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    Authorities investigating the decades-old disappearances of several girls say they've found possible evidence during a search of an abandoned suburban Detroit warehouse. Warren police Commissioner Bill Dwyer says police and the FBI searched a warehouse Monday formerly used by Arthur Ream, who was convicted in 2008 in the slaying of a 13-year-old girl. Dwyer says they found evidence including 'what we believe are very valuable documents,' but no human remains. In May, police dug for the remains of up to seven missing girls including Kimberly King, who disappeared in 1979 at age 12. That search began after police interviewed Ream, who was convicted in the 1986 death of 13-year-old Cindy Zarzycki. Her remains were found near the same Macomb Township woods. Ream has denied knowing anything about the missing girls.
  • London police say investigators are treating a Tuesday morning crash outside the Houses of Parliament as a “terrorist incident.” Here are the latest updates: Update 5:46 a.m. EDT Aug. 14: A man in his late 20s has been arrested “on suspicion of terrorist offenses” in connection with the crash that left “a number of people” injured, London police said in a news release. The injuries are not believed to be life-threatening. The man, who was driving a silver Ford Fiesta, struck cyclists and pedestrians before hitting security barriers in the area, police said. The car was not carrying any passengers, police said. “At this stage, we are treating this as a terrorist incident and the Met's Counter Terrorism Command is now leading the investigation,” the news release said. Authorities are requesting anyone with photos, videos or information about the incident to contact police. Read more here. Original report: London’s Counter-Terrorism Command is leading the probe into a Tuesday morning crash outside the U.K. Houses of Parliament, The Associated Press is reporting. Police said a man driving a car slammed into security barriers in the area about 7:37 a.m., hurting pedestrians. None of the injured “are in life-threatening condition,” the AP reported. Police arrested the man. Metropolitan police tweeted that authorities are “keeping an open mind” about the investigation. In March 2017, four people were killed in a terror attack in the same area, the AP reported. – The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Ecuadorean officials say at least 23 people died and another 14 were injured when a long-distance bus overturned on a highway near Ecuador's capital. The Colombian-registered bus was traveling to Quito and hit another vehicle in an area known as dead man's curve at about 3 a.m. Tuesday. Quito district security secretary Juan Zapata told Colombia's Blu Radio that Colombian and Venezuelan nationals are among the dead. Ecuador's emergency response agency said the bus overturned after running into a smaller vehicle.
  • Coca-Cola says it's buying a minority ownership stake in sports drink maker BodyArmor for an undisclosed amount, marking the latest move by the world's biggest beverage maker to diversify its offerings. The Atlanta company said Tuesday the deal will allow it to increase its stake in BodyArmor. BodyArmor will get access to Coca-Cola's bottling system, which the companies say could increase distribution. Coca-Cola also makes the sports drink Powerade, while rival PepsiCo Inc. makes the more popular Gatorade. Coca-Cola has been investing in newer drinks to become what CEO James Quincey calls a 'total beverage' company as Americans move away from traditional sodas. Its investments in recent years have included milk that is strained to have more protein and a push behind sparkling water.
  • U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is making a pitch to Brazil for building a closer defense partnership with the United States, including in space research. Mattis spoke Tuesday to military students at Brazil's senior war college in Rio de Janeiro. He encouraged them to remember and follow their nation's long tradition of working with the U.S. military, including as allies in World War II. Mattis' visit reflected his emphasis on strengthening alliances, demonstrating U.S. concern about instability in Venezuela, and countering the influence of China and Russia. Later this week he will visit Argentina, Chile and Colombia.
  • President Donald Trump called former White House aide and “The Apprentice” star Omarosa Manigault Newman a “dog” in a Tuesday morning tweet praising Chief of Staff John Kelly for firing her late last year. >> Read more trending news “When you give a crazy, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn’t work out,” Trump wrote. “Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog!” The tweet came after Manigault Newman released audio recordings that she says were made during her time in the White House. In one clip, the president can be heard telling Manigault Newman that he was never told of her firing ahead of time. >> Trump denies using racial slur during 'Celebrity Apprentice' “Nobody even told me about it. You know they run a big operation, but I didn’t know it,” a man, purportedly Trump, says in the recording. “I don’t love you leaving at all.” >> Listen to the clip here (WARNING: Audio includes strong language.)  Manigault Newman also released a recording allegedly made while Kelly was informing her of her dismissal in December. 'It's come to my attention over the last few months that there's been some pretty, in my opinion, significant integrity issues,' a man, purportedly Kelly, can be heard saying in the recording. 'I think it's important to understand that if we make this a friendly departure ... you can look at your time here in the White House as a year of service to the nation, and then you can go on without any type of difficulty in the future relative to your reputation.' Newman told 'Meet the Press' that she believed the latter was a threat. >> Omarosa’s book promises 'jaw-dropping' account on White House from Trump insider 'He goes on to say that 'things can get ugly for you,'' said Newman, whose book, 'Unhinged: An Insider's Account of the Trump White House,' hit stores Tuesday. 'The chief of staff of the United States, under the direction of the president of the United States, threatening me on damage to my reputation and things getting ugly for me – that's downright criminal.' Manigault Newman also says she has heard audio tape of Trump using the N-word, a claim the president denies. “I don’t have that word in my vocabulary, and never have,” Trump wrote Monday night in a tweet. “She made it up.”
  • A river selfie with some bears has landed a man in hot water in Alaska. Anchorage Daily News reported that a man waded into a stream in Alaska’s Katmai National Park and Preserve to get a photo with some brown bears that were fishing for salmon at Brooks Falls. The section of the park was closed to tourists, the National Park Service said in a statement. The encounter happened last week, KTVA reported.  But the closed status didn’t stop the man and two others from entering the restricted area.  Park service officials told the Daily News that the man used an emergency exit of a bear viewing platform to get a closer look at the wildlife.  The entire thing was caught on live streaming cameras.  >> Read more trending news  Viewers of the live streams alerted officials about the unauthorized bear encounter, KTVA reported. “In doing so, the group violated National Park Service wildlife viewing regulations, putting themselves and wildlife at risk,” Mark Sturm, superintendent of Katmai National Park, told the Daily News. Charges are pending. It is illegal to be within 50 yards of a bear that is “using a concentrated food source.” “People need to recognize that these are wild brown bears. These visitors are lucky that they escaped the situation without injury. The possible consequences for the bears and themselves could have been disastrous,” Strum said.
  • Lordy, there are tapes. And tapes and tapes and more tapes. Omarosa Manigault Newman's former colleagues say they are shocked that she secretly recorded private conversations with President Donald Trump and his chief of staff. But surreptitious tapes in Trump's world are nothing new, with the president himself once suggesting he secretly recorded fired FBI Director James Comey (who responded by saying : 'Lordy, I hope there are tapes'). Trump's ex-attorney Michael Cohen has his own cache of recordings, too. ' What to know about the latest White House tapes and why they matter: FROM 'LOYAL FRIEND' TO 'DOG' Trump on Tuesday called Manigault Newman, who is African-American, a 'dog.' But he clearly thought highly enough of her to give her a top post at his White House following his election. A former contestant on his TV show 'The Apprentice,' Manigault Newman joined the campaign and became an assistant to the president, earning $179,000 a year as director of communications for the White House office of public liaison. She lasted shy of one year, getting escorted off White House grounds in December 2017. (Manigault Newman later joined the cast of the reality TV show 'Celebrity Big Brother,' where she tearfully told a fellow contestant that the nation is 'not going to be OK' under Trump.) Now promoting a new book, Manigault Newman has released a recording of White House chief of staff John Kelly accusing her of 'significant integrity issues' and saying, 'If we make this a friendly departure ... you can go on without any type of difficulty in the future relative to your reputation.' In another recording that Manigault Newman says was taken the next day, Trump can be heard saying he was surprised and disappointed that she was leaving the White House: 'Nobody even told me about it ... I don't love you leaving at all.' On Tuesday, she released a third recording to CBS 'This Morning' that suggested top campaign staffers knew Trump had used the 'N-word' and discussed a potential response if it leaked. ___ SMART MOVE? Manigault Newman defends her secret recordings, saying otherwise 'no one in America would believe me.' That's possible, considering her reputation as a reality show villain on 'The Apprentice.' She also has offered differing accounts on her claim that Trump used a racial slur. In her book 'Unhinged,' Manigault Newman cites unnamed sources saying the president was recorded using the 'N-word' repeatedly on the reality show. She later said she heard the tape herself. When asked to clarify on NBC's 'Meet the Press,' Manigault Newman said she listened to the recording after finishing the book during a trip to Los Angeles. The White House and Trump have pounced on the discrepancy and her reputation as someone who seeks the spotlight in a bid to discredit her. Hogan Gidley, deputy press secretary, said media outlets never took her seriously until she released the tapes. 'This is someone now that makes me concerned. I wonder if she is recording some of the things that we've talked about as well,' he told Fox News' 'Fox & Friends.' ___ BUT SHE ISN'T ALONE Manigault Newman clearly wasn't the only one who felt she needed to protect herself with audio recordings. Before becoming president, Trump himself had a reputation for quietly recording conversations during his business dealings in New York. 'He had to protect himself from allegations that would come up, both personal and business,' said Sam Nunberg, a former Trump campaign aide. Yet Trump expressed shock and disdain after Cohen, his longtime personal attorney, released a recording in which the two appear to discuss a $150,000 payout by a third party to a former Playboy model who alleged an affair with Trump. In a tweet , Trump called it 'inconceivable' and 'totally unheard of' that a lawyer would tape a client. Gidley and other White House staffers are now acting shocked as well. 'The thought of doing something like that to a fellow employee, not to mention the leader of the free world, is completely disgraceful,' Gidley said. ___ Associated Press writer Jill Colvin contributed to this report.
  • At least 11 people were killed Tuesday when part of a highway bridge collapsed in northwestern Italy, officials said. Here are the latest updates:  Update 8:10 a.m. EDT Aug. 14: At least 11 people are dead and 20 vehicles were affected when part of a highway bridge collapsed in Genoa, according to The Associated Press. At least two survivors were rescued from the rubble and flown to a nearby hospital, a firefighter told Italy’s RAI state TV. Original report: Emergency crews were searching for victims Tuesday after part of a highway bridge collapsed in northwestern Italy. According to The Associated Press, about 10 vehicles were affected when a 650-foot portion of the Morandi Bridge gave way. At least one survivor has been rescued from the rubble, Italy’s ANSA news agency reported. >> Read more trending news  Although local news outlets reported that people had died in the collapse, authorities had not confirmed that information, the AP reported. The collapse came as a “sudden and violent storm” hit the area, according to the AP.   – The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • London police say investigators are treating a Tuesday morning crash outside the Houses of Parliament as a “terrorist incident.” Here are the latest updates: Update 5:46 a.m. EDT Aug. 14: A man in his late 20s has been arrested “on suspicion of terrorist offenses” in connection with the crash that left “a number of people” injured, London police said in a news release. The injuries are not believed to be life-threatening. The man, who was driving a silver Ford Fiesta, struck cyclists and pedestrians before hitting security barriers in the area, police said. The car was not carrying any passengers, police said. “At this stage, we are treating this as a terrorist incident and the Met's Counter Terrorism Command is now leading the investigation,” the news release said. Authorities are requesting anyone with photos, videos or information about the incident to contact police. Read more here. Original report: London’s Counter-Terrorism Command is leading the probe into a Tuesday morning crash outside the U.K. Houses of Parliament, The Associated Press is reporting. Police said a man driving a car slammed into security barriers in the area about 7:37 a.m., hurting pedestrians. None of the injured “are in life-threatening condition,” the AP reported. Police arrested the man. Metropolitan police tweeted that authorities are “keeping an open mind” about the investigation. In March 2017, four people were killed in a terror attack in the same area, the AP reported. – The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • With less than three months until the mid-term elections for the U.S. House and Senate, four more states hold primaries today for the Congress, but the roster of races is unlikely to produce the news associated with last week’s tight race in a special U.S. House election in Ohio, which amplified questions about whether the GOP can maintain control of Capitol Hill after November. Primaries take place on Tuesday in four states: Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont and Wisconsin. No sitting incumbents in the Congress are on upset alert at this point – though there could always be some out-of-the-blue defeat that no one saw coming; but really, this is more about setting the roster for the final races in November. At this point in time, the Congressional change for November is 57 seats in the House, and 3 in the Senate. (Please note that various news organizations calculate these numbers differently.) As you can see from the data, the total change is already equal to that for the House in the 2016 election cycle, as a large amount of turnover continues in the Congress. Most people don’t realize that currently in the U.S. House, almost 200 of the 435 seats are held by lawmakers who were elected since 2012 – that number will grow substantially after the 2018 elections. In the Senate, fully half of Senators have less than eight years in office, just over one term. The primaries for 2018 are rapidly coming to an end – next Tuesday brings Alaska and Wyoming; Arizona and Florida vote on August 28. Then, after Labor Day, Massachusetts, Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island finish out the primaries for the 2018 mid-term elections for Congress. November is not that far away.
  • The Wagoner County Sheriff’s Office is focusing on busting sex offenders who fail to register. Wagoner County deputies say they recently discovered that Raymond Bryant was registering at his parent’s home near Coweta, but had not lived there in years.  Investigators learned that Bryant has was self-employed doing lawn care jobs.  They set up a meeting last Wednesday to discuss a job at a convenience store in Coweta.  When Bryant arrived, he was taken into custody for his outstanding warrant without incident.   Bryant was transported to the Wagoner County Detention Center and was booked in on a 10,000 bond. Sheriff Chris Elliott said, “We will continue to aggressively pursue any offender that does not register as a sex offender when they are required to do so.”
  • Embarking on a mission that scientists have been dreaming of since the Sputnik era, a NASA spacecraft hurtled Sunday toward the sun on a quest to unlock some of its mysteries by getting closer than any object sent before. If all goes well, the Parker Solar Probe will fly straight through the wispy edges of the sun’s corona, or outer atmosphere, in November. In the years ahead, it will gradually get within 3.8 million miles of the surface, its instruments protected from the extreme heat and radiation by a revolutionary new carbon heat shield and other high-tech wizardry. Altogether, the Parker probe will make 24 close approaches to our star during the seven-year, $1.5 billion journey. “Wow, here we go. We’re in for some learning over the next several years,” said Eugene Parker, the 91-year-old astrophysicist for whom the spacecraft is named.  It was Parker who accurately theorized 60 years ago the existence of solar wind — the supersonic stream of charged particles blasting off the sun and coursing through space, sometimes wreaking havoc on electrical systems on Earth. This is the first time NASA has named a spacecraft after a living person.
  • The 'Queen of Soul,' legendary singer and songwriter Aretha Franklin, is gravely ill, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news Family members confirmed the news Monday to WDIV-TV after a report from entertainment site Showbiz411 claimed Franklin, 76, was being surrounded by friends and family in Detroit. Tom Joyner, a nationally syndicated radio host and friend of Franklin’s, said Monday that Franklin has been in hospice care for a week, according to The Detroit News.  Franklin had announced plans to retire from touring in February 2017 to focus on her family and a few select projects, the News reported. 'I feel very, very enriched and satisfied with respect to where my career came from, and where it is now,” Franklin told WDIV in 2017. “I'll be pretty much satisfied, but I'm not going to go anywhere and just sit down and do nothing. That wouldn't be good either.” Franklin has canceled several concerts this year due to health issues, Fox13Memphis reported. According to The Associated Press, “she was ordered by her doctor to stay off the road and rest up.” She performed  in her hometown of Detroit in June 2017, the Detroit Free Press reported. She ended the concert with an appeal for those in the crown to, “Please keep me in your prayers,” according to the newspaper. >> Photos: Aretha Franklin through the years She last performed in November at Elton John’s AIDS Foundation gala in New York City, the News reported. Franklin was born March 25, 1942, in Memphis, Tennessee. Her family moved to Detroit when she was young, according to Fox13Memphis. Franklin started singing when she was young, with encouragement from her mother, Barbara, and her father, the Rev. C.L. Franklin. She started out singing gospel but launched a career in secular music after she turned 18. She rose to fame after signing in 1967 with Atlantic Records. Franklin’s career, spanning six decades, has spawned hits including “Respect,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and “Chain of Fools.” She’s considered one of the best-selling artists of all time, selling more than 75 million albums worldwide. Franklin was inducted in 1987 to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. She’s earned 18 Grammy Awards and a Presidential Medal of Freedom for her work. In 2005, then-President George W. Bush described Franklin as “a woman of achievement, deep character and a loving heart.” Check back for updates to this developing story.