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KRMG Evening News with Dick Loftin

Monday through Friday, 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Dick Loftin

KRMG Evening News with Dick Loftin

The KRMG Evening News with Dick Loftin brings Tulsans 2 full hours of the top stories of the day. It is Tulsa’s only radio station providing comprehensive, live coverage of news, weather and traffic during the busy evening commute. 

  • Oklahoma lawmakers are getting to work on regulations for the new medical marijuana industry. The Oklahoma House and Senate named a 13-member working group of legislators. The nine Republicans and four Democrats plan to convene a series of public meetings on medical marijuana beginning next week. State Question 788 was approved by voters last month. Lawmakers now have to come up with a system for licensing applications for patients and dispensaries. The Oklahoma Board of Health approved emergency rules last week that were quickly signed by the governor. Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter said on Wednesday the board overstepped its authority and should reconvene to pass less restrictive rules. 
  • Firefighters in Texas battled blazes outside an Austin factory twice last week after cardboard boxes of tortilla chips reportedly 'spontaneously combusted.' >> Read more trending news  According to the Austin Fire Department, the first fire broke out last Thursday after factory workers tried 'a new way to handle the waste from the chips that, suffice it to say, didn't work out so well.' As crews fought the blaze, more cases erupted in flames, officials said. Firefighters quickly put out the flames, the Austin American-Statesman reported. But their work wasn't done. On Sunday, several other boxes ignited, prompting firefighters to '[drown] all of the other crates that had yet to burn, thereby eliminating the risk completely,' officials said. Read more here and here. >> See the Facebook post here
  • Alarmed by the lack of information from the White House on what was discussed in talks earlier this week between President Donald Trump and Russian leader Vladimir Putin, lawmakers in both parties on Thursday demanded that the Trump Administration detail what exactly was agreed to by Mr. Trump in his talks in Helsinki, Finland. “We have got to find out what the Russian Ambassador was finding out yesterday, when he said that important agreements were reached,” said Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ). “We shouldn’t be just guessing based on the statements of the Russian Ambassador, or based on the reports of what we hear in the media,” said Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE). “What are they hiding?” Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer added on the Senate floor. “What are they afraid of?” At a briefing in Moscow on Wednesday, the Russian Ambassador to the U.S., Anatoly Antonov, said that no ‘secret deals’ were made in the Trump-Putin meeting – but then, Antonov said in a television interview later in the day that, ‘important verbal agreements were made.’ “The meeting was important, intense, constructive and productive,” Antonov was quoted by the Russian TV network RT. But with no joint statement from the two leaders after the Trump-Putin meeting, and no rundown of exactly what was discussed, lawmakers felt they were being left in the dark. Those expressions of concern on Capitol Hill came as other arms of the federal government made clear they were also did not know details of any Trump-Putin agreements as well. At the Pentagon, reporters spoke via video conference with CENTCOM Commander, Gen. Joseph Votel, who said he had received no information from the White House on any future U.S.-Russian military cooperation in Syria. “No new guidance as of yet,” from #HelsinkiSummit Gen. Joe Votel @CENTCOM Commander tells Pentagon reporters. Says #NDAA prohibits cooperating, coordinating with #Russia in #Syria. “Any space for that would have to be created by Congress… I have not asked for that.” pic.twitter.com/2QBxsXHYGX — Jamie McIntyre (@jamiejmcintyre) July 19, 2018 Gen. Votel said there had been “no new guidance for me as a result of the Helsinki discussions as of yet.” President Trump on Wednesday declared his meeting with Putin to be a ‘tremendous success,’ adding on Twitter this morning that he wants a second meeting with the Russian leader. In a pair of tweets, Mr. Trump rattled off a list of items which he had discussed in the Putin meeting: “stopping terrorism, security for Israel, nuclear proliferation, cyber attacks, trade, Ukraine, Middle East peace, North Korea and more.” “There are many answers, some easy and some hard, to these problems,” the President wrote, “but they can ALL be solved,” as he again attacked the press as the “enemy of the people.” The Summit with Russia was a great success, except with the real enemy of the people, the Fake News Media. I look forward to our second meeting so that we can start implementing some of the many things discussed, including stopping terrorism, security for Israel, nuclear…….. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 19, 2018 ….proliferation, cyber attacks, trade, Ukraine, Middle East peace, North Korea and more. There are many answers, some easy and some hard, to these problems…but they can ALL be solved! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 19, 2018 Some lawmakers were also demanding any notes from the woman who served as Mr. Trump’s interpreter during the meeting – but that option seemed unlikely. One other discussion point between the two leaders drew additional bipartisan notice, as the Senate moved to go on the record against the idea of allowing Russia to question the former U.S. Ambassador to Russia, Michael McFaul, as the White House faced stern criticism for not rejecting the idea out of hand. “When President Trump called Putin’s offer, an incredible offer, he was incredibly wrong,” said Sen. Schumer.
  • You’ve had Jack Nicholson, Heath Ledger and Jared Leto, but now Joaquin Phoenix is throwing his card on the pile and will portray the “Clown Prince of Crime”- The Joker. Warner Bros confirmed the standalone project and has announced the film’s title and release date. “Joker” is now scheduled to hit the big screen on Oct. 4, 2019, Variety reported. >> Read more trending news  The crime boss’ origin story has a budget of $55 million and is expected to not have the traditional of huge action sequences. Instead it will show how the Joker became Batman’s nemesis, NME reported.  Warner Bros. said it will be an “exploration of a man disregarded by society [that] is not only a gritty character study, but also a broader cautionary tale.” The idea of a low-budget superhero movie came from Phoenix himself, NME reported. “Joker” will be directed by Todd Phillips.
  • He doesn’t have long to live but the days he does have left will be filled with free cheeseburgers.  Cody the dog was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer, CBS News reported. WNWO reported that he has only months left.  His owner Alex Karcher went to his local Burger King to pick up a burger to help Cody take his medications, CBS News reported. A worker wondered why Karcher ordered a plain burger, and he explained it was for his dog who was suffering from cancer. The employee spoke with her manager, who told Karcher that Cody could have free cheeseburgers for the rest of his life at that location, CBS News reported.  Karcher posted the story to Twitter and it got the attention of the Burger King home offices which responded to Karcher, saying that, “The world needs more kindness and empathy.” >> Read more trending news  The owner of the Burger King franchise  told WTOL that he is proud his employees did the right thing and that they are following the company’s motto: “People pleasing people.”