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Latest from Ben Morgan

    First Lady Sarah Stitt, Linda Edmondson and Superintendent Joy Hofmeister will be hosting an evening of fun on Friday. It’s called The Back to School Movie Night for Oklahoma Foster Families. It takes place Friday from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Guthrie Green. The event will feature bounce houses, snow cones, food, a photo booth and of course, the movie!  The movie will be Marry Poppins (2018)  Every child registered who is of school age will receive a backpack and a variety of school supplies.  They’ll also get to hang out with The First Lady.  Tickets are limited, click here to register for a pair.
  • The Hop Jam, Oklahoma’s largest craft beer and music festival, has announced the third annual Brewers’ Table Dinner, raising funds for the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma.  The event will take place Sept 6th, at the Food Bank. Brewers’ Table will feature a multi-course gourmet meal prepared by executive chef Jeff Marlow with a unique beer paring for each course.  Guests will get a chance to sample some of the unique brews provided by Nothing’s Left and by Isaac, Taylor & Zac Hanson of Hanson Brothers Beer. They will offer a selection of beers curated especially for the occasion. Hop Jam founders, musicians and fellow brewers Hanson Brothers Beer will again co-host the event.  Last year’s event helped raise thousands of dollars and provided thousands of meals for hungry Oklahomans. Limited space is available. You can get tickets and learn more by clicking here. 
  • Tulsa County deputies say they were called to the KRMG AM Transmitter Site around 10 o’clock Sunday morning.  They say when they arrived they found two individuals who had appeared to have been electrocuted.  One of the individuals died in the incident the other has been taken to a nearby hospital in critical condition. Deputies say tools found on scene would indicate the two were trying to steal copper from the transmitter site.  Deputies arrested Angie West on Sunday, who they say is the girlfriend of the man who died. West told deputies she drove the two men to the site in an attempt to steal copper.  Deputies said West could face a murder charge for her involvement in the matter. Cox Media Group Tulsa Market Vice President Cathy Gunther has released this statement:  “Early this morning two individuals broke into the KRMG AM transmitter site. It appears they attempted to access a building through a conduit and were electrocuted. One of the individuals is deceased and one was transported to the hospital. From the tools and materials found at the site, it appears that they were attempting to steal copper.  The safety of our community is of utmost importance – please do not enter any transmitter site, for any reason, as the area is extremely dangerous.   -Cathy” Deputies arrested Angie West on Sunday, who they say is the girlfriend of the man who died. West told deputies she drove the two men to the site in an attempt to steal copper. Deputies say she fell asleep in the car and drove away the next morning thinking the two men may have ran away from authorities in the area.
  • The National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum have announced two officially licensed Kyler Murray Oklahoma Sooners bobbleheads are available for pre-order and Oklahoma fans should love them!  These are among the first bobbleheads of the former Oklahoma Sooners star quarterback and 2018 Heisman Trophy Winner in his Oklahoma uniforms The football bobblehead features Murray getting ready to release the football while standing on a football field base with a backing that includes his name, the Oklahoma Sooners and his number 1. The baseball bobblehead features Murray admiring a long drive as well as his name, Oklahoma and his number 7. Murray was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals with the 1st overall pick in the 2019 NFL Draft. He was drafted 9th overall by the Oakland Athletics in the 2018 MLB Draft, making him the only player to be drafted in the first rounds of both sports’ drafts.  The bobbleheads, which are being produced for the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum by FOCO, are scheduled to ship in September, just in time for the football season. If you’d like a piece of sports history you can click here to pre-order. 
  • The Broken Arrow Police Department, The Assembly at Broken Arrow and St. John Broken Arrow are teaming up to put on the 12th Annual Back to School Bash and Community Health Fair.  It’s a free event that takes place this Saturday. They’ll be supplying school supplies, haircuts, immunizations, vision screenings as well as many other services provided by BAFD and the community.  The ‘Bash’ will be held at The Assembly at Broken Arrow, located at 101st and 129th East Ave from 9 a.m. to Noon. 
  • Homeowners in the Dallas-Fort Worth area got quite a surprise when they checked out the video on their doorbell camera. A very polite cow had sauntered up to the house and onto the from porch, peered into the front door and nudged the doorbell. It happened in the suburb of Mansfield.. After waiting on the porch for a few minutes, the cow turned and walked away. It’s unclear where it came from and where it went after ringing the family’s doorbell. You can watch the video of the curious cow by clicking here. 
  • A new study shows that Native American Tribes have contributed significantly to Oklahoma's economic growth. The study was done through the Oklahoma Tribal Finance Consortium, and shows tribes had a near $13 Billion dollar impact on the state, an increase of nearly $10 Billion dollars since 2011. The study shows employment numbers also spiked with 10,000 new jobs since 2011. The information comes as Gov. Kevin Stitt has asked tribes to renegotiate their gaming compacts. You can check out the full study by clicking here. 
  • A dog born with upside down paws has made it through a successful surgery to fix it. Back in January a 7-week-old puppy from Stillwater went through extensive surgery at Oklahoma State's Veterinary Hospital.  The puppy's name is Milo who was born with upside down paws. Milo’s condition was identified as congenital dislocation of both elbows, making two paws face upward.  Milo’s now six months post-surgery and exceeding all expectations. Milo is now running, playing, and swimming like any 8-month-old puppy would.
  • The Tulsa Health Department reminds parents of children entering kindergarten or the 7th grade that now is the time to visit immunization clinics to avoid the back-to-school rush that starts every year in August. There are no new immunization requirements for the 2019-2020 school year. THD offers several convenient features to help clients during this busy time:  Online immunizations records requests Parents and legal guardians can request immunization records electronically at www.tulsahealth.org/shotrecords. Requests will be processed within 5 business days.  Extended hours at two locations Starting August 5-22, the immunization clinic at the James O. Goodwin Health Center, 5051 S. 129 E. Ave. will stay open until 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and the Central Regional Health Center, 315 S. Utica, will stay open until 6 p.m. on Thursdays. On Fridays, these locations will be open regular hours from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m The demand for vaccines turns into a rush before school starts in August because of the booster shots which are due after a child turns four and required before children enter kindergarten.
  • Mechanics for American Airlines are being forced to work overtime. A federal judge ordering the mechanics for the airline, including those here in Tulsa to work, or receive a fine as the result of a lawsuit between the airline and two mechanic's unions. The airline claims union workers are pulling planes from the air and doing maintenance work on them just to spite the airline for not giving them a work contract since the merge with US Airways back in 2015. Hundreds of flights have been cancelled as a result of this situation. The union claims they have never ordered a 'slow down' or asked employees to refuse work in Tulsa.
  • Ben Morgan

    News Editor

    Born and raised in Dayton, Ohio, Ben Morgan is new to Tulsa, but is eager to be a part of the KRMG family. He earned his degree in Multimedia Production and Broadcasting at the International College of Broadcasting, graduating in 2018, and has been in radio for about 2 and a half years. Ben is a self-described nerd and loves movies. He can be found at home with his cat playing video games in his free time. You might see him out and about doing interviews and working on stories, but most of the time he'll be behind-the-scenes producing  the Cox Communications broadcast of the KRMG Morning News with Dan Potter on Cox Channel 3 or 1003. Plus, he'll be writing and producing stories for KRMG radio newscasts. Favorite Movie: Pulp Fiction. Favorite Band: Queen. Favorite TV Show: Breaking Bad. Favorite Sports Team: Cleveland Cavaliers.

    Read More
  • A single blood test may be able to detect your risk of dying within five to 10 years. That’s according to new research published this week in the journal Nature Communications, for which scientists in the Netherlands examined blood sample data on 44,168 Europeans ages 18 to 109 from 12 cohorts. More than 5,500 participants died during follow-up studies. When looking through the data, lead researcher Eline Slagboom and her team identified 14 biomarkers in the blood independently associated with “all-cause mortality.” These biomarkers, which are “involved in various processes, such as lipoprotein and fatty acid metabolism, glycolysis, fluid balance, and inflammation,” ultimately help determine one’s score (or risk) of dying within five to 10 years. “Such a score,” study authors wrote, “could potentially be used in clinical practice to guide treatment strategies, for example when deciding whether an elderly person is too fragile for an invasive operation.” But how well can those 14 biomarkers actually predict risk of death? To find out, the scientists also compared their data with a 1997 cohort in Finland. According to data on more than 7,600 Finnish individuals (1,213 of whom had died during follow-up), the 14 biomarkers initially examined predicted patient deaths within five to 10 years with approximately 83% accuracy, according to the study. This suggests the biomarkers “clearly improve risk prediction of five and 10-year mortality as compared to conventional risk factors across all ages,” study authors wrote. Conventional risk factors, such as systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol, typically have a mortality prediction accuracy of 78% to 79%. Still, further research is certainly needed before a blood test based on the 14 biomarkers is used in clinical settings. Because the data used in the study comes from a variety of cohorts, future efforts should focus on creating a biomarker score based on individual-level data. Read the full study at nature.com.
  • A federal judge has placed the man at the center of the John Grisham book 'The Innocent Man' on the path to potential freedom. Karl Fontenot’s story was also made into a Netflix documentary series. U.S. District Judge James Payne, of Muskogee, ruled there is reasonable doubt that Fontenot should have been convicted in 1988 in the kidnapping and killing of Ada convenience store clerk Denice Haraway in 1984.  Judge Payne's opinion discusses alleged misconduct by police, investigators and prosecutors. Fontenot and co-defendant Tommy Ward were convicted in Haraway's murder in part due to a recording of them talking about dreams they had about her murder.
  • On a day of big losses on the stock markets sparked first by China levying new tariffs on imports from America, President Donald Trump wasted no time Friday afternoon in announcing higher import duties against the Chinese, plunging the two countries even deeper into an economic standoff which could have negative worldwide ramifications. 'China should not have put new Tariffs on 75 BILLION DOLLARS of United States product,' the President tweeted about an hour after the close on Wall Street, where the Dow Jones dropped over 600 points. 'Starting on October 1st, the 250 BILLION DOLLARS of goods and products from China, currently being taxed at 25%, will be taxed at 30%,' the President wrote.  'Additionally, the remaining 300 BILLION DOLLARS of goods and products from China, that was being taxed from September 1st at 10%, will now be taxed at 15%,' he added. The President also called on American companies to take their manufacturing businesses out of China, arguing that the United States was the victim of an 'unfair Trading Relationship.' 'Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China, including bringing your companies HOME and making your products in the USA,' Mr. Trump tweeted. The White House did not provide any explanation as to how the President would have the power to force U.S. companies to abandon their manufacturing operations in China. Economic experts and businesses were worried by the days events. “(T)his is a major risk as it's the economy - households and businesses - that are in play,” said Gregory Daco of Oxford Economics. “The administration's approach clearly isn't working, and the answer isn't more taxes on American businesses and consumers,” said the National Retail Federation. “Where does this end?'  “These added tariffs will ratchet up consumer prices, stall business investment, escalate uncertainty and cost American jobs,” said the pro-free trade group Tariffs Hurt the Heartland. “In just the past three years, U.S. soybean exports to China have fallen nearly 80 percent, and once these tariffs kick in, things are likely to get worse,” said Roger Johnson, the head of the National Farmers Union.  The standoff with China was a far cry from President Trump's prediction in March of 2018, when he wrote on Twitter that trade wars are 'easy to win.' As for Democrats - even though many of them would like to see the United States be more forceful with China - their answer is not retaliatory tariffs and a trade war. “Our economy is showing signs of weakening due to the president’s trade war, and these back-and-forth tariffs will only make things worse,” said Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA). “The facts are clear: President Trump's destabilizing and reckless trade war is undermining growth,” said Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-CA). “Your tariffs are hurting our country badly,” said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). “There's nothing funny about tanking people's retirement accounts with a failed trade war,” said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA).
  • The Trump campaign has a message for its female supporters: It’s time to come out of hiding. “There’s a lot of people that are fearful of expressing their support, and I want you ladies to know it’s OK to have felt that way, but we need to move past that or the Democrats win,” said Tana Goertz, a Trump campaign adviser, at an Iowa “Women for Trump” event on Thursday. The Iowa event, held in the back room of a barbecue joint in a Des Moines suburb, was one of more than a dozen in battleground states nationwide as part of a push to make the president’s case on the economy and train volunteers. The move is a recognition of the president’s persistent deficit with women — an issue that has the potential to sink his chances for reelection. Over the course of his presidency and across public opinion polls, women have been consistently less supportive of President Donald Trump than men have. Suburban women in particular rejected Republicans in the 2018 midterm by margins that set off alarms for the party and the president. Trump himself called into a gathering of hundreds in Tampa, Florida, and insisted, to cheers: “We’re doing great with women, despite the fake news.”
  • With the United States set to slap a new 10 percent tariff on billions of dollars in Chinese goods coming into the U.S. on September 1, the Chinese government officially retaliated on Friday, announcing its own new tariffs on American products, and denouncing President Donald Trump's get-tough actions on trade. 'The US measures have led to the continuous escalation of Sino-US economic and trade frictions, which have greatly harmed the interests of China, the United States and other countries,' the Chinese Minstry of Finance announced. The documents released by China today apply to over 5,000 categories of items imported from the United States, covering everything from diapers to pipes and cigarette holders, to a range of agricultural products like barley, wheat, oats, corn, sorghum, soybeans, peanuts, cotton, covering about $75 billion in U.S. goods. Much like a 122 page list of targeted items put out by the United States earlier this month, China issued over 100 pages of products which would face new import duties. The reaction from Congress and business groups was negative. 'This trade war is not holding China accountable,' said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA). 'It's hurting farmers and small business owners all over the country who are just trying to earn a living.' “The fact of the matter is that nobody wins a trade war, and the continued tit-for-tat escalation between the U.S. and China is putting significant strain on the U.S. economy, raising costs, undermining investment, and roiling markets,” the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said in a statement. As for President Trump, he has not wavered in his public statements about taking on china, tariff for tariff, as one of his Friday tweets caused some shock on  the markets. “Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China,” the President wrote. “Here’s the thing: Somebody had to take on what China was doing to the United States economically,” the President told reporters this week. “We’re winning big. I took it on. And it should have been done by previous Presidents,” he added. And on Twitter Friday morning, the President expressed no concerns about the Chinese response. Asked by reporters earlier this week about the trade war with China, Mr. Trump said he was the only President who had decided to actually confront Beijing. “I am the chosen one,” the President said, as he looked skyward.

Washington Insider

  • On a day of big losses on the stock markets sparked first by China levying new tariffs on imports from America, President Donald Trump wasted no time Friday afternoon in announcing higher import duties against the Chinese, plunging the two countries even deeper into an economic standoff which could have negative worldwide ramifications. 'China should not have put new Tariffs on 75 BILLION DOLLARS of United States product,' the President tweeted about an hour after the close on Wall Street, where the Dow Jones dropped over 600 points. 'Starting on October 1st, the 250 BILLION DOLLARS of goods and products from China, currently being taxed at 25%, will be taxed at 30%,' the President wrote.  'Additionally, the remaining 300 BILLION DOLLARS of goods and products from China, that was being taxed from September 1st at 10%, will now be taxed at 15%,' he added. The President also called on American companies to take their manufacturing businesses out of China, arguing that the United States was the victim of an 'unfair Trading Relationship.' 'Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China, including bringing your companies HOME and making your products in the USA,' Mr. Trump tweeted. The White House did not provide any explanation as to how the President would have the power to force U.S. companies to abandon their manufacturing operations in China. Economic experts and businesses were worried by the days events. “(T)his is a major risk as it's the economy - households and businesses - that are in play,” said Gregory Daco of Oxford Economics. “The administration's approach clearly isn't working, and the answer isn't more taxes on American businesses and consumers,” said the National Retail Federation. “Where does this end?'  “These added tariffs will ratchet up consumer prices, stall business investment, escalate uncertainty and cost American jobs,” said the pro-free trade group Tariffs Hurt the Heartland. “In just the past three years, U.S. soybean exports to China have fallen nearly 80 percent, and once these tariffs kick in, things are likely to get worse,” said Roger Johnson, the head of the National Farmers Union.  The standoff with China was a far cry from President Trump's prediction in March of 2018, when he wrote on Twitter that trade wars are 'easy to win.' As for Democrats - even though many of them would like to see the United States be more forceful with China - their answer is not retaliatory tariffs and a trade war. “Our economy is showing signs of weakening due to the president’s trade war, and these back-and-forth tariffs will only make things worse,” said Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA). “The facts are clear: President Trump's destabilizing and reckless trade war is undermining growth,” said Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-CA). “Your tariffs are hurting our country badly,” said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). “There's nothing funny about tanking people's retirement accounts with a failed trade war,” said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA).
  • With the United States set to slap a new 10 percent tariff on billions of dollars in Chinese goods coming into the U.S. on September 1, the Chinese government officially retaliated on Friday, announcing its own new tariffs on American products, and denouncing President Donald Trump's get-tough actions on trade. 'The US measures have led to the continuous escalation of Sino-US economic and trade frictions, which have greatly harmed the interests of China, the United States and other countries,' the Chinese Minstry of Finance announced. The documents released by China today apply to over 5,000 categories of items imported from the United States, covering everything from diapers to pipes and cigarette holders, to a range of agricultural products like barley, wheat, oats, corn, sorghum, soybeans, peanuts, cotton, covering about $75 billion in U.S. goods. Much like a 122 page list of targeted items put out by the United States earlier this month, China issued over 100 pages of products which would face new import duties. The reaction from Congress and business groups was negative. 'This trade war is not holding China accountable,' said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA). 'It's hurting farmers and small business owners all over the country who are just trying to earn a living.' “The fact of the matter is that nobody wins a trade war, and the continued tit-for-tat escalation between the U.S. and China is putting significant strain on the U.S. economy, raising costs, undermining investment, and roiling markets,” the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said in a statement. As for President Trump, he has not wavered in his public statements about taking on china, tariff for tariff, as one of his Friday tweets caused some shock on  the markets. “Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China,” the President wrote. “Here’s the thing: Somebody had to take on what China was doing to the United States economically,” the President told reporters this week. “We’re winning big. I took it on. And it should have been done by previous Presidents,” he added. And on Twitter Friday morning, the President expressed no concerns about the Chinese response. Asked by reporters earlier this week about the trade war with China, Mr. Trump said he was the only President who had decided to actually confront Beijing. “I am the chosen one,” the President said, as he looked skyward.
  • Before the leaders of the G7 nations had even boarded their flights for the meeting in Biarritz, France, President Donald Trump was already stirring the political pot associated with the meeting of western allies, making it clear he wants to see Russia return to the group, after being exiled in 2014 over the seizure of the Crimea from Ukraine. 'We spend a lot of time talking about Russia at those meetings,' the President told reporters this week. 'And they're not there. I think it would be a good thing if Russia were there so we can speak directly.' Russia was a member of what was then known as the 'Group of Eight' - but Moscow was booted out in 2014 after Russia seized Crimea from Ukraine. 'President Obama thought it wasn't a good thing to have Russia in,' Mr. Trump said to reporters. 'But I think it's much more appropriate to have Russia in.' But there seems to be little chance of that happening in the current political environment in Europe, especially with Russian backed forces fighting in Ukraine. During a meeting with Vladimir Putin earlier this week, French President Emmanuel Macron made clear his opposition to such a move proposed by President Trump, arguing that Russia must first address Crimea - and the ongoing proxy war pushed by Russian backed forces inside Ukraine - before any such change is made. 'In effect, the resolution of this conflict is a magic wand that will open the door for Russia to return to the G7 club,' Macron said . With the two leaders seated before reporters, Macron labeled the Ukraine situation an 'irritant' in Russian relations with the West. 'It is obvious that the return to the G8 format and normal relations with the EU requires the settlement of the Ukrainian crisis,' Macron added. Last year, the 2018 meeting of world leaders from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom, ended in odd fashion, when President Trump suddenly left the meeting early, refusing to endorse a joint communique by the leaders. In order to avoid a dispute along those lines in 2019, Macron has decided there will not be a joint communique issued by the G-7. It will be the first time since the meetings began in the 1970's that the group will not issue a statement of joint goals. White House officials previewing the President's trip said much of his focus at the G-7 will be on free, fair and reciprocal trade, as he has often criticized Canada and the European Union of unfair trade barriers to U.S. exports.
  • Back in their home districts on an extended summer break, the drip-drip sound Democrats hear is not coming from the watering the plants, but rather from the halls of the Congress, where more and more Democratic members of the House are publicly announcing their support for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. A flurry of announcements were made on Thursday, as a series of Democrats said they would back an impeachment inquiry by the House Judiciary Committee, bringing the total number to 135 - more than a majority of Democrats in the House. 'I cannot ignore the call to defend our institutions, to safeguard our democratic norms, and to stand up for our democracy,' said Rep. Mark Takano (D-CA) on Thursday afternoon. A few hours earlier, Rep. William Keating of Massachusetts told his Bay State constituents that the Mueller Report left too many unanswered questions about the President, accusing the White House of stonewalling legitimate Congressional oversight. 'No person in America is above the law, including the President of the United States,' said Rep. Lauren Underwood, a freshman Democrat from Illinois. 'I support moving forward with an impeachment inquiry, which will continue to uncover the facts for the American people and hold this president accountable,' said Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM), the fourth ranking Democrat in the House.  'This is not a position I’ve reached lightly,' Lujan said earlier this week. When Democrats left town four weeks ago for their six week summer break, the number of lawmakers endorsing the start of an impeachment idea was nowhere near 100. But it's been creeping up on almost a daily basis - and more lawmakers seem likely to join in the weeks ahead.
  • Unlikely to qualify for the next debate among Democratic candidates for the White House, Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington State told supporters in an email on Wednesday night that he was dropping his bid for the Democratic Party's nomination for President, further thinning the field with just over five months until the first vote is cast. 'I want to share a tough decision with you,' Inslee said to supporters, as he cited his top priority of climate change. 'But I've concluded that my role in that effort will not be as a candidate to be the next president of the United States,' Inslee added. Earlier in the week, Inslee touted that his campaign had hit 130,000 donors - one of the qualifying requirements for the next Democratic debate in Houston. But Inslee had no chance to register at 2 percent or higher in four different polls, leaving him on the sidelines - and off the debate stage. 'As a result, I don't believe we can compete for the attention and exposure needed to have a reasonable shot at the nomination,' Inslee said. Inslee had tried hard to be the loudest voice in the party on climate change, bringing it up in both debates, and doing numerous events on the subject. But the former Congressman, and current Governor, was never able to break out of the lower tier of Democratic candidates. “I want to once again thank everyone who helped in this effort. We have so much to be proud of,” Inslee wrote to his backers.  “Make no mistake, we also have a lot more work to do.” On MSNBC Wednesday night, Inslee said it was clear this was the right choice. “I'm not going to be carrying the ball,” Inslee said in an interview.  “I'm not going to be the President, so I'm withdrawing tonight.”