ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

heavy-rain-night
68°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 83° L 70°
  • heavy-rain-night
    68°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 83° L 70°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    74°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 83° L 70°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    83°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 83° L 70°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Top Stories

    An Indiana man was arrested after he was found naked in the backyard of a Kentucky home after allegedly attempting to start a fire, claiming he “may be Jesus,” Kentucky New Era reported. >> Read more trending news Austin Michael Johnson, 31, was arrested June 18 by Magoffin County Sheriff’s deputies in Johnson Fork, where he was reportedly naked and lying in the grass. Originally, Johnson would not give deputies his name but told them he “may be Jesus.” Police said Johnson was behind a residence and had poured gasoline around the house. He then grabbed a service wire that provided electricity to an outbuilding on the property and attempted to start a fire, Kentucky New Era reported. When chased away by the homeowner, Johnson got into a car in front of the house before exiting the vehicle and walking down the road. Deputies found him approximately 75 feet from the front gate of the home, Kentucky New Era reported. Johnson was charged with third-degree burglary; first-degree indecent exposure, first offense; third-degree criminal trespassing; second-degree criminal mischief; giving an officer false identifying information; and public intoxication – controlled substance (excludes alcohol).  A court date has not been scheduled, Kentucky New Era reported.
  • Israel's opposition leader has been appointed chairman of the Jewish Agency for Israel, a non-governmental organization responsible for bridging Israel and Jewish communities worldwide. The organization issued a statement Sunday that its board of governors unanimously elected Isaac Herzog, a former Labor Party leader, as its new chairman. Herzog was selected over Energy Minister Yuval Steinitz, a close ally of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. His appointment is seen as a defeat for Netanyahu, but Herzog vowed to work closely with his political rival. Herzog, who starts Aug. 1, succeeds outgoing chairman, former Soviet political prisoner Natan Sharansky. The Jewish Agency is a non-governmental umbrella organization that works closely with the Israeli government to encouraging Jewish immigration and developing ties with Diaspora communities. It had a $362 million budget in 2018.
  • Hundreds of protesters are marching through the German capital to demand an end to burning coal to produce electricity. The demonstrators — many of them families pushing strollers, people on bikes and samba bands — walked through the Berlin's government district on Sunday, ahead of next week's first meeting of Germany's commission on exiting coal use. Germany has invested a lot in renewable energy but still heavily relies on coal, which creates harmful carbon emissions when burnt. About 22 percent of Germany's electricity still comes from burning soft lignite coal — and a further 12 percent from hard coal — while some 33 percent is now generated using renewable energy. Last week, Germany's environment minister said the country will likely miss its goal of cutting emissions by 40 percent by 2020.
  • Republican apprehension over President Donald Trump's next tweet and fear of riling conservative voters is undermining GOP leaders' election-year struggle to shove an immigration bill through the House this week, leaving their prospects dubious. Party leaders are trying to finally secure the votes they need for their wide-ranging bill with tweaks they hope will goose support from the GOP's dueling conservative and moderate wings. But more importantly, wavering Republicans want Trump to provide political cover for immigration legislation that's despised by hard-right voters. His recent statements on their bill and history of abruptly flip-flopping on past health care and spending measures have not been reassuring. Last Tuesday, he privately told House Republicans that he backed their legislation '1,000 percent' and would protect them during their campaigns, lawmakers said. By Friday, he was tweeting that 'Republicans should stop wasting their time on Immigration' and wait until after the November elections, when he said the GOP would approve tougher legislation because it will gain strength in Congress. That proposition is dicey at best. 'I think that the best way to pass legislation is to consistently support a position and help move it forward,' Rep. Greg Walden of Oregon, a senior House Republican. Asked if Trump was doing that, Walden pivoted toward a door and said, 'I'll leave it at that.' The bill would make citizenship a possibility for 'Dreamer' immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. when young. It would also finance Trump's aspirational $25 billion wall with Mexico and curb government agencies from wrenching migrant children from detained parents. The measure is the product of weeks of bargaining between party conservatives and moderates. Even so, the two GOP factions have been unable to resolve their final differences and vote-counters have yet to round up a majority. Republicans are getting no help from Democrats, who uniformly oppose the legislation. The GOP divisions come at a bad time for the party: Elections are approaching and immigration has riveted public attention for months. Republicans who are battling to retain House control have hoped to focus this fall's campaigns on the economy and tax cuts. Instead, Republican blockades against ending deportations of young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children were major news earlier this year. In recent days, the focus has shifted to the Trump administration's wrenching of migrant children from their parents. Neither of those have been good looks for Republicans from swing districts with large numbers of moderate voters — the very incumbents who must be re-elected for the GOP to retain House control. Lawmakers said leaders wanted to round up GOP votes by adding provisions requiring companies to verify workers' citizenship, which conservatives like. They would also ease restrictions on seasonal migrant workers, a priority for farm-district, moderate Republicans. Until now, party leaders have hesitated to include those items because they could end up costing votes, not gaining them. Moderate Republicans don't like the citizenship verification requirement and some conservatives don't like helping immigrants stay in the U.S. Another problem is the two additional provisions don't address the major reason for GOP defections: Conservatives say helping Dreamers stay in the U.S. is handing amnesty to lawbreakers. 'I'm a 'no,'' said Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., a member of the hard-right House Freedom Caucus. He said he couldn't defend helping the Dreamers 'to people waiting in line the right way' to immigrate to the U.S. The House defeated a more conservative immigration alternative last week. GOP leaders said the House will vote on its compromise immigration bill despite Trump's flashing red light on the subject. Top Republicans have wanted to hold the votes, win or lose, partly to defuse an effort by GOP moderates to force the chamber to vote on liberal-leaning bills helping immigrants win citizenship. Those measures could pass the House backed by Democrats and a few Republicans, an outcome that would enrage conservative voters. In addition, some Republicans are eager for roll calls to show voters back home that they've tried to address the issue. 'I think it's important that the House be able to show we can take the action,' said House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif.
  • Zimbabwe's presidential spokesman is ruling out an election delay or a state of emergency after an explosion at the president's campaign rally on Saturday that state media called an assassination attempt. George Charamba told the state-run Sunday Mail newspaper that the historic July 30 vote will go ahead as planned despite the blast that occurred shortly after President Emmerson Mnangagwa addressed a stadium crowd in Bulawayo, an opposition stronghold. At least 49 people, including both of Zimbabwe's vice presidents, were injured in the explosion that Mnangagwa said occurred just 'inches' from him. Dramatic footage showed him walking off the stage and into a crowded tent where the blast occurred seconds later, sending up smoke as people screamed and ran for cover. Mnangagwa was unscathed and later pointed out he'd had numerous attempts on his life in the past, saying he was used to them by now. No arrests have been reported. Police spokeswoman Charity Charamba told reporters on Sunday that investigations continued and a 'substantial reward' was being offered for information. She gave no further details and did not take questions. The president 'will not be driven by vengefulness or a spirit of retribution,' his spokesman told The Sunday Mail. 'Until the investigators pronounce themselves and present the evidence for arrest and prosecution, no one should ascribe motive or blame.' Mnangagwa shortly after the attack told the state broadcaster, without elaborating, that those responsible must have come from 'outside Bulawayo.' He added: 'I can assure you these are my normal enemies.' Zimbabwe's main opposition leader, Nelson Chamisa, condemned the attack. The president has vowed to hold a free and fair election, the first since longtime leader Robert Mugabe stepped down in November under military pressure. Allegations of violence and fraud marked past votes. Mnangagwa, a longtime ally whose firing as Mugabe's deputy after a ruling party feud led to the transfer of power, is under pressure to deliver a credible election that western countries see as key to lifting international sanctions. He has invited election observers from the United States, the European Union and elsewhere for the first time in 16 years. Mugabe rejected Western observers, accusing them of bias. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • The leaders of Germany, France and about a dozen other European Union nations are converging on Brussels for an afternoon of informal talks on differences over migration ahead of a full EU summit that starts next Thursday. Facing a domestic political crisis in Germany over the topic, Chancellor Angela Merkel will be seeking to get EU leaders to forge a joint approach to manage the influx of migrants and refugees. At the heart of the problem lies deep divisions over who should take responsibility for arriving migrants, how long they should be required to accommodate them, and what should be done to help those EU countries hardest hit like Italy and Greece. What started as talks between a half dozen leaders now involves about 16, as others demanded to take part.
  • For Lionel Messi, the time is now. Time to score at the World Cup. Time to save Argentina from another crushing disappointment. Time to live up to his reputation as one of the world's best players. Time to end questions about his performance in the biggest games. One thing there isn't time for is celebration. Messi turned 31 on Sunday, two days before Tuesday's must-win game against Nigeria. Nigeria would advance with a win, and a draw might be enough for the Super Eagles depending on group leader Croatia's result against Iceland. Other stars have come through at this World Cup. Messi's great rival, Portugal's Cristiano Ronaldo, has scored four goals. So has Belgium's Romelu Lukaku. Neymar has a goal for Brazil. Toni Kroos scored when Germany desperately needed it. The only thing Messi has accumulated after two matches is mounting pressure. To leave Russia without even making it past the group stage would be a massive humiliation for Messi. It would also strengthen the impression some fans have of him back home, which is of a maverick genius who goes missing in critical international matches. His only medal with Argentina came 10 years ago — at the Summer Olympics — but other than that there have been only demoralizing defeats. Messi was kept quiet in the World Cup final four years ago as Argentina lost 1-0 to Germany. Messi also played for Argentina when it lost the Copa America final in 2007 — when he didn't shoulder much blame because of his youth — and in 2015 and 2016. After the loss to Chile two years ago, Messi missed a penalty in the shootout and then announced his retirement. But he changed his mind, desperate to make things right by leading Argentina to World Cup success. It was Messi's hat trick — in the final qualifying match at Ecuador — that got Argentina to Russia in the first place. Considering he will be 35 at the next tournament, this may be his last chance. Tuesday's game, therefore, is make-or-break not just for his country but also for him. So far in this tournament, he has missed a penalty — which was poorly taken — in the 1-1 draw against Iceland. Then he had a frustrating game in the 3-0 loss to Croatia. The widely accepted view is that Messi didn't get enough help from his teammates and wasn't getting the ball to his feet quickly enough to trouble the slick Croats. It's a convenient argument when applied to most forwards, but Messi is unique and beyond comparison with all current players except Ronaldo. He is a five-time Golden Ball winner, a scorer of 552 club goals for Barcelona — not to mention 64 for his country — and dozens of hat tricks. If his teammates can't find a way to play to his strengths, Messi should still be good enough to produce at least one moment of magic. Preferably on Tuesday night in St. Petersburg. DOWN IN THE DUMPS The mood at Argentina's training camp has been somber since last Thursday's loss to Croatia in Group D. Messi and other players trained with their heads down on Saturday, while beleaguered coach Jorge Sampaoli asked them to run for only a few minutes and then implored them to 'play and have fun as usual.' CONTRASTING FORTUNES While Sampaoli is under huge strain as he fights to save his reputation, Nigeria coach Gernot Rohr faces less pressure. Rohr was hailed as shrew tactician after making key positional changes that directly influenced the 2-0 win against Iceland on Friday. Now Rohr has a chance to cement his reputation by leading the Super Eagles into the second round, likely at the expense of Sampaoli's job. CAUSE FOR CONCERN Given how easily Croatia found holes in Argentina's defense last week, Sampaoli's defenders have good cause to dread facing Ahmed Musa. Musa's searing pace allows him to hover around the midfield and attack from deep positions. This means Argentina's defenders will be less inclined to push up for fear of leaving too much space behind them for him to exploit. It could end up impacting Messi too, since slowing Argentina's passing game is the key to keeping him quiet. With defenders sitting too deep, this means a slower transition to the midfield and therefore less passing cohesion, and ultimately less possession for Messi. Argentina's best bet is to score first and control the dynamic, forcing Nigeria to push forward and allowing Argentina to find Messi on the break. Then, it will be down to him to do the rest. As usual. ___ Follow Jerome Pugmire on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jeromepugmire ___ More AP World Cup coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/WorldCup
  • At least 25 people were hurt in an explosion in Wuppertal, Germany, police said Sunday. According to The Associated Press, four victims were hurt 'severely' in the blast and ensuing fire late Saturday at a 'several-story building.' The other victims suffered slight injuries, the AP reported.  >> Read more trending news  'It can currently not be ruled out that there are still other people in the building,' police said Sunday, according to Deutsche Welle. 'The rescue efforts are ongoing.' Authorities are looking into what caused the blast, the AP reported. Read more here.
  • KRMG has updated information regarding early voting in Tulsa County. As of early Sunday morning, numbers from Saturday have not been released. However, we do know Thursday and Friday saw 5,000 voters show up at the polls. Election officials tell KRMG they saw a spike in the number of people who registered to vote this year. Also, they've seen a higher turnout among first-time voters. For reference, polling stations will open back up on Tuesday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Pro-Brexit politicians and business figures have urged British Prime Minister Theresa May to be ready to walk away from the European Union without a trade agreement, despite warnings from major manufacturers that a 'no deal' Brexit would be an economic disaster. In an open letter, 60 lawmakers, economists and business chiefs accused the EU of being 'intransigent' in divorce talks and said Britain should threaten to withhold the 39 billion pound ($52 billion) divorce bill it has already agreed to pay. The letter released Sunday by Economists for Free Trade was signed by prominent supporters of a 'hard Brexit,' including ex-U.K. Treasury chief Nigel Lawson, Conservative lawmakers John Redwood and Peter Bone, and Tim Martin, chairman of the Wetherspoons pub chain. They urged U.K. authorities 'to accelerate their preparations for 'no deal' and a move to a World Trade Deal under WTO rules.' That would mean tariffs and other trade barriers between Britain and the EU, and many businesses say it would severely harm the U.K. economy. Airbus, Siemens and BMW have all warned recently that leaving the EU without a free-trade deal would hurt British businesses and cost jobs. Airbus alone employs nearly 14,000 workers in the U.K. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said the warnings from businesses were 'inappropriate' and undermined chances of getting a 'clean Brexit.' 'The more that we undermine Theresa May, the more likely we are to end up with 'a fudge,' which would be an absolute disaster for everyone,' he told the BBC. May's Conservative government is divided between Brexit-backing ministers calling for a clean break so that Britain can strike new trade deals around the world, and those who want to stay closely aligned to the EU, Britain's biggest trading partner. Hunt urged people to unite behind the prime minister, saying she would mix 'cautious pragmatism' with a determination to fulfil voters' decision to leave the EU. On Saturday, however, tens of thousands of anti-Brexit protesters marched in London to demand a new referendum on leaving the EU as Britain marked the second anniversary of its 2016 vote to quit the bloc. 'Brexit is not a done deal. Brexit is not inevitable. Brexit can be stopped,' Liberal Democrat leader Vince Cable told the crowd.
  • A male pedestrian was hit and killed Saturday night while crossing the street in Tulsa. An officer at the scene tells KRMG the auto-pedestrian collision happened around 11:10 p.m. in the westbound lanes of 71st Street near Trenton Avenue. “A black truck comes through and strikes him,” the officer said.  “Then continues on westbound and we were not able to get a good description of the vehicle.” The pedestrian was transported to a nearby hospital where he was later pronounced dead.  As of early Sunday morning, the victim hasn't been identified. KRMG’s told the scene was closed to traffic until around 2 a.m. Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.  
  • You may have heard the storms overnight in and around the Tulsa area.   The possibility of storms continues on Sunday.  This is especially true during the morning hours.   “We’ll probably start the morning with lingering storm chances,” National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Lacy said.  “Those storm chances will gradually go away during the afternoon.” The high for Sunday will be close to 91 degrees.   The Tulsa area will have more chances for storms Sunday night.  NWS is reporting the low will be near 77 degrees.   There is a severe thunderstorm watch in effect for Tulsa and surrounding counties until 10 a.m.
  • A 37-year-old Broken Arrow man faces a long list of sexual-related charges in connection with having an alleged sexual relationship with a 15-year-old girl.  Court records show Larado Smith was charged on Friday with 12 counts of second-degree rape and three counts of forcible sodomy.  Tulsa World reports the sexual acts apparently happened at the girl's home when her parents were not home.  When police found out about what was going on, a sting was set up. They posed as the girl over social media.    Smith showed up at the teenager's home and was arrested.  He has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.  
  • Today may not be the best day for outdoor activities. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Teague says to keep an umbrella handy.  This is especially true during the afternoon hours.   “We are still holding on for a chance of showers and thunderstorms during the day,” Teague said.  “Again, another chance of showers and thunderstorms late into the evening.” The high is expected to reach around 86 degrees. There is better news for Sunday.  The sun is expected to come out, storm chances are low and the high will be close to 93 degrees.  
  • As President Donald Trump this week threatened $200 billion in new tariffs on Chinese imports, and then warned Europe that he would slap a 20 percent tariff on imported automobiles, members of both parties Congress accused the administration of starting a trade war which could cause collateral economic damage across the United States. The differences were on display at a hearing Wednesday with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who took a bipartisan tongue lashing on a recent round of tariffs levied on imported steel and aluminum from Canada, Mexico and Europe. “We’re picking winners and losers,” argued Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA), who said those tariffs were already hurting businesses in his home state. “Probably resulting – in my view – in far more jobs being lost than being gained,” Toomey told Ross, citing a very well-known Pennsylvania company that could find it less expensive to move jobs from the U.S. to Canada. Sen. @PatToomey tells Ross that $KHZ moved some @HeinzKetchup_US manufacturing to Pennsylvania from Canada – but could move back now that Canada plans to tax American ketchup as retaliation for steel and aluminum tariffs. — Kayla Tausche (@kaylatausche) June 20, 2018 Almost every Senator on the panel had a story of a small business that was feeling the pinch due to Trump Administration tariffs, impacting all sorts of agricultural products, as well as manufacturing, big and small. “Do you think we’re in a trade war right now?” asked Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA). “Because I do,” as Cantwell rattled off farm products that were losing markets because of retaliatory tariff measures. Ross downplayed the cost of higher imported steel and aluminum, basically making the case that economic hardships were being overplayed. “It’s a fraction of a penny on a can of Campbell’s soup, it’s a fraction on a can of Budweiser, it’s a fraction on a can of Coke,” Ross said. That did not please the Senator from the state of Coca-Cola. “Although a couple of pennies on a can is not much, a couple pennies times a billion is lots,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA). “We’re hit harder than any other state by the Canadian retaliatory tariffs,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), warning the Trump Administration against tariffs on imported automobiles, as GOP Senators labeled such actions a tax on consumers. “Steel prices are going up – not just for foreign steel subject to tariffs, but also for U.S. steel,” complained Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). “Mexico’s buying their wheat from Argentina and their corn from Brazil,” said Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS), as he told Ross that Kansas wheat exports were encountering troubles because of new retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports, bringing bad economic news on the farm report. Ross simply told Senators if other countries put new tariffs on U.S. exports, that was out of his control. “We have no control over what another country does in retaliation,” Ross said. The bipartisan complaints clearly had no impact, as by Friday, President Trump was on Twitter, issuing new threats against European auto imports. Based on the Tariffs and Trade Barriers long placed on the U.S. & its great companies and workers by the European Union, if these Tariffs and Barriers are not soon broken down and removed, we will be placing a 20% Tariff on all of their cars coming into the U.S. Build them here! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 23, 2018 As Democrats registered their opposition, they also couldn’t help but note the oddity of a Republican President going against what’s been a bedrock belief of the GOP. “I feel like I’ve gone down a rabbit hole,” said Sen. Clare McCaskill (D-MO), who said she found it hard to believe the party of free trade now had a President in office who was doing the exact opposite. “In a chaotic and frankly incompetent manner, you’re picking winners and losers,” McCaskill told Ross. But for the President, this is about re-setting trade deals, which he says were tilted against the United States. #President #Trump #speaking in #Duluth, #Minnesota: We want fair & reciprocal #trade not stupid trade that we've had for years. We've been ripped off by all of our friends. And frankly the do a much better job than our enemies. #MAGA #economy #POTUS #TrumpTrain — Leanne Howard Kenney (@neeneebucket) June 21, 2018 “As far as trade is concerned with other countries, we want fair and reciprocal trade, we don’t want stupid trade like we had for so long,” the President said at a rally in Minnesota. “Remember the world reciprocal,” Mr. Trump said. “We have been ripped off by almost every country on Earth, our friends and our enemies.” “But those days are over,” the President said to cheers from the crowd. But while they’re cheering Mr. Trump on the stump, at the U.S. Capitol, they’re worried about a trade war. “We’re getting into a war that’s going to cost lots of billions of dollars,” Isakson warned.