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MoneyTalk

Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Dan Witham

MoneyTalk

MoneyTalk is an informative and unique show that pulls back the curtain on Wall Street. We show you the things other shows won’t. The fees and expenses, the sales charges that are hidden. They way your money can be tied up for years. We tell you what to avoid when making investment decisions, and what to look for as well. 

We’ve had a very loyal audience for eight years. We give away a free book on every show to every caller, anywhere in the U.S. We give away a different book each week on a variety of investment topics. Books on long term care, index investing, stock selection methods and exchange traded funds and mutual funds. In addition to a free book for every caller we will also do a free financial plan for every caller, anywhere in the U.S. 

Information you need. What Wall Street won’t tell you and why they won’t tell you. We discuss the perils of investing. What type of advisor to work with and the type you can do without as well. 

Innovative and different investment strategies. Equities, mutual funds ETF’s and annuities. Life insurance, health insurance and annuities. Estate planning. Wills trusts and health care directives. 

Behavioral investing. We explore the psychology behind why people invest the way they do. We delve into the who, what, when, where and how the mind works when it comes to investing. The mistakes people make, why they make them and how to correct them.

About Dan Witham:

Dan Witham is a Branch Manager and Registered Principal with LPL Financial. A graduate of Miami University, member of MENSA and the International High IQ Society, he has over 25 years experience in the securities industry. Dan is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Finance at Harvard University. 

Formerly an Associate Vice President with Morgan Stanley, Dan knows his way around wall street. He has taught classes for numerous law enforcement agencies around the country, including The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), Tulsa Police Department and Lawton Police Department. Dan has devoted the last 15 years of his free time to our city. Dan serves as a reserve deputy for the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office. He routinely works patrol, makes traffic stops and takes calls, all to serve his community. Dan also works with the Tulsa County Criminal Justice Authority. He serves as Chairman of the Sales Tax Overview Committee. Dan and his committee oversee $26 million of taxpayers' money that is spent annually for the Tulsa County Jail (David L. Moss) operations and maintenance. In his capacity as Chairman, Dan reports directly to Fred Perry, Head County Commissioner.

About LPL Financial:

As the nation’s largest independent broker-dealer*, a top RIA custodian, and a leading independent consultant to retirement plans, LPL is an enabling partner to more than 14,000 financial advisors and approximately 700 financial institutions. We believe that objective financial guidance is a fundamental need for everyone. Through our proprietary technology and a suite of customized services, we enable our customers to focus on creating the personal, long-term client relationships that are the foundation for turning life’s aspirations into financial realities. 

LPL is the: 

#1 independent broker-dealer for 20 consecutive years 

#1 provider of third-party brokerage services to retail banks and credit unions 

#5 custodian of RIA assets and one of the fastest growing 

#23 in Barron's 2015 ranking of top high net worth managers in the U.S. 

What helps sets LPL apart and makes us unique is the combination of our capabilities across research, technology, risk management, and practice management, which we believe together exceed any individual competitor's offering. LPL also puts its size to work for its advisors as an influential industry leader. We have the ability to influence and adapt to changes in our industry and our size allows us to constantly reinvest in our offering and to deliver value to advisors and investors, while maintaining a focus on generating shareholder returns.

January 20, 2019

Topics: Investments that can protect you during down times; equity-linked certificates of deposit
Posted: January 20, 2019

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January 13, 2019

Topics: Dividend investing and equity linked CDs are among the topics discussed.
Posted: January 13, 2019

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January 6, 2019

Topics: Navigating the Social Security system to maximize your benefits, plus a free book on that topic.
Posted: January 06, 2019

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More audio replays

  • With no resolution of an over month-long partial government shutdown that has blocked paychecks for over 800,000 federal workers, Democratic leaders in the House said on Wednesday that they would not sign off on the scheduled State of the Union Address by President Donald Trump next Tuesday, unless shuttered federal agencies are re-opened before the original scheduled date for the speech, January 29. “Unless the government is re-opened, it is highly unlikely the State of the Union will take place on the floor of the House,” said Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), the head of the House Democratic Caucus. The comments of Jeffries came just after a closed door meeting of House Democrats, in which Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged rank-in-file Democrats to stick together on the shutdown, as Democrats continue to argue that no negotiations should take place on funding border security until the government has been funded. In private caucus meeting, Pelosi urged her caucus to stay united and stick with the plan, referring to reopen government first before border security talks, per sources. She emphasized to caucus that they are more powerful when they are united, not when they are freelancing. — Manu Raju (@mkraju) January 23, 2019 While Democrats want the government to open first, Republicans, and the President, say the opposite should take place – that negotiations on border security should go first, before the partial government shutdown is ended. GOP leaders scoffed at the idea that the State of the Union should be postponed simply because of the funding dispute, which began before Christmas. “It doesn’t matter what crisis America had in the past, we were able to still have a State of the Union,” said Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA), the House Republican leader. House GOP leaders argued that Democrats were at fault for the partial shutdown – which has now stretched for 33 days – as they demanded that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi offer a plan for extra border security measures. Not one time has Nancy Pelosi come forward with an alternative,” said Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA), the second-ranking Republican in the House. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy says the State of the Union address should be held 'in the House chamber just as it has done for generations before us' https://t.co/No7mzAhmGm pic.twitter.com/FYc5xsjodp — This Week (@ThisWeekABC) January 23, 2019 While the House on Wednesday was ready to approve more funding bills from Democrats to fully fund the government, most eyes were still on the Senate, where leaders set two votes for Thursday – one on a GOP plan that mirrored the President’s immigration proposal set forth last weekend, and a second plan from Democrats which would fund the government until February 8. The White House has already threatened to veto that Democratic plan; officials on Wednesday morning issued a letter in which they said President Trump would sign the GOP proposal. But Republicans would need the votes of seven Democrats to get 60 votes to proceed to that bill; for now, that seems unlikely.
  • Denver teachers voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to go on strike after more than a year of negotiations over base pay. Rob Gould, lead negotiator for the Denver Classroom Teachers Association, said 93 percent of unionized teachers voted in favor of a strike. The union represents 5,635 educators in the Denver Public School system, which could see a strike as soon as Monday. “They’re striking for better pay, they’re striking for our profession and they’re striking for Denver students,” Gould said. The main sticking point was increasing base pay, including lessening teachers’ reliance on one-time bonuses for things such as having students with high test scores or working in a high-poverty school. Teachers also wanted to earn more for continuing their education.
  • With no evidence that President Donald Trump’s weekend speech on immigration and a border wall had changed the dynamic in Congress related to a partial government shutdown, Senate leaders set a pair of votes on competing plans from Democrats and Republicans for Thursday afternoon, the first time Senate Republicans have allowed votes to end the shutdown since before Christmas. “The President’s made a comprehensive and bipartisan offer,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. “It’s a strong proposal, it’s the only thing on the table.” “It was not a good faith proposal. It was not intended to end the shutdown,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer. “The President’s proposal is one-sided.” The political jousting came as representatives of federal workers – who seem likely to go without a paycheck again this Friday – urged the Congress and the President to fully fund the government, and then settle their differences over border security spending. Your Coast Guard leadership team & the American people stand in awe of your continued dedication to duty, resilience, & that of your families. I find it unacceptable that @USCG members must rely on food pantries & donations to get through day-to-day life. #uscg pic.twitter.com/TZ9ppUidyO — Admiral Karl Schultz (@ComdtUSCG) January 23, 2019 “Every family in the FBI has mortgages, car payments, bills that come in at the end of the month,” said Tom O’Connor, the head of the FBI Agents Association. “You have to pay those. Try doing that without a paycheck,” O’Connor told a Washington news conference. Meanwhile, the Trump Administration announced it was calling more federal employees back to work – as the Department of Agriculture said Farm Service Agency offices would resume operations on Thursday. “The FSA provides vital support for farmers and ranchers and they count on those services being available,” said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. Farmers have complained for weeks that the lack of FSA offices was hampering all sorts of work, like applying for bailout payments related to retaliatory tariffs against the U.S., filing paperwork for operating loans, and a variety of other crop programs. But those Farm Service Agency workers won’t be paid until the Congress resolves the shutdown. Good News: @USDA just announced that all Farm Service Agency offices will reopen beginning Thursday, January 24th and offer expanded services to #Ag producers. More information and a list of services here: https://t.co/o8oiQkdnaS — Senator Deb Fischer (@SenatorFischer) January 22, 2019 Back on Capitol Hill, there were no signs that the President’s immigration offer from Saturday was going to break the gridlock over Mr. Trump call for $5.7 billion in border security funding. But the mere fact that there were going to be votes in the Senate related to the shutdown – the first votes on government funding since before Christmas – was seen by some as a welcome event. “I’m pleased that the gears of the legislative process are moving,” said Matt Glassman, a fellow at the Georgetown University Government Affairs Institute. Senate leaders agreed to two procedural votes on Thursday – with 60 votes needed – first on the President’s border plan, plus funding for the federal government, and then on a Democratic plan which combines disaster aid with a plan to simply fund shuttered agencies through February 8. For Glassman and a few others – the decision to set those votes so that Republicans would go first, and then Democrats second, raised questions about whether GOP Senators might vote first to approve money for a border wall, and then also vote to re-open the government, despite the President’s opposition. 1/ My Twitter feed tells me it's folly to think that Thursday's second cloture vote (open government with a 2-week CR) will get 60 votes (47 D + 13 R). I'm not so sure. Just because only 10 GOP signed a bipartisan letter doesn't mean that's the full lid on GOP votes. — Sarah Binder (@bindersab) January 22, 2019 A spokesman for the Senate Majority Leader rejected that idea, saying that Sen. McConnell was against the Democratic plan – but the schedule on Thursday does give GOP Senators the option to first vote for the border wall funding – and when that fails – then vote to re-open the government for about two weeks.
  • It's one thing to WATCH a show like Game of Thrones, but it’s something else to take a swing at an actual sword fight! Tomorrow night starting at 6:00 p.m., the Flying Tee driving range in Jenks is hosting a fundraiser for Tulsa Tyrants, a team in the Armored Combat League, which is just what it sounds like. These guys put on suits of armor and fight with real swords and battle axes and maces. League rules mandate that they dull the edges on the weapons, but they still pack a punch. Once they're done fighting, they'll walk out to the range and raise money by letting people buy chances to hit golf balls at them! They'll then cap the night by having a watch party for the new TV show on the History Channel called Knight Fight, which is all about sword-fighting competitions. You can find out more about the event here.
  • The Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma hosted an event designed to help federal workers who are furloughed or working without pay as a result of the ongoing partial federal shutdown. CFBEO Executive Director Eileen Bradshaw told KRMG her agency was contacted by federal “These are folks who don’t need to navigate the charitable assistance system,” she told KRMG Tuesday, pointing out that many of them don’t even know where to start. “211 is a real treasure for folks who find themselves in this situation,” she added. “If they need something other than food, they can call 211, explain what the need is, chances are there’s someone in our community who’s willing to help.” She told KRMG people lined up at 2:00 p.m. for the event, which ran from 3:00 to 7:00 so that both day and evening workers could make time to take advantage of the free food. KRMG spoke with federal workers who said they’d never expected to need food assistance, and had never visited a food bank before. But they were extremely grateful for the assistance.