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    Actress and comedian Tina Fey has made a surprise visit to her former Pennsylvania high school. District officials say Fey stopped by Upper Darby High School in Upper Darby Wednesday to film a promotional video for her Broadway musical 'Mean Girls.' Fey graduated from Upper Darby in 1988, and she previously said her time there loosely inspired the 2004 'Mean Girls' film. The district welcomed the actress in a Facebook post, saying 'Once a Royal, Always a Royal.' Fey spoke with students who had seen the musical during her visit, and she was serenaded by the school's Encore Singers. Fey called the singing, 'beautiful.' 'Mean Girls' has received 12 Tony Award nominations, including Best Musical and Best Book of a Musical. The awards will be given out in June.
  • Actor Morgan Freeman has been accused of inappropriate behavior and harassment by at least eight women, CNN reported Thursday. >> Read more trending news Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • Cyclone Mekunu pounded the Yemeni island of Socotra in the Arabian Sea on Thursday morning, lashing it with heavy rain and strong winds as the powerful storm remained on a path to strike Oman this weekend. At least 17 people were reported missing. With winds now gusting up to 160 kph (100 mph), meteorologists expected the 'very severe' cyclone to strike Oman on Saturday near Salalah, the sultanate's third-largest city and home to some 200,000 people near the country's border with Yemen. 'It is very likely to intensify further during next 24 hours,' India's Meteorological Department warned in a bulletin Thursday. It said gusts from the storm will likely reach 190 kph (118 mph) by Saturday. Yemen's pro-government SABA news agency reported that 17 people were missing after two ships capsized in the storm and three vehicles washed away. It said Yemen's government, exiled in Saudi Arabia, had declared Socotra a 'disaster' zone after the storm. Images circulated online from Socotra show soaking wet residents attempting to find shelter from the storm. The photos and video footage, which went viral Thursday, show strong winds with rain, flash flooding and mudslides. Mohammed al-Arqabi, a resident of the island who works as a local journalist, described the situation as 'very bad,' saying 'the water level has greatly increased, and floods are everywhere ... washing away cars.' 'More than 200 families have been displaced from their homes in the suburbs of Hadibu and areas close to the northern coast,' he said. 'Two Indian cargo ships have gone missing, losing five of their crew members.' Rajeh Bady, a spokesman for the exiled government, said the island was in need of 'urgent' aid, according to SABA. The island, listed by UNESCO as a world natural heritage site, has been the focus of a dispute between the United Arab Emirates and Yemen's internationally recognized government amid that country's war after Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, seized the Yemeni capital, Sanaa. Saudi troops recently deployed on Socotra as a confidence-building measure over complaints by Yemen's government that the UAE deployed troops there without its permission. Socotra has a unique ecosystem and is home to rare species of plants, land snail and reptile species that can be found nowhere else around the planet. It is known for its flower-and-fruit-bearing dragon blood tree, which resembles an umbrella and gets its name from the dark red sap it secretes. Socotra hosts endangered species of land and sea birds and its waters hold hundreds of distinctive species of reef-building corals and fish. A cyclone is the same as a hurricane or a typhoon; their names only change because of their location. Hurricanes are spawned east of the international date line. Typhoons develop west of the line. They are known as cyclones in the Indian Ocean and Australia. Seasonal rains are nothing unusual for southern Oman this time of year. While the rest of the Arabian Peninsula bakes in areas where temperatures near 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit), those in the sleepy port city of Salalah enjoy rainy weather that sees fog and cool air at wrap around its lush mountainsides. Temperatures drop down around 25 degrees Celsius (77 degrees Fahrenheit) during its annual monsoon festival. Powerful cyclones, however, are rare. Over a roughly 100-year period ending in 1996, only 17 recorded cyclones struck Oman. In 2007, Cyclone Gonu tore through the sultanate and later even reached Iran, causing $4 billion in damage in Oman alone and killing over 70 people across the Mideast. The last hurricane-strength storm to strike within 100 miles (160 kilometers) of Salalah came in May 1959, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's archives. However, that cyclone was categorized as a Category 1 hurricane, meaning it only had winds of up to 95 mph (152 kph). Mekunu, which means 'mullet' in Dhivehi, the language spoken in the Maldives, is on track to potentially be as powerful as a Category 3 hurricane. Ahead of the storm, Omani media reported lines at gas stations in Salalah, the hometown of Oman's longtime ruler, Sultan Qaboos bin Said. The Royal Oman Police urged citizens to seek safety and warned that floods were likely in valleys. It also said it planned to deploy more ambulances and police officers to areas likely to be affected by the cyclone. Also, the Health Ministry said it evacuated critically ill patients at locations of the Sultan Qaboos Hospital in Salalah, flying them by air north to Muscat, the country's capital. State television aired images of others being evacuated from remote villages in the path of the cyclone. The port of Salalah, crucial to Qatar amid a boycott by four Arab nations over a diplomatic spat with Doha, said it also had taken precautions and secured cranes ahead of the cyclone. ___ Associated Press writers Menna Zaki and Maggie Michael in Cairo contributed to this report. ___ Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jongambrellAP . His work can be found at http://apne.ws/2galNpz .
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump canceling his planned summit with North Korea (all times local): 11:15 a.m. South Korean President Moon Jae-in's office says it is trying to figure out President Donald Trump's intentions in canceling a summit next month with North Korea's leader. Moon played a prominent role in planning for the summit with Kim Jong Un, which was scheduled for June 12 in Singapore. South Korea's Yonhap News Agency quoted a presidential office spokesman as saying they 'are trying to figure out what President Trump's intention is and the exact meaning of it.' Trump released a letter to Kim on Thursday saying he had canceled the summit because of 'tremendous anger and open hostility' expressed in a recent North Korean statement. He did not elaborate, but a North Korean vice minister of foreign affairs issued a statement referring to comments by U.S. Vice President Mike Pence as 'ignorant' and 'stupid,' and saying North Korea is just as ready to meet in a nuclear confrontation as at the negotiating table. ___ 11:05 a.m. A Republican senator often critical of Donald Trump says the president 'made the right call' in canceling a summit with North Korea's leader. Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska says Kim Jong Un is a 'murderous despot and habitual liar.' Sasse is often critical of Trump but is siding with the president on his decision Thursday to pull out of the summit that had been planned for June 12 in Singapore. Trump cited recent aggressive statements from Kim's government for his decision to cancel the meeting. Sasse adds in a statement that if North Korea wants diplomacy, 'it should know that half-measures and spin about its nuclear program won't cut it.' Sasse is a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, ___ 10:55 a.m. The U.N. chief says he is 'deeply concerned' by the cancellation of the planned summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un. Antonio Guterres told an audience at the University of Geneva on Thursday that he was urging the parties to keep working 'to find a path to the peaceful and verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.' Guterres' comments came as he laid out his disarmament agenda, warning that nuclear agreements between states have been threatened like never before. Trump announced Thursday that he was canceling the June 12 summit in Singapore with Kim following hostile comments. Overnight, Kim's government threatened nuclear confrontation and called Vice President Mike Pence a 'political dummy.' ___ 10:45 a.m. House Speaker Paul Ryan says achieving a peaceful resolution to the nuclear standoff on the Korean Peninsula will require 'a much greater degree of seriousness' from Kim Jong Un. President Donald Trump announced Thursday that he has canceled a June 12 summit in Singapore with the North Korean leader, citing hostile comments from Kim. Overnight, Kim's government threatened nuclear confrontation and called Vice President Mike Pence a 'political dummy.' Ryan says in a statement Thursday that Kim's government has long given ample reason to question its commitment to stability. The Republican says that, until a peaceful resolution is achieved, Congress has provided 'significant tools' to hold North Korea accountable. Ryan says the U.S. must continue the 'maximum pressure' campaign that Trump and others say brought North Korea to the table in the first place. ___ 10:35 a.m. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says North Korea did not respond to repeated requests from U.S. officials to discuss logistics for the now-canceled summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Pompeo told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Thursday that the lack of response was an additional reason for Trump's decision to call off the meeting. Trump cited recent bellicose comments from the North in a letter to Kim released by the White House. Pompeo says: 'We had received no response to our inquiries from them.' Pompeo says the North's attitude changed markedly since he returned from a trip to Pyongyang earlier this month, when he met with Kim and secured the release of three American prisoners being held there. ___ 10:30 a.m. A senior Democratic senator says President Donald Trump's withdrawal from a planned summit with North Korea shows the consequence of his failure to prepare properly. Sen. Bob Menendez of New Jersey said Thursday that the withdrawal shows 'the art of diplomacy is a lot harder than the art of the deal.' The top-ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee says it's 'pretty amazing' that Trump's Republican administration would be shocked that North Korea 'is acting as North Korea might very well normally act.' He adds: 'I'm not sure that constantly quoting the Libya model is the diplomatic way to try to get to the results that we seek in North Korea because that didn't work out too well for Gadhafi.' Menendez was speaking Thursday at a committee hearing attended by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. ___ 10:05 a.m. President Donald Trump says North Korea's leader should not 'hesitate to call me or write' if he changes his mind about their now-canceled summit. Trump announced Thursday that he had canceled a summit planned with Kim Jong Un in Singapore on June 12. Trump released a letter to Kim saying his decision was based on 'the tremendous anger and open hostility' in Kim's most recent statement. Trump did not explain what triggered his decision. But in a statement, the North Korean government had referred to Vice President Mike Pence as a 'political dummy' and said it is just as ready to meet in a nuclear confrontation as at the negotiating table. But Trump tells Kim 'please do not hesitate to call me or write' should he change his mind about a one-on-one meeting. ___ 10 a.m. President Donald Trump is telling North Korea's Kim Jong Un in a letter that the world is losing a 'great opportunity for lasting peace and great prosperity and wealth' now that their summit has been canceled. Trump on Thursday canceled the planned June 12 summit in Singapore with Kim, citing the 'tremendous anger and open hostility' in a recent statement from North Korea. In the statement, the North Korean government referred to Vice President Mike Pence as a 'political dummy' and said it is just as ready to meet in a nuclear confrontation as at the negotiating table. Trump says in the letter: 'This missed opportunity is a truly sad moment in history.' ___ 9:50 a.m. President Donald Trump is canceling the planned June 12 summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, citing the 'tremendous anger and open hostility' in a recent statement from North Korea. Trump says in a letter to Kim released Thursday by the White House that based on the statement, he felt it was 'inappropriate, at this time, to have this long-planned meeting.' The president says the North Koreans talk about their nuclear capabilities, 'but ours are so massive and powerful that I pray to God they will never have to be used.
  • The U.N. chief said Thursday he is 'deeply concerned' by the cancellation of the planned summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un. Antonio Guterres told an audience at the University of Geneva that he was urging the parties to keep working 'to find a path to the peaceful and verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.' Guterres' comments came as he laid out his disarmament agenda Thursday, warning that nuclear agreements between states are threatened like never before. He said nuclear powers must do more to promote disarmament, putting a particular onus on Russia and the United States to remedy a world 'going backwards' in this area since right after the Cold War. He welcomed efforts by the European Union and others to stick to the nuclear deal with Iran that Washington has abandoned. Guterres' plan offers broad ambitions, from curbing growth in conventional weapons to addressing the prospect of artificial intelligence in war machines. He announced he was launching a new initiative to combat the illicit circulation and trade in small arms within countries and across borders. 'Disarmament concerns every country, and all weapons, from hand grenades to H-bombs,' he said. 'Deadly weapons put us all at risk and leaders have a responsibility to minimize that risk.' While Guterres said all nuclear-armed states have 'primary responsibility' for disarmament and nonproliferation efforts, he called on the U.S. and Russia to end a dispute over the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, to extend the New START treaty on strategic, offensive weapons, and to do more to cut their nuclear stockpiles. He noted there are no bilateral talks between Moscow and Washington right now on greater nuclear-arms reductions. He bemoaned the expansionist ambitions of arms traders, rising military weapons production and the buildup of 'massive stockpiles' of conventional weapons — especially in conflict-prone zones. He said the 'total elimination' of nuclear weapons remains the U.N.'s top priority on disarmament, but efforts toward that goal are in 'severe crisis.' Since the immediate aftermath of the Cold War, when deals reduced nuclear arsenals and banned nuclear testing, 'our world is going backwards,' he said.
  • Algeria's government denies any human rights abuses against African migrants who have been expelled from the country in large numbers, refuting U.N. allegations. The country's foreign affairs ministry said in a statement Thursday that Algeria was carrying out the expulsions according to both its own laws and international obligations and denounced the allegations as a concerted campaign by non-governmental organizations that have unfairly damaged the country's relationship with its southern neighbors. The U.N. High Commission on Human Rights has called on Algeria to stop the mass expulsions, saying they violate international human rights law.
  • The House has passed a $717 billion defense policy bill that would give the military a 2.6 percent pay hike, the largest in nine years. The bipartisan 351-66 vote sends the measure to the Senate, where a key panel completed a companion measure in a closed-door session on Wednesday. The annual measure sets policies and a budget outline for the Pentagon that are funded by a subsequent appropriations bill that typically follows its parameters fairly closely. The military got a major budget increase under the terms of a bipartisan pact passed earlier this year that the Pentagon's many allies in Washington promise will address shortfalls in military readiness such as pilot training, maintenance of equipment, and procurement of new weapons systems.
  • Police in Gwinnett County, Georgia, are searching for the person who they say shot and killed a teenager on a basketball court, WSB reports. Witnesses told investigators the argument started over a football when the suspect pulled out a gun, according to WSB. The teen suffered from multiple gunshot wounds and died on the way to the hospital. >> Read more trending news  “I just heard gunshots and ran down, and it’s my friend on the ground,” Quentin Wearwood said. Investigators with the Gwinnett County Police Department said the shooting happened Wednesday evening at the Smokecreek Mobile Home Park in unincorporated Snellville.  Investigators said the suspect also pistol-whipped the victim's brother. Witnesses said the suspect fled in light blue Nissan Altima.
  • Preparing for the pride and angst of watching Liverpool contest the biggest game in club football, John Henry is ready to take stock of the often-fraught, eight-year journey as owner. The perilous plight of the club he inherited: The early mistakes as the Boston Red Sox ownership group found its feet in soccer: The challenge of restoring the team to the pinnacle of the European game: And the toughest decisions of them all: Reluctantly selling players adored by supporters. 'Maybe it's because I'm an American, but I have a difficult time understanding why anyone would want to leave Liverpool,' Henry told The Associated Press in an in-depth discussion of the club carried out by email. 'The club is so rich in history and tradition, supported by so many millions around the world, in virtually every country of the world.' That global standing wasn't enough to prevent Barcelona twice in the last four years tempting Liverpool's star forwards, paying around 240 million euros ($280 million) for Luiz Suarez and Philippe Coutinho. 'You don't want to be in the position where players want to go somewhere else, even if it is a great club like Barcelona,' Henry said. 'It's hard to understand why players would want to go to a league where the competition is so weak. They must play 30 or so meaningless matches per year waiting for Champions League matches.' When the final of the Champions League is played on Saturday it will be Liverpool taking on Real Madrid in Kiev's Olympic Stadium. For Coutinho and Suarez, the Champions League ended in the quarterfinals. 'They'll be watching this weekend and could have been playing,' Henry said. 'But (part owner) Mike Gordon, (sporting director) Michael Edwards and everyone in our scouting department have done a terrific job in making the best of those two difficult situations.' 2010 TAKEOVER The squabbling and financial strife of the previous American owners — Tom Hicks and George Gillett Jr. — left Liverpool facing not just relegation from the Premier League but bankruptcy in 2010. It took a court battle instigated by the Royal Bank of Scotland in the midst of a global financial crisis for Henry's Fenway Sports Group to be able to wrest control of the debt-ridden club. In the heat of the October 2010 Merseyside derby — Henry's first game as principal owner — the hazardous state of his new asset was brought home by taunts from rival supporters. Relegation was looming after a 2-0 loss to Everton left Liverpool only off the bottom of the Premier League on goal difference. 'Evertonians were chanting 'You're going down,'' Henry recalled. 'We were 19th at the time, but we managed to stay up despite a lot of early mistakes.' Such as when then-director of football Damien Comolli oversaw the 50 million pounds generated by selling Fernando Torres to Chelsea in 2011 being reinvested in paying 35 million pounds on an unproven Andy Carroll, who was blighted by injuries. 'Football isn't easy,' Henry said, 'and building from that squad, if you remember that squad, took a lot time.' TRANSFORMING THE CLUB While fan unrest was dissipated with the return of an Anfield hero as manager, Kenny Dalglish was only a short-term fix. Unity had been restored but it took Brendan Rodgers to come within touching distance of winning the Premier League in 2014. Rodgers was fired in October 2015, but FSG was working behind the scenes to create an appealing environment to attract Juergen Klopp, one of the new generation of super coaches who won the Bundesliga twice with Borussia Dortmund. 'It took Michael Edwards winning more and more of the battles internally to get us to the point that when we met with Juergen he said, 'I really want to coach this group. This will be fun,'' Henry said. Boisterous on the sidelines, Klopp ensured his team was similarly expressive on the pitch with high-energy, attacking football. There have been setbacks: An eighth-place finish and Europa League final loss meant Liverpool failed to return to the Champions League in 2016. But given Liverpool has not even featured in the Champions League in consecutive seasons over the last decade, it represents unexpected progress under Klopp. 'He has done a tremendous job getting us into this position,' Henry said. 'He has been just as effective in inspiring not just our players but everyone who loves this club. He is an inspired, natural leader who is sensitive to what some might see as small things, but are very important over the long term.' Few expected Klopp to be able to find a way past Manchester City in the Champions League quarterfinals. But Liverpool won home (3-0) and away (2-1) against a formidable City side that went on to win the Premier League by 19 points. 'On European nights I felt like the supporters at Anfield pushed the club past opponents to the point that we were just unbeatable on those nights,' Henry said. 'On away nights the resolve and effort of this group of highly talented players got us to the finals. 'Being in the final is a reflection of the incredible support this club gets at Anfield and the ability (of) Juergen and the entire staff to put our players in the position to be successful. You can do all of that but the players have to step up and they have.' SALAH SURPRISE For all the mistakes Henry acknowledges have been made at Liverpool, decisions can be made with unexpectedly fruitful consequences. None more so than the 50 million euro deal to sign Mohamed Salah from Roma last year. After struggling to make an impact at his first Premier League club — Chelsea — the Egypt forward has been the revelation of the season, netting 44 goals in 51 games for Liverpool to sweep the board of domestic individual honors. 'His record-setting scoring became one of the biggest stories in England this year,' Henry said. 'Perhaps my favorite Anfield songs ever are a couple about Mo. We are proud of more than what he has meant to us on the field. It is highly significant for a global club with a particular set of values to have a huge star who personifies what can be accomplished with unity rather than the divisions among people we see so often these days.' TITLE DROUGHT While Liverpool has more European titles than any other Premier League club, it won the last of its 18 English league titles in 1990 and has been usurped as the most successful domestic team by 20-time winner Manchester United. 'Liverpool has a history in European competition and it may be more important to many of our supporters,' Henry said. 'Is a European championship bigger than an English championship? Most people would say, 'Yes, much more so.' However, in many ways the Premier League is the world's Premier League — there is nothing like it. 'Viewership dwarfs other leagues. Interest in the Premier League is far greater than the Champions League until the last month of the season. Probably because the vast majority of Champions League matches are not compelling for the first few months of the competition.' There's no doubting the final will be captivating when Liverpool's players try to dethrone Madrid, which has won the last two Champions League titles. 'They've been on a mission,' Henry said. 'I expect that will continue this weekend in Kiev.' ___ Rob Harris is at www.twitter.com/RobHarris and www.facebook.com/RobHarrisReports
  • The Latest on Syria developments (all times local): 6:45 p.m. A U.S.-backed Syrian Kurdish group says it has detained a French Islamic State group fighter linked to terror attacks in Paris and Nice in 2015 and 2016. The Syrian Democratic Forces say they captured Adrien Lionel Kiyali on Saturday in a region in north Syria that was recaptured in 2017 from IS control. In a statement Thursday, the SDF said Kiyali was hiding in the region around Raqqa, the former Syria capital of the IS group, and waiting to cross into Turkey and then travel on to Europe. The group says Kiyali crossed into Syria in 2015. French media reported his name as Adrien Guihal. In recordings for the Islamic State group, Guihal claimed responsibility for the July 2016 truck attack in Nice as well as the double killings of two French police officials at their home in Magnanville. The newspaper Liberation reports that Guihal is a convert to Islam who studied Arabic in Egypt and was close to Fabien Clain, another French Islamic State member who himself claimed responsibility for the November 2015 attacks in Paris. ___ 10:45 a.m. A Syria war-monitoring group says at least 12 pro-government fighters were killed in airstrikes the previous night in the country's east. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says none of the fatalities were Syrian nationals but foreign fighters. Syria's government forces have relied on support from the Lebanese militant Hezbollah group and also regional militias organized by Iran to wage war on rebels and Islamic State militants. In Damascus, government media reported early on Thursday that international coalition aircraft struck Syrian army positions near the front lines with IS in eastern Syria. The Observatory says the U.S.-led coalition was likely behind the strikes but the Pentagon said it had 'no information to substantiate those reports.
  • After days of uncertainty about a planned June 12 summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, President Donald Trump on Thursday told Kim in a letter that because of hostile statements from the Pyongyang regime in recent days, the summit in Singapore would not take place. “Sadly, based on the tremendous anger and open hostility displayed in your most recent statement, I feel it is in appropriate, at this time, to have this long-planned meeting,” the President wrote in his letter to Kim. The decision came as North Korean officials seemed to back away from public assurances that they would give up on their nuclear weapons program, which had been Mr. Trump’s demand from the start – as the President delivered a clear warning to Kim about a possible conflict. “You talk about your nuclear capabilities, but ours are so massive and powerful that I pray to God they will never have to be used,” Mr. Trump wrote. Here is the President’s letter to Kim Jong Un.
  • You normally don’t need much more than the New York Yankees visiting Globe Life Park  to make for a fun evening at the ballpark. But when President George Bush is sitting near the dugout, and heckles a likeness of himself, things ramp up a bit. Near the end of a between innings race between Texas Legends, the President Bush character trailed those of Sam Houston and Nolan Ryan. When the ballonish mascot passed the president's box, Bush leaned forward and shouted “get moving.” That spurred the duplicate W to speed up and win the race. See the video below. The Rangers won a slug-fest over the Yankees, 12-10.
  • President Donald Trump renewed his attacks on how investigators dealt with allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 elections and any links to his campaign, as he again charged that top officials at the FBI had committed misconduct, led by former FBI Director James Comey. “The FBI is a fantastic institution but some of the people at the top were rotten apples,” the President said. “James Comey was one of them.” “I’ve done a great service for this country by getting rid of him,” the President said in a recorded interview aired on the Fox News morning program, “Fox and Friends.” Mr. Trump and his allies have been on a public blitz in recent days against the Russia probe, trying to cast the actions of the FBI – and the Obama Administration – as an effort to infiltrate his campaign, in order to dummy up charges of collusion against his campaign and top aides. “The firing of Comey is a good thing”: President @realDonaldTrump discusses former FBI Dir. James Comey & possible spying by the FBI pic.twitter.com/7J4lS7PG40 — FOX & friends (@foxandfriends) May 24, 2018 Democrats though point out that while the FBI was investigating the Trump Campaign during the 2016 election, news of it never leaked, even as Comey was publicly inserting himself into the campaign with announcements about Hillary Clinton and her email troubles. On Thursday afternoon, officials at the Justice Department will brief lawmakers in both parties about how the FBI used an informant to check out reports of ties between Russia and the Trump Campaign in 2016. Originally, only House GOP lawmakers were going to be involved, but protests from Senators forced that to change; the briefings will involve the FBI Director, the Deputy Attorney General, and the Director of National Intelligence. Those three officials met earlier this week with President Trump at the White House, as Mr. Trump has charged the FBI basically planted a ‘spy’ in his campaign, an allegation that has so far gained little traction outside a group of more conservative House Republicans. As for Special Counsel Robert Mueller, his office provided an update of sorts on the investigation while submitting documents to a federal judge handling criminal charges against Paul Manafort, once the head of the Trump Campaign in 2016. “The Special Counsel’s conduct of the investigation remains ongoing,” the Mueller team reported, saying the probe continues to look at “links and/or coordination between Russia and individuals affiliated with the campaign of President Trump.” “The investigation is not complete and its details remain non-public,” the Special Counsel’s office stated, in arguing against the public release of search warrants involved in the Manafort case. Meanwhile on Wednesday, Mueller’s office started moving toward the final stages in the guilty plea of one-time foreign policy advisor George Papadopoulos. “The parties respectfully request that the Court refer this case for the preparation of a presentence investigation report, and that the parties provide a joint status report within thirty days, no later than June 22, 2018,” the two sides agreed in a court document. Legal experts said that showed the feds were ready to have Papadopoulos sentenced, and that he likely had no more information to offer to investigators. Papadopoulos pleaded guilty in October 2017 to lying to investigators, when asked about Russian contacts who had told him they had negative information on Hillary Clinton. The Special Counsel’s office outlined their indictments and guilty pleas this way in their Manafort case submission:
  • President Donald Trump will discuss North Korea, immigration and the NFL's new policy on national anthem protests in an interview airing this morning on Fox News' 'Fox and Friends.' >> PREVIOUSLY: Trump slams Comey, DOJ in wide-ranging 'Fox & Friends' interview Brian Kilmeade's interview with Trump was taped Wednesday in Bethpage, New York, after the president appeared at a forum about MS-13, The Hill reported.  Trump tweeted about the interview Wednesday night. >> Read more trending news  'Will be interviewed on @foxandfriends tomorrow morning at 6:00 A.M. Enjoy!' he wrote. >> See the tweet here Please return for updates.
  • The National Weather Service issued issued a Severe Thunderstorm Warning Tulsa Creek and Rogers counties until 6:15 Wednesday evening.  Meteorologists say the biggest hazard with the storm is 60 mph wind gusts and quarter size hail. Tune to NEWS102.3 and AM740 KRMG for the latest on the severe weather threat.