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National

    The body of a missing North Carolina teacher, who disappeared while hiking in Mexico, has been recovered, according to a Facebook page that was dedicated to the search for Patrick Braxton-Andrew. >> Read more trending news  'It is with a sense of relief that we are able to confirm that Patrick's body has been recovered and we will be able to bring him home soon,' the post said. Woodlawn School in Mooresville, where Braxton-Andrew taught, canceled classes Friday after learning of his death. The Facebook page said on Friday that Braxton-Andrew, a Spanish teacher and Davidson College graduate, died Oct. 28 at the hands of a criminal organization in Mexico. Since he was last seen on Oct. 28 in Urique, a tiny village in the country’s Chihuahua state, Braxton-Andrew’s family has been in Mexico working with local and U.S. authorities to locate him. Chihuahua officials and Patrick Braxton-Andrew's family desperately searched for the missing backpacker for weeks. The family thanked the Chihuahua governor and attorney general for their ''unwavering commitment to locating Patrick.' On his official Facebook page, Javier Corral, the governor of Chihuahua, wrote that investigators believe Braxton-Andrew was killed by a narco-trafficker operating in the region named José Noriel Portilo Gil, also known as “El Chueco.” “Through the advances in the investigation, I can say that it was a cowardly and brutal assassination of a person who was totally innocent, a clean man whose misfortune was to cross paths with this criminal,” Corral wrote. Patrick Braxton-Andrew's brother, Kerry Braxton-Andrew, said the 34-year-old was last seen by a hotel employee in Urique, a remote town in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua. >> Related: Missing North Carolina teacher killed in Mexico, according to Facebook post The Mexico Daily News reported in January that 31 people died in seven hours there due to organized criminal activity. The state government said in a statement Monday that searchers checked cabins in the area surrounding the village of Urique and rappelled down into 900-foot deep ravines looking for Braxton-Andrew. Urique is a former mining village at the base of one of the many canyons that make up Mexico's Copper Canyon National Park. According to the Washington Post, Braxton-Andrew was a fluent Spanish speaker who loved the language and had traveled widely in Central America and Mexico. He was originally scheduled to meet his brother in Mexico City on Oct. 30 after spending a few days hiking the Copper Canyon. When he failed to show, his family began retracing his steps, eventually determining he was last seen leaving his hotel in Urique on Oct. 28.
  • A train derailed south of Macon, Georgia, forcing residents in one town to evacuate.  >> Read more trending news  The train went of the CSX line and onto Georgia 90 near Byromville around 7:00 a.m. Saturday morning. Residents within a half mile of the crash were evacuated because some of the cars were pressurized propane cars.  Dramatic photos at the scene showed cars piled on top of each other in heaps of twisted metal. Parts of the road and the train trestle were damaged and the highway was shut down.  Crews worked to remove 30 rail cars. The Georgia DOT said the repairs to the road and trestle could take weeks.  CSX hazmat crews determined there were no leaks and people were allowed to return to their homes. No injuries were reported.  >> Trending: 7 of 10 most stressed states in country are in the south; where do you rank? Byromville is about 130 miles south of downtown Atlanta.
  • In a rare admission of fault, President Donald Trump said on “Fox News Sunday” that he made a mistake and regretted missing the Veterans Day services at Arlington National Cemetery last week. >> Read more trending news    “I should have done that. I was extremely busy on calls for the country. We did a lot of calling,” Trump told host Chris Wallace, who pressed the president on why he didn’t take a quick trip across the river to attend ceremonies honoring America’s war dead. “I probably, ah, you know, in retrospect I should have, and I did last year and I will virtually every year, but we came in very late at night and I had just left, literally, the American cemetery in Paris, and I really probably assumed that was fine.” Trump had just returned from ceremonies in France commemorating the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, where he also missed a service for American veterans buried in France. “I was extremely busy because of affairs of state, doing other things,” he said. >> Related: Former Fox News executive Bill Shine accepts post in Trump White House, reports say During the interview, Trump also doubled down on calling journalists “the enemy of the people,” and he criticized a retired Navy SEAL who commanded the mission that resulted in the death of Osama bin Laden. Trump said it took too long to get bin Laden, and he complained that Pakistan didn’t help at all.  
  • The FBI and other police agencies are continuing their search to find a 13-year-old girl kidnapped from a North Carolina mobile home park. >> Read more trending news  The FBI said Saturday that agents are conducting searches on foot and using drones as part of the search for Hania Noelia Aguilar. Relatives say the eighth-grader went outside last week to start a relative's SUV to prepare to leave for the bus stop. Police say a man then forced her into an SUV and drove off. Authorities said the SUV was later found in Lumberton, several miles from the mobile home park. A total reward of $30,000 is being offered for information leading to the girl. The FBI said it has no reason to believe Hania has been spotted in Charlotte. On Tuesday, officials said someone in Charlotte called to report seeing a girl who looked like Aguilar. They said the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department was looking into the report, but at this point, there is no reason to believe it is accurate. On Tuesday, the girl's mother released a handwritten statement:  'I trust in God that my daughter will return. No one knows the pain I have in my heart. Despite all the criticism and speculation against me, I would never use my daughter’s name in order to take advantage of this situation. I thank all those people who have provided me help. Please, if you know something, call. I ask everyone not to make absurd comments. For the love of God respect my pain. I only want Hania, my princess, back. I miss her.' Investigators said they airlifted evidence to FBI headquarters in Quantico, Virginia so it can be analyzed and processed quickly in hopes of locating the missing teen. The FBI said investigators need help to identify a person seen walking near the area where Hania was abducted on Nov. 5. FBI officials said their plea grows more and more urgent by the minute.  >> Related: FBI poster released on Nov. 9 Search crews said they need to talk to anyone who lives near Rosewood Mobile Home Park and Quincey Drive and will be walking in the neighborhood to make contact with everyone. Police Chief Michael McNeill asked Monday for people to contact police if someone they know is acting strange. He said, 'Maybe they haven't gone to work, haven't come home or they aren't answering your calls or your text messages.' The FBI released a new missing person poster for the girl. On the poster, the photos that show her wearing red were taken the day before the abduction. Surveillance video the FBI released the day prior shows what appears to be a man wearing light-colored shoes, a light-colored shirt and a hoodie walking south on Lambert Street, then turning north on Highway 41/Elizabethtown Highway toward the Rosewood Mobile Home Park. FBI officials said surveillance images also helped them find the green SUV that was stolen and used in the kidnapping.  According to the FBI, the SUV was located around 8 a.m. Nov. 8 off Quincey Drive in Lumberton, 10 miles from her home. >> Related: 7 of 10 most stressed states in country are in the South; where do you rank? Officials said the FBI's Evidence Response Team processed the vehicle for any clues. The teen’s mother, Elsa Hernandez, is pleading for her daughter’s safe return. 'Return my daughter. I need her,” Hernandez said. “I am suffering for her. Her sisters, too.' Investigators have been collecting and analyzing surveillance video since Aguilar was taken from her home. An FBI release issued last week said investigators were following nearly 50 leads in the girl's disappearance.
  • Amazon is growing at breakneck speed across the nation and in Ohio, where it has created 6,000 jobs in the past seven years and has commitments to add 5,500 more employees. >> Read more trending news  Last week, the online giant said it would open a package-sorting “air gateway” at Wilmington Air Park, an airport 40 minutes southeast of Dayton that was decimated in the past decade when cargo carrier DHL announced it was leaving town. “We have all the right ingredients for companies to succeed in e-commerce here,” said Ted Griffith, a managing director at JobsOhio, the state’s economic development organization. The Wilmington announcement preceded the company’s biggest news in its history when it announced Tuesday that it had picked New York and Northern Virginia’s Crystal City over 238 U.S. cities to split its highly sought second headquarters. The company has said the headquarters come with a $5 billion investment and up to 50,000 jobs that pay, on average, $150,000 apiece. >> Related: Amazon’s newest expansion to bring 1,500 jobs to Ohio Although Ohio was not chosen for the second headquarters, the $178 billion company appears to have an affinity to the Buckeye State where it’s now one of the top 60 largest employers. In May, Amazon announced plans to open its sixth Ohio fulfillment center in West Jefferson, creating more than 1,500 full-time jobs by the end of 2019. This is in addition to fulfillment centers already operating in Etna and Obetz, with new fulfillment centers slated for Monroe and North Randall by the end of 2018, and another one in Euclid in 2019. The new Wilmington air gateway will retrofit existing space at the Air Park, in buildings F and A. In all, it will take up 1.2 million square feet and about 35 acres. The company would not say how many jobs will be coming with the new sorting center. “We think this operation will be consequential,” said Dan Evers, executive director of the Clinton County Port Authority, which owns and manages the Air Park. The nation’s biggest e-retailer has about 20 gateway operations, all part of the company’s national air cargo network. Geographically, Wilmington makes sense within Amazon’s network, given the facility’s proximity to the busy Amazon hub at Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky Airport, Evers said. Said Evers: “Air cargo is in our DNA.” Buckeye State growth Amazon has invested more than $2 billion in Ohio since 2011. But Amazon is not the only company drawn to Ohio and its strength in logistics. The roster of companies investing in large local distribution operations just in the Dayton area grows longer by the year — Caterpillar Logistics, Payless Shoe Source, Crown Packaging, Heidelberg, Spectrum, Purina, Chewy Inc. and many others. Griffith cites proximity to consumers, a “fantastic” labor force and road system, a tax regimen that does not tax inventory — plus, more than 25 universities in Ohio with logistics programs. Read more here.
  • A good Samaritan vessel and the Coast Guard helped rescue 15 people from a tilted liftboat Sunday. >> Read more trending news  The good Samaritan vessel, the Starfleet Guardian, brought six people aboard, while the Coast Guard crew from Station Grand Isle rescued the other nine people, WBRZ reported.  The liftboat reported control issues after a power loss, tilted to a 45 degree angle and could not correct itself, KATC reported. It had nearly 14,000 gallons of diesel on board but none of it has spilled. 
  • Your commute is too long. Your mortgage or rent is too high. You’re stressed. >> Read more trending news  Welcome to Georgia. >> Related: Georgia is one of the unhappiest states in US, report says A new analysis and ranking by Zippia, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey for 2012-2016, puts Georgia as the No. 2 most stressed state in the country. >> Related: Georgia among the most stressed states in 2017 Being stressed out is nothing new to Georgians, though. Last year, WalletHub put the Peach State at No. 8 on its ranking. In 2014, Movoto ranked Georgia at No. 2 on its stress scale. For its study, Zippia used six criteria: Long commute times Unemployment Hours worked Population density Home price to income ratio Percent uninsured population Zippia then ranked each state from 1 (most stressed) to 50 in each category, and combined those rankings for one majorly stressed out score. That put Georgia at No. 2, right behind New Jersey.  >> Related: Florida, Georgia most stressed out states in 2014 According to Zippia’s analysis, “many Georgians must tackle a high unemployment rate, high uninsured rate, and a long commute.”  The state’s unemployment outlook is improving, however. The unemployment rate fell to 3.9 percent in July, its lowest level since 2001. >> Related: People who live in this Georgia city are among the most stressed in America, study says What about traffic? Anyone who drives to work — or a game, or a concert, or through Atlanta on their way somewhere else — will tell you traffic is terrible.  In 2017, the INRIX Global Traffic Scorecard determined Atlanta has the eighth-worst traffic congestion in the world.  >> Related: Report confirms Atlanta has some of the world's worst traffic If you’re thinking of moving somewhere less stressful, don’t stay in the South. Seven of the top 10 stressed out states are southern. New Jersey  Georgia  Florida  California  New York  Louisiana  Maryland  North Carolina  Virginia  Mississippi The country’s least-stressed states are clustered in the north central part of the country: Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, and North and South Dakota. 
  • Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Sunday he's donating $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, to boost financial aid for low- and middle-income students. The Baltimore university said the contribution — the largest ever to any education institution in the U.S. — will allow Johns Hopkins to eliminate student loans in financial aid packages starting next fall. The university will instead offer scholarships that don't have to be repaid. University President Ronald Daniels said Bloomberg's contribution will also let the institution permanently commit to 'need-blind admissions,' or the principle of admitting the highest-achieving students, regardless of their ability to pay for their education. 'Hopkins has received a gift that is unprecedented and transformative,' he said in a statement, noting the prestigious school was founded in 1876 by a $7 million gift from Baltimore merchant Johns Hopkins that was, similarly, the largest gift of its kind at the time. By way of comparison, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched the Gates Millennium Scholars program in 1999 with a $1 billion commitment over 20 years. The Chronicle of Higher Education listed it as the largest private donation to a higher-education institution in the U.S. earlier this month. Bloomberg said he expects the money will allow Hopkins to offer more generous scholarships and ease the debt burden for graduates. 'America is at its best when we reward people based on the quality of their work, not the size of their pocketbook,' he said in a statement. 'Denying students entry to a college based on their ability to pay undermines equal opportunity.' The 76-year-old founder of the global finances services and media company, Bloomberg L.P., is among the world's richest people. He graduated from Hopkins in 1964, served as New York mayor from 2002 to 2013 and has for years weighed running for president — including in 2020.
  • Two pedestrians were struck and killed by a Christmas-themed train in Wareham, according to Massachusetts State Police. >> Read more trending news  Police and emergency workers responded to the scene at about 7:30 p.m. Saturday to discover two people had died near 72 Minot Avenue after being hit by the train. According to the Plymouth County District Attorney's office, the preliminary investigation revealed that the deceased victims were a 33-year-old woman and a 36-year-old man, both from Wareham. The victims are not being identified at this time. Massachusetts State Police confirmed they were assisting with the scene, and an Airwing was also called in to help. Investigators said the 'Train to Christmas Town' had more than 300 people on board, most of them children. No passengers were injured. According to the DA's office, the train conductor made attempts to stop the train and activated the emergency braking system before the collision occurred. Children on the train weren't told of the incident, but instead were told the train had run out of 'magic gas' and had to stop. Police said the incident doesn't appear to be suspicious and is being investigated by the Massachusetts State Police, the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority Police and the Wareham Police Department. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Sen. Bill Nelson, a Florida political icon who first arrived on Capitol Hill in the decades when Democrats dominated this presidential battleground state, conceded his bitterly close re-election bid to Republican Rick Scott on Sunday after a bruising recount left Nelson thousands of votes short of the outgoing governor. Nelson gave up his quest after days of tense and often acrimonious recounting wrapped up at midday Sunday, when Florida's counties had to turn in their official results. Florida will not officially certify the final results until Tuesday, but the totals showed Nelson trailing Scott by more than 10,000 votes. 'It has been a rewarding journey as well as a very humbling experience,' Nelson said in a videotaped statement. 'I was not victorious in this race but I still wish to strongly re-affirm the cause for which we fought: A public office is a public trust.' The close of nearly two weeks of high political drama in the presidential swing state likely spelled the end of the political career of the 76-year-old Nelson. First elected to the U.S. House 40 years ago, Nelson had been a Democratic survivor in an era when Republicans swept to power in Florida in the '90s. He was first elected to the U.S. Senate in 2000 and was making his fourth bid at Senate re-election. A Florida native with a distinct twang, Nelson fought a hard race against Scott, a multimillionaire businessman and relative newcomer to the state who had been urged to run by President Donald Trump. A Scott victory will help Republicans boost their Senate majority. This marked the third time Scott, who did not jump into politics until eight years ago, has barely edged a Democratic rival. 'Now the campaign truly is behind us, and that's where we need to leave it,' Scott said in a statement after official results were posted. 'We must do what Americans have always done: come together for the good of our state and our country. My focus will not be on looking backward, but on doing exactly what I ran on: making Washington work.' Trump congratulated Scott on Twitter: 'From day one Rick Scott never wavered. He was a great Governor and will be even a greater Senator in representing the People of Florida.' Nelson was seen as a moderate, rarely making waves or gaining much national exposure as he focused on Florida-specific issues. One of his more notable moments came when he flew on Space Shuttle Columbia while serving in Congress. Florida's other senator, Republican Marco Rubio, said he would miss working with Nelson. 'I knew Bill Nelson not just as a Democratic senator, but also as a man of genuine faith, integrity and character,' Rubio said in a statement. 'A man who served our country with a dignity that is increasingly rare in our modern politics.' This marked only the second electoral defeat of Nelson's long political career. He lost a Democratic primary for governor to eventual winner Lawton Chiles in 1990. After it became clear the Senate race would head to a legally required recount, Nelson and Democrats filed several lawsuits that challenged everything from Scott's authority over the state's election division to deadlines for mail-in ballots. Amid the recount, Scott suggested that some county election officials were allowing fraud to occur. Republicans raised questions about how some South Florida election officials were counting the ballots. The South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported late Sunday that one of those officials, Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes, had presented a resignation letter to step down in January. The report cited an attorney who works as counsel to the Broward elections office, Burnadette Norris-Weeks, but Snipes couldn't immediately be reached for comment. State officials had ordered a manual recount after a legally required machine recount showed that Scott led Nelson by about 12,600 votes. More than 8 million voters cast ballots in the race. Scott ran a harsh campaign against Nelson, calling the incumbent ineffective and out of touch. While the two disagreed on such key issues as gun control, health care and the environment, they focused primarily on character and competence. Scott repeatedly bashed Nelson in TV ads paid for by more than $60 million of his own wealth. Meanwhile, Nelson branded Scott as a Trump follower who had used the governor's office to pad his wealth. Nelson and his allies also ran ads that questioned Scott's ethics, pointing to his ouster years ago as chief executive of health care giant Columbia/HCA amid a federal fraud investigation. Although Scott was never charged with any wrongdoing, the health care conglomerate paid a then-record $1.7 billion fine for Medicare fraud. While the Senate contest was one of the marquee races of the U.S. midterm elections, it was shadowed by the governor's race: a bitterly close competition between Republican Ron DeSantis and Democrat Andrew Gillum that became a proxy battle between Trump and his Democratic opponents. Gillum, Florida's first African-American nominee for governor, conceded to DeSantis on Saturday after lagging in a legally required machine recount.