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    A male pedestrian was hit and killed Saturday night while crossing the street in Tulsa. An officer at the scene tells KRMG the auto-pedestrian collision happened around 11:10 p.m. in the westbound lanes of 71st Street near Trenton Avenue. “A black truck comes through and strikes him,” the officer said.  “Then continues on westbound and we were not able to get a good description of the vehicle.” The pedestrian was transported to a nearby hospital where he was later pronounced dead.  As of early Sunday morning, the victim hasn't been identified. KRMG’s told the scene was closed to traffic until around 2 a.m. Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.  
  • You may have heard the storms overnight in and around the Tulsa area.   The possibility of storms continues on Sunday.  This is especially true during the morning hours.   “We’ll probably start the morning with lingering storm chances,” National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Lacy said.  “Those storm chances will gradually go away during the afternoon.” The high for Sunday will be close to 91 degrees.   The Tulsa area will have more chances for storms Sunday night.  NWS is reporting the low will be near 77 degrees.   There is a severe thunderstorm watch in effect for Tulsa and surrounding counties until 10 a.m.
  • A 37-year-old Broken Arrow man faces a long list of sexual-related charges in connection with having an alleged sexual relationship with a 15-year-old girl.  Court records show Larado Smith was charged on Friday with 12 counts of second-degree rape and three counts of forcible sodomy.  Tulsa World reports the sexual acts apparently happened at the girl's home when her parents were not home.  When police found out about what was going on, a sting was set up. They posed as the girl over social media.    Smith showed up at the teenager's home and was arrested.  He has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.  
  • Today may not be the best day for outdoor activities. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Teague says to keep an umbrella handy.  This is especially true during the afternoon hours.   “We are still holding on for a chance of showers and thunderstorms during the day,” Teague said.  “Again, another chance of showers and thunderstorms late into the evening.” The high is expected to reach around 86 degrees. There is better news for Sunday.  The sun is expected to come out, storm chances are low and the high will be close to 93 degrees.  
  • As President Donald Trump this week threatened $200 billion in new tariffs on Chinese imports, and then warned Europe that he would slap a 20 percent tariff on imported automobiles, members of both parties Congress accused the administration of starting a trade war which could cause collateral economic damage across the United States. The differences were on display at a hearing Wednesday with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who took a bipartisan tongue lashing on a recent round of tariffs levied on imported steel and aluminum from Canada, Mexico and Europe. “We’re picking winners and losers,” argued Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA), who said those tariffs were already hurting businesses in his home state. “Probably resulting – in my view – in far more jobs being lost than being gained,” Toomey told Ross, citing a very well-known Pennsylvania company that could find it less expensive to move jobs from the U.S. to Canada. Sen. @PatToomey tells Ross that $KHZ moved some @HeinzKetchup_US manufacturing to Pennsylvania from Canada – but could move back now that Canada plans to tax American ketchup as retaliation for steel and aluminum tariffs. — Kayla Tausche (@kaylatausche) June 20, 2018 Almost every Senator on the panel had a story of a small business that was feeling the pinch due to Trump Administration tariffs, impacting all sorts of agricultural products, as well as manufacturing, big and small. “Do you think we’re in a trade war right now?” asked Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA). “Because I do,” as Cantwell rattled off farm products that were losing markets because of retaliatory tariff measures. Ross downplayed the cost of higher imported steel and aluminum, basically making the case that economic hardships were being overplayed. “It’s a fraction of a penny on a can of Campbell’s soup, it’s a fraction on a can of Budweiser, it’s a fraction on a can of Coke,” Ross said. That did not please the Senator from the state of Coca-Cola. “Although a couple of pennies on a can is not much, a couple pennies times a billion is lots,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA). “We’re hit harder than any other state by the Canadian retaliatory tariffs,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), warning the Trump Administration against tariffs on imported automobiles, as GOP Senators labeled such actions a tax on consumers. “Steel prices are going up – not just for foreign steel subject to tariffs, but also for U.S. steel,” complained Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). “Mexico’s buying their wheat from Argentina and their corn from Brazil,” said Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS), as he told Ross that Kansas wheat exports were encountering troubles because of new retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports, bringing bad economic news on the farm report. Ross simply told Senators if other countries put new tariffs on U.S. exports, that was out of his control. “We have no control over what another country does in retaliation,” Ross said. The bipartisan complaints clearly had no impact, as by Friday, President Trump was on Twitter, issuing new threats against European auto imports. Based on the Tariffs and Trade Barriers long placed on the U.S. & its great companies and workers by the European Union, if these Tariffs and Barriers are not soon broken down and removed, we will be placing a 20% Tariff on all of their cars coming into the U.S. Build them here! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 23, 2018 As Democrats registered their opposition, they also couldn’t help but note the oddity of a Republican President going against what’s been a bedrock belief of the GOP. “I feel like I’ve gone down a rabbit hole,” said Sen. Clare McCaskill (D-MO), who said she found it hard to believe the party of free trade now had a President in office who was doing the exact opposite. “In a chaotic and frankly incompetent manner, you’re picking winners and losers,” McCaskill told Ross. But for the President, this is about re-setting trade deals, which he says were tilted against the United States. #President #Trump #speaking in #Duluth, #Minnesota: We want fair & reciprocal #trade not stupid trade that we've had for years. We've been ripped off by all of our friends. And frankly the do a much better job than our enemies. #MAGA #economy #POTUS #TrumpTrain — Leanne Howard Kenney (@neeneebucket) June 21, 2018 “As far as trade is concerned with other countries, we want fair and reciprocal trade, we don’t want stupid trade like we had for so long,” the President said at a rally in Minnesota. “Remember the world reciprocal,” Mr. Trump said. “We have been ripped off by almost every country on Earth, our friends and our enemies.” “But those days are over,” the President said to cheers from the crowd. But while they’re cheering Mr. Trump on the stump, at the U.S. Capitol, they’re worried about a trade war. “We’re getting into a war that’s going to cost lots of billions of dollars,” Isakson warned.
  • There was a big setback for the group challenging the tax hikes to pay for teacher pay raises on Friday. The Oklahoma Supreme Court said the petition from Oklahoma Taxpayers United is invalid. Oklahoma's highest court handed down the ruling Friday morning and ordered that the initiative not appear on an election ballot. Justices said the wording of the petition is misleading and those who sign it don't know what they would vote on. The Legislature earlier this year voted to hike taxes on cigarettes, fuel and energy production.
  • A national medical group Thursday abruptly canceled its plans to train doctors about marijuana for pain relief after a federal agency pulled its funding. The episode highlights an ongoing conflict between federal and state laws on marijuana. The American Academy of Pain Medicine scrubbed its plans for a one-hour online course next month after a request from the U.S. government agency that provided the funding, a spokeswoman for the pain medicine group said. The money came from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA. “We cannot speak to the reason that SAMHSA has asked that we not proceed with this webinar, but the webinar will no longer take place,” spokeswoman Megan Drumm in an email Thursday. The group had informed a coalition of medical groups overseeing the government money about the course title and its learning objectives, Drumm said. But after an inquiry from The Associated Press this week, the federal agency said the coalition that gave the grant would no longer take part.
  • In a fresh reminder that political cooperation is not dead on Capitol Hill, the House on Friday overwhelmingly approved a sweeping package of over fifty bipartisan bills to address the misuse of prescription opioid pain medicine, as lawmakers voted to expand a variety of services under Medicare and Medicaid to deal with the drug scourge. “We can do things when we put partisan politics aside and work together,” said Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-FL), one of a number of lawmakers who touted various provisions in the sweeping opioids measure. “This particular bill, H.R. 6, is the crown jewel of all that legislation,” said Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX). “This legislation will strengthen our efforts to advance treatment and recovery issues, and bolster the fight against deadly and illicit drugs,” said Rep. Rick Allen (R-GA). Today’s SUPPORT bill fights the #OpioidCrisis by Advancing treatment and recovery programs Improving prevention efforts Providing resources to communities Fighting deadly drugs like fentanyl We won’t stop until we’ve ended this epidemic. pic.twitter.com/1lwSUVfE6R — Paul Ryan (@SpeakerRyan) June 22, 2018 “This is a big deal in the fight against the largest public health crisis in our country,” said Speaker Paul Ryan. “Mr. Speaker, so often we hear about the partisan wrangling in Congress and clearly there are dividing lines on some high-profile issues,” said Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA). “But this an issue where Republicans and Democrats have come together.” The final vote was 396-14. The bill now goes to the Senate. “Currently, Medicare doesn’t cover opioid treatment programs,” said Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA). “These bills are pieces of a large, complex puzzle. We need to find realistic solutions with long term outcomes.”
  • Toys R Us will be no more after next week. The toy retailer, which started liquidating in March, has said that all Toys R Us and Babies R Us locations will close on or before next Friday, June 29 via posts on the company’s social media pages. The locations that are still open are currently offering what’s left for up to 70 percent off. Many stores are also selling the fixtures, NJ.com reported. >> Read more trending news  There had been hope that some of the 735 stores in the U.S. could remain open after Isaac Larian, MGA Entertainment CEO and the creator of Bratz dolls, offered $675 million to buy some of the U.S. locations, in addition to $215 million for some Canadian stores, but Toys R Us said no, claiming the offer “was well below the liquidation value of the assets he was seeking,” NJ.com reported. It’s not just North American shoppers who are losing the toy store. It was announced this week that the Toys R Us Australian locations will close. There were 44 stores that some had hoped were going to survive, but now are expected to close over the next few weeks, ABC in Australia reported.
  • A day after Republicans in the House defeated one more conservative immigration reform plan, and delayed action until next week on a second bill because of a lack of GOP votes, President Donald Trump on Friday suggested a different avenue entirely – urging Republicans in Congress to drop the issue until after the November elections. “Republicans should stop wasting their time on Immigration until after we elect more Senators and Congressmen/women in November,” the President tweeted early on Friday morning, saying the answer was simple – get more GOP lawmakers in the 2018 mid-term elections. “Elect more Republicans in November and we will pass the finest, fairest and most comprehensive Immigration Bills anywhere in the world,” Mr. Trump pledged, as he blamed Democrats and the Senate rules, which would force him to get 60 votes to do what he wants on immigration. Mr. Trump’s suggestion came as GOP leaders were still looking for a magic legislative formula on immigration reform, as the issue has divided Republicans in both the House and Senate. Even if we get 100% Republican votes in the Senate, we need 10 Democrat votes to get a much needed Immigration Bill – & the Dems are Obstructionists who won’t give votes for political reasons & because they don’t care about Crime coming from Border! So we need to elect more R’s! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 22, 2018 Elect more Republicans in November and we will pass the finest, fairest and most comprehensive Immigration Bills anywhere in the world. Right now we have the dumbest and the worst. Dems are doing nothing but Obstructing. Remember their motto, RESIST! Ours is PRODUCE! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 22, 2018 Republicans should stop wasting their time on Immigration until after we elect more Senators and Congressmen/women in November. Dems are just playing games, have no intention of doing anything to solves this decades old problem. We can pass great legislation after the Red Wave! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 22, 2018 The suggestion by the President that immigration efforts are a waste of time came as Republicans were trying to fine tune a second immigration bill in the House, with hopes of approving that next week, before lawmakers go home for a July Fourth break. Many GOP lawmakers had been hoping that the President instead would come out very publicly in favor of those efforts, and help convince some reluctant House Republicans to get on board, and vote for the plan, despite misgivings about certain provisions.
  • A male pedestrian was hit and killed Saturday night while crossing the street in Tulsa. An officer at the scene tells KRMG the auto-pedestrian collision happened around 11:10 p.m. in the westbound lanes of 71st Street near Trenton Avenue. “A black truck comes through and strikes him,” the officer said.  “Then continues on westbound and we were not able to get a good description of the vehicle.” The pedestrian was transported to a nearby hospital where he was later pronounced dead.  As of early Sunday morning, the victim hasn't been identified. KRMG’s told the scene was closed to traffic until around 2 a.m. Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.  
  • You may have heard the storms overnight in and around the Tulsa area.   The possibility of storms continues on Sunday.  This is especially true during the morning hours.   “We’ll probably start the morning with lingering storm chances,” National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Lacy said.  “Those storm chances will gradually go away during the afternoon.” The high for Sunday will be close to 91 degrees.   The Tulsa area will have more chances for storms Sunday night.  NWS is reporting the low will be near 77 degrees.   There is a severe thunderstorm watch in effect for Tulsa and surrounding counties until 10 a.m.
  • A 37-year-old Broken Arrow man faces a long list of sexual-related charges in connection with having an alleged sexual relationship with a 15-year-old girl.  Court records show Larado Smith was charged on Friday with 12 counts of second-degree rape and three counts of forcible sodomy.  Tulsa World reports the sexual acts apparently happened at the girl's home when her parents were not home.  When police found out about what was going on, a sting was set up. They posed as the girl over social media.    Smith showed up at the teenager's home and was arrested.  He has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.  
  • Today may not be the best day for outdoor activities. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Teague says to keep an umbrella handy.  This is especially true during the afternoon hours.   “We are still holding on for a chance of showers and thunderstorms during the day,” Teague said.  “Again, another chance of showers and thunderstorms late into the evening.” The high is expected to reach around 86 degrees. There is better news for Sunday.  The sun is expected to come out, storm chances are low and the high will be close to 93 degrees.  
  • As President Donald Trump this week threatened $200 billion in new tariffs on Chinese imports, and then warned Europe that he would slap a 20 percent tariff on imported automobiles, members of both parties Congress accused the administration of starting a trade war which could cause collateral economic damage across the United States. The differences were on display at a hearing Wednesday with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who took a bipartisan tongue lashing on a recent round of tariffs levied on imported steel and aluminum from Canada, Mexico and Europe. “We’re picking winners and losers,” argued Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA), who said those tariffs were already hurting businesses in his home state. “Probably resulting – in my view – in far more jobs being lost than being gained,” Toomey told Ross, citing a very well-known Pennsylvania company that could find it less expensive to move jobs from the U.S. to Canada. Sen. @PatToomey tells Ross that $KHZ moved some @HeinzKetchup_US manufacturing to Pennsylvania from Canada – but could move back now that Canada plans to tax American ketchup as retaliation for steel and aluminum tariffs. — Kayla Tausche (@kaylatausche) June 20, 2018 Almost every Senator on the panel had a story of a small business that was feeling the pinch due to Trump Administration tariffs, impacting all sorts of agricultural products, as well as manufacturing, big and small. “Do you think we’re in a trade war right now?” asked Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA). “Because I do,” as Cantwell rattled off farm products that were losing markets because of retaliatory tariff measures. Ross downplayed the cost of higher imported steel and aluminum, basically making the case that economic hardships were being overplayed. “It’s a fraction of a penny on a can of Campbell’s soup, it’s a fraction on a can of Budweiser, it’s a fraction on a can of Coke,” Ross said. That did not please the Senator from the state of Coca-Cola. “Although a couple of pennies on a can is not much, a couple pennies times a billion is lots,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA). “We’re hit harder than any other state by the Canadian retaliatory tariffs,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), warning the Trump Administration against tariffs on imported automobiles, as GOP Senators labeled such actions a tax on consumers. “Steel prices are going up – not just for foreign steel subject to tariffs, but also for U.S. steel,” complained Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). “Mexico’s buying their wheat from Argentina and their corn from Brazil,” said Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS), as he told Ross that Kansas wheat exports were encountering troubles because of new retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports, bringing bad economic news on the farm report. Ross simply told Senators if other countries put new tariffs on U.S. exports, that was out of his control. “We have no control over what another country does in retaliation,” Ross said. The bipartisan complaints clearly had no impact, as by Friday, President Trump was on Twitter, issuing new threats against European auto imports. Based on the Tariffs and Trade Barriers long placed on the U.S. & its great companies and workers by the European Union, if these Tariffs and Barriers are not soon broken down and removed, we will be placing a 20% Tariff on all of their cars coming into the U.S. Build them here! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 23, 2018 As Democrats registered their opposition, they also couldn’t help but note the oddity of a Republican President going against what’s been a bedrock belief of the GOP. “I feel like I’ve gone down a rabbit hole,” said Sen. Clare McCaskill (D-MO), who said she found it hard to believe the party of free trade now had a President in office who was doing the exact opposite. “In a chaotic and frankly incompetent manner, you’re picking winners and losers,” McCaskill told Ross. But for the President, this is about re-setting trade deals, which he says were tilted against the United States. #President #Trump #speaking in #Duluth, #Minnesota: We want fair & reciprocal #trade not stupid trade that we've had for years. We've been ripped off by all of our friends. And frankly the do a much better job than our enemies. #MAGA #economy #POTUS #TrumpTrain — Leanne Howard Kenney (@neeneebucket) June 21, 2018 “As far as trade is concerned with other countries, we want fair and reciprocal trade, we don’t want stupid trade like we had for so long,” the President said at a rally in Minnesota. “Remember the world reciprocal,” Mr. Trump said. “We have been ripped off by almost every country on Earth, our friends and our enemies.” “But those days are over,” the President said to cheers from the crowd. But while they’re cheering Mr. Trump on the stump, at the U.S. Capitol, they’re worried about a trade war. “We’re getting into a war that’s going to cost lots of billions of dollars,” Isakson warned.