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Mom mad at high school for throwing out her son's lunch
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Mom mad at high school for throwing out her son's lunch

Mom mad at high school for throwing out her son's lunch
Photo Credit: Russell Mills

Mom mad at high school for throwing out her son's lunch

A Tulsa mom says her son shouldn't have to go hungry just because he forgot lunch money, but Tulsa Public Schools says by that age, he needs to be more responsible.

The mom, who wished to remain anonymous, told KRMG that her son was told he couldn't eat because he owed $3.

She says they took his tray and threw the food away, and she feels like the situation could have been handled differently.

"Let me know that he owes money, send a note home or something, but I don't think a child should be told no, they can't eat," she told KRMG. "I don't think that if he forgets his money one day, it should just be 'no, you can't eat.'"

Chris Payne, spokesman for Tulsa Public Schools, tells KRMG the district policy is that no high school student should be allowed to charge meals.

He says it's about teaching students responsibility.

"In the real world if you don't have your money and you go to McDonald's, they're not going to serve you," Payne told KRMG.

Students at the elementary and middle school levels are allowed to charge up to around $6 or $7, depending on the individual school.

And, he says, some high school principals allow a little latitude, but the district policy is clear.

"We, at the high school level, do not allow charges for lunches."

Some districts around the country have programs where students can earn their lunches by working in the cafeteria.

But Oklahoma's stringent food handling laws remove that option from the table, Payne says.

Plus, he said, "we really do want their emphasis to be on learning."

Read More
  • The Acting Secretary of the Navy apologized on Monday evening after a transcript and recording of his remarks to the crew of the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt became public, acknowledging that he should not have called the ousted Captain 'too naive and too stupid' to be in command of the aircraft carrier. 'I do not think Captain Brett Crozier is naive nor stupid,' read a statement from Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly, who just hours earlier had said he stood by his remarks aboard the carrier. In that speech, Modly blasted Crozier for sending a plea for help about Coronavirus cases on board the ship to too many people, resulting in it being leaked to the press. 'It's now become a big controversy in Washington, D.C.,' Modly told sailors in a speech broadcast over the ship's speakers, which was recorded, and then leaked to the military affairs website Task and Purpose. In that speech, the Acting Navy Secretary said Crozier was 'too naive or too stupid to be the commanding officer of a ship like this,' prompting one of those listening to respond with an expletive. Crozier, who left the vessel in Guam to loud cheers and chants of his name on Friday, has reportedly tested positive for the Coronavirus. The statement issued by the Navy came not long after President Donald Trump told reporters at the White House that he may get involved in the fracas.
  • Tulsa Police are still trying to sort out exactly what happened during a shooting at a house near 3rd and Sheridan in Tulsa just before noon on Monday. Police say it started when a group of around seven people tried to kick in a door at a house. They say that someone inside the house opened the door and started yelling at them. The group fled, but police say one person in the group fired shots at the house along the way, hitting it multiple times. Some shots hit a neighboring house too, police said. The group apparently ran right by neighbor Tawana Ogle's house as they fled. “I was in bed, watching TV, and I heard 'POW POW POW POW POW,' like nine shots, and I thought, hell, they're right there on the front porch, 'cause it was that loud,” Ogle said. Police initially described the incident as a gun battle, but it's now not clear if anyone at the house fired shots or not. A person showed up at a hospital with a life-threatening gunshot wound about an hour after the shooting, but police aren't certain that's connected to this case. They say the same house has been shot at twice before in recent weeks.
  • The Coronavirus continued its assault on Americans Monday as the overall death toll crossed 10,000, though the Governor of the worst hit area in the nation says it's possible his state could be turning the corner in the virus outbreak, which has jammed big city hospitals and crippled portions of the U.S. economy. The latest figures from New York State - which reported 599 deaths in the last 24 hours - put the U.S. over 10,000, with almost half of those deaths coming from the outbreak in the Empire State. 'The number of deaths are up once again,' Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced at his Monday briefing, though he noted that the number of deaths in his state have been 'flat for two days,' raising some hope about the course of the virus in America's largest metropolis. 'While none of this is good news, the flattening - possible flattening of the curve - is better than the increases that we have seen,' Cuomo told reporters on Monday. New York remains Ground Zero for U.S. infections from the virus, with seven counties in and around the city in the top ten for total deaths in the country. On the ground in New York, data released by New York City health officials showed a continued decline in people seeking treatment at emergency rooms in the city, as well as a drop in those being admitted for treatment because of influenza-like illnesses. Governor Cuomo was not declaring victory. 'There’s a real danger in getting overconfident too quickly,' the Governor told reporters. Some health experts were allowing themselves to get more confident, especially after looking at models on the Coronavirus. Federal health experts continue to hammer home the message that social distancing works - and that is the best tool for Americans to use in fighting the virus outbreak. “If we do this, we could potentially be better,” said Dr. Deborah Birks, a top White House Coronavirus adviser.
  • Leaders of Hillcrest Health System say hospitals have experienced significant declines in routine and elective procedures as patients adhere to “stay-at-home” guidelines due to COVID-19. “As the virus continues to spread, we must ensure we can provide life-saving care with the necessary caregivers and resources we have available,” said Kevin Gross, CEO of Hillcrest HealthCare System. “As a result, we’ve had to make difficult workforce decisions.”  Hillcrest is realigning services and making staffing changes including reassignment of staff, reduction of hours, furlough and pay reduction for exempt employees at the hospital and other facilities. The temporary furlough of approximately 600 employees (or 9 percent of total) is expected to last up to 90 days. Employees may be called back sooner based on need. “We know this is a difficult time for workers and families,” Gross said. “We are hopeful that these measures will be short-lived. We are grateful for the service of all staff members and we remain hopeful that over the next few months, we will return to normal hours for our employees. 
  • COVID-19 tests will be available in Okmulgee County this week. The Okmulgee County Health Department will provide testing at its facility on Wednesday, April 8th from 9am to 1pm. The health department said testing is by appointment only. To make an appointment, call 539-286-4582. To receive a test, the health department requires the following: -You must be at least 16 or older -You must have a fever of 100.4 or higher, or have a cough, or have shortness of breath The health department said only one person per household will be tested.

Washington Insider

  • The Acting Secretary of the Navy apologized on Monday evening after a transcript and recording of his remarks to the crew of the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt became public, acknowledging that he should not have called the ousted Captain 'too naive and too stupid' to be in command of the aircraft carrier. 'I do not think Captain Brett Crozier is naive nor stupid,' read a statement from Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly, who just hours earlier had said he stood by his remarks aboard the carrier. In that speech, Modly blasted Crozier for sending a plea for help about Coronavirus cases on board the ship to too many people, resulting in it being leaked to the press. 'It's now become a big controversy in Washington, D.C.,' Modly told sailors in a speech broadcast over the ship's speakers, which was recorded, and then leaked to the military affairs website Task and Purpose. In that speech, the Acting Navy Secretary said Crozier was 'too naive or too stupid to be the commanding officer of a ship like this,' prompting one of those listening to respond with an expletive. Crozier, who left the vessel in Guam to loud cheers and chants of his name on Friday, has reportedly tested positive for the Coronavirus. The statement issued by the Navy came not long after President Donald Trump told reporters at the White House that he may get involved in the fracas.
  • The Coronavirus continued its assault on Americans Monday as the overall death toll crossed 10,000, though the Governor of the worst hit area in the nation says it's possible his state could be turning the corner in the virus outbreak, which has jammed big city hospitals and crippled portions of the U.S. economy. The latest figures from New York State - which reported 599 deaths in the last 24 hours - put the U.S. over 10,000, with almost half of those deaths coming from the outbreak in the Empire State. 'The number of deaths are up once again,' Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced at his Monday briefing, though he noted that the number of deaths in his state have been 'flat for two days,' raising some hope about the course of the virus in America's largest metropolis. 'While none of this is good news, the flattening - possible flattening of the curve - is better than the increases that we have seen,' Cuomo told reporters on Monday. New York remains Ground Zero for U.S. infections from the virus, with seven counties in and around the city in the top ten for total deaths in the country. On the ground in New York, data released by New York City health officials showed a continued decline in people seeking treatment at emergency rooms in the city, as well as a drop in those being admitted for treatment because of influenza-like illnesses. Governor Cuomo was not declaring victory. 'There’s a real danger in getting overconfident too quickly,' the Governor told reporters. Some health experts were allowing themselves to get more confident, especially after looking at models on the Coronavirus. Federal health experts continue to hammer home the message that social distancing works - and that is the best tool for Americans to use in fighting the virus outbreak. “If we do this, we could potentially be better,” said Dr. Deborah Birks, a top White House Coronavirus adviser.
  • President Donald Trump this weekend bluntly warned Americans to prepare for what his team said could be one of the roughest weeks yet against the Coronavirus, as the U.S. has now had four consecutive days with over 1,000 new deaths related to the virus outbreak. 'This will be probably be the toughest week,' the President told reporters at a Saturday briefing. 'There will be a lot of death, unfortunately.' Top federal health officials agreed with that assessment. 'Right now, we're seeing - as well all said correctly - that this is probably going to be a really bad week,' said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top infectious disease expert for the U.S. government. Fauci joined the President in again urging Americans to do what they can to limit their social activities, and thus limit the spread of the virus. 'The only tool - but the best tool that we have - is mitigation,' Fauci told reporters at a Sunday night White House briefing. Fauci reminded reporters that the measures being taken by Americans in terms of social distancing take about two and a half weeks to show up in terms of fewer cases, and a drop in the number of deaths. 'People really understand the responsibility they have for themselves, their family and for the country,' Fauci said at the White House. Fauci's colleague, Dr. Deborah Birx, told reporters that health officials continue to see the most problems in the New York City metro area, as well as in New Orleans and Louisiana as a whole. Birx also name-checked Massachusetts, Michigan, Washington State, Illinois, Colorado, Pennsylvania, and Washington, D.C. - where there have been rumblings in recent days about a possible broader spread of the virus. 'We do see hopeful signs in Spain and Italy. They have completed nearly four weeks of mitigation,' Birx said, telling Americans they should follow the lead of those nations in terms of social distancing, as a way to stop the spread of the virus. During Sunday's briefing, the President repeated his endorsement of the use of hydroxychloroquine - a drug often associated with malaria treatment - to be used against the Coronavirus. 'What really do we have to lose?' the President asked reporters at one point, encouraging people to use the drug, even though it has not been specifically found to stop the virus. 'It may not work, in which case, hey - it didn't work,' the President said at one point. 'And it may work, in which case, it may save a lot of lives.' 'If it does help, great,' Mr. Trump added. 'If it doesn't help, we gave it a shot.' The President's promotion of hydroxychloriquine has drawn concerns from Fauci - who has noted the lack of broader trials - but Mr. Trump has pressed forward with the idea, bolstered by support among GOP lawmakers and conservative media. On Sunday, when one reporter tried to ask Fauci his opinion, the President stepped in and did not let Fauci answer. 'You know how many times he's answered that question?' the President said to a reporter from CNN. '15 times. You don't have to ask that question. He's answered that question 15 times.' The death toll from the Coronavirus in the U.S. will go over 10,000 people on Monday.
  • With the threat of the Coronavirus spurring calls from Democrats for broader use of mail-in voting in the 2020 General Election, President Donald Trump on Friday sternly denounced the idea, even though he just cast a ballot in recent weeks using a mail-in ballot system in Florida. 'It shouldn't be mail-in voting, it should be you go to a booth,' President Trump said at his regular Coronavirus briefing. 'You don't send it in the mail where people pick up all sorts of bad things could happen,' Mr. Trump added, alleging that mail-in elections could create fraud. 'I think a lot of people cheat with mail-in voting,' the President said, though his special commission on voter fraud made no such findings. But while the President and some Republicans in Congress have objected to the effort to expand mail-in voting for this year because of the virus outbreak, not all GOP elected officials oppose the idea of expanded mail-in voting opportunities. With the Coronavirus causing troubles right now, the Secretary of State in Georgia - a Republican - is sending absentee ballot request forms to every single registered voter in the state for the May 19 primary election. 'They will simply have to fill out and return the application to vote by mail in the upcoming elections with no in-person risk of exposure to COVID-19,' Georgia Secretary of State John Raffesnperger's office said. In Nevada, state officials decided to go one step further than Georgia. 'All active registered voters in Nevada will be mailed an absentee ballot for the primary election,' Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske announced. 'No action or steps, such as submitting an absentee ballot request application, will be required by individual voters in order to receive a ballot in the mail.' While the President said voters should use a voting booth, Mr. Trump voted absentee - by mail - in the Florida Primary just last month. Federal elections official estimate almost 24 percent of the votes cast in the 2016 election were cast using absentee-by-mail balloting, an option used by the President's home state of Florida and over 30 other states. Some states - most notably Washington, Oregon, California and Colorado - have shifted to mail-in voting.
  • A new report from the Labor Department on Friday showed the economic storm associated with the Coronavirus battering the U.S. economy in March, causing the loss of 701,000 jobs, and pushing the jobless rate up by almost one percent, the largest monthly increase in over forty five years. The unemployment rate was at 4.4 percent in March, not far under the 4.7 percent rate when President Donald Trump took office in January of 2017, the highest jobless rate of his presidency. 'Employment in leisure and hospitality fell by 459,000, mainly in food services and drinking places,' the Labor Department reported.  'Notable declines also occurred in health care and social assistance, professional and business services, retail trade, and construction,' the report added. Lawmakers and economists readily acknowledged upcoming unemployment reports would likely be even worse. 'Elevated unemployment at 4.4 percent in the March jobs report shows only a glimpse of the surge in layoffs caused by the economic impact of the coronavirus,' said Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX). '700k is an awful jobs month,' tweeted Austan Goolsbee, a top economic adviser under President Barack Obama. 'That it’s the best news we will get for some time should give us a terrible pit in our stomach.' Last week, 3.3 million Americans filed for initial jobless claims. That number doubled this week, as 6.6 million Americans made similar filings, indicating massive amounts of unemployment. The massive amount of job losses have sent state governments scrambling to help people seeking jobless benefits. But some states have found their systems ill-prepared for such a surge. “I'm in Florida and get an error on the unemployment website when trying to sign-up,” one person told me.  “I call and the phone number is busy.”