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    KRMG has previously told you about the Gathering Place banning firearms. Gerry Bender, Tulsa’s Litigation Division manager, recently told the Tulsa World police won't arrest people who violate the park's gun policy. This is reportedly because of concerns such an action would be legally challenged. Under state law, firearms are allowed to be carried on property designated by a governmental authority as a park, recreational area or fairgrounds. “TPD has had a presence at the Gathering Place since its opening and will continue to do so in order for the citizens of Tulsa to enjoy the park in a safe environment,” a Tulsa police statement reads.  “We maintain the legal authority to enforce all ordinances and State laws applicable to private spaces open to the public.” Do you believe people should be allowed to have firearms at the Gathering Place?  Let us know in the comments.  
  • You can put away your umbrella in the Tulsa area today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Chuck Hodges says we have a beautiful fall day ahead of us. “Fog should be clearing out,” Hodges said.  “We should have plenty of sun.  We are looking at highs probably in the lower 70’s.” The normal high for Tulsa this time of year is in the mid-70’s.   If you have outdoor plans Saturday night, bring a heavy coat.  The low will be close to 37 degrees.
  • This Saturday marks the 45th anniversary of the infamous ‘Saturday Night Massacre,’ when an embattled President Richard Nixon fired the special Watergate prosecutor, but only after both the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General refused to carry out the President’s orders, and resigned from their positions. The move by President Nixon came during an ongoing legal dispute over the release of the Watergate tapes – recordings made in the Oval Office by a secret taping system that the President had installed – which ultimately contained evidence that forced Nixon from office. Special Watergate Prosecutor Archibald Cox wanted all the tapes for his investigation, but even with the backing of a federal court order, President Nixon refused to turn them over, instead offering summaries, an offer that Cox refused to accept. “I’m not looking for a confrontation,” Cox told an October 20, 1973 news conference at the National Press. “I’m certainly not out to get the President of the United States.” Several hours later, Nixon ordered that Cox be fired. The President first asked Attorney General Elliot Richardson to fire Cox. Richardson refused and quickly resigned. The same request the went to Deputy Attorney General Williams Ruckleshaus. Like Richardson, Ruckleshaus also refused and quit. Finally, the firing of Cox was carried out by Solicitor General Robert Bork. It’s a scenario that some have focused on, wondering if President Donald Trump might try to end the investigation of Special Counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. In an op-ed in August of 2018, Ruckleshaus drew parallels between Watergate and the current battle over the Russia investigation. “President Trump is acting with a desperation I’ve seen only once before in Washington,” Ruckleshaus wrote. “45 years ago when President Richard M. Nixon ordered the firing of special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox.” “Nixon was fixated on ending the Watergate investigation, just as Trump wants to shut down the Mueller investigation,” Ruckleshaus added. It took until late July of 1974 for the U.S. Supreme Court to finally order Nixon to turn over the tapes – in a unanimous 8-0 ruling. Nixon resigned soon after, on August 8, 1974.
  • Federal prosecutors in New York announced the arrest on Friday of a man who allegedly threatened to murder and assault a pair of U.S. Senators for their support of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, as police say the suspect placed a series of threatening telephone calls in which the man threatened to shoot the Senators if they supported the Kavanaugh nomination. In court documents unsealed on Friday, a special agent with the U.S. Capitol Police detailed a number of voice mails left by the suspect, identified as Ronald DeRisi of Smithtown, on Long Island in New York. The expletive-filled messages came during the final stages of debate on the Kavanaugh nomination, some as Kavanaugh testified for a second time before the Senate Judiciary Committee, on the same day as a woman who accused him of sexual misconduct back when they were in high school. “The male caller, who did not identify himself on the recording, stated in relevant part, that he had a “present” for Senator-1, specifically: “It’s a nine millimeter,” court documents stated. “He’s a dead man! Nine millimeter, side of the f—ing head!” police quoted the phone threats. More voice mails were allegedly left by DeRisi after Kavanaugh had been confirmed by the Senate, as he called a second Senator’s office and left threatening messages. “I’m gonna get you,” police quoted the message. “Don’t you know that guy’s a sex offender?” At one point, the suspect allegedly read off the home address of the second Senator; it was not immediately clear from the court documents what two Senators had been targeted by the phone calls. Court documents show that DeRisi pled guilty in 2015 to making threatening phone calls, and that police compared the telphone evidence from the two cases.
  • As a former FBI agent was sentenced to 4 years in prison Thursday in Minnesota for disclosing classified information to the news media, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions hailed the latest court moves against leakers in the federal government, saying the Trump Administration is waging what may be ‘the most aggressive campaign against leaks’ in the history of the Department of Justice. “Today’s sentence should be a warning to every would-be leaker in the federal government that if they disclose classified information, they will pay a high price,” Sessions said in a statement, making clear that government leakers will be ‘prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law and punished.’ Terry Albury, the Minneapolis FBI agent arrested for leaking classified information to the Intercept, gets four years in prison. 'We are conducting perhaps the most aggressive campaign against leaks in Department history,' AG Sessions says in statement: https://t.co/QBFKUUiXy8 — Kevin Collier (@kevincollier) October 18, 2018 The Sessions statement came after a busy week on the leak front for the feds: + On Monday, a former employee of the Senate Intelligence Committee plead guilty to lying to the FBI about leaks to a reporter. + Wednesday, a Department of Treasury official was charged with leaking banking activity reports to a reporter which was linked to the Russia investigation. + Today, former FBI agent Terry Albury was sentenced to four years of jail time for leaking national security material to the Intercept. From press reports in recent days, it is obvious that more leak investigations are underway as well. + The Trump Administration has sent a subpoena to an immigration attorney, trying to find out how leaked an internal government memo from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, on how asylum applications would be handled for domestic violence victims. + The charges this week against a Treasury Department employee for leaking “Suspicious Activity Banking” reports shows another official in the same office had contacts with the news media as well. + Earlier this week, Attorney General Sessions told the Washington Times that there were 27 ongoing leak investigations at the Department of Justice. + Back in February, Sessions vowed that the Justice Department was going “aggressively” to find out who leaked information about transcripts of phone conversations involving former Trump National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.
  • Vice President Pence arrived at Tulsa International Airport around 3:45 Thursday afternoon to head to his speech at the Mabee Center near 81st and Lewis Thursday evening. People started lining up around 9:00 Thursday morning to get a good seat.  Pence scheduled the trip to stump for Republican Gubernatorial Candidate Kevin Stitt. Stitt is running against Democrat Drew Edmondson. Pence took the podium at around 5:25pm and spoke until 5:55pm. The packed auditorium listened to Vice President Pence talk about healthcare, the border wall and the jobless rate.
  • Expressing confidence in recent days about the impact of his work for GOP candidates in the 2018 mid-term elections for Congress, President Donald Trump starts a swing out west on Thursday to help Republican efforts to maintain control of the U.S. Senate, as he tries to make the issue of illegal immigration more central to the final days of the 2018 campaign, as the President threatened to use U.S. military forces to closed down the southern border with Mexico. “Republicans must make the horrendous, weak and outdated immigration laws, and the Border, a part of the Midterms!” the President tweeted on Wednesday, as he again blamed Democrats for a stalemate in Congress on immigration law changes. “Our laws are terrible,” Mr. Trump said at the White House. “They’re a laughingstock all over the world.” Hours before leaving on a campaign swing which will take him to rallies in Montana, Arizona, and Nevada over the next three days, the President amplified his comments on immigration with a series of breakfast-time tweets on the subject on Thursday morning. “All Democrats fault for weak laws!” he concluded. I am watching the Democrat Party led (because they want Open Borders and existing weak laws) assault on our country by Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, whose leaders are doing little to stop this large flow of people, INCLUDING MANY CRIMINALS, from entering Mexico to U.S….. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2018 ….In addition to stopping all payments to these countries, which seem to have almost no control over their population, I must, in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught – and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!.. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2018 ….The assault on our country at our Southern Border, including the Criminal elements and DRUGS pouring in, is far more important to me, as President, than Trade or the USMCA. Hopefully Mexico will stop this onslaught at their Northern Border. All Democrats fault for weak laws! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2018 Both the President and Vice President have also publicly called for efforts by the governments of Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico to stop what the Trump Administration describes as a ‘caravan’ of illegal immigrants reportedly heading for the southern U.S. border. “When you look at the border, how bad it is, that’s because the Democrats want it to be bad,” the President told reporters at the White House on Wednesday. “Back to one of his core wedge issues,” political expert Stuart Rothenberg said of the President and immigration. The President’s first stop will be a campaign rally on Thursday evening in Montana, where Republican Matt Rosendale is trying to knock off Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT), who is trying to win election to a third term in the Senate. As the Billings Gazette newspaper noted, this is the third trip to Montana for President Trump, an unusual amount of political attention for the state. . @realDonaldTrump 'apparently has taken a great deal of interest in (Montana's Senate) race. He likes Rosendale. I think he's annoyed by Tester.' #mtpol #mtal https://t.co/aOlDZXymb9 — Billings Gazette (@billingsgazette) October 17, 2018 On Friday the President will hold a rally in Mesa, Arizona, trying to boost the Senate bid of Rep. Martha McSally (R-AZ). Mr. Trump will go to Elko, Nevada for a rally on Saturday night to help Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV). Next Monday, the President will stop in Houston, Texas, where Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) is in a hotly-contested race for re-election. Most of the President’s campaign rallies since Labor Day have been in areas where he won in 2016. The latest polls seem to give Republicans a good chance to hold on to their slim majority in the Senate – or even expand it – a bit different from the House, where Democrats seem to have an edge. “I think I’m helping people,” the President told the Associated Press in an interview on Tuesday, making the case that his campaign rallies and support will turn the tide for GOP candidates in a number of states. “I don’t believe anybody’s ever had this kind of impact,” Mr. Trump added, with Election Day now 19 days away.
  • Broken Arrow police say 71-year-old Vivian Louise McGuire, of Tulsa, was killed Monday evening in the northbound lanes of Aspen Avenue near Albany. Officers say 59-year-old Isiah Eugene Keys Jr., of Broken Arrow, crossed the center line and hit McGuire head-on. Keys for was arrested at the scene for suspicion of driving under the influence. Five cars were involved in the crash. None of the other drivers were seriously injured. Keys is charged with first degree manslaughter.
  • KRMG has previously told you about the Gathering Place banning firearms. Gerry Bender, Tulsa’s Litigation Division manager, recently told the Tulsa World police won't arrest people who violate the park's gun policy. This is reportedly because of concerns such an action would be legally challenged. Under state law, firearms are allowed to be carried on property designated by a governmental authority as a park, recreational area or fairgrounds. “TPD has had a presence at the Gathering Place since its opening and will continue to do so in order for the citizens of Tulsa to enjoy the park in a safe environment,” a Tulsa police statement reads.  “We maintain the legal authority to enforce all ordinances and State laws applicable to private spaces open to the public.” Do you believe people should be allowed to have firearms at the Gathering Place?  Let us know in the comments.  
  • You can put away your umbrella in the Tulsa area today. National Weather Service Meteorologist Chuck Hodges says we have a beautiful fall day ahead of us. “Fog should be clearing out,” Hodges said.  “We should have plenty of sun.  We are looking at highs probably in the lower 70’s.” The normal high for Tulsa this time of year is in the mid-70’s.   If you have outdoor plans Saturday night, bring a heavy coat.  The low will be close to 37 degrees.
  • This Saturday marks the 45th anniversary of the infamous ‘Saturday Night Massacre,’ when an embattled President Richard Nixon fired the special Watergate prosecutor, but only after both the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General refused to carry out the President’s orders, and resigned from their positions. The move by President Nixon came during an ongoing legal dispute over the release of the Watergate tapes – recordings made in the Oval Office by a secret taping system that the President had installed – which ultimately contained evidence that forced Nixon from office. Special Watergate Prosecutor Archibald Cox wanted all the tapes for his investigation, but even with the backing of a federal court order, President Nixon refused to turn them over, instead offering summaries, an offer that Cox refused to accept. “I’m not looking for a confrontation,” Cox told an October 20, 1973 news conference at the National Press. “I’m certainly not out to get the President of the United States.” Several hours later, Nixon ordered that Cox be fired. The President first asked Attorney General Elliot Richardson to fire Cox. Richardson refused and quickly resigned. The same request the went to Deputy Attorney General Williams Ruckleshaus. Like Richardson, Ruckleshaus also refused and quit. Finally, the firing of Cox was carried out by Solicitor General Robert Bork. It’s a scenario that some have focused on, wondering if President Donald Trump might try to end the investigation of Special Counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. In an op-ed in August of 2018, Ruckleshaus drew parallels between Watergate and the current battle over the Russia investigation. “President Trump is acting with a desperation I’ve seen only once before in Washington,” Ruckleshaus wrote. “45 years ago when President Richard M. Nixon ordered the firing of special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox.” “Nixon was fixated on ending the Watergate investigation, just as Trump wants to shut down the Mueller investigation,” Ruckleshaus added. It took until late July of 1974 for the U.S. Supreme Court to finally order Nixon to turn over the tapes – in a unanimous 8-0 ruling. Nixon resigned soon after, on August 8, 1974.
  • Federal prosecutors in New York announced the arrest on Friday of a man who allegedly threatened to murder and assault a pair of U.S. Senators for their support of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, as police say the suspect placed a series of threatening telephone calls in which the man threatened to shoot the Senators if they supported the Kavanaugh nomination. In court documents unsealed on Friday, a special agent with the U.S. Capitol Police detailed a number of voice mails left by the suspect, identified as Ronald DeRisi of Smithtown, on Long Island in New York. The expletive-filled messages came during the final stages of debate on the Kavanaugh nomination, some as Kavanaugh testified for a second time before the Senate Judiciary Committee, on the same day as a woman who accused him of sexual misconduct back when they were in high school. “The male caller, who did not identify himself on the recording, stated in relevant part, that he had a “present” for Senator-1, specifically: “It’s a nine millimeter,” court documents stated. “He’s a dead man! Nine millimeter, side of the f—ing head!” police quoted the phone threats. More voice mails were allegedly left by DeRisi after Kavanaugh had been confirmed by the Senate, as he called a second Senator’s office and left threatening messages. “I’m gonna get you,” police quoted the message. “Don’t you know that guy’s a sex offender?” At one point, the suspect allegedly read off the home address of the second Senator; it was not immediately clear from the court documents what two Senators had been targeted by the phone calls. Court documents show that DeRisi pled guilty in 2015 to making threatening phone calls, and that police compared the telphone evidence from the two cases.