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    Tulsa Public Schools held its second community meeting Wednesday night on how to plan for $20-million in budget cuts for next school year. The meeting was held at Nathan Hale High School. The meetings were brought about by state funding cuts over the years and a drop in enrollment in Tulsa. Other meetings are scheduled this week. The next one is Thursday evening starting at 5:30 at Booker T. Washington High School. The remaining meetings are: Thursday, Sept. 19 - Booker T. Washington at 5:30 p.m.  Saturday, Sept. 21 - St. Francis Xavier Church at 9:30 a.m.  Thursday, Sept. 26 - McLain High School at 5:30 p.m.  Saturday, Sept. 28 - Location Pending at 9:30 a.m.  Saturday, Sept. 28 - Rogers High School at 12:30 p.m.  Thursday, Oct. 3 - East Central High School at 5:30 p.m.  Tuesday, Oct. 8 - Hale High School at 5:30 p.m.  Wednesday, Oct. 9 - Edison High School at 5:30 p.m.  Thursday, Oct. 10 - Memorial High School at 5:30 p.m.
  • A Delta flight full of passengers from Atlanta plunged nearly 30,000 feet. >> Read more trending news  Passengers described panic as they grabbed for oxygen masks onboard a Delta flight, WSB-TV reported. Pictures show the masks hanging from the ceiling during a fast descent. Flight Aware shows how Flight 2353 to Fort Lauderdale diverted to Tampa instead. According to the website, the plane descended from 39,000 feet to 10,000 feet in fewer than seven minutes. 'Air masks, the oxygen masks dropped from the top of the plane. Chaos sort of ensued amongst the passengers,' passenger Harris Dewoskin said. Dewoskin snapped pictures during what he described as a panic onboard. 'One of the flight attendants, I believe, grabbed the intercom and was just repeatedly over the intercom stating, ‘Do not panic. Do not panic,’ but obviously it’s a hectic moment, so the passengers around me, a lot of people were kind of hyperventilating, breathing really hard,” Dewoskin said. Another passenger said he was so scared by what was happening, he told his family he loved them and hugged his son. 'Life is fragile, like, there was a scary 60 to 90 seconds where we really didn’t know what was going on. At 15,000 feet in the air, it's a scary moment for sure,” Dewoskin said. The plane was sitting Wednesday night at Tampa International Airport, where mechanics were working to figure out what went wrong. Some passengers booked other flights with other airlines to get to Fort Lauderdale. Officials with Delta Air Lines apologized to everyone on the plane and said the plane diverted to Tampa 'out of an abundance of caution.
  • A gambler is charged with cheating a Washington casino out of more than $38,000 after his alleged sleight of hand was caught on camera. >> Read more trending news  Surveillance video released by the Washington State Gambling Commission shows one of the 38 times investigators say 51-year-old Fredrick Steven Nolan cheated the Crazy Moose Casino in Mountlake Terrace, KIRO-TV reported. 'Our suspect visited the casino almost daily for a six-week period. He was careful, though. We reviewed, and it looks like he never went to the same dealer more than about twice in a night,' said Heather Songer, of the Washington State Gambling Commission. On a night in January, investigators say Nolan played three spots of High Card Flush. After distracting the dealer by requesting an exchange of chips, through sleight of hand, investigators say he moved a card from one spot to another, folded two of the spots and produced a straight flush. Investigators say that single cheating act cost the house at least $3,280. All told, prosecutors say Nolan cheated the Crazy Moose out of $38,335. 'Casinos are a big target,' Songer said. 'There's a lot of money flowing through and there's a big temptation. Unfortunately, we do see frequent situations where people switch cards or utilize other cheating schemes, but they're almost always caught.' Nolan is charged in Snohomish County with a felony and a gross misdemeanor. Prosecutors in King County, Washington, are now reviewing evidence about incidents there.
  • An anonymous massage therapist who was suing actor Kevin Spacey for an alleged sexual assault has died, according to a court filing. >> Read more trending news  A notice of the man's death was filed by Spacey's attorneys Tuesday in U.S. Central District Court, according to documents obtained by The Los Angeles Times. The man, who has remained anonymous and is referred to in court filings as 'John Doe,' filed claims in September 2018 that Spacey grabbed his genitals and forced him to grab Spacey's genitals during a massage in 2016 at a private residence in California, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Spacey has denied these allegations through his attorney. A trial date in the case hadn't been scheduled. “His untimely death was, to his family, a devastating shock that they are struggling to process and is so recent that they have not yet held his funeral service,” Doe's attorney, Genie Harrison, said in a statement to the Times on Wednesday. Now that the death notice has been filed, Doe's attorneys have 90 days to substitute Doe's estate as a plaintiff if the case is to continue, Harrison said. 'Mr. Doe’s family must now open his estate at the same time as planning a funeral and processing their grief,' Harrison said. 'Mr. Doe was a dignified, kind, middle-aged man traumatized by Spacey’s alleged sexually depraved attack. As a result of this case, other victims from around the world have reached out to our firm. Mr. Doe believed their harrowing stories, and in his final months he looked forward to standing up for all of them. His fight for justice is still very much alive.' Attorneys for Spacey haven't publicly commented on Doe's death. Doe's death comes two months after a civil case and criminal case against Spacey, from one alleged victim, came to an end, Entertainment Tonight reported. On July 5, a man alleging the 'House of Cards' actor groped him at a Massachusetts bar in 2016 dropped his civil lawsuit. On July 17, the sexual assault case was dropped by the court due to 'unavailability of the complaining witness.
  • The feds and Muskogee Police have 29 suspects in jail as part of an international drug conspiracy and money laundering case. “Operation Pop Can” has been ongoing for several years. We're told others will be arrested soon. Some of the arrests were made on Wednesday.
  • A former high school principal in South Carolina who reported his wife missing has been charged with killing her. >> Read more trending news  James 'Stan' Yarborough, 64, is charged with murder, possession of a weapon during a violent crime and obstruction of justice in connection with the death of 63-year-old Karen Yarborough, Summerville police Lt. Shaun Tumbleston told WCSC-TV. Stan Yarborough called police Tuesday morning to his Summerville home and said he hadn't seen his wife since 8 p.m. the previous evening, when she said she was going on a walk, according to an incident report. Police searched Karen Yarborough's walking route but found no signs of her, The Post and Courier of Charleston reported. As police were talking with Stan Yarborough, they noticed a red stain on his shirt, the incident report said. When asked about it, Yarborough reportedly told police that he must have gotten blood on his shirt because he uses blood thinners. Police searched the house and found a single bullet of unknown caliber on the floor of the Yarboroughs' bedroom with no shell casing nearby, according to the report. Police said Yarborough told them he doesn't have a gun and didn't know why the bullet would be there. Police also found damage to the vehicles parked outside, as well as broken flower pots and a wheelbarrow, the report said. Yarborough was arrested on suspicion of obstruction of justice. Later Tuesday, a body was found in an unincorporated area of nearby Dorchester County, WCBD-TV reported. Dorchester County Coroner Paul Brouthers identified the body as Karen Yarborough and said she was the victim of an apparent homicide. An autopsy is scheduled for Thursday morning. Stan Yarborough was principal at Summerville High School from 1994 to 1998 and then was Dorchester District 2 facilities director from 1998 to 2002 before retiring, The Post and Courier reported.
  • If you're a fan of the ever-growing food truck scene in Tulsa, there's a good chance you've already seen, and even ordered some chicken and waffles, from the Waffle That food truck. The truck has grown a large and loyal following and often has long lines of people at its usual locations at Guthrie Green and on MLK Boulevard between Pine and Apache. In fact, after just one year or so in operation,  business at the food truck has been so good that owner Roy Tillis is going to open a brick-and-mortar restaurant at the spot on MLK Boulevard. He says it's a simple case of giving the customers what they want. “People always want to try to find us every day, and it's hard with a food truck, getting it open every day,” Tillis says. The restaurant will be housed in a fully renovated building and is set to open next month, but Tillis says the food truck will also still be going out at least three times a week.
  • New York authorities are investigating the stabbing death Monday of a 16-year-old boy who was attacked as dozens of other teenagers watched and shot video of the brutal assault. >> Read more trending news  The victim, identified as Khaseen Morris, and a 17-year-old friend were surrounded by a group of other teens after school outside a restaurant in Long Island, according to NBC News. Morris died from his injuries and the friend suffered a broken arm and injuries to his head, police said. Officials said as many as 60 teenagers watched the attack as it unfolded in a parking lot, recorded it on their cellphones and posted it to social media, NBC reported. 'Kids stood here and didn't help Khaseen,' Nassau County Detective Lt. Stephen Fitzpatrick said. 'They'd rather video. They videoed his death instead of helping him.' Fitzpatrick said the deadly assault appears related to an argument over a girl. Investigators said they're confident they know the identities of the teens directly involved in Morris's death, but they're still asking witnesses to come forward, the news network reported. 'If you're not a part and parcel of the murder of Khaseen Morris, now's the time to get in touch with us to let us know who did this and why,' Fitzgerald said. 'If it was just coming here and thinking you were fighting and then he got stabbed during that, you need to get in front of this.' Investigators have not made any arrests in the case yet.
  • Days after his 13-month-old son died of a drug overdose, a California man has died of an overdose as well, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  Patrick O'Neill, 29, was taken off life support Monday night, Santa Rosa police confirmed to The San Francisco Chronicle. He was found unresponsive Saturday next to his son, Liam O'Neill, in a Santa Rosa home. The child was pronounced dead at the scene. Police are awaiting toxicology results, but authorities believe the toddler was exposed to fentanyl. Patrick O'Neill was found with 'life-threatening injuries,' police said. 'The officers who arrived at the scene located narcotics and narcotics paraphernalia in the bedroom, near where both of them were discovered,' Lt. Dan Marincik, of the Santa Rosa Police Department, told KTTV-TV. Police would have arrested O'Neill on suspicion of murder if he had survived, Marincik said. O'Neill had a recurring drug problem and was trying to get clean in recent months, Michael Arevalo, one of O'Neill's friends, told the Chronicle. “Pat was struggling with addiction, but at the same time, he loved his son,” he said. “His son was the reason he got clean. It was hard for him. It was a struggle for him.” Autopsies and toxicology reports are scheduled for both Patrick and Liam O'Neill, the Santa Rosa Press Democrat reported. Friends have set up a GoFundMe for Liam's funeral expenses.
  • A family of four dolphins stuck in a canal in St. Petersburg, Florida, is free thanks to the state's wildlife commission. >> Read more trending news  The animals, including two calves, had been trapped in the canal since Sunday, according to WFTS-TV.Officials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conversation Commission assessed the situation and waited a day to see if the dolphins would leave on their own.  When they didn't, wildlife officials theorized that the mammals, which were not in distress, saw the canal bridges as an obstacle blocking their way out, according to a statement from the Clearwater Marine Aquarium. So, members of the FWC formed a human chain Tuesday, blocking the dolphins' view of the bridges, and used underwater sounds to direct them out of the canal and into Riviera Bay, WFTS reported.
  • After the Federal Reserve announced on Wednesday that it was cutting interest rates for the second time in two months, President Donald Trump skewered the Fed for not being aggressive enough to help the economy, while the Fed chair said too much economic uncertainty was being created by President Trump's various trade fights. 'This is a time of difficult judgments,' Fed chair Jerome Powell told reporters at a Washington news conference, as he indicated that trade gyrations involving the US, China, and other nations, is not helping with domestic economic growth. 'We do feel that trade uncertainty is having an effect,' Powell told reporters. 'We see it in weak business investment, weak exports.' 'Trade policy is not the business of the Fed,' Powell said. 'It's the business of the Congress and of the Administration.' While the President has said further rate cuts would spur even more growth, the Fed continues to forecast that overall economic growth will be just over two percent this year, down from 2018. Democrats in Congress pointed the finger of blame straight at President Trump for creating economic uncertainty, especially for farmers. “Our family farmers need stability right now - not more uncertainty,” said Rep. Angie Craig (D-MN).  “I don’t agree with the reckless trade war we’ve created without a coherent strategy.” Meanwhile, on Capitol Hill, lawmakers were at odds over how to deal with President Trump's second bailout for farmers, who have been hit hard by retaliatory tariffs from China and other nations. In a letter to the Secretary of Agriculture, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), raised questions as to where the money was going to come from for the $28 billion in farm bailout payments announced by the President over the last two years. 'For context, that amount is larger than the entire discretionary budget Congress appropriates to USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) each fiscal year,' DeLauro wrote. While Democrats had initially threatened to block approval of that extra money, now party leaders were demanding to know where that bailout money was going. 'That lack of transparency regarding a $28 billion federal program is outrageous,' DeLauro wrote. 'Maybe an accounting of who is getting the money up to this point would be a start,' said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA), as Democrats said the GOP was resisting efforts for a public accounting of the farm bailout billions.
  • If you're a fan of the ever-growing food truck scene in Tulsa, there's a good chance you've already seen, and even ordered some chicken and waffles, from the Waffle That food truck. The truck has grown a large and loyal following and often has long lines of people at its usual locations at Guthrie Green and on MLK Boulevard between Pine and Apache. In fact, after just one year or so in operation,  business at the food truck has been so good that owner Roy Tillis is going to open a brick-and-mortar restaurant at the spot on MLK Boulevard. He says it's a simple case of giving the customers what they want. “People always want to try to find us every day, and it's hard with a food truck, getting it open every day,” Tillis says. The restaurant will be housed in a fully renovated building and is set to open next month, but Tillis says the food truck will also still be going out at least three times a week.
  • Since June of 2017 when medical cannabis was on the ballot, voter turnout in Tulsa County has set several records, and by all accounts, that momentum will continue throughout the 2020 presidential election. Tulsa County Election Board Secretary Gwen Freeman tells KRMG “we need a lot of precinct workers, and we need them now.” [Hear the KRMG In-Depth report on the need for poll workers HERE, or use the audio player below] “The folks at the election board who've worked there forever and ever, they all say the same thing,” Freeman said Wednesday. “We think it's going to be unprecedented in terms of turnout (in 2020). If you'll remember, back in November and June of last year during midterms, we had unprecedented numbers that showed up for midterms. Unprecedented numbers of people that actually registered to vote, that sort of thing. We don't see any of that slowing down any time soon.” So, the goal is to get about 500 more precinct workers trained and ready to go, before the busy 2020 election cycle begins. Stephanie Johnson has done the job for years, and now trains others as well. She began at the age of 22 when her mother, a precinct official for some 40 years herself, recruited her during a busy presidential election. “It was a huge and overwhelming experience for a 22-year-old,” Johnson told KRMG, “but the love of it just brought me back, and that's why I'm still here today.” Freeman says the average age of a precinct worker is 75, so naturally they experience fairly high turnover. But many return again and again, much like Johnson. The requirements include residency in Tulsa County, good vision and hearing, a working cell phone, and reliable transportation. Currently, precinct workers get a $25 stipend for taking the eight-hour course to learn the ropes, then between $87 and $97 for their work on election days. That amount will go up next year to between $100 and $110, depending on the position. Precinct officials are also compensated for mileage if they drive over 20 miles (round trip). Classes take place at the Tulsa County Election Board. They run from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and are currently scheduled for: Saturday, Sept. 21st Monday, Sept. 23rd Wednesday, Sept. 25th Tuesday, Oct. 1st Wednesday, Oct. 2nd Saturday, Oct. 5th For more information, or to enroll in a class, call 918-596-5762. You can also get more information online on the Tulsa County Election Board website.
  • A bicyclist in Broken Arrow died Wednesday morning on a busy street. It happened a little after 9:30 on New Orleans St.  Police say 74 year-old John Mathes was crossing New Orleans St. from Aster Ave and entered the intersection in front of an east-bound pickup truck.   Officers don’t believe alcohol was involved in the accident.  Part of New Orleans was closed between Garnett and Olive.  Investigators are still looking for exactly what led to the crash.
  • The number and rate of abortions across the United States have plunged to their lowest levels since the procedure became legal nationwide in 1973, according to new figures released Wednesday. The report from the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports abortion rights, counted 862,000 abortions in the U.S. in 2017. That’s down from 926,000 tallied in the group’s previous report for 2014, and from just over 1 million counted for 2011. Guttmacher is the only entity that strives to count all abortions in the U.S., making inquiries of individual providers. Federal data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention excludes California, Maryland and New Hampshire. The new report illustrates that abortions are decreasing in all parts of the country, whether in Republican-controlled states seeking to restrict abortion access or in Democratic-run states protecting abortion rights. Between 2011 and 2017, abortion rates increased in only five states and the District of Columbia. One reason for the decline in abortions is that fewer women are becoming pregnant. The Guttmacher Institute noted that the birth rate, as well as the abortion rate, declined during the years covered by the new report. A likely factor, the report said, is increased accessibility of contraception since 2011, as the Affordable Care Act required most private health insurance plans to cover contraceptives without out-of-pocket costs.

Washington Insider

  • After the Federal Reserve announced on Wednesday that it was cutting interest rates for the second time in two months, President Donald Trump skewered the Fed for not being aggressive enough to help the economy, while the Fed chair said too much economic uncertainty was being created by President Trump's various trade fights. 'This is a time of difficult judgments,' Fed chair Jerome Powell told reporters at a Washington news conference, as he indicated that trade gyrations involving the US, China, and other nations, is not helping with domestic economic growth. 'We do feel that trade uncertainty is having an effect,' Powell told reporters. 'We see it in weak business investment, weak exports.' 'Trade policy is not the business of the Fed,' Powell said. 'It's the business of the Congress and of the Administration.' While the President has said further rate cuts would spur even more growth, the Fed continues to forecast that overall economic growth will be just over two percent this year, down from 2018. Democrats in Congress pointed the finger of blame straight at President Trump for creating economic uncertainty, especially for farmers. “Our family farmers need stability right now - not more uncertainty,” said Rep. Angie Craig (D-MN).  “I don’t agree with the reckless trade war we’ve created without a coherent strategy.” Meanwhile, on Capitol Hill, lawmakers were at odds over how to deal with President Trump's second bailout for farmers, who have been hit hard by retaliatory tariffs from China and other nations. In a letter to the Secretary of Agriculture, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), raised questions as to where the money was going to come from for the $28 billion in farm bailout payments announced by the President over the last two years. 'For context, that amount is larger than the entire discretionary budget Congress appropriates to USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) each fiscal year,' DeLauro wrote. While Democrats had initially threatened to block approval of that extra money, now party leaders were demanding to know where that bailout money was going. 'That lack of transparency regarding a $28 billion federal program is outrageous,' DeLauro wrote. 'Maybe an accounting of who is getting the money up to this point would be a start,' said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA), as Democrats said the GOP was resisting efforts for a public accounting of the farm bailout billions.
  • In the face of strong opposition from California elected officials and parts of the auto industry, President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced that his administration will revoke a special waiver which has allowed California to set stricter auto emission and fuel mileage standards than the federal government. 'The Trump Administration is revoking California’s Federal Waiver on emissions in order to produce far less expensive cars for the consumer, while at the same time making the cars substantially SAFER,' President Trump announced in a series of tweets from California. The announcement drew immediate condemnation from California officials and Democrats in the Congress. 'The President is completely wrong,' said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). California officials expressed outrage at the President's plans, arguing the main impact would be to create more pollution in the Golden State. 'You have no basis and no authority to pull this waiver,' California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said. 'We’re ready to fight for a future that you seem unable to comprehend; we’ll see you in court if you stand in our way,' Becerra added. The authority for California comes from the federal Clean Air Act, which allowed the feds to grant waivers to states that wanted to set tougher emission standards than the federal government. The announcement opens a second legal fight with the Golden State over auto emission standards, as last week the Trump Administration said it would investigate agreements made between California and major automakers about those standards. 'This investigation appears to be nothing more than a politically motivated act of intimidation,' Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) wrote in a letter to the U.S. Attorney General.
  • A week after ousting top aide John Bolton, President Donald Trump announced Wednesday on Twitter that he was naming Robert O'Brien to replace Bolton, choosing the State Department's top hostage negotiator to fill that important White House post. 'I have worked long and hard with Robert,' the President tweeted from California, where he is currently on a western campaign swing. 'Robert O'Brien is a great choice to be National Security Advisor,' said Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-WI), who labeled the choice an 'exceptional pick.'  'He is a high energy, low ego individual who will do fantastic in this role,' the Congressman added. O'Brien's most recent high profile diplomatic effort was in Sweden, where he headlined U.S. efforts to free rapper A$AP. O'Brien's official title at the State Department was, 'Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.' O'Brien will be the fourth National Security Adviser for President Trump, going through former Defense Intelligence Agency chief Michael Flynn, Army General H.R. McMaster, and then Bolton. Last week, Mr. Trump said Bolton had disagreed with him on a number of major foreign policy issues.
  • In a spirited hearing full of sharp exchanges and pointed verbal barbs, former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski confirmed to a U.S. House committee that President Donald Trump had used a White House meeting in 2017 to ask Lewandowski to tell then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions to limit the scope of Robert Mueller's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. 'I didn't think the President asked me to do anything illegal,' Lewandowski told the House Judiciary Committee. In the first testimony to Congress by a fact witness involved in the Russia investigation, Lewandowski acknowledged that despite President Trump's request - made at least twice in the summer of 2017 - the Trump adviser admitted that he never followed through on the President's request to pressure Sessions about the Russia probe. Democrats mocked Lewandowski for not having the guts to take the President's message directly to the Attorney General. 'You chickened out,' said Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA). 'I went on vacation,' Lewandowski replied, drawing loud laughter from Democrats on the committee. In his multiple hours of testimony, Lewandowski repeatedly refused to delve into details of his conversations with the President, even those which were a part of the Mueller Report, which Lewandowski proudly said he had not read. 'If it's in the report, I consider it to be accurate,' Lewandowski said multiple times. While Republicans denounced the hearing as a 'joke' and more, Democrats zeroed in on Lewandowski in round after round of questioning, accusing him of obstructing justice by not answering certain questions about his talks with the President during the campaign. 'I wasn't asked to do anything illegal,' as Lewandowski said he took notes in a June 2017 meeting on what Mr. Trump wanted to be said to Attorney General Sessions, and then placed the notes in a safe at his home. 'It's a big safe Congressman,' Lewandowski said in a bitter exchange with Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA), whom he called “President” at one point - apparently referring to Swalwell's failed White House run.  'There's lots of guns in it,” Lewandowski added about his safe. Asked multiple times if he had turned over his notes to the Special Counsel investigation, Lewandowski would only say that he had complied with all requests from the Mueller probe. Lewandowski also did not directly respond to the basic question of whether he lied to the Special Counsel, or whether he had ever discussed a pardon with the President. 'Not to the best of my recollection,' Lewandowski said multiple times. Democrats also ridiculed Lewandowski's refusal to answer certain questions related to the President, by claiming that there was an issue involving executive privilege. The hearing was notable on one point, in that it was the first time Democrats had been able to question someone who was an actual fact witness interviewed as part of the Mueller Investigation. Two other former White House aides - Rob Porter and Rick Dearborn - were blocked from testifying by the Trump White House. Democrats still want testimony not only from those two former aides, but also former White House Counsel Doug McGahn and others. Maybe the most effective questioning of Lewandowski came at the end of the hearing, when Democrats allowed their outside Judiciary Committee counsel Barry Berke to ask Lewandowski questions for a full 30 minutes. Berke repeatedly took Lewandowski through statements he made in television interviews and to the committee, making it clear that the Trump adviser had not necessarily told the truth. “I have no obligation to be honest with the media,” Lewandowski said at one point, as he tried to bait Berke into a verbal sparring match, dropping in references to where Berke went to college and law school. Here's the entire 30 minutes of their exchanges.
  • Cokie Roberts, who covered Congress and national politics for many years at ABC News and National Public Radio, died Tuesday at age 75, ABC News announced, saying her death was due to complications from breast cancer. 'A mentor, a friend, a legend,' tweeted ABC News correspondent Cecilia Vega. 'Horrible, sad news,' said ABC White House correspondent Karen Travers, as tributes poured in about Roberts. While many knew that Cokie was married to veteran political reporter Steve Roberts, her experience in politics came directly from her family - as both of her parents were members of the U.S. House. Her father, Hale Boggs, might have been Speaker of the House, but a plane he was traveling on in Alaska - disappeared 47 years ago next month - and was never found. Also aboard was Rep. Nick Begich of Alaska; his son, Mark Begich, would later serve in the U.S. Senate. When the plane carrying Begich and Boggs disappeared on October 16, 1972, Boggs was House Majority Leader at the time; after his plane was never found, Democrats in the House elected Rep. Tip O'Neill (D-MA) to be the new Majority Leader. O'Neill would later succeed Rep. Carl Albert (D-OK) as House Speaker. Boggs was succeeded in his House seat by his wife, Rep. Lindy Boggs (D-LA), the first woman ever elected to Congress in Louisiana. Lindy Boggs retired after the 1990 elections.