ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
55°
Sunny
H 61° L 40°
  • clear-night
    55°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 61° L 40°
  • clear-day
    58°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 61° L 40°
  • clear-day
    61°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 66° L 38°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Top Stories

    James Harden scored 57 points but the Memphis Grizzlies outlasted Houston 126-125 in overtime Wednesday night, handing the Rockets only their second loss in the last 14 games. Mike Conley scored 35 points for Memphis and Jonas Valanciunas had a career-best 33, including the game-winning free throw with less than a second left. Valanciunas made the first of two free throws with 0.1 seconds remaining after he was fouled by Clint Capela under the Grizzlies basket. The clock ran out after Valanciunas, who also had 15 rebounds, missed the second foul shot. Harden scored 15 during a 17-2 fourth-quarter burst that helped the Rockets tie the game at 115 at the end of regulation. Harden's three free throws with 4 seconds left tied it. Conley ended the night 12 of 23 from the field, including 6 for 9 from outside the 3-point arc. Valanciunas made 10 of 19 shots from the floor and was 13 of 17 at the foul line. Harden, who added eight assists, scored 28 points in the fourth quarter and overtime. Chris Paul had 18 points and seven assists for Houston, which had won three straight. Capela added 14 points and 10 rebounds. TIP-INS Rockets: Eric Gordon (rest) was given the night off, and Kenneth Faried sat out with left knee soreness. . Harden's streak of five straight double-doubles ended. ... Houston won the season series 3-1. Grizzlies: Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel, signed recently by the Memphis Express of the Alliance of American Football, attended the game. . Memphis was already dealing with numerous injuries to key players when earlier this week CJ Miles was declared out for the season with a stress reaction to his left foot. Avery Bradley was ruled out Wednesday with a bruised right shin. The team will re-evaluate the injury in a week. . With Bradley out, Delon Wright started his third game since joining Memphis at the trade deadline. ... Conley has scored at least 20 points in six straight games, matching the longest such streak of his career. UP NEXT Rockets: Host the San Antonio Spurs on Friday. Grizzlies: At the Orlando Magic on Friday. ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/tag/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The winning numbers in Wednesday evening's drawing of the 'Powerball' game were: 10-14-50-53-63, Powerball: 21, Power Play: 2 (ten, fourteen, fifty, fifty-three, sixty-three; Powerball: twenty-one; Power Play: two) ¶ ___ ¶ Online: ¶ Multi-State Lottery Association: http://www.powerball.com/
  • Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced an immediate ban Thursday on semi-automatic and automatic weapons like the ones used in the attacks on two mosques in Christchurch that killed 50 worshippers. The man charged in the attack had purchased his weapons legally using a standard firearms license and enhanced their capacity by using 30-round magazines 'done easily through a simple online purchase,' she said. 'Every semi-automatic weapon used in the terrorist attack on Friday will be banned,' she said. Ardern's announcement comes less than a week after the killings, as more of the dead were being buried. At least six funerals took place Thursday, including for a teenager, a youth soccer coach and a Muslim convert who loved connecting with other women at the mosque. Cashmere High School student Sayyad Ahmad Milne, 14, was known as an outgoing boy and the school's futsal goalkeeper. Tariq Rashid Omar, 24, graduated from the same school, played soccer in the summer and was a beloved coach of several youth teams. In a post on Facebook, Christchurch United Football Club Academy Director Colin Williamson described Omar as 'a beautiful human being with a tremendous heart and love for coaching.' Linda Armstrong, 64, a third-generation New Zealander who converted to Islam in her 50s, was also buried, as were Hussein Mohamed Khalil Moustafa, 70, Matiullah Safi, 55, and Haji Mohammed Daoud Nabi. Families of those killed had been awaiting word on when they could bury their loved ones. Police Commissioner Mike Bush said authorities have formally identified and released the remains of 21 victims. Islamic tradition calls for bodies to be cleansed and buried as soon as possible. An Australian white supremacist, Brenton Harrison Tarrant, was run off the road and arrested by police while he was believed to be on his way to a third target. He had livestreamed the attack on Facebook and said in his manifesto he planned to attack three mosques. Tarrant, 28, is next scheduled to appear in court on April 5. Police have said they are certain Tarrant was the only gunman but are still investigating whether he had support. Meanwhile, preparations were underway for a massive Friday prayer service to be led by the imam of one of the two New Zealand mosques where worshippers were killed. Imam Gamal Fouda said he is expecting 3,000 to 4,000 people at Friday's prayer service, including many who have come from abroad. He expects it will take place in Hagley Park, a city landmark across from Al Noor mosque with members of the Linwood mosque also attending. Al Noor workers have been trying feverishly to repair the destruction at the mosque, Fouda said. 'They will bury the carpet,' he said. 'Because it is full of blood, and it's contaminated.' Fouda said that he expects the mosque to be ready to open again by next week and that some skilled workers had offered their services for free. 'The support we have been getting from New Zealand and the community has been amazing,' he said. As the investigation continues into the attack, Ardern has also said an inquiry would look into intelligence and security services' failures to detect the risk from the attacker or his plans. Ardern said Thursday the government is working on a large-scale buy-back plan to encourage owners of now-banned weapons to surrender them. She did not say what would happen to those who violate the law. She also said she and the Cabinet would work through legal exemptions to the ban, such as for farmers needing to cull their herds but said any exemptions would be 'tightly regulated.' 'For other dealers, sales should essentially now cease. My expectation is that these weapons will now be returned to your suppliers and never enter into the New Zealand market again,' she said
  • Scheduling glitches led an immigration judge to deny the Trump administration's request to order four Central American migrants deported because they failed to show for initial hearings Wednesday in the U.S. while being forced to wait in Mexico. The judge's refusal was a setback for the administration's highly touted initiative to make asylum seekers wait in Mexico while their cases wind through U.S. immigration courts. One migrant came to court with a notice to appear on Saturday, March 30 and said he later learned that he was supposed to show up Wednesday. He reported in the morning to U.S. authorities at the main crossing between San Diego and Tijuana. 'I almost didn't make it because I had two dates,' he said. Similar snafus marred the first hearings last week when migrants who were initially told to show up Tuesday had their dates bumped up several days. Judge Scott Simpson told administration lawyers to file a brief by April 10 that explains how it can assure migrants are properly notified of appointments. The judge postponed initial appearances for the four no-shows to April 22, which raised more questions about they would learn about the new date. Government documents had no street address for the four men in Tijuana and indicated that correspondence was to be sent to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Simpson asked how the administration would alert them. 'I don't have a response to that,' said Robert Wities, an attorney for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. At least two others were given notices to appear Tuesday but, when they showed up at the border, were told by U.S. authorities that they were not on the schedule that day. Their attorneys quickly got new dates for Wednesday but Mexico refused to take them back, forcing them to stay overnight in U.S. custody. Laura Sanchez, an attorney for one of the men, said she called a court toll-free number to confirm her client's initial hearing Tuesday but his name didn't appear anywhere in the system. Later, she learned that it was Wednesday. Sanchez said after Wednesday's hearing that she didn't know if Mexico would take her client back. Mexican officials didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. Homeland Security Department representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment late Wednesday. The snafus came two days before a federal judge in San Francisco hears oral arguments to halt enforcement of the 'Migration Protection Protocols' policy in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, Southern Poverty Law Center and Center for Gender & Refugee Studies. The policy shift, which followed months of high-level talks between the U.S. and Mexico, was launched in San Diego on Jan. 29 amid growing numbers of asylum-seeking families from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. Mexicans and children traveling alone are exempt. Families are typically released in the U.S. with notices to appear in court and stay until their cases are resolved, which can take years. The new policy aims to change that by making people wait in Mexico, though it is off to a modest start with 240 migrants being sent back to Tijuana from San Diego in the first six weeks. U.S. officials say they plan to sharply expand the policy across the entire border. Mexican officials have expressed concern about what both governments say is a unilateral move by the Trump administration but has allowed asylum seekers to wait in Mexico with humanitarian visas. U.S. officials call the new policy an unprecedented effort that aims to discourage weak asylum claims and reduce a court backlog of more than 800,000 cases. Several migrants who appeared Wednesday said they fear that waiting in Mexico for their next hearings would jeopardize their personal safety. The government attorney said they would be interviewed by an asylum officer to determine if their concerns justified staying in the U.S. Some told the judge they struggled to find attorneys and were granted more time to find one. Asylum seekers are entitled to legal representation but not at government expense. U.S. authorities give migrants who are returned to Mexico a list of no-cost legal providers in the U.S. but some migrants told the judge that calls went unanswered or they were told that services were unavailable from Mexico. A 48-year-old man said under the judge's questioning that he had headaches and throat ailments. The judge noted that migrants with medical issues are exempt from waiting in Mexico and ordered a medical exam. ___ Associated Press writer Maria Verza in Mexico City contributed to this report.
  • News 1023 an AM740 KRMG plans an InDepth Hour Monday focusing on cyber security and Tulsa’s growing role as a leading market for cyber security innovation. An expert from the University of Tulsa is expected to comment on their leadership in the field and the resulting innovations. Be sure to be listening Monday morning at eight for the InDepth Hour on KRMG.
  • Nick Collison's No. 4 jersey was retired by the Oklahoma City Thunder during a ceremony before their game against the Toronto Raptors on Wednesday night. It's the first number the Thunder have retired since the franchise moved to Oklahoma City in 2008. The Seattle SuperSonics drafted Collison out of Kansas in 2003 and he spent his entire 15-year career with the club. Collison averaged only 5.9 points and 5.2 rebounds per game for Seattle/Oklahoma City, but played a key role in developing the team's Oklahoma City culture and became known as 'Mr. Thunder.' Mayor David Holt declared Wednesday to be 'Nick Collison Day' in Oklahoma City. 'I could never have expected something like this,' Collison said. 'But it's really a special night for me and my family. It's been a long run. To be able to have the career I had here and then have a celebration like that, I feel very fortunate. That kind of goes without saying, but it's amazing for me. It's a good feeling coming back. I don't know how to feel for something like this. It's like nothing can prepare you for it.' Among his former Thunder teammates who attended the ceremony were Kevin Durant of Golden State and Serge Ibaka of the Raptors. Neither were mentioned during Collison's pregame speech, but current Thunder star Russell Westbrook was. 'I used to play with Nick,' Ibaka said. 'He was one of the guys who really helped me in my first year in the league, when I was 19. Playing tonight, the same day they're going to retire his jersey, it's really special.' ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Andrei Vasilevskiy piled up the saves, and the Tampa Bay Lightning and Washington Capitals traded blows in a thrilling potential playoff preview. Vasilevskiy made a franchise-record 54 saves, Nikita Kucherov scored twice and the NHL-leading Lightning won their sixth consecutive game, beating the defending Stanley Cup champion Capitals 5-4 in overtime Wednesday. The frenetic pace, high energy and hatred between the teams that met in last year's Eastern Conference final made a rematch this spring all the more of a tantalizing possibility. 'I'm sure both of us would be very happy to see each other again if it's the Eastern Conference final,' Tampa Bay captain Steven Stamkos said. 'There's a long way to get to that point. We'll hopefully see them.' Victor Hedman scored 3:01 into overtime to keep the Lightning rolling in their first game since clinching the Presidents' Trophy and home-ice advantage throughout the playoffs. Despite nothing to gain in the standings, they managed to pick up two more points against the Metropolitan Division-leading Capitals. Vasilevskiy was on top of his game as Washington set a franchise record with 58 shots and allowed Tampa Bay just 28. He stopped countryman Alex Ovechkin 11 times in one of the finest performances of his career. 'Pretty safe to say who our MVP was tonight,' coach Jon Cooper said. 'He was exceptional. Shame on us for giving up that many scoring chances, especially to a team that played a back to back, but you wake up in the morning and you see the boxscore and it's going to say 5-4 Tampa, but obviously Vasy was a big reason for that.' Kucherov's two goals came on the power play, gave him 37 overall this season and increased his league-leading point total to 119. That's 14 more than the next-closest player, reigning Art Ross Trophy winner Connor McDavid. Anthony Cirelli and Stamkos each took advantage of a Capitals mistake to score, and Stamkos added two assists for a three-point night. The Lightning's league-leading power play that hadn't scored in two games went 3 for 3, and their penalty kill was 5 for 6, thanks in large part to Vasilevskiy. 'Another incredible performance,' defenseman Ryan McDonagh said. 'Definitely wish we played a little bit better in front of him and caused a lot of our havoc and chances against. He stood tall and gave us a great chance to find a way to win a game.' The Capitals picked up a point to build on their division lead because of Evgeny Kuznetsov's tying goal with 52.6 seconds left. Lars Eller, Carl Hagelin and T.J. Oshie also scored, and Braden Holtby allowed five goals on 28 shots as the Lightning beat the Capitals for the second time in five days. 'They're a good team, we're a good team, and it's been two very close games,' Holtby said. 'That's what you want going into playoffs. That's how you can learn the most and grow your team the most.' The teams meet again at Tampa Bay on March 30 and could face off in the Eastern Conference final for the second consecutive year, if each gets through two playoff rounds. 'Oftentimes you'll see teams that have success versus an opponent in the regular season, it doesn't always carry over,' Capitals coach Todd Reirden said. 'It's going to be a good challenge and there's a little bit of animosity and rivalry forming with them. They're fun games for our guys to play.' There's no shortage of bad blood between them already, and that caused the Capitals to suffer what would be a devastating loss. Defenseman Michal Kempny's left leg bent awkwardly as he went down to the ice during a tussle with Cedric Paquette, and he needed help from trainers to get down the tunnel to the locker room. Kempny did not return with what the team called a lower-body injury, and Reirden said 'it's safe to say he's going to miss some time.' In the aftermath of Kempny going down, two unlikely fighters dropped the gloves when Washington's Jakub Vrana and Tampa Bay's Yanni Gourde traded punches. It was a boiling point in a fast-paced, intense clash that didn't seem at all as if the Lightning had nothing to play for. 'Today was a good example of the goods and the bads in our game,' Hedman said. 'When we do all the goods, we are a tough team to play against.' NOTES: Lightning D Dan Girardi was downgraded to out indefinitely with a lower-body injury. Girardi missed his sixth consecutive game, and D Anton Stralman missed his seventh in a row with a lower-body injury. ... Capitals D Brooks Orpik returned to the lineup in place of Christian Djoos after being rested at New Jersey on Tuesday in the first half of the back-to-back set. Djoos could return to the lineup, if Kempny misses any time. UP NEXT Lightning: Make second stop on three-game trip Thursday at the Carolina Hurricanes. Capitals: Continue homestand Friday against former coach Bruce Boudreau and the Minnesota Wild. ___ Follow AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SWhyno ___ More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The body of a 5-year-old California girl was found Wednesday afternoon after she slipped and fell Sunday into the fast-moving Stanislaus River in Knights Ferry and disappeared. >> Read more trending news  Update 10:45 p.m. EDT March 20: Volunteers searching the area found Matilda Ortiz around 4:45 p.m. local time, the Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Department said, and her family has identified her remains. Authorities had begun to reduce the flow of the river in an effort at finding the little girl, who was with her father when she slipped on rocks  and tumbled into the turbulent waters. >> See photos from the scene here Original story: According to the Los Angeles Times, the girl's father and other witnesses tried to save the 5-year-old when she plunged into the Stanislaus River about 5 p.m. Sunday, the Stanislaus County Sheriff's Department said. >> Read more trending news  “Her father went and jumped in the water after her, but because of the water current and how cold it is – it’s really high this time of year – he started struggling, and he was not able to reach his daughter,” department spokesman Royjindar Singh told reporters. Crews used boats and a helicopter to look for the girl, who has not been publicly identified, before halting the search Sunday night, the Times reported. Authorities will start searching again Monday morning. Read more here.
  • Mike Trout and the Los Angeles Angels on Wednesday night announced their 12-year contract, a record deal that ties baseball's top player to the Orange County club for what likely will be the rest of his career. A person with knowledge of the contract told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the deal is worth $432 million, shattering baseball's previous high set when Bryce Harper and Philadelphia struck a $330 million, 13-year agreement earlier in spring training. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal had not yet been finalized. The Angels will celebrate with a public appearance by Trout outside Angel Stadium on Sunday when the team returns from spring training for the first of three exhibitions against the Dodgers. Fans are invited to welcome home the two-time AL MVP, who already ranks among the most accomplished players of his generation. 'This is where I wanted to be all along,' Trout said in a statement. 'I have enjoyed my time as an Angel and look forward to representing the organization, my teammates and our fans for years to come.' Trout also thanked Angels owner Arte Moreno, who avoided two seasons of uncertainty over his superstar center fielder's future by shattering the record for the biggest financial commitment to a player in North American team sports history. 'This is an exciting day for Angels fans and every player who has ever worn an Angels uniform,' Moreno said. 'Mike Trout, an athlete whose accomplishments have placed him among the greatest baseball players in the history of the game, has agreed to wear an Angels uniform for his entire career.' Trout's $36 million average annual value surpasses pitcher Zack Greinke's $34.4 million in a six-year deal with Arizona that started in 2016. Trout will set a baseball record for career earnings at about $513 million, surpassing the roughly $448 million Alex Rodriguez took in with Seattle, Texas and the New York Yankees from 1994-2017 Trout had been due $66.5 million over the next two seasons under his previous deal, a $144.5 million, six-year agreement. He is now under contract to the Angels through the 2030 season, when he will turn 39. Trout had never shown any public interest in leaving the Angels, who drafted him late in the first round in 2009 and fostered his development. But his lifelong ties to the Philadelphia area and the Angels' on-field struggles provided ample fodder for fans wondering whether Trout would leave after his contract expired. The Angels have made the playoffs just once in Trout's seven full big league seasons, which coincide with Albert Pujols' seven-year tenure with the Halos. They were swept by Kansas City in that Division Series in 2014. Los Angeles also is coming off three consecutive losing seasons for the first time since 1992-94, but the Angels' progress under general manager Billy Eppler was enough to persuade Trout to take the deal. The Angels now have two impressive cornerstones in place with Trout and AL Rookie of the Year Shohei Ohtani, who will return as their designated hitter at some point this season. Ohtani won't pitch until 2020 after undergoing Tommy John surgery, but the 24-year-old two-way star is tied to the Angels for at least five more seasons. 'I'm really happy and excited to play with such a great player for a long time,' Ohtani said through an interpreter. 'If anyone deserved such a big contract, it's Mike.' ___ AP freelance writer Carrie Muskat in Tempe, Arizona, contributed to this report. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced an immediate ban on all assault weapons, and “military-style semi-automatic weapons,” like the weapons used in last Friday’s attacks on two Christchurch mosques. >> Read more trending news Ardern announced the ban Thursday and said it would be followed by legislation to be introduced next month. She said the man arrested in the attacks had purchased his weapons legally and enhanced their capacity by using 30-round magazines “done easily through a simple online purchase.” Ardern said a buyback program will be created to pay owners “fair and reasonable compensation” for the soon-to-be outlawed guns. She said that it will cost New Zealand between $100 million and $200 million and the guns would be destroyed according to NPR. Unlicensed gun owners would not be prosecuted for any weapon they turn in.  “Amnesty applies ... we just want the guns back,” Ardern said in a press briefing. “For other dealers, sales should essentially now cease. My expectation is that these weapons will now be returned to your suppliers and never enter into the New Zealand market again,” she said. Ardern did not say what would happen to those who violate the law. >> RELATED: Assault weapon vs. assault rifle: What is the difference? What is an “assault rifle”?  An assault rifle is a rapid-fire, magazine-fed rifle designed for military use. It is a shoulder-fired weapon that allows the shooter to select between semi-automatic (requiring you to pull the trigger for each shot), fully automatic (hold the trigger and the gun continuously fires) or three-shot-burst modes. What is an 'assault weapon?' Technically, there is no such thing. What’s called an assault weapon (or sometimes an assault rifle) in reports on gun violence is a semi-automatic rifle that looks similar to the assault rifles used by the military. An AR-15 rifle, like the ones that have been used in some mass shootings, is an example of this type of weapon. What’s the difference between a semi-automatic and an automatic weapon? An automatic weapon (“assault rifle”) can shoot more than one round when you pull the trigger. A semi-automatic weapon (“assault weapon”) does not.  Automatic weapons have not been used in recent mass shootings. In the shootings in Orlando, Florida; Newtown, Connecticut, and San Bernardino, California, semi-automatic weapons, were the weapons used. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • News 1023 an AM740 KRMG plans an InDepth Hour Monday focusing on cyber security and Tulsa’s growing role as a leading market for cyber security innovation. An expert from the University of Tulsa is expected to comment on their leadership in the field and the resulting innovations. Be sure to be listening Monday morning at eight for the InDepth Hour on KRMG.
  • An independent, non-profit military watchdog group says the F-35 stealth fighter, even after 17 years of testing and billions of dollars spent on development, is STILL not ready for combat. Dan Grazier with the group Project on Government Oversight says that there have been so many cracks in the jets during durability testing and so many modifications made, they might only last about 25-percent of their supposed life expectancy. If that's not bad enough, he says the most combat-critical high-tech systems on the plane continue to malfunction and are vulnerable to hackers. Pentagon officials dispute Grazier's report. They still hope the F-35 can replace most of America's roughly 3,000 fighter jets, at a cost of $1-trillion. You can read more about the story here.
  • Cincinnati Ave. is closed between 21st and 19th streets after workers say a stormwater drain caused the road to collapse Wednesday afternoon. Repair crews sent a camera down into the manhole to get a better look at the problem. No word yet on the exact cause of the problem of when the road will be reopened. Tune to NEWS102.3 and AM740 KRMG for live traffic reports. 
  • Roundup weed killer was a substantial factor in a California man’s cancer, a jury determined Tuesday in the first phase of a trial that attorneys said could help determine the fate of hundreds of similar lawsuits. The unanimous verdict by the six-person jury in federal court in San Francisco came in a lawsuit filed against Roundup’s manufacturer, agribusiness giant Monsanto. Edwin Hardeman, 70, was the second plaintiff to go to trial out of thousands around the country who claim the weed killer causes cancer. Monsanto says studies have established that Roundup’s active ingredient, glyphosate, is safe.  A San Francisco jury in August awarded another man $289 million after determining Roundup caused his non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. A judge later slashed the award to $78 million, and Monsanto has appealed. Hardeman’s trial is before a different judge and may be more significant. U.S. Judge Vince Chhabria is overseeing hundreds of Roundup lawsuits and has deemed Hardeman’s case and two others “bellwether trials.”
  • The year’s final supermoon will coincide with the spring equinox, the term used to mark the end of winter.  >> Read more trending news  According to the United States Naval Observatory, the equinox, which occurs in the spring and autumn, is the moment when the center of the sun is directly above the equator. During this vernal equinox, the sun shines directly on the equator, and both the Northern and Southern hemispheres get the same amount of rays; night and day are nearly equal length. The 2019 spring equinox will occur on Wednesday, March 20. Four hours after the arrival of the equinox, we’ll witness the first full moon of spring for the Northern Hemisphere and the first full moon of autumn for the Southern Hemisphere. That moon will also be a supermoon. >> Related: What to know about the spring equinox According to Space.com, the March 20 Worm Moon—a nickname for the first full moon in March—will reach its full phase at 9:43 p.m. It will reach perigee (the closest point in its orbit around Earth) at 3:48 p.m. on March 19. Why is it called a Worm Moon? “At the time of this Moon, the ground begins to soften enough for earthworm casts to reappear, inviting the return of robins and migrating birds— a true sign of spring,” according to the Farmer’s Almanac. “Roots start to push their way up through the soil, and the Earth experiences a re-birth as it awakens from its winter slumber.” The nickname was first given by Native Americans — the Algonquin tribes in particular — who used lunar phases to track the seasons. What is a supermoon? According to NASA, the moniker supermoon was coined by an astrologer in 1979 and is often used to describe a full moon happening near or at the time when the moon is at its closest point in its orbit around Earth. >> Related: What is a supermoon and how does it affect us? Supermoons may appear as much as 14 percent closer and 30 percent brighter than the moon on an average night. The moon’s average distance from Earth is approximately 238,000 miles. Where are the best places to see the supermoon? Wherever the sky is clear and the moon is visible is an ideal place from which to experience the spectacle.  But if you’re really up to making an adventure out of it, consider heading to a state park or the Tellus Science Museum in Cartersville. Stephen C. Foster State Park in the Okefenokee Swamp is notorious for being one of the best spots in the world for star gazing and was named a gold-tier “International Dark Sky Park.” You can also make your way to one of the nine best places to see stars around Atlanta. Any of those spots would make great viewing points for a supermoon, too.  Best ways to photograph the supermoon? According to National Geographic, seeing the supermoon near the horizon with buildings, trees or mountains for scale will make the moon appear slightly larger in your photos, even though it isn’t. >> Related: Full snow moon on the way; it’s the largest supermoon of the year “Don’t make the mistake of photographing the moon by itself, with no reference to anything,” Bill Ingalls, a senior photographer for NASA, told National Geographic last year. “Instead, think of how to make the image creative—that means tying it into some land-based object. It can be a local landmark or anything to give your photo a sense of place.” Other photo tips from National Geographic staff photographers: Shoot with the same exposure you would in daylight on Earth. Don’t leave your camera shutter open too long. This will make the moon appear too bright and you won’t be able to photograph lunar detail. If you’re using your smartphone, use your optical lens only.  If you’re using your smartphone, do not use your digital zoom. This will decrease the quality of your photo. Instead, take the photo and zoom or crop later. Use a tripod or a solid surface to keep your phone stabilized. Use your fingers to adjust the light balance and capture the lunar detail. More from National Geographic.

Washington Insider

  • Using his veto pen for the first time in just over two years in office, President Donald Trump on Friday rejected a special resolution from Congress which would block his national emergency declaration to shift money into construction of a border wall, a day after the GOP Senate joined the Democratic House in rebuking the President. 'Congress’s vote to deny the crisis on the southern border is a vote against reality,' President Trump said in the Oval Office. 'It's against reality. It is a tremendous national emergency. It is a tremendous crisis.' The measure now goes back to the House and Senate, where any effort to override the President's veto is far short of the necessary two-thirds super majority. 'On March 26, the House will once again act to protect our Constitution and our democracy from the President’s emergency declaration by holding a vote to override his veto,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. But the President sternly disagreed. Here's the text of the President's veto message, as sent back to the Congress: To the House of Representatives:   I am returning herewith without my approval H.J. Res. 46, a joint resolution that would terminate the national emergency I declared regarding the crisis on our southern border in Proclamation 9844 on February 15, 2019, pursuant to the National Emergencies Act.  As demonstrated by recent statistics published by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and explained in testimony given by the Secretary of Homeland Security on March 6, 2019, before the House Committee on Homeland Security, our porous southern border continues to be a magnet for lawless migration and criminals and has created a border security and humanitarian crisis that endangers every American. Last month alone, CBP apprehended more than 76,000 aliens improperly attempting to enter the United States along the southern border -- the largest monthly total in the last 5 years. In fiscal year 2018, CBP seized more than 820,000 pounds of drugs at our southern border, including 24,000 pounds of cocaine, 64,000 pounds of methamphetamine, 5,000 pounds of heroin, and 1,800 pounds of fentanyl. In fiscal years 2017 and 2018, immigration officers nationwide made 266,000 arrests of aliens previously charged with or convicted of crimes. These crimes included approximately 100,000 assaults, 30,000 sex crimes, and 4,000 killings. In other words, aliens coming across our border have injured or killed thousands of people, while drugs flowing through the border have killed hundreds of thousands of Americans.   The current situation requires our frontline border enforcement personnel to vastly increase their humanitarian efforts. Along their dangerous trek to the United States, 1 in 3 migrant women experiences sexual abuse, and 7 in 10 migrants are victims of violence. Fifty migrants per day are referred for emergency medical care, and CBP rescues 4,300 people per year who are in danger and distress. The efforts to address this humanitarian catastrophe draw resources away from enforcing our Nation's immigration laws and protecting the border, and place border security personnel at increased risk.   As troubling as these statistics are, they reveal only part of the reality. The situation at the southern border is rapidly deteriorating because of who is arriving and how they are arriving. For many years, the majority of individuals who arrived illegally were single adults from Mexico. Under our existing laws, we could detain and quickly remove most of these aliens. More recently, however, illegal migrants have organized into caravans that include large numbers of families and unaccompanied children from Central American countries. Last year, for example, a record number of families crossed the border illegally. If the current trend holds, the number of families crossing in fiscal year 2019 will greatly surpass last year's record total. Criminal organizations are taking advantage of these large flows of families and unaccompanied minors to conduct dangerous illegal activity, including human trafficking, drug smuggling, and brutal killings.   Under current laws, court decisions, and resource constraints, the Government cannot detain families or undocumented alien children from Central American countries in significant numbers or quickly deport them. Instead, the Government is forced to release many of them into the interior of the United States, pending lengthy judicial proceedings. Although many fail ever to establish any legal right to remain in this country, they stay nonetheless.   This situation on our border cannot be described as anything other than a national emergency, and our Armed Forces are needed to help confront it.   My highest obligation as President is to protect the Nation and its people. Every day, the crisis on our border is deepening, and with new surges of migrants expected in the coming months, we are straining our border enforcement personnel and resources to the breaking point.   H.J. Res. 46 ignores these realities. It is a dangerous resolution that would undermine United States sovereignty and threaten the lives and safety of countless Americans. It is, therefore, my duty to return it to the House of Representatives without my approval.   DONALD J. TRUMP   THE WHITE HOUSE, March 15, 2019. 
  • Democrats in the U.S. House will try to send an unmistakable message to President Donald Trump on the issue of relations with Russia this week on Capitol Hill, bringing up a series of bills on the House floor dealing with Russia and Vladimir Putin, including a plan which demands the public release of any report by Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Russian interference in the 2016 elections. 'This transparency is a fundamental principle necessary to ensure that government remains accountable to the people,' a series of key Democrats said about the resolution on the Mueller inquiry. The Russian legislative blitz comes as Democrats on a series of House committees have stepped up their requests for information from the White House and the Trump Administration on issues related to the Russia investigation and the Mueller probe. So far, Democrats say they aren't getting much in the way of help from the White House on any of their investigative efforts. 'It's like, zero,' said House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD). 'We can't get witnesses, they don't want us to talk to witnesses.' Among the Russia-related bills on the schedule this week in the House: + The 'KREMLIN Act,' a bipartisan bill which would require the Director of National Intelligence - already reportedly in hot water with the President for saying that North Korea probably wouldn't give up its nuclear arsenal - to submit to Congress a new round of intelligence assessments on Russia and its leaders. 'The Kremlin’s efforts to sabotage our democracy and those of our allies across Europe are undeniable,' said Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL), who has sponsored this bill with fellow Intelligence Committee member Rep. Chris Stewart (R-UT).  Earlier this year, DNI Dan Coats said of Russia: 'We assess that Moscow will continue pursuing a range of objectives to expand its reach, including undermining the US-led liberal international order, dividing Western political and security institutions, demonstrating Russia’s ability to shape global issues, and bolstering Putin’s domestic legitimacy.' + The Vladimir Putin Transparency Act, a bipartisan bill which again asks the U.S. Intelligence Community to weigh in with evidence about the Russian government, and expressing the sense of Congress 'that the United States should do more to expose the corruption of Vladimir Putin.' 'I am proud to cosponsor this bill which aims to identify Putin and his allies for who they are: nefarious political actors undermining democracies,' said Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY), who teamed up with Rep. Val Demings (D-FL) on this measure. 'Some people HATE the fact that I got along well with President Putin of Russia,' President Trump tweeted last July, after his controversial summit with Putin in Finland. 'They would rather go to war than see this. It’s called Trump Derangement Syndrome!' + A bipartisan bill to block any move by the U.S. Government to recognize the 2014 annexation of Crimea by Russia and Vladimir Putin. This is another measure meant to put public pressure on the President, who has been somewhat uneven in public statements on his feelings about Russia's move to take Crimea, as well as the ongoing proxy war being supported by Moscow in areas of eastern Ukraine, and how the U.S. should respond - even as his administration has leveled new economic sanctions against Moscow. In November of 2018, the President canceled a scheduled meeting with Putin at the G20 Summit in Argentina, after Russian naval forces seized several Ukrainian ships and their crews. + A bipartisan resolution calling for 'accountability and justice' surrounding the assassination of Russian activist Boris Nemtsov, who was shot and killed in Moscow in 2015. Lawmakers in both parties have urged the Trump Administration to sanction those involved in the murder, as the measure also calls for an international investigation into his death. 'Boris Nemtsov had a vision for a democratic and free Russia. Sadly, that put him right in Putin’s cross hairs,' said Rep. Eliot Engel (D-NY). This not just a House effort, as there is a companion bill in the Senate sponsored by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL). 'Putin's media and surrogates called Boris Nemtsov an 'enemy of the people,'' said Michael McFaul, the U.S. Ambassador to Russia under President Obama, and a frequent critic of President Trump. + Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report.  While the four previous legislative measures have bipartisan support, the final piece of this 'Russia' week in the U.S. House might create a bit of a tussle on the floor of the House, as Democrats move to put GOP lawmakers on the record about whether they want to make any report from the Special Counsel public.  Under the Special Counsel law, there is no guarantee that the Mueller report will ever see the light of day - the Special Counsel submits a report to the U.S. Attorney General - in this case, William Barr - who is then authorized to summarize that to Congress.  That's different than back during the Monica Lewinsky scandal, when independent counsel Ken Starr was able to send Congress volumes and volumes of evidence - knowing that all of it would be made public. In testimony before the Senate earlier this year, Barr did not expressly commit to releasing any report, saying 'my goal will be to provide as much transparency as I can consistent with the law. I can assure you that, where judgments are to be made by me, I will make those judgments based solely on the law and will let no personal, political, or other improper interests influence my decision.
  • As President Donald Trump sent Congress on Monday a $4.7 trillion budget proposal for 2020, the estimates of his own budget experts predict that this spending plan will result in four straight years of deficits exceeding $1 trillion, with no budget surplus until the mid-2030's. After a deficit of $779 billion in Fiscal Year 2018, the President's new budget plan forecasts four more years of even higher levels of red ink. 2019 - $1.092 trillion 2020 - $1.101 trillion 2021 - $1.068 trillion 2022 - $1.049 trillion The White House budget document shows the deficit dropping to an estimated $909 billion in 2023. The higher deficit figures come even as the White House projected a growing amount of revenues coming in for Uncle Sam as a result of the 2017 GOP tax cut plan, as officials said the problem is not taxes, but the level of government spending. 'We don't think the tax cuts are going to lead to anything other than economic growth over the next ten years,' a senior White House official told reporters on Monday morning. After revenues were basically flat from 2017 to 2018, the official predicted the feds would see growth of 6 percent in money coming into the Treasury in 2020, as compared to 2019. Part of the President’s 2020 budget plan would make the GOP tax cut permanent for individuals - the business part of that tax package was permanent, but the income tax cuts and other items impacting individual taxpayers end in 2025. Still, for the President - and his chief aides - the big problem is spending, not tax revenues, as the White House said the 2020 budget was a ‘fiscally responsible and pro-American budget.’ While GOP supporters of the President like Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) touted today’s budget plan - the declaration that the Trump budget will result in a balanced budget won’t be happening anytime soon. In the next ten years, the 2020 Trump budget estimates that another $7.2 trillion would be added in deficits, pushing the national debt towards the $30 trillion mark. “Under reasonable economic assumptions, we find it would add about $10.5 trillion to the national debt over 10 years,” said the watchdog group, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. “It's quite an achievement for the President's budget to have fantastical economic assumptions, massive & unprecedented cuts to domestic discretionary spending, and *still* manage to end up with trillion dollar deficits for the next four years,” tweeted Shaki Akabas, an economic expert at the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington.
  • With over $2 trillion added to the federal debt since he took office just over two years ago, President Donald Trump will deliver a spending plan to the Congress on Monday which is certain to spur a sharp debate with Democrats over proposed cuts in domestic spending programs, but won't come close to producing a balanced budget for more than a decade. 'It is time for Congress to join the president in his commitment to cutting spending, reducing bloated deficits, and getting our national debt under control. America’s future generations are depending on them,' said Russ Vought, the acting chief of the White House budget office. But, so far, President Trump's time in office has seen the growth in the deficit accelerate, from $584 billion in President Obama's last full year in office in 2016, to $779 billion in 2018. As of January, the deficit in 2019 was running 77 percent higher than a year ago, as even White House budget estimates have forecast a yearly deficit over $1 trillion in coming years. Here's some of what to look for in Monday's budget submission, which is titled, 'A Budget for a Better America.' 1. Domestic spending cuts, back door increase for defense. With no deal as yet to avoid budget caps from a 2011 deficit law, spending in 2020 would be limited on defense to $576 billion, and $542 billion for domestic programs. But the President wants much more for the military, so the Trump Administration will reportedly propose spending a massive $174 billion for the 'Overseas Contingency Operations' fund - an increase of $106 billion - for a total military budget of $750 billion. Budget watchdog groups say the idea is a big, fat budgetary gimmick, nothing but a slush fund for the Pentagon. 2. Trump to request $8.6 billion for the border wall. With no confirmed details yet on how the President will shift around some $6.6 billion in the Pentagon budget to fund construction of his border wall, Mr. Trump will reportedly ask Congress to approve $8.6 billion for the wall in 2020. Democrats had a simple reaction on Sunday. 'No,' said Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI). 'No,' said Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI). 'Dead on arrival,' said Rep. Mike Quigley (D-IL). Even after a 35 day partial government shutdown earlier this year, the President received $1.375 billion for barriers - but not a wall, and there seems to be little chance that dynamic will change for Democrats in the 2020 budget debate. 'Congress refused to fund his wall,' Speaker Nancy Pelosi tweeted on Sunday. 'The same thing will repeat itself if he tries this again.' 3. Goal for a balanced budget would be 2035. Even if President Trump serves two terms in office, his own White House doesn't forecast anything close to a balanced budget. The last official budget estimates from the White House in July of 2018 - which will be updated with this new budget proposal - predicted the deficit would peak over $1 trillion for three years, and then finally get below $500 billion by 2027, adding almost $8 trillion in deficts along the way. More conservative Republicans in the House aren't worried by those details, as they say the President has shown 'fiscally conservative leadership,' even though the debt has already increased by more than $2 trillion during his two plus years in office. 4. Not all the details, and already behind schedule. President Trump was supposed to have sent this budget to Congress by the first Monday in February - but today will only bring the basic highlights, not all the nitty gritty details of the proposal. Part of the reason is that the 35 day partial government shutdown delayed a lot of work in government agencies. All of the spending work is supposed to be done by Congress each year by September 30 - but that's only happened four times since the budget process was reformed in 1974. Congress has six and a half months until the deadline - it's hard to see how lawmakers avoid more stop gap funding plans - and maybe another shutdown as well. 5. A new dynamic with divided control of Congress. In the first two years of the Trump Presidency, Republicans in the House and Senate were in charge - but now, Democrats will have first crack at the President's budget, and they are certain to take a much different road. In a sense, that's a good thing for Mr. Trump, giving him the chance to battle it out with Democrats more clearly on budget priorities. But it also amplifies the chance for a government shutdown on October 1. Speaker Pelosi likes to say that a budget is a 'statement of values.' After the Trump budget gets delivered to Congress, the next move will be up to Democrats in the House, to forge their on budget outline for 2020. There are political pitfalls ahead for both sides.
  • The top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee took the unusual step Friday of publicly releasing a 268 page interview transcript with Justice Department official Bruce Ohr, confirming reports that Ohr forwarded material to the FBI from his wife, and that former British Intelligence agent Christopher Steele warned during the 2016 campaign that Russian intelligence believed they had President Donald Trump 'over a barrel.'  'He (Steele) told me that the former head of - or he had information that the former head of the Russian foreign intelligence service had said that they had Trump over a barrel,' said Bruce Ohr, a Justice Department official who funneled information from Steele to FBI investigators. 'My interpretation is that that meant that, if true, the Russian Government had some kind of compromising material on Donald Trump,' Ohr told lawmakers in the August 28, 2018 deposition, as he defended the quality of information Steele had provided the U.S. Government in the past. 'Chris Steele has, for a long time, been very concerned about Russian crime and corruption and what he sees as Russian malign acts around the world, in the U.S., U.K., and elsewhere,' Ohr told Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC). 'And if he had information that he believed showed that the Russian Government was acting in a hostile way to the United States, he wanted to get that information to me.' In the deposition, Ohr acknowledged that he forwarded information not only from Steele to the FBI - but also from his wife, Nellie Ohr, who worked at Fusion GPS, the company which had hired Steele to do intelligence work on President Trump from Europe. Ohr said he realized during 2016 that his wife was researching 'some of the same people that I had heard about from Chris Steele,' and that she provided her husband with a thumb drive of information, which he then gave to FBI investigators.  Republicans found the chain of events described by Ohr to be a bit difficult to swallow. 'I'm trying to envision this cold start to a conversation with 'Here, honey, here's a thumb drive,'' said Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) at one point. Ohr, an expert in Russian organized crime, said he never looked at any of the information. 'I didn't want to plug it into my machine at work,' Ohr testified. 'I just gave it to the FBI.' The transcript of the deposition was released by Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) on Friday; Collins said he took the unilateral action because he was frustrated that it was taking so long for the Trump Justice Department to make the transcript public. 'After many months, and little progress, our patience grows thin,' Collins said in a speech on the House floor on Friday morning. 'I intend to make other transcripts public soon,' Collins said, referring to interviews done with a variety of Justice Department and FBI figures when Republicans were in charge of the House in 2018. Collins said the transcripts were being held back because of questions over redactions, as he accused the Trump Justice Department of slow walking requests to make the testimony public. In 2018, House Republicans conducted a series of private interviews with different figures involved in the Russia investigation - not focusing on possible wrongdoing involving the Trump campaign - but instead looking at Justice Department and FBI officials, and how they came to start and conduct the initial investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 elections.  Other than a two day closed door interview with former FBI Director James Comey - who requested the release of his closed door testimony - none of the other private transcripts had been released publicly until Collins did so on Friday. While Ohr's testimony was in private, some highlights were immediately leaked to a series of news organizations back in August of 2018. 'AP sources: Lawyer was told Russia had 'Trump over a barrel,'' the Associated Press reported. 'DOJ official told Russia had Trump 'over a barrel,'' was the CNN headline at the time. The GOP inquiries for Ohr repeatedly sought to raise questions about a broader conspiracy of actions by officials at the Justice Department, as Republicans tried to paint a picture of a group of government officials doing everything they could to investigate Mr. Trump and his allies. Republicans also found it hard to believe that Ohr's wife got a job from Fusion GPS without his involvement. 'I don't remember who made the contact, whether she spoke with Glenn Simpson directly or whether there was another party or someone else involved. I just know it wasn't me,' Ohr said of his wife's job. “So when she came home and said, 'Honey, I got a job with Glenn Simpson,' what did you say?” asked Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) at one point. In the interview, Ohr was asked about an email from Steele in which Steele wanted to talk about 'our favorite business tycoon’ - which GOP lawmakers seemed to believe was a certain U.S. candidate. But Ohr repeatedly said that description wasn't a reference to President Trump, but rather to Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska, who was owed money by Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort. Republicans again and again pressed Ohr about how he handled information from Steele, and why he did not inform his bosses that he was handing over that material to the FBI. 'I have received information from different people about organized crime over the years, and in each case I've provided it to the FBI,' Ohr explained. Ohr said he did not have a personal relationship with Glenn Simpson, who had hired Christopher Steele for Fusion GPS, but that they had met several times through the years. Ohr defended his contacts with Steele, even after the FBI had terminated their relationship with the former British agent. “When I got a call from Chris Steele and he provided information, if it seemed like it was significant, I would provide it to the FBI,” Ohr said.