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Local
Man spotted urinating on a business fence
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Man spotted urinating on a business fence

Man spotted urinating on a business fence

Man spotted urinating on a business fence

Sometimes, when you have to go, you have to go.

We're told two Tulsa officers on patrol observed a man urinating on a business fence Friday night.

Carl Wilson was spotted around 9:50 p.m., near Cameron and Denver.

Police say when officers approached Wilson, his private area was showing in full view of the public.

It didn't take long for the officers to see Wilson was showing signs of being intoxicated.  His speech was said to be slurred and officers could smell an odor of alcohol coming from his breath.

At first, Wilson was a little bit apprehensive about being taken into custody.  Eventually, Wilson complied with demands and was arrested.

He was taken to the Tulsa County Jail.

Police say Wilson faces counts of public intoxication and openly urinating.

Read More
  • A teenager accused of a deadly shooting in Tulsa is going to prison. 17-year old Antonio Wilson was arrested for the death of Leonard Tillis in September of 2018. Wilson was originally charged with murder but took a plea deal, dropping the charge to manslaughter. Wilson will now serve twenty years in prison with the last seven years suspended. An accomplice to the shooting Robert McCoy was sentenced in May to twenty years with the last half suspended.
  • WSOC-TV has followed mounting cases of Hyundai and Kia vehicles randomly catching on fire and injuring people. >> Read more trending news  The carmakers agreed to settle a class-action lawsuit, which could result in a $750 million payout to customers. More than 4 million cars and SUVs could be affected. 'I was just driving down the road, and I had both hands on the wheel, and I realized I had no power steering and, immediately, I went for the brake,” driver Michaela Fink said. “I didn't have any brakes and then (I) saw smoke everywhere.' She was driving a Kia Optima in Stallings, North Carolina. 'I started seeing flames and I thought, 'I'm about to die,'' Fink said. Debi Morris said her Kia Soul wasn’t moving when the car burst into flames in front of her house.  'And all I could think about, ‘Was it was going to blow up?’' Morris said. The Center for Auto Safety has received more than 230 complaints of Hyundais and Kias catching fire without being in a wreck.  CAS officials said that at least six people have been hurt in the fires, which prompted the agency to push the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to investigate. CAS urged Hyundai and Kia to issue recalls and in January, the car companies did that. Vehicles recalled: 2011-2019 Hyundai Sonata 2013-2018 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe 2014, 2015, 2018 and 2019 Hyundai Tucson 2011-2019 Kia Sportage, Sorento and Optima *All with 2.0-liter and 2.4-liter GDI engines. Customers sued the automakers the next month and in April, the NHTSA launched an investigation. “We were pleased to see, finally, the federal government take these Kia and Hyundai fires seriously,” said Jason Levine, who is with CAS. The lawsuit could also give customers lifetime warranties, free repairs and new software for their vehicles. 'I'm really glad,” Fink said. “I'm really glad that they're finally doing something about it.' Hyundai said in a statement, “This settlement acknowledges our sincere willingness to take care of customers impacted by issues with this engine’s performance.' Kia said in a statement, “This resolution is the result of good-faith efforts among all parties to resolve owner concerns.' If your vehicle is one of the ones on the list, you should get a notice in the mail. There will, typically, be a settlement website with important dates.
  • Buoyed by the decisions of a series of witnesses to ignore requests by the Trump Administration not to testify before Congress, House Democratic leaders said Tuesday evening that they would push ahead with their impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump, seeing no need to hold an official vote now to authorize a formal probe. 'They can't defend the President, so they're going to process,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in a news conference at the U.S. Capitol.  'There's no requirement that we have a vote,' Pelosi pointed out accurately about the rules of the House - though Congress in the past has held such votes to officially launch such an investigation. 'What a SCAM,' said Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA), as Republicans complained bitterly about closed door depositions, and their inability to control the narrative about the investigation - a reminder that elections do matter, as Democrats are able to run this probe simply because they won control of the House in 2018. Democrats emerged from a closed door meeting in no hurry to have a vote on the House floor, as some lawmakers worried that voters would not be able to divine the difference between launching an investigation, and actually casting a vote on impeachment. Coming out of a closed door meeting, House Democrats were a loose group, not feeling any pressure to force a vote - arguing it would be a meaningless exercise. 'It seems to me that every day they get more information,' said Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA), who said there should be no rush to any vote. 'I don't think it matters at this point,' said Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL). 'An inquiry is ongoing.' There were some Democrats who were still withholding judgment. 'I'm not talking, I'm not saying anything,' said Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), who has steadfastly refused to take a position on the impeachment of President Trump. Republicans denounced the effort. 'They know they cannot win at the ballot box with these out of touch ideas, so they are trying to impeach,' said Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC). Republicans have focused mainly on the closed door aspect of depositions, arguing they undermine the credibility of the impeachment investigation. But GOP lawmakers routinely used closed door questioning during their own investigations of the Russian interference in the 2016 elections, and with controversies like Uranium One - where GOP lawmakers interviewed a man who supposedly held bombshell evidence about wrongdoing involving Hillary Clinton. The Q&A was done in secret; no transcript was ever relased. And the GOP never issued any details of what was said to lawmakers.
  • Route 66 in Tulsa will become a sort of living, driving museum, as workers this week are installing 29 markers at various historical sites along the road. Some of the marker spots along the way include the Rose Bowl, Whittier Square, and the Blue Dome building, to name just a few. Each one has information and photos about the site. “If you go sign to sign to sign, you'll have an incredible history of Route 66, really know about its heyday, and understand why it's important today and continues to be,” said Ken Busby with the Route 66 alliance. The project has been about two years in the making.
  • The Legislative Compensation Board voted Tuesday to boost legislative pay by 35% next year. Two years ago, the same board voted to cut pay by 8.8%. Board Chairman Wes Milbourn said at the time that Oklahomans were frustrated with the Legislature. But since then, board membership has changed. The vote was 7-2 to authorize the raises from $35,021 to $47,500.  The legislators' first pay raise since 1997 will take effect on Nov. 18, 2020.

Washington Insider

  • Buoyed by the decisions of a series of witnesses to ignore requests by the Trump Administration not to testify before Congress, House Democratic leaders said Tuesday evening that they would push ahead with their impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump, seeing no need to hold an official vote now to authorize a formal probe. 'They can't defend the President, so they're going to process,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in a news conference at the U.S. Capitol.  'There's no requirement that we have a vote,' Pelosi pointed out accurately about the rules of the House - though Congress in the past has held such votes to officially launch such an investigation. 'What a SCAM,' said Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA), as Republicans complained bitterly about closed door depositions, and their inability to control the narrative about the investigation - a reminder that elections do matter, as Democrats are able to run this probe simply because they won control of the House in 2018. Democrats emerged from a closed door meeting in no hurry to have a vote on the House floor, as some lawmakers worried that voters would not be able to divine the difference between launching an investigation, and actually casting a vote on impeachment. Coming out of a closed door meeting, House Democrats were a loose group, not feeling any pressure to force a vote - arguing it would be a meaningless exercise. 'It seems to me that every day they get more information,' said Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA), who said there should be no rush to any vote. 'I don't think it matters at this point,' said Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL). 'An inquiry is ongoing.' There were some Democrats who were still withholding judgment. 'I'm not talking, I'm not saying anything,' said Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), who has steadfastly refused to take a position on the impeachment of President Trump. Republicans denounced the effort. 'They know they cannot win at the ballot box with these out of touch ideas, so they are trying to impeach,' said Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC). Republicans have focused mainly on the closed door aspect of depositions, arguing they undermine the credibility of the impeachment investigation. But GOP lawmakers routinely used closed door questioning during their own investigations of the Russian interference in the 2016 elections, and with controversies like Uranium One - where GOP lawmakers interviewed a man who supposedly held bombshell evidence about wrongdoing involving Hillary Clinton. The Q&A was done in secret; no transcript was ever relased. And the GOP never issued any details of what was said to lawmakers.
  • On a day when another Trump Administration official refused to follow the directive of the President to not cooperate with a U.S. House impeachment investigation, President Donald Trump's personal lawyer told Democrats that he would heed Mr. Trump's call, and refuse to turn over documents and other information to Congress. 'Mr. Giuliani will not participate because this appears to be an unconstitutional, baseless, and illegitimate 'impeachment inquiry,'' wrote Giuliani's own counsel, John Sale. Those words echoed a missive from the White House last week, in which the President's White House Counsel declared that the Executive Branch would not cooperate with the House impeachment investigation. 'In addition, the subpoena is overbroad, unduly burdensome, and seeks documents beyond the scope of legitimate inquiry,' the Giuliani letter continued, as Democrats look for more information on what Giuliani was doing in Ukraine in recent months. Democrats had asked for 'text messages, phone records, and other communications' about his work in Ukraine in a September 30 letter which set Monday as the deadline to produce information. 'He’s solely focused on obstructing the Impeachment Inquiry,' tweeted Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN) about President Trump. 'The White House has engaged in stonewalling and outright defiance of Congressional prerogatives,' said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer. Republicans meanwhile complained that Democrats were running an unfair investigation, echoing attacks from the White House. 'The American people are not participants in this process,' said Rep. Mike McCaul (R-TX), as Republicans said a series of closed door depositions should be made public. As lawmakers in Congress returned from a two week break, some Republicans were reminded of their past statements about figures who refused to honor subpoenas during investigations. Meanwhile, as questioning continued behind closed doors for another State Department witness, an interesting break was developing in this investigation - while high profile witnesses like Giuliani were defying subpoenas, former Trump Administration and State Department officials were not. On Tuesday, George Kent, a State Department official who specializes in Ukraine policy was answering questions, even though he had been directed not to answer any. Wednesday is expected to bring testimony from a former top aide to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Michael McKinley abruptly resigned from his State Department post earlier this month.
  • WOKV Washington Insider Jamie Dupree took a short break from covering news on Capitol Hill to receive the Radio Television Digital News Association award for innovation. The national award was the latest mark in what has been a years-long personal battle for Dupree.  Following an illness in 2016, Dupree found himself unable to speak in more than a few words at a time. He eventually received a diagnosis of a rare neurological disorder, tongue protrusion dystonia.  The veteran reporter, who has been staple on WOKV and other Cox Media Group news and talk radio stations, continued to work off the radio by sending stories featuring local lawmakers and writing stories in his Washington Insider Blog.  Then in June of 2018, listeners were able to hear Jamie’s voice once again, as Jamie Dupree 2.0 debuted.  Cox Media Group partnered with Scotland-based tech company CereProc to produce a text-to-speech program that compiles years of Jamie’s actual voice.  “The listeners obviously knew something was very wrong when I disappeared from the radio, and I felt it was important to let them know what was going on – and especially important to let them know that I wasn’t dying,” said Dupree.  The RTDNA said Dupree’s story is innovative not only in multiplatform storytelling, but in the use of technology at the heart of the story.  “Since its initial version, the digital Jamie Dupree 2.0 has been improved to sound more natural and less electronic, and regular listeners have gotten used to it. But not all the feedback has been positive. “In today’s world of social media, I routinely get nasty messages each week from people who celebrate the loss of my voice, tell me that I should lose my job, and more. One of the weirdest things has been the accusations by people that since I lost my real voice, I’ve become biased. I think that’s just a sign of the current political times we are in right now,” said Dupree.”.   Dupree’s condition has not changed much, but he has found ways to innovate in the way he communicated with his wife and kids, as well as colleagues and lawmakers on Capitol Hill.  “Yes, I would much rather be able to speak – but it was great to get this kind of recognition for the work done by our company to find a way to keep me on the radio”, said Dupree.  
  • After dominating the national news in three previous debates, a dozen Democrats will gather just outside Columbus, Ohio on Tuesday evening for their party's fourth Presidential debate, coming at a time when the news focus has shifted away from the Democratic field, crowded out by controversy involving President Donald Trump, and a possible impeachment bid by Democrats in the U.S. House. 'This month was supposed to be all about the 2020 Democrats,' wrote Amy Walter, a veteran political analyst with the Cook Political Report.  'Thanks to impeachment drama, however, this month is all about Trump and Congress,' Walter wrote. Here are some story lines to look for tonight: 1. Joe Biden. His son. Impeachment. President Trump. Biden has been in the spotlight in recent weeks a lot as President Trump has repeatedly attacked him - and Biden's son Hunter. Does that get brought up during tonight's debate? Does Biden bring it up on his own? Do others bring it up in a negative way to attack the former Vice President? 2. This time - 12 candidates are on stage. I'll call it the Democratic Dozen. After complaints about a debate stage with 10 people, this debate will have a dozen Democrats, which may make it more choppy in terms of who gets to talk, and for how long. Let's be honest - trying to balance the time for ten candidates didn't work out that well in the first three debates. Twelve will mean some candidates might disappear for a time during this three hour event. Yes, I said three hours. 3. Bernie Sanders had a heart attack. It's still sort of difficult to believe that one of the major Democratic Party candidates had a heart attack, and has been sidelined for the past two weeks - and it's not making that big of an impact on the race. Sanders spent several days in the hospital in Las Vegas, and has now been back at his home in Vermont, meaning the 78 year old Sanders will have been off the campaign trail for the past 14 days. Sanders has talked about slowing his schedule - his first campaign event won't be until a 'Bernie's Back' rally in New York City on Saturday. As with Biden and impeachment, we'll see how Sanders addresses his health issues tonight; he remains a big player in the Democratic race. 4. What kind of audience will this debate get? Since this debate has been overshadowed by other news in recent weeks, we will have to see just how many people tune in for the Democratic Dozen. The September debate had to deal with a Thursday night NFL game, but this time Democrats will be doing a debate at the same time as the playoffs for Major League Baseball are underway. Ironically, the home team in Washington is playing on Tuesday night, which means some of the politically involved class of people in D.C. might not be watching every single debate question tonight from Westerville, Ohio. 5. Gabbard, Steyer are the new debate faces. Getting enough polls and donations to qualify for the October debate, Tulsi Gabbard returns to the debate stage after missing the September debate. Meanwhile, billionaire Tom Steyer makes his first debate, after not qualifying for the first three. Gabbard had been making noise about boycotting this debate, claiming that the Democratic Party hierarchy was not playing fair. As for Steyer, not only has he qualified for this debate, but he will also be on stage in November for the fifth debate, which will be in Georgia.  For Gabbard, this may be her final debate, unless she finds a way to take a dramatic step forward. 6. Looking ahead to November. The field may well shrink for the November debate, as at this point just eight Democrats have qualified with the necessary poll numbers and campaign donors. On the outside looking in are Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke, Tulsi Gabbard, and Julian Castro. Klobuchar and O'Rourke need three more polls to qualify. Gabbard and Castro have no polls as yet for November. Already qualified for November are Biden, Sanders, Warren, Harris, Buttigieg, Steyer, Booker and Yang. Remember - the start of the 2020 race isn't far away. Iowa is on February 3. New Hampshire - Feb. 11 Nevada - February 22 South Carolina on February 29
  • With bipartisan condemnation of President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw a small group of U.S. soldiers from Syria, Congress returns to Capitol Hill on Tuesday with members of both parties denouncing the President, and lawmakers willing to approve sanctions on Turkey to slow its move into Syria. 'I thought you were going to defeat ISIS, that is why people voted for you,' Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) tweeted to President Trump, as Republicans from all corners of the country have denounced the President. 'I urge the President to reverse his decision of removing our troops, and to send a strong message to Turkey,' said Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL). 'President Trump is a populist who wants to put America first and to the detriment of our allies and friends, people we’ve been associated with for decades,' said Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL), who denounced Mr. Trump's decision last week, during an interview with KMOX Radio in St. Louis. 'I called my chief of staff in D.C., I said pull my name off the I-support-Donald-Trump-list,' Shimkus added. 'President Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. forces from northern Syria is having sickening and predictable consequences,' said Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY). Members of both parties say they want to quickly approve economic sanctions against Turkey, as a way to try to force the Turks to stop their push into Syria, and halt attacks on groups which had allied with the U.S. military. 'I will be working across party lines in a bicameral fashion to draft sanctions and move quickly,' said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who tweeted on Monday that he already spoken with Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  'The Speaker indicated to me that time was of the essence,' Graham said. But both parties said the President had started this crisis, by giving the green light to the Turks to move troops into Syria, while the U.S. pulled back, as Democrats were also livid. 'The President’s actions in Syria have made the world less safe,' said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA). 'Donald Trump sold out our allies to appease authoritarian dictators, and paved the way for an onslaught of war crimes against the Kurds,' said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR).  'The Turkish attacks against the Kurds are attacks against humanity, and our President is sitting back and watching,' said Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA). 'Our enemies - ISIS - are escaping while our partners - Kurdish & Syrian opposition forces - are dying,' tweeted Rep. Chrissy Houlihan (D-PA). 'We are seeing the results of our betrayal of U.S. partners, namely the Syrian Kurds, who were critical to the international fight against ISIS,' said Rep. Elissa Slotkin (D-MI), who worked at both the CIA and Pentagon.