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World

    Israel's ambassador to Poland has joined Warsaw residents in recalling the first mass deportations of Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto and in honoring a Jewish activist who took his own life while despairing the world's indifference to the Holocaust. The March of Remembrance got underway Sunday at Umschlagplatz Memorial, the site where Nazi Germans occupying Poland started in July 1942 putting Jews on trains to the Treblinka death camp. The marches have been held each year since 2012 in memory of Warsaw's Jewish community, which was Europe's largest before World War II. This year's event was dedicated to Szmul Zygielbojm, who killed himself in London in 1943. After fleeing Poland, Zygielbojm publicly relayed what he was hearing about the Jewish genocide in Nazi-occupied Poland and begged allied leaders to help.
  • Iran's president Hassan Rouhani has urged U.S. President Donald Trump to 'make peace' with Iran, the semi-official ISNA news agency reported on Sunday. The report quotes Rouhani as saying 'American must understand well that peace with Iran is the mother of all peace and war with Iran is the mother of all wars.' Rouhani warned Trump to stop 'playing with the lion's tail' and threatening Iran, 'or else you will regret it.' Trump earlier this year pulled the United States out of the international deal meant to prevent Tehran from developing a nuclear weapon and ordered increased American sanctions. Trump has suggested Iranian leaders are 'going to call me and say 'let's make a deal'' but Iran has rejected talks. Rouhani has previously lashed out against Trump for threatening to re-impose the sanctions, as well as for moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem and banning travel to the U.S. from certain Muslim-majority countries.
  • Yemeni tribal leaders say a suspected U.S. drone strike has killed four alleged al-Qaida militants in the central province of Marib. The tribal leaders said on Sunday that the alleged operatives' charred bodies were later found after the unmanned aircraft targeted a house while they were inside in the district of al-Rawda. They spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals. Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, as the Yemeni affiliate is known, has long been considered the global network's most dangerous branch and has attempted to carry out attacks on the U.S. mainland. Yemen was plunged into civil war more than three years ago. Al-Qaida and an Islamic State affiliate have exploited the chaos to expand their presence in the country.
  • Differences remain over trade and the tensions could escalate further despite talks by the world's top financial officials taking place in Argentina's capital amid fears that a wave of tariffs could damper global economic growth, a European official said Sunday. The meeting of G-20 finance ministers and central bankers in Buenos Aires comes with the United States and China in a full-blown trade war with both nations imposing tariffs on billions of dollars of each other's goods with even bigger tariffs being threatened. International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde has warned that the tariffs could significantly harm the global economy, lowering growth by about 0.5 percent 'in the worst case scenario.' 'These meetings have been taking place in an international context which is very challenging,' European financial affairs commissioner Pierre Moscovici told reporters Sunday. 'Trade tensions remain high and they threaten to escalate further.' But the EU's top economy official said the two-day summit that began Saturday has not been 'tense,' and that countries must remain 'cool-headed and maintain a proper sense of perspective.' Representing the U.S. at the meetings is Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who on Saturday said the overall U.S. economy has not been harmed by the trade battles set off by President Donald Trump's get-tough policies. But he acknowledged that some individual sectors have been hurt and said U.S. officials are looking at ways to help them. The U.S. and China have hit each other with tariffs on $34 billion goods with another $16 billion in penalty tariffs in the pipeline. The Trump administration is preparing to impose tariffs on another $200 billion and threatening to add $300 billion more to that figure. Washington has also imposed tariffs of 25 percent on steel and 10 percent on aluminum, including from Europe. China, the EU, Canada, Mexico and Turkey have counterpunched with taxes on more than $24 billion worth of U.S. exports. 'Protectionism, I want to insist on that, is good for no one,' Moscovici said. 'Trade wars are not easy ... they create no winners, only casualties.' But Moscovici said that the EU remains open to dialogue. 'That's why EU President Jean-Claude Juncker and Eu Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom will meet with Trump' in Washington D.C. next week, he said. 'We hope this meeting will be productive and successful.' Global markets have remained generally calm despite the U.S.-China trade war and the other conflicts ignited by Trump. But analysts say they expect Trump will impose more tariffs on China and potentially other key U.S. trading partners. With those nations almost certain to retaliate, the result could be higher prices for Americans, diminished export sales and a weaker U.S. economy by next year. Officials in Buenos Aires are also discussing issues including the future of work and infrastructure for development, the international tax system and financial inclusion. It is the third of five meetings by finance ministers and central bankers scheduled in advance of a main G-20 meeting in Argentina that will be held Nov. 30-Dec 1. On Sunday afternoon, participants were still working on the details of a final draft of a resolution from the meeting. The Group of 20 nations is composed of traditional economic powers such as the United States, Japan and Germany and emerging economic powers including China, Brazil, India and Argentina.
  • Yemeni officials say unidentified armed men have killed a Muslim preacher in the southern city of Aden, base of Yemen's internationally recognized government backed by a Saudi-led coalition. They said on Sunday that the slain Mohammed Ragheb was known to be close to the Islah party, a local affiliate of the Muslim Brotherhood group that is allied with Yemen's self-exiled President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief media. Muslim clerics and preachers have often been targeted, mostly in Aden, prompting some imams to quit, abandon their mosques or flee the war-torn country. The coalition has been backing Hadi's government in a three-year war against the Iran-aligned Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, aiming to restore him to power.
  • Iran was jolted by a series of moderate and light earthquakes on Sunday, including a 5.9 magnitude temblor in a mountainous western region in which officials said some 150 people were injured. The first temblor, measuring a magnitude of 4.6 rocked the town of Ruydar, in Hormozgan province, earlier in the day. The town is located some 940 kilometers, or 580 miles, south of the capital, Tehran. It was followed shortly after by a 5.4 magnitude aftershock, according to the United States Geological Survey. Iran's semi-official news agency had initially reported the magnitude at 5.7. No injuries were reported. In the afternoon, a 5.9 magnitude quake rocked an area in western Iran near the border with Iraq in Kermanshah province. The head of the country's agency that handles responses to emergencies and natural disasters, Pirhossein Kolivand, told state television that 146 people were injured, including 21 who were taken to hospitals for treatment. Kolivand did not mention any fatalities and could not be reached by phone for further details. Some houses in the region were damaged, and the earthquake caused a landslide that temporarily shut down a local road, the governor of Karmanshah, Houshang Bazvand, told semi-official Tasnim news agency. Local residents reported multiple aftershocks through the day, said Morteza Salimi, an official with Iran's Red Crescent aid agency. Iran sits on major fault lines and is prone to regular earthquakes. A magnitude 7.2 quake hit western Iran in November, killing more than 600. In 2003, a 6.6 magnitude quake flattened the historic city of Bam, killing 26,000 people.
  • Yemen's government says the Iran-aligned Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, should release all detainees and captives held in their prisons ahead of peace talks. The official news agency SABA quoted the government Sunday as saying that the Houthis should also hand over their arms and withdraw from all rebel-held areas including the capital, Sanaa, which they seized in September 2014. The agency says Prime Minister Ahmed Obaid bin Daghr made the remarks in a meeting with the U.N. special envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths. Yemen was plunged in March 2015 into a war pitting a Saudi-led coalition backing the government of a self-exiled president against the Houthis. Last month, Griffiths announced plans to bring Yemen's warring parties to the negotiating table. He held several meetings with both sides since.
  • Tens of thousands of Israeli LGBT advocates and their supporters went on strike across the country Sunday, protesting the exclusion of gay men from a recently passed surrogacy law. Protesters marched in Tel Aviv and other Israeli cities on Sunday, waving rainbow flags and briefly blocking a major highway. The community is outraged that after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pledged to pass legislation supporting surrogacy for gay fathers, he then voted against it, apparently under pressure from his ultra-Orthodox Jewish coalition partners. Hundreds protested near Netanyahu's residence in Jerusalem. Eyal Lurie Pardes, a protester draped in a rainbow flag, chanted: 'We will not remain silent!' 'Look me in the eyes and tell me I don't deserve to be a father!' he said. Footage aired on Israeli TV later showed police pushing him into a police car. Israeli police said two people were detained and then released. The protest has grown into a general call for equality, following other recent controversial legislation that appeared to target Israeli liberalism. The protest has generated widespread support and hundreds of employers said they would allow employees to observe the strike without penalty. Tel Aviv's central Rabin Square was packed with tens of thousands of people for the main demonstration Sunday night. Israel has emerged as one of the world's most gay-friendly travel destinations in recent years, in sharp contrast to the rest of the Middle East where gays are persecuted and even killed. In Israel, homosexuals serve openly in Israel's military and parliament, and many popular artists and entertainers are homosexual. However, leaders of the gay community say Israel still has far to go in promoting equality.
  • A 3-year-old boy suffered severe burns on his face and arm during a suspected acid attack in England that investigators think was deliberate, police said Sunday. West Mercia police Chief Superintendent Mark Travis said police were working to identify the substance that burned the child Saturday at a discount store in Worcester. A 39-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to cause grievous bodily harm. Three others were being sought for questioning and police released photos to generate public tips. 'At this time we are treating this as a deliberate attack,' Travis said in a statement. 'The incident will rightly shock the local community, and I would like to reassure local people that we are carrying out a thorough investigation.' British police have reported seeing an increase in acid attacks during the last year, but it is very rare for a victim to be so young. Some attacks are related to gang fights or late-night bar confrontations. Most of the attacks have happened in London, but they have been reported in many parts of Britain. A London teenager was given a prison sentence of more than 10 years this year after being convicted of spraying acid into the faces of moped drivers so he could steal their mopeds. Police also report that innocuous liquids sometimes are thrown into the face of mugging targets to make them think they have been hit with a corrosive substance, panic and give up their valuables more easily. Robin Walker, the Worcester representative in Parliament, said lawmakers are considering allowing tougher sentences for people convicted of any type of intentional assault with acid. He described what happened to the 3-year-old boy as 'horrific.' The child attacked Saturday is hospitalized. He has not been identified.
  • The Latest on developments in Afghanistan (all times local): 8:15 p.m. An Afghan interior ministry spokesman says that 14 people, including both civilians and military forces, have been killed in the suicide attack near Kabul's airport shortly after the country's controversial first vice president landed on his return from abroad. Spokesman Najib Danish added that 50 other people were wounded in the attack. The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack through its Aamaq News Agency. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani strongly condemned the attack in a statement released by the presidential palace. ___ 7:15 p.m. Hashmat Stanekzai, spokesman for the Kabul police chief, said that 11 people, including both civilians and military forces, have been killed in the suicide attack near Kabul's airport shortly after the country's controversial first vice president landed on his return from abroad. Mohib Zeer, an official form the public health ministry, also confirmed that 11 people were killed in the attack and 48 others wounded. Vice President Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostum, the likely the target of the attack, escaped unharmed. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the explosion, but both Taliban and the Islamic State group are active in the Afghan capital. ___ 5:20 p.m. An Afghan spokesman says there has been a large explosion near the Kabul airport shortly after the country's controversial first vice president landed on his return from abroad. Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostum and members of his entourage were unharmed in the explosion on Sunday, which took place as his convoy had already left the airport. The Interior Ministry's spokesman, Najib Danish, says the explosion took place outside of the airport. It was unclear what had caused it. Danish says that Dostum was likely the target of the attack. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the explosion, but both Taliban and the Islamic State group are active in the Afghan capital. ___ 11:40 a.m. An Afghan spokesman says the country's first vice president, a former Uzbek warlord, is returning home after more than a year of living in Turkey. Presidential spokesman Haroon Chakhansuri says Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostum is expected to return to Kabul on Sunday afternoon. He says Dostum had been undergoing medical treatment in Turkey, was now well and would resume work. Dostum left the country under controversial circumstances in 2017, after the attorney-general's office opened an investigation into allegations that his followers had tortured and sexually abused a former ally turned political rival. Dostum had since reportedly been prevented by the government from returning to Afghanistan. Dostum, accused of war crimes committed after the collapse of the Taliban in 2001, has been criticized by the United States for human rights abuses.