crew chief Tony Gibson calling the shots for suspended crew chief Rodney Childers — but soon saw the sun set on his championship push. 'When it got dark, we just lost the rear grip and couldn't get off the corner and was having trouble turning in the corner,' Harvick said. 'We just never could get the rear grip back to where we needed to, and I couldn't take off.' Logano did, zipping past Truex late to win his first Cup championship in a season where he was the outlier of the 'Big Three.' ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Cambodia has reiterated it intends to end the work of the U.N.-backed tribunal that last week convicted the last two surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Deputy Prime Minister Sar Kheng said the tribunal's work had been completed and there would not be any additional prosecutions for acts that led to the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million people in the 1970s. The only other person convicted was the regime's prisons chief. He cited the terms under which the tribunal, staffed jointly by Cambodian and international prosecutors and judges, had been established, limiting its targets to senior leaders of the Khmer Rouge regime that was in power from 1975 to 1979. The rules also allow prosecuting those most responsible for carrying out atrocities. Sar Kheng spoke Saturday at a government ceremony in the northern province of Oddar Meanchey and his remarks were reported Sunday. On Friday, the tribunal convicted and gave life sentences to Nuon Chea, 92, the main Khmer Rouge ideologist and right-hand man to its late leader Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, 87, who was the regime's head of state. The sentences were merged with the life sentences they were already serving after an earlier conviction for crimes against humanity. In nine years of hearings and at a cost exceeding $300 million, the tribunal has convicted only one other defendant, Kaing Guek Eav, alias Duch, who as head of the Khmer Rouge prison system ran the infamous Tuol Sleng torture center in Phnom Penh. Cases of four more suspects, middle-ranking members of the Khmer Rouge, had already been processed for prosecution but have been scuttled or stalled. Without the cooperation of the Cambodian members of the tribunal, no cases can go forward. Long-serving Prime Minister Hun Sen has repeatedly declared there would be no more prosecutions, claiming they could cause unrest. Hun Sen himself was a midlevel commander with the Khmer Rouge before defecting while the group was still in power, and several senior members of his ruling Cambodian People's Party share similar backgrounds. He helped cement his political control by making alliances with other former Khmer Rouge commanders. In his remarks, Sar Kheng sought to reassure former Khmer Rouge members that they would not face prosecution. 'Because there are some former Khmer Rouge officers living in this area, I would like to clarify that there will be no more investigations taking place (against lower-ranking Khmer Rouge members), so you don't have to worry,' said Sar Kheng, who is also interior minister. He acknowledged that even without more prosecutions, the tribunal still had to hear the appeals expected to be lodged by Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan, but aside from that task, its work was finished.
  • After a post-election vote fight that showcased vote counting troubles in two south Florida counties, Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) conceded defeat to Gov. Rick Scott (R) on Sunday, ensuring Republican gains in the Senate in the 2018 mid-term elections, and delivering a welcome piece of good post-election news for President Donald Trump and the GOP. “I just spoke with Senator Bill Nelson, who graciously conceded, and I thanked him for his years of public service,” said Scott in a statement. “My focus will not be on looking backward, but on doing exactly what I ran on,” Scott said. “Making Washington Work.” Florida elections officials on Sunday announced a final advantage for Scott of 10,033 votes – that was down from just under 15,000 in favor of Scott when the machine recount began, and lower than the nearly 12,500 edge for the GOP before the hand recount started on Friday. For Republicans, the hard fought win gives them a gain of two seats in the Senate for 2019, as the GOP will have a 53-47 edge, provided they can also win a special runoff election for Senate in Mississippi after Thanksgiving. The Scott victory was a rare piece of good news for Republicans since Election Day, as the GOP has lost a number of close House races in recent days. Democrats have now gained 37 seats in the House, with five GOP seats still undecided amid continued vote counting. Nelson becomes the fifth U.S. Senator to lose in November, joining three other Democrats – McCaskill in Missouri, Heitkamp in North Dakota, and Donnelly in Indiana – along with one Republican Senator, Heller in Nevada. While 5 Senators were tossed out by the voters in November, 27 House members – all Republicans – have been defeated. Several more could still lose in the five remaining House contests which are undecided. Hanging over the defeat for Nelson is what appears to have been a ballot design problem in one small part of Broward County, Florida, where thousands of voters did not cast a vote in the U.S. Senate race, which happened at a much higher rate than other areas in that county. The Florida Senate count is at Scott+10,033, right around the margin where the Broward County undervote/bad ballot design could have been decisive. We may never know https://t.co/Gg14C1heaV — Nate Cohn (@Nate_Cohn) November 18, 2018 The ‘undervote’ problems in that area of Broward County were just part of a slew of post-election issues highlighted by the wrangling over the final tally in both the Florida Senate and Florida Governor’s race.
  • Over a week after being publicly ridiculed for losing her seat in Congress by President Donald Trump, Rep. Mia Love (R-UT) on Friday night was on the verge of pulling off a stunning comeback in her re-election bid, as the continued counting of ballots in her Utah district finally pushed her into the lead by a slender 419 votes. “Hard to see how she relinquishes that now,” said Dave Wasserman, an elections expert who has been forecasting a possible comeback by Love for several days. Still being tabulated are thousands of provisional ballots in Utah and Salt Lake counties, which take time to verify, as Utah and a number of other states slowly push their way through the votes of the November mid-term elections. The jump into first place for Love came as a judge tossed out a lawsuit that she filed – which oddly would have stopped vote counting in Salt Lake County – a move that her opponent said ‘smacks of desperation.’ “Utah voters deserve better than this,” said Democrat Ben McAdams. With the Utah County numbers posting, Rep. Mia Love has taken a 419-vote lead over Ben McAdams. #utpol — #VoteGehrke (@RobertGehrke) November 16, 2018 But the McAdams lead over Love has slowly withered away in recent days, leaving Love favored by many to win re-election. A comeback victory would be filled with irony, especially after the mocking ridicule heaped upon Love and a number of other House Republicans by President Donald Trump, who said the day after the elections that Love and others were defeated because they refused to embrace him. “Mia Love gave me no love and she lost,” the President said, almost seeming to enjoy the outcome. “Too bad. Sorry about that Mia.” President Trump lists Republicans who didn't embrace him and lost. 'They did very poorly. I'm not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it.' 'Mia Love gave me no love and she lost. Too bad. Sorry about that Mia.' pic.twitter.com/ZV7EKcWjLX — CSPAN (@cspan) November 7, 2018 Two weekends after the elections, a small number of races remained undecided – with some that could stretch until after Thanksgiving: FLORIDA SENATE – With a manual recount finishing up, and Florida’s 67 counties waiting through Saturday to deal with any other stray ballots, Gov. Rick Scott (R-FL) seems headed for victory over Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL). This will give the GOP a big victory, and a 2 seat margin in the U.S. Senate. From a statistical/electoral/historical perspective, Scott's defeat of Nelson is pretty much unmatched in recent political history. Beating a swing state opposition party senator without a hint of scandal in a midterm… It's quite impressive. — (((Harry Enten))) (@ForecasterEnten) November 17, 2018 CALIFORNIA 39 – This is the first of six (or maybe seven) undecided House races. After holding the lead for days, Republican Young Kim has now been swamped by late votes coming from both Orange and Los Angeles counties, and now trails Democrat Gil Cisneros by over 3,000 votes. This should complete what is a total GOP wipeout in Orange County, as Democrats would gain six GOP seats in the Golden State. Congressional districts in Orange County, Calif. in 2016 and in 2018 pic.twitter.com/TWRQ1pPzS4 — Morning Joe (@Morning_Joe) November 16, 2018 CALIFORNIA 21 – This seat has already been called by the AP and other news organizations for the Republicans, but as the votes keep coming in, Rep. David Valadao’s lead keeps shrinking, and some wonder if he can hold on. This might be a long shot, but it bears watching. It’s hard to fathom that Democrats could gain a seventh seat in California. We've been watching CA-21 like a hawk for more than a week now, and the chance for Democrat T J Cox to catch up to Valadao has gone from remote but intriguingly possibile to plausible. We're moving this one to our uncalled races tab. https://t.co/FeGWU7SsoE — Daniel Donner (@donnermaps) November 17, 2018 UTAH 4 – As mentioned above, Rep. Mia Love (R-UT) now has the lead. This would be a big save for Republicans, who have had very little to cheer about in the past 10 days since the elections. In fact, there has been an almost daily drumbeat of Democratic victories each night since then, as they edge closer to a possible pickup of almost 40 House seats, their largest gains since 1974 after Watergate. BREAKING: As expected, #UT04 GOP Rep. Mia Love (R) has pulled into the lead over Ben McAdams (D) by 419 votes. Hard to see how she relinquishes it now. https://t.co/nfsptUdHiN — Dave Wasserman (@Redistrict) November 16, 2018 NEW YORK 22 – This seat can probably be called for the Democrats by the AP and other organizations, as absentee ballot counts on Friday went clearly for Democrat Anthony Brindisi, leaving Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-NY) behind by over 3,000 votes in this northern New York district. This is not a spot where the GOP should have lost. @Redistrict Brindisi lead in NY22 has surged to more 3000 votes! I see no path to victory for Tenney. She's falling further behind as more ballots are counted, that's a losing combination, a larger deficit, and fewer votes left to count. https://t.co/ae1Ny8Osws — Kevin O'Connell (@Kevtoco) November 17, 2018 NEW YORK 27 – Indicted Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) still leads by over 1,000 votes in this western New York district, with one big cache of absentee ballots and provisionals to count next Tuesday around Buffalo. Democrat Nate McMurray has been winning a majority of absentee ballots in recent days in counties where he lost the Election Day vote, making some wonder if he has a chance to win this race at the last minute next week. This is the equivalent of betting a horse that’s maybe 9-1. It might win. Nate McMurray continues to gain ground in counties that he lost to Rep. Chris Collins in. Biggest test will be Tuesday when the Erie County absentee and affidavit votes will be counted. https://t.co/f5nincKkZx — WGRZ (@WGRZ) November 16, 2018 GEORGIA 7 – While the race for Governor is over, Rep. Rob Woodall (R-GA) has a 419 vote edge in this suburban Atlanta district, with all of the votes counted. Democratic challenger Carolyn Bourdeaux announced on Friday afternoon that she would ask for a recount. While a recount doesn’t usually switch the outcome, we have certainly seen in Florida and other states in recent days where there are tabulation errors uncovered – so you can’t say this is in the bag for the GOP – but they are favored. News: We will file for a recount of the 7th district race. With a margin of only 419 votes (0.14%), we want to make sure every vote was counted correctly & fairly. It is crucial that every eligible vote is counted & every voice is heard. #GA07 #GAPol — Carolyn Bourdeaux (@Carolyn4GA7) November 16, 2018 TEXAS 23 – Even though she’s behind by just under 1,000 votes, Cindy Ortiz Jones spent the week in Washington going through freshman orientation, but that may not work out for the Texas Democrat, as Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX) seems like he’s in good position in this race, leading by 0.5 percent. Hurd’s people on Friday were declaring victory, but it wasn’t clear if Jones would press for any kind of vote review. Republicans are favored to hold on to this border district, but it was much closer than anyone had predicted. Bexar County has finished counting, leaving only six votes left to count (Kinney & Upton). @WillHurd has won by 928 votes, this race is over #TX23 — Connor Pfeiffer (@ConnorPfeiffer) November 16, 2018 Democrats right now have a net gain of 36 seats – they should win at least two of the undecided races left, and have an outside chance at others. Right now, the new Congress stands at 231 Democrats to 198 Republicans, with six seats undecided. One final note – this extended time of vote counting is totally normal. Reporters follow it every two years, but many partisans think there is something amiss.
  • Deputies say Rick Swan’s body was found in a burned travel trailer east of Claremore on Thursday. Investigators tracked down Kevin Foster, the victim’s stepson at his home in Bixby and arrested him for first degree murder and first degree arson. “He certainly denied the fact that he had been in Claremore yesterday,” said Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton. “And we know by multiple sources and video that he was.” Sheriff Walton says it was well known that Foster and Swan had been in a feud.
  • A public memorial service is scheduled for country music star Roy Clark. His longtime manager, Jim Halsey, says the service will be at Rhema Bible Church in Broken Arrow on November 21st. Clark passed away yesterday at his Tulsa home after complications from pneumonia. He was 85-years-old. The legend was known for his music and his 24 years on Hee Haw. KRMG will be at the memorial. Tune to NEWS102.3 and AM740 KRMG for the latest.  
  • Ironically, the 2018 edition of the Blue Dome Arts Festival was the largest, best-attended, and by all accounts most successful in the event’s 15-year run. But when Jo and Chris Armstrong saw the sign go up that Santa Fe Square has begun leasing spaces, they knew that was the last nail in the coffin. “That’s great for Tulsa, it’s great for the Blue Dome District.  As a business owner down here, it’ll be great for our business, I’m certain of that. For the festival, it means more construction,” Jo Armstrong told KRMG Friday. More construction, and less space. The hotel which just opened nearby would have closed off a quarter of the space the BDAF once had. And while the Armstrongs considered moving the festival, they decided it just wouldn’t feel right. “If we move it, it’s just not the same. It’s not the Blue Dome Arts Festival. It’s more than the fact that we use the Blue Dome as our office. It’s that it’s this iconic landmark that is the heart of the festival, and it’s important to be near it. We could shrink the festival down and do things very, very differently, but unfortunately still yet the festival is diminished, and it’s only going to get more and more so while this stuff is happening for now, until new things can be figured out... potentially... maybe.” Another complication is the state’s new liquor laws, which no longer allow for “low-point” beer consumers to leave the premises from which it was purchased. That means they would have had to fence in the entire festival, at great cost, and face fines for every individual citation issued. She says while she knows closing the festival is the right decision, that doesn’t make it any easier. “This has been a hard day,” she said. “I’m not gonna lie.”