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    Tulsa police say a suspected robber is now behind bars thanks to the public. FOX23 got ahold of surveillance video of the alleged crime which took place on April 13th. RELATED: Police search for Tulsa robbery suspect Police say after we aired that video on April 19th, they got tips that helped them to identify the suspect. Police say they found and arrested Michael Herron, on Friday, April 20th. Police say Herron was living in the same neighborhood where the robbery happened.   
  • Verne Troyer, famous for his role as Mini-Me in the 'Austin Powers' comedies died Saturday. He was 49.  >> Read more trending news
  • Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif accused the U.S. government of arrogance and belligerence, saying that Washington needed 'a change in attitude' before any meaningful negotiations can begin over several U.S. citizens being held prisoner in Iran. 'It is important... for the (Trump) administration to show the ability to engage in a respectful dialogue,' Zarif said. 'The United States needs to learn how to treat other sovereign nations, particularly sovereign nations who do not depend on the United States for continued existence.' Zarif spoke to CBS' Face the Nation on Friday; the full interview will be broadcast Sunday and portions of the transcript were made available The Associated Press. At least five Iranians, all dual-American citizens or green-card holders, have been sentenced to prison in Iran on espionage-related charges, as has Chinese-American Princeton graduate student Xiyue Wang. Zarif said his government is open to talks on a prisoner release — particularly on health or humanitarian grounds; one of the prisoners, Baquer Namazi, is 81 and in poor health. But he said the current American attitude makes such negotiations impossible. 'You do not engage in negotiations by exercising disrespect for a country, for its people, for its government,' he said. 'Then you do not leave much room for a genuine dialogue.' President Donald Trump has had an antagonistic relationship with Tehran since before his election. Trump campaigned partially on his strong opposition to the 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran signed by his predecessor Barack Obama. Most recently Trump has vowed to withdraw from the agreement by May 12 unless U.S., British, French and German negotiators can agree to fix what he sees as its serious flaws.
  • White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar suffered a brain hemorrhage while in the dugout during a game Friday night, and is in stable but critical condition. Farquhar passed out in the sixth inning , and was helped by team medical personnel and on-site EMTs. He regained consciousness before he was taken to a hospital by ambulance. The White Sox announced Saturday that additional testing revealed the brain hemorrhage caused by a ruptured aneurysm. Farquhar was receiving treatment and being closely monitored in the neurosurgical ICU unit at Rush University Medical center. The team said it will provide updates on Farquhar's health as appropriate, but requested privacy for the family. Farquhar got two outs in the top of the sixth against Houston. The 31-year-old right-hander fainted moments later. 'It takes your breath away a little bit,' manager Rick Renteria said after Chicago's 10-0 loss. 'One of your guys is down there and you have no idea what's going on. Again, the medical staff was like there right away the whole time and you know they called into the EMTs and somebody was already caring for him before they even got up.' Farquhar was selected by Toronto in the 10th round of the 2008 draft and made his major league debut with the Blue Jays in 2011. The right-hander is 10-15 with a 3.93 ERA in 253 career relief appearances with Toronto, Seattle, Tampa Bay and Chicago. The White Sox placed Farquhar on the 10-day disabled list before the second game of their weekend set against Houston. Right-hander Gregory Infante was recalled from Triple-A Charlotte. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • President Donald Trump says he's considering a posthumous pardon for boxing's first black heavyweight champion more than 100 years after the late Jack Johnson was convicted by all-white jury of accompanying a white woman across state lines. Trump announced Saturday on Twitter that the actor Sylvester Stallone, a friend of his, had called to bring Johnson's story to his attention. 'His trials and tribulations were great, his life complex and controversial,' Trump wrote from his Mar-a-Lago club in Florida. 'Others have looked at this over the years, most thought it would be done, but yes, I am considering a Full Pardon!' Johnson is a legendary figure in boxing and crossed over into popular culture decades ago with biographies, dramas and documentaries following the civil rights era. Most famously, his story was fictionalized for the play 'The Great White Hope,' starring James Earl Jones, which won the Pulitzer Prize for drama and the Tony Award for best play in 1969. A film version with Jones was released in 1970. More recently, the documentary 'Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson,' directed by Ken Burns, was aired on PBS in 2004. Johnson was convicted in 1913 for violating the Mann Act, which made it illegal to transport women across state lines for 'immoral' purposes. The boxer died in 1946. His great-great niece has pressed Trump for a posthumous pardon, and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., have been pushing Johnson's case for years. The tweet came a week after Trump pardoned I. Lewis 'Scooter' Libby, who had been a top aide to Vice President Dick Cheney, arguing that Libby had been 'treated unfairly' by a special counsel. Stallone, who starred in the 1976 boxing film 'Rocky' and several sequels, is a supporter of the president and attended Trump's New Years' Eve party at Mar-a-Lago in 2016. McCain previously told The Associated Press that Johnson 'was a boxing legend and pioneer whose career and reputation were ruined by a racially charged conviction more than a century ago.' 'Johnson's imprisonment forced him into the shadows of bigotry and prejudice, and continues to stand as a stain on our national honor,' McCain said earlier this month. In Jim Crow America, Johnson was one of the most despised African-American of his generation, humiliating white fighters and flaunting his affection for white women. The son of former slaves, he defeated Tommy Burns for the heavyweight title in 1908 at a time when blacks and whites rarely entered the same ring. He then mowed down a series of 'great white hopes,' culminating in 1910 with the undefeated former champion, James J. Jeffries. 'He is one of the craftiest, cunningest boxers that ever stepped into the ring,' said the legendary boxer John L. Sullivan, in the aftermath of what was called 'the fight of the century.' But Johnson also refused to adhere to societal norms, living lavishly and brazenly and dating outside of his race in a time when whites often killed African-Americans without fear of legal repercussions. After seven years as a fugitive following his conviction, Johnson eventually returned to the U.S. and turned himself in. He served about a year in federal prison and was released in 1921. He died in 1946 in an auto crash. The stain on Johnson's reputation forced some family members to live in shame of his legacy. The family 'didn't talk about it because they were ashamed of him, that he went to prison,' Linda E. Haywood, 61, has said of her great-great uncle. 'They were led to believe that he did something wrong. They were so ashamed after being so proud of him.' Haywood said she didn't find out she was related to Johnson until she was 12. She remembers learning about Johnson when she was in sixth grade during Black History Month, and only learned later that he was kin. Once, she recalled, she asked her mother about Johnson. 'She just grimaced,' Haywood said. Haywood has pressed to have Johnson pardoned since President George W. Bush was in office, a decade ago. Posthumous pardons are rare, but not unprecedented. President Bill Clinton pardoned Henry O. Flipper, the first African-American officer to lead the Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th Cavalry Regiment during the Civil War; he was framed for embezzlement. Bush pardoned Charles Winters in 2008, an American volunteer in the Arab-Israeli War convicted of violating the U.S. Neutrality Acts in 1949. Haywood wanted Barack Obama, the nation's first black president, to pardon Johnson, but Justice Department policy says 'processing posthumous pardon petitions is grounded in the belief that the time of the officials involved in the clemency process is better spent on the pardon and commutation requests of living persons.' The Justice Department makes decisions on potential pardons through an application process and typically makes recommendations to the president. The general DOJ policy is to not accept applications for posthumous pardons for federal convictions, according to the department's website. But Trump has shown a willingness to work around the DOJ process. __ Associated Press writer Kareem Copeland contributed to this report.
  • A birdie on the last hole gave Alvaro Quiros a one-shot lead to take into the final round of the Trophee Hassan II. Quiros' birdie four on No. 18 allowed the Spanish golfer to sign for a level-par 72 on Saturday to stay at 7-under par overall and clear of four players queued up in second place. South African pair Erik van Rooyen and Christiaan Bezuidenhout, France's Alexander Levy, and Finland's Mikko Ilonen were just a shot behind on 6 under heading into the last day at Royal Golf Dar Es Salam in Rabat. Quiros is a seven-time winner on the European Tour but went six years without a victory until last year and his triumph at the Rocco Forte Open in Italy. He's seeking a wire-to-wire victory in Morocco after sharing the first-round lead with Bradley Dredge before taking it outright on day two. Quiros had an on-off day in the third round — he said it was 'suddenly great shot, suddenly not so good' — and carded four birdies and four bogeys to come out level and still hold onto his lead. Van Rooyen shot 71, Bezuidenhout 68, Levy a 69, and Ilonen the best round of the week so far with his 6-under 66. Ilonen had seven birdies and just a single bogey — on his first hole — to leap 23 places up the leaderboard and into contention for a first tour title since 2014 when he won the World Match Play Championship.
  • An assistant referee was hit by an object thrown from the stands causing a second-division football match in Spain to be stopped for about 15 minutes. The match between host Tenerife and Huesca was nearing its end when the object hit the head of lineswoman Guadalupe Porras Ayuso. The officiating crew left the field until local authorities could assess security conditions at Heliodoro Rodriguez Lopez Stadium in Tenerife. Ayuso was not seriously hurt and returned to finish the game. It wasn't clear what object hit Ayuso. The game ended with Huesca winning 4-2 to provisionally take the second-division lead. ___ More AP Spanish soccer coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/LaLiga
  • Nicaragua's government says it is willing to negotiate over controversial social security reforms that have prompted protests and deadly clashes this week. Vice President, first lady and government spokeswoman Rosario Murillo says nine people have been killed in the unrest. She calls the protests 'cruel.' Dozens of others have been injured or arrested in the chaos in various cities across the Central American nation. Murillo said late Friday that President Daniel Ortega's government is responding to calls for dialogue made by Roman Catholic Cardinal Leopoldo Brenes and the private business sector. She added that the social security reforms 'are not concluded proposals, but (rather) we are open to discussing them.
  • The leader of Turkey's main opposition party predicted Saturday that voters who backed President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the past would 'side with democracy' instead of a 'dictatorship' during the next elections in June. Republican People's Party leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu said he is confident of ousting Erdogan from office by winning the snap parliamentary and presidential elections 'with at least 60 percent of votes' even though the party lagged in past votes. But the 69-year-old politician's optimism has weak spots. Though Kilicdaroglu says the pro-secular party, known as CHP, wasn't 'surprised' by this week's announcement of early elections and ready to compete, it has yet to put forward a presidential candidate, a campaign plan or potential alliances. Erdogan, meanwhile, has worked to consolidate his base for months with speeches and events, bolstered by rising nationalism amid Turkey's military operation in Syria against a Kurdish stronghold. During a live interview on NTV Saturday, Erdogan challenged Kilicdaroglu to run as the CHP's candidate for president. 'He should enter this race,' the president said. 'Let's see how much the nation votes for you.' Erdogan scoffed at the opposition leader's 'self-confident statements,' noting that Kilicdaroglu greatly overestimated how many votes CHP would get in the 2015 general elections. In an interview with The Associated Press, Kilicdaroglu said Erdogan and his ruling party moved up the next elections from November 2019 to June 24 this year 'to obtain more power, to completely suspend democracy.' A year ago, Erdogan narrowly won a referendum to change Turkey's form of government to an executive presidency, abolishing the office of the prime minister and giving the president more powers. The change takes effect after a presidential election is held. Kilicdaroglu said if Erdogan is victorious, the new system would establish Turkey as 'the one-man regime.' Though the CHP garnered only a quarter of national votes in the 2015 general elections, it has been emboldened by the 48.6 percent of 'no' votes in the referendum and the wide support for the party's protest march last June. The march, following the jailing of a CHP lawmaker, was a response to the state of emergency declared after a failed coup attempt in July 2016 that is still in place and which the opposition leader calls 'a civilian coup.' In its aftermath, he said, pressures on media increased, parliamentarians were arrested, journalists were jailed, non-governmental organizations were silenced or their managers imprisoned. 'I hope that on June 24 we go to the polls with joy and wake up on June 25 with hope,' Kilicdaroglu said.
  • It was a busy and emotional day on Friday in the courtroom during the Michael Bever trial. The 911 call was played and jurors heard from the surviving sister. Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler says the sister was able to testify from a separate courtroom and the jurors heard the testimony through a television. “I was very grateful to the court for the arrangements she had made to try and it make it easier on this young lady,” Kunzweiler said.  “I’m just glad that she’s been able to get through it.” During her testimony, Michael was seen crying on several occasions and putting his hands over his face. KRMG will continue to update the story as more information comes into the newsroom.  
  • If you have outdoor plans for today, bring an umbrella and be prepared to get wet. National Weather Service Meteorologist Brad McGavick says we'll see plenty of rain in Tulsa. “We’re expecting widespread showers, isolated thunderstorms,” McGavick said.  “The chance of rain is 100 percent.” It’s also going to be cooler than normal.  NWS is reporting the high will only reach around 57 degrees.   For reference, the normal high for this time of year in Tulsa is closer to 73 degrees.   Keep that umbrella handy Saturday night as well.  There is an 80 percent chance for rain and the low will be near 49 degrees.  
  • U.S. Rep. Joaquín Castro, D-San Antonio, took to Twitter on Thursday to call out a San Antonio school assignment about slavery that he called “unacceptable.”  >> Read more trending news Castro tweeted an image of the assignment, which asked students to list both positive and negative aspects to living as a slave.  The charter school where the assignment came from, Great Hearts, has since responded in a statement on Facebook saying that it would conduct an audit of the textbook the assignment at its Monte Vista North campus came from and decide whether or not to use the textbook in the future. The statement also said that the assignment had only been used by one teacher, at one campus:  'We fully intend to make sure something like this does not happen again and will keep parents posted as we address this issue further,' Great Hearts said of the incident.
  • A volcano in southern Japan has erupted for the first time in 250 years, and authorities set up a no-go zone around the mountain. Mount Io spewed smoke and ash high into the sky Thursday in its first eruption since 1768. Japan’s Meteorological Agency on Friday expanded a no-go zone to the entire mountain from previously just around the volcano’s crater. Explosions have briefly subsided Friday, but officials cautioned residents in nearby towns against falling volcanic rocks and ash. The volcano is part of the Kirishima mountain range on Japan’s southern main island of Kyushu. The area is about 620 miles southwest of Tokyo. Another volcano nearby also erupted violently in March for the first time in seven years. Japan sits on the Pacific “Ring of Fire” and has 110 active volcanoes.
  • The legal fight over the 2016 elections expanded further on Friday, as the Democratic National Committee filed a wide-ranging lawsuit against President Donald Trump’s campaign, top aides, one of Mr. Trump’s sons, his son-in-law, the Russian government, and others caught up in the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 race for the White House. The 66 page lawsuit, filed in the Southern District of New York, where an FBI raid recently took place on the President’s personal lawyer, alleges a broad conspiracy involving Russia, its intelligence service, and members of the Trump inner circle, like former campaign manager Paul Manafort. “No one is above the law,” the lawsuit begins. “In the Trump Campaign, Russia found a willing and active partner in this effort.” DNC lawsuit accuses Trump campaign, Russia of a conspiracy that 'constituted an act of previously unimaginable treachery.' — Steven Portnoy (@stevenportnoy) April 20, 2018 The charges cover everything from racketeering, conspiracy, computer fraud, trespass, and more, claiming the hacking effort was a coordinated effort with the Trump Campaign, designed to damage the bid of Hillary Clinton for the White House. Along with the Russian government and intelligence service known as the GRU, the Democratic lawsuit names Julian Assange and Wikileaks, the Trump Campaign, Donald Trump, Jr., Paul Manafort, Roger Stone, Jared Kushner, and two campaign aides who have already agreed to help the Russia investigation, George Papadopoulos and Richard Gates. The document did not seem to make public any brand new details about how the hacking occurred at the DNC or with members of the Clinton campaign. In the lawsuit, Democrats charge “Russia’s cyberattack on the DNC began only weeks after Trump announced his candidacy for President,” in June 2015. “In April 2016, another set of Russian intelligence agents successfully hacked into the DNC, saying that “massive amounts of data” were taken from DNC servers. The lawsuit makes no mention of the FBI warning to the DNC that it was being hacked, and how that was ignored for weeks by officials at DNC headquarters in Washington. If the lawsuit actually goes forward, it would not only involve evidence being gathered from those being challenged by the Democrats – but some made clear it could open the DNC hacking response to a further review as well in terms of discovery.