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    Twin brothers were arrested in Tulsa early Sunday morning following a home invasion and pursuit. Jason and James Fields are accused of forcing their way into a home at the Comanche Park Apartments near East 36th and North Peoria. One of the suspects was said to be armed. Officers arrived at the scene as the twins were leaving. “Attempted a traffic stop but the vehicle failed to stop and fled westbound on 36th Street North from the complex,” an officer at the scene said. “The pursuit continued westbound to Hartford Avenue where it went south and stopped in the 3400 Block North. The suspects ran on foot and officers gave chase.” The armed suspect threw away his gun during the chase.  Moments later, the twins were caught.  
  • Keep those umbrellas handy today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says Sunday could be a washout.  There are storms possible throughout the day in Tulsa. “We are going to have occasional showers and thunderstorms in the morning,” Plate said.  “Showers and thunderstorms are still likely in the afternoon.  The high will be in the lower 80’s.” There is a chance the afternoon storms could be severe.   “Damaging winds would be the most likely threat,” Plate continues.  “We can’t rule out some large hail, up to a quarter size.” We could also see more storms Sunday night.  The low will be close to 70 degrees.
  • A tragedy in Tulsa Friday night involving a husband and wife. The apparent murder/suicide happened around 8:14 p.m. near 41st and Garnett. A police supervisor reports when officers arrived at the scene, they found the couple dead. “On this night, the male suspect had apparently killed his wife and then taken his own life,” the supervisor said.   Witnesses told investigators the couple had been having problems. So far, no names have been released.   We will update the story when more information comes into the newsroom.  
  • A woman suffered serious injuries after being hit by a vehicle Friday night in south Tulsa. The auto-pedestrian crash happened around 9:45 p.m. near 71st and Trenton. Police at the scene report the victim had come from a nearby apartment complex. “Apparently, the individual was running from one of those locations,” an officer said.  “Still not entirely certain what exactly was going on in that regard.  She attempted to cross 71st Street and did not apparently make the appropriate effort to clear traffic and was struck by a westbound vehicle.”  The driver of the vehicle did stay at the scene. No word on if any citations were issued. An update on her condition hasn’t been released.  
  • Today is your best bet for outdoor plans.   National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says rain will stay out of the forecast. “Saturday should be mostly sunny with a high in the lower 90’s,” Plate said.  “A northeast wind up to 10 MPH.” There is a chance for thunderstorms late Saturday night.  The low will be close to 72 degrees. Sunday could be a total washout.  NWS is reporting an 80 percent chance of showers.  The low will around 68 degrees.  
  • The idea of forming a “Space Force” as a branch of the military gets ridiculed in some circles, but for former Navy pilot and current NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, it’s abundantly clear that America’s enemies see space as a potentially devastating avenue of attack. His comments came during a wide-ranging, exclusive interview with KRMG from his office in Washington, D.C. [Hear the entire interview HERE, or use the embedded audio player below] “Our very way of life in this country is dependent on space, in a way that most Americans don’t recognize,” Bridenstine said Friday. “And it’s an existential threat, if we were to lose space, it would be an existential threat to our country.” He ticked off just a few of the many systems that rely heavily on a timing signal from the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system. “Every banking transaction in the United States is dependent upon a timing signal from GPS. That means if we lose GPS, we lose banking in the United States of America. In other words, there will be no milk in the grocery store in a matter of three days if we lose GPS. That GPS timing signal is not just necessary for banking transactions, it’s also  necessary to regulate the flows of electricity on the power grid, it’s necessary to regulate the flows of data on wireless networks, and terrestrial networks. So again, if we lose GPS, it’s an existential threat to the United States of America.” Our country’s enemies have been busy developing several methods of attacking the U.S. in space, he said, including jamming, spoofing, hacking and dazzling - all forms of attack that are fairly inexpensive and could be deployed against American assets in space. “This is what’s important to note,” Bridenstine said. “They have declared that space is America’s Achilles’ heel. We should take note of that.”   Administrator Bridenstine also spoke at length about the many projects in which NASA is engaged, including launching a probe toward the sun, building a permanent base on the moon, and of course sending humans to Mars. The Parker Solar Probe was launched last week, and will become (by far) the fastest human-made object in history. It will eventually reach speeds of some 430,000 miles per hour - roughly 1,700 times the speed of a bullet fired from a rifle. Its mission is to help scientists understand solar wind, solar flares, and most importantly solar eruptions, which could potentially pose an extreme danger to our planet. Another mission would see the U.S. return to the moon, in a big way.  NASA wants to have a permanent presence on the moon, a space station in orbit around it (called “The Gateway”) and the ability to utilize what some believe may be trillions of dollars worth of “rare earth” metals that could potentially be found on the moon’s surface. That’s not all; Bridenstine says in 2009, NASA scientists discovered that there are “hundreds of billions of tons of water ice at the poles of the moon, on the surface at the polls of the moon.” “It’s a resource that’s available for us to use on the surface of the moon. So it’s water to drink, it’s air to breathe, but it’s even more,” he told KRMG. “When you crack (water) into its component parts, hydrogen and oxygen, and you put it into liquid form, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, that is the same propellant that powered the space shuttles.” Building a sustainable, reusable system of rockets, surface vehicles, and tugs (shuttles) between the earth and the moon, and between the moon and the Gateway, would also help NASA reach its next goal - Mars. It’s a lot to administer, but the enthusiasm and passion in Bridenstine’s voice as he talks about what NASA has done - and plans to do - is palpable. “Without question, it’s the best job I’ve ever had, and there’s a lot more to do.”
  • A 14-year-old boy is accused of stabbing a 14-year-old girl on the first day of school Thursday at Luther High School. Luther Police Chief David Randall and Superintended Barry Gunn said Friday that the boy has no history of trouble at the school. Chief Randall says the boy 'blurted out some statements that made no sense' after he was taken into custody. Randall says a trend has emerged from the interviews that could point to a motive, but he declined to elaborate. The 14-year-old victim remains hospitalized in Oklahoma City and is expected to fully recover.  She suffered numerous stab wounds and was only acquainted with the boy.
  • Electric car maker Tesla’s CEO Elon Musk admitted to The New York Times that stress is taking a heavy toll on him personally in what he calls an “excruciating” year. The newspaper said Musk alternated between laughter and tears during the interview in which he said he was working up to 120 hours a week and sometimes takes Ambien to get to sleep. “This past year has been the most difficult and painful year of my career,” he said. “It was excruciating.” The interview published Friday offered rare insights into Musk’s personal life and thinking. He stood by his tweet last week saying he might take Tesla private and that he had secured the funding to do so. Asked if he regretted it, he said, “Why would I?”
  • Why go to Waffle House for that big event, when it can come to you? >> Read more trending news  The Atlanta-based restaurant chain introduced a new food truck that can cater private events, WSYX reported. On its website, Waffle House notes that the food truck can set up for parties at the office, schools or even at homes. It also can cater tailgating parties, family reunions, bar mitzvahs and bat mitzvahs, and corporate events. “Our team members are available to serve you 24/7 and offer the same unique experience as in (a) restaurant,” the company said on its website. “We can pull up and cook your desired menu choices for you and your guests,' Waffle House said. The food truck can be rented nationwide, but an extra fee will be charged for locations outside of Georgia, WSYX reported.
  • The Veterans Day military parade that President Donald Trump hoped to stage to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day has been postponed, according to the Department of Defense. >> Read more trending news  “The Department of Defense and White House have been planning a parade to honor America's military veterans and commemorate the centennial of World War I,' Defense Department spokesman Col. Rob Manning said in a statement Thursday. 'We originally targeted Nov. 10, 2018 for this event but have now agreed to explore opportunities in 2019.” The parade, scheduled to be in Washington, was to feature armored vehicles, aircraft flyovers and soldiers parading in World War I-era uniforms, CNBC reported. The original cost of the parade was to be approximately $12 million and was based on the cost for the victory parade after the 1991 Gulf War, NBC News reported. The Washington Post estimated the cost of that parade at $8 million. In February, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told Congress the price could be between $10 million to $30 million. However, CNBC reported that the expected cost had risen to $92 million. President Emmanuel Macron of France is hosting world leaders in Paris on Nov. 11 to celebrate the anniversary, CNN reported. Trump said he was inspired to host a similar parade in Washington after viewing the Bastille Day parade in Paris in 2017, CNN reported.
  • Keep those umbrellas handy today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says Sunday could be a washout.  There are storms possible throughout the day in Tulsa. “We are going to have occasional showers and thunderstorms in the morning,” Plate said.  “Showers and thunderstorms are still likely in the afternoon.  The high will be in the lower 80’s.” There is a chance the afternoon storms could be severe.   “Damaging winds would be the most likely threat,” Plate continues.  “We can’t rule out some large hail, up to a quarter size.” We could also see more storms Sunday night.  The low will be close to 70 degrees.
  • A tragedy in Tulsa Friday night involving a husband and wife. The apparent murder/suicide happened around 8:14 p.m. near 41st and Garnett. A police supervisor reports when officers arrived at the scene, they found the couple dead. “On this night, the male suspect had apparently killed his wife and then taken his own life,” the supervisor said.   Witnesses told investigators the couple had been having problems. So far, no names have been released.   We will update the story when more information comes into the newsroom.  
  • A woman suffered serious injuries after being hit by a vehicle Friday night in south Tulsa. The auto-pedestrian crash happened around 9:45 p.m. near 71st and Trenton. Police at the scene report the victim had come from a nearby apartment complex. “Apparently, the individual was running from one of those locations,” an officer said.  “Still not entirely certain what exactly was going on in that regard.  She attempted to cross 71st Street and did not apparently make the appropriate effort to clear traffic and was struck by a westbound vehicle.”  The driver of the vehicle did stay at the scene. No word on if any citations were issued. An update on her condition hasn’t been released.  
  • Today is your best bet for outdoor plans.   National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says rain will stay out of the forecast. “Saturday should be mostly sunny with a high in the lower 90’s,” Plate said.  “A northeast wind up to 10 MPH.” There is a chance for thunderstorms late Saturday night.  The low will be close to 72 degrees. Sunday could be a total washout.  NWS is reporting an 80 percent chance of showers.  The low will around 68 degrees.  
  • The idea of forming a “Space Force” as a branch of the military gets ridiculed in some circles, but for former Navy pilot and current NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, it’s abundantly clear that America’s enemies see space as a potentially devastating avenue of attack. His comments came during a wide-ranging, exclusive interview with KRMG from his office in Washington, D.C. [Hear the entire interview HERE, or use the embedded audio player below] “Our very way of life in this country is dependent on space, in a way that most Americans don’t recognize,” Bridenstine said Friday. “And it’s an existential threat, if we were to lose space, it would be an existential threat to our country.” He ticked off just a few of the many systems that rely heavily on a timing signal from the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system. “Every banking transaction in the United States is dependent upon a timing signal from GPS. That means if we lose GPS, we lose banking in the United States of America. In other words, there will be no milk in the grocery store in a matter of three days if we lose GPS. That GPS timing signal is not just necessary for banking transactions, it’s also  necessary to regulate the flows of electricity on the power grid, it’s necessary to regulate the flows of data on wireless networks, and terrestrial networks. So again, if we lose GPS, it’s an existential threat to the United States of America.” Our country’s enemies have been busy developing several methods of attacking the U.S. in space, he said, including jamming, spoofing, hacking and dazzling - all forms of attack that are fairly inexpensive and could be deployed against American assets in space. “This is what’s important to note,” Bridenstine said. “They have declared that space is America’s Achilles’ heel. We should take note of that.”   Administrator Bridenstine also spoke at length about the many projects in which NASA is engaged, including launching a probe toward the sun, building a permanent base on the moon, and of course sending humans to Mars. The Parker Solar Probe was launched last week, and will become (by far) the fastest human-made object in history. It will eventually reach speeds of some 430,000 miles per hour - roughly 1,700 times the speed of a bullet fired from a rifle. Its mission is to help scientists understand solar wind, solar flares, and most importantly solar eruptions, which could potentially pose an extreme danger to our planet. Another mission would see the U.S. return to the moon, in a big way.  NASA wants to have a permanent presence on the moon, a space station in orbit around it (called “The Gateway”) and the ability to utilize what some believe may be trillions of dollars worth of “rare earth” metals that could potentially be found on the moon’s surface. That’s not all; Bridenstine says in 2009, NASA scientists discovered that there are “hundreds of billions of tons of water ice at the poles of the moon, on the surface at the polls of the moon.” “It’s a resource that’s available for us to use on the surface of the moon. So it’s water to drink, it’s air to breathe, but it’s even more,” he told KRMG. “When you crack (water) into its component parts, hydrogen and oxygen, and you put it into liquid form, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, that is the same propellant that powered the space shuttles.” Building a sustainable, reusable system of rockets, surface vehicles, and tugs (shuttles) between the earth and the moon, and between the moon and the Gateway, would also help NASA reach its next goal - Mars. It’s a lot to administer, but the enthusiasm and passion in Bridenstine’s voice as he talks about what NASA has done - and plans to do - is palpable. “Without question, it’s the best job I’ve ever had, and there’s a lot more to do.”