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    A woman is accused of assaulting her parents with a cane and oxygen tanks in a Utah hotel Saturday, police said. >> Read more trending news  Anne Cockrell, 42, was arrested on two counts of aggravated abuse of an elder and two counts of aggravated assault, according to a probable cause statement filed by the Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office. A Salt Lake County deputy responded to a domestic call at a hotel in Midvale, KSTU reported. According to the probable cause statement, Cockrell allegedly attacked her parents, who are both older than 65. First, Cockrell allegedly hit her mother with the older woman's cane and her oxygen tanks, KUTV reported. When her father attempted to intervene, Cockrell allegedly hit him with her hands, the cane and oxygen tanks, the television station reported. According to the probable cause statement, Cockrell then poured laundry detergent on her parents and threatened them, KSTU reported. Cockrell's father suffered lacerations and bruising on his arms, the television station reported. The probable cause statement did not mention the extent of the injuries suffered by Cockrell's mother.  Cockrell, who was not at the hotel when police arrived, was later arrested and booked into the Salt Lake County Jail, KUTV reported.
  • Police in Portland, Oregon, are earning praise from outside observers for using the city's Willamette River to keep dueling protesters apart during a weekend far-right rally and large counter-demonstration. Two of the 13 people arrested during Saturday's events made a first court appearance Monday. The rest have court dates next month to allow authorities to process evidence, including videos and photos posted on social media. Authorities said more arrests may come from Saturday's rallies as those postings are reviewed. The state's top federal prosecutor called the handling of the event a 'definitive counterpoint' for those who on both sides who have criticized police after past protests for favoring one side or the other in a politically charged environment.
  • Carmen Riley bent over her unconscious son, looked into his eyes and knew. It didn't take a mother's intuition or a doctor's prognosis to figure out that Ty'rique was gone. Several days earlier, 21-year-old Ty'rique Riley had been jailed after an altercation with his father. Now he lay in a hospital bed, his body covered in lacerations and deep, dark bruises. He was missing teeth. His kidneys were failing. How did this happen? And who was responsible? Seven weeks after his death, Riley's family and supporters are pushing for answers. 'This family's been kept in the dark. The first thing they want is answers,' said their attorney, Riley Ross III. 'If it turns out there was abuse that contributed to his death, then they want justice.' Authorities have said that Riley struggled with guards at Dauphin County Prison and became unresponsive after he was placed in a restraint chair, a device used to immobilize inmates at risk of hurting themselves or others. He was taken to a hospital June 26 and died there July 1. The coroner has yet to rule on a cause of death. Photos taken at the funeral home and released by Ross show his battered body. 'He didn't go in there looking like that,' Riley's mother said. The case raises questions about how inmates are treated and cared for at Dauphin County Prison, a lockup in the Pennsylvania capital that houses about 1,000 people. County officials say they don't tolerate abuse. Brian Clark, Dauphin County director of corrections, said via email Monday that 'we continue to work on reform of our correctional system. ... I can tell you we have a zero-tolerance policy for excessive use of force.' The reforms include training, he said, in 'new use-of-force techniques with an emphasis on de-escalation.' Riley was an aspiring rapper who lived with his parents. They called him a good kid who didn't cause trouble. When his father suffered a series of heart attacks, it was Riley who tied his shoes and helped him up the stairs. 'He was always by my side, in my right pocket,' said his father, Thomas Matthews. 'That's my co-pilot, my navigator.' Riley had no criminal record before police showed up at his door June 18. In court documents, police said he struck his father in the chest, neck and back with a large sledgehammer in an 'unprovoked attack' at their home around 4:45 a.m. The family disputes that account. Matthews said his son had heard noises outside, thought an intruder was lurking and grabbed a sledgehammer. Thomas, who had been sleeping, said he told Riley to put it away and go back to bed. Riley refused. Thomas said he tried to get the sledgehammer away from his son, took a hard fall and then had trouble with his pacemaker. That prompted Riley's mother to call 911. As medics tended to Matthews, police officers put Riley in handcuffs and led him away, said Carmen Riley. It was the last his parents saw of him until June 27, when they showed up in court for Riley's preliminary hearing and were told to go to the hospital instead. District Attorney Fran Chardo, whose office is investigating Riley's death, has said that Riley was placed on suicide watch at the jail but did not elaborate why. On June 26, he suffered some sort of medical problem, and jail staff determined he needed to go to the hospital. It was then that Riley became combative, Chardo told Pennlive last month. Surveillance video from the jail shows several guards dragging Riley out of his cell and putting him in the restraint chair, but the view is obstructed and it's unclear what exactly is happening, said Ross, who has seen the footage. Guards also spent about 15 minutes in Riley's cell before removing him, but there's no video of what took place, he said. Ross added that Riley had no history of mental illness. 'Every day that goes by and we don't have results,' Ross said, 'I have less patience and I have less confidence that the right thing is being done.' Though there's been no official ruling on the cause and circumstances of Riley's death, Ross said it's clear his injuries were not self-inflicted. Dauphin County was recently sued over allegations that guards at the jail's booking center and Harrisburg police savagely beat and kicked a man who had been arrested June 29 for public drunkenness, fracturing his orbital bone and inflicting 'bruises and cuts from head to toe.' The plaintiff, Jarrett Leaman, was severely intoxicated at the time, offered no resistance and 'did nothing to warrant the 'Lord of the Flies' violence he received,' the suit said. Two guards were suspended in the wake of the allegations. The jail has not said whether any staff members have been disciplined during the investigation into Riley's death. In an interview with The Associated Press, a former longtime guard at the jail said abusive correctional officers beat and withheld food from inmates they didn't like. The ex-guard said inmates were sometimes placed in solitary confinement to allow their bruises to heal out of view. The ex-guard spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals by current jail staff. Clark, the jail official, rejected those claims.
  • A Colorado man says he was able to fight off a lion mountain attack thanks to his pocketknife. Sky-Hi News reported that the man, identified as Richard Marriott, was attacked around 9 p.m. on Aug. 10 near Kremmling, Colorado. He said he saw the animal and walked backward about 200 yards, but tripped and fell. The mountain lion swiped his leg, he said. >> Read more trending news  Marriott told Sky-Hi News he thinks the attack lasted about 10 minutes. He initially thought it was a deer rustling in the woods before realizing it was a mountain lion. He slashed it in the face when it attacked him. “I didn’t really hit it that great, but I got it enough the cat knew I wasn’t going to lay there and have him devour me,” Marriott said. The pocketknife attack gave Marriott more distance from the animal, and he threw rocks at its head, scaring it off. “I can’t believe it actually happened,” he told Sky-Hi News Sunday. “I’m lucky it didn’t get a lot worse.” Marriott said he typically brings his gun with him when he goes into the wood, but he didn't think he'd need it that time since he only planned on being out for a few hours.  Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokesman Mike Porras said Marriott did everything right when he stabbed the animal with the pocketknife when he was attacked. Marriott said it may have turned out differently had he brought his pistol. “I think I would have been able to give it a warning shot and hopefully it would have ran off,” he said. “That’s what I kind of take from all of this. When I go into the field now, I need to make sure I have my sidearm.” Marriott went out the next day with wildlife officials, who tracked down the mountain lion with hounds and shot it. Porras said the lion was unusually aggressive with the hounds and fought them, rather than running away as mountain lions typically do. The lion's aggression with humans meant he had to be put down, Sky-Hi News reported. KCNC reported that a necropsy revealed the mountain lion, a young male, only had grass in his stomach and may have been hungry when he attacked. 
  • No love for this driver. >> Read more trending news  An Indiana motorist was not going to be pampered after a soiled diaper was thrown from the back seat of his vehicle, sending it into the windshield of an Indiana State Police cruiser, the Indianapolis Star reported. Trooper Sgt. Stephen Wheeles tweeted he was traveling on Interstate 65 in Johnson over the weekend when he observed a passenger from a nearby car throwing the diaper out of a window.  'Littering by throwing a used diaper out of the car window right in front of a police officer is asking for a ticket.' Wheeles wrote. 'Especially when diaper hits said police officer’s (car).' “I was heading home after working the Indiana State Fair, tired, and wasn’t really expecting it,” Wheeles told the Star. “It hit my car and bounced a couple of times … it’s not something I could really let fly.” Wheeles said his cruiser was not damaged or soiled, the newspaper reported. However, the driver did receive a ticket, WXIN reported. Wheeles did not say whether the diaper was cloth or disposable. Needless to say, Wheeles' post prompted some diaper humor.  'My guess is that even though you 'Pamper'ed' them with kindness and the 'Luv' of a public servant, this stop didn’t end with a 'Huggie's,'' state Trooper Ted Bohner tweeted. 'I found myself laughing as I read this, but after the initial chuckle, I realize it isn't funny. I despise littering!' Sandra Adair tweeted. And finally ... 'Does it have to sit in the evidence locker for six weeks until the 'idjit' comes to court to dispute the ticket?' tweeted 'Henry.' That's a good question. Let's hope not.
  • Nerves are being frayed by a global economy that increasingly looks breakable. Growth is stalling. Factory output is down. Oil demand is off. U.S. tariffs on China have slowed trade. Investors have crowded into government bonds and sent interest rates sliding in a way that has often preceded a recession. So is a recession near? Hard to tell. What's clear is that many of the world's most powerful countries have skidded into a moment of uncertainty that has left consumers, businesses, markets and much of the political world feeling gloomier. President Donald Trump has asserted that the U.S. economy is strong. Yet on Monday, Trump called for the Federal Reserve to slash interest rates with the kind of aggressiveness the Fed normally uses to combat a recession. Things have grown muddled. ___ BOTTOM LINE: SO IS THE U.S. ECONOMY HEADED FOR A RECESSION? Lots of economists think so. A new survey shows that a clear majority of economists expect a downturn to hit by 2021 at the latest, according to a report Monday from the National Association of Business Economics. Some of that pessimism is a natural byproduct of the duration of the U.S. expansion: The economy has been growing for more than a decade — the longest expansion on record — and a recession at some point is inevitable. Of course, the old joke is that economists have predicted nine of the past two recessions. Adding to the challenge is that recessions often go unrecognized until they are well underway. The Great Recession, for example, began in December 2007. Yet not until 11 months later, by which time it was obvious, did the official arbiter, the National Bureau of Economic Research, declare a recession. At that point, layoffs were spiking, home foreclosures were mounting and a financial panic had set the economy hurtling toward a devastating meltdown. OK, BUT HOW REALISTIC ARE THOSE RECESSION FEARS? Parts of the economy remain sturdy. Retail sales surged last month, for example, and the bulk of U.S. economic activity depends on consumer spending. Also, the unemployment rate is near a 50-year low at 3.7%. Administration officials cite these kinds of figures to argue, as Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway did Monday on Fox News Channel, that the economy's fundamentals are 'very strong.' What's more, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell has committed himself to prolonging the expansion. After cutting their benchmark interest rate in July for the first time in a decade, Fed officials might do so several more times if the data worsens. Yet at the same time, as the Fed reported, factory output has dropped for the past 12 months. Home sales have tumbled. Trump's tariffs against China have hindered business investment. And while Trump has asserted that additional Fed rate cuts would turbocharge the economy, the central bank's July cut actually caused a drop in consumer confidence, according to a University of Michigan survey. The fears built last week when an economic barometer called the yield curve briefly 'inverted.' This occurs when the interest rate on a 10-year U.S. Treasury note falls below the rate on a two-year Treasury note. In theory, a short-term Treasury should carry the lower rate. When it doesn't, it's regarded as a possible recession warning. As analysts at the bank UBS said, a recession on average has started 21 months after this kind of inversion. But rates are already so low that it's possible that the inversion signals only that growth will remain persistently weak, not that the economy will succumb to a recession. IS EUROPE DRIVING THE JITTERS? Very possibly. The world is more interconnected than ever. Germany's economy shrank last quarter, and analysts expect it to decline again, which could put Germany in a technical recession. Recessions are usually linked to two straight quarters of economic shrinkage. Germany's downturn resulted from a decline in industrial production. Much of that decline reflected spillover effects from Trump's escalation of his trade war with China and Britain's plans to withdraw from the European Union later this year. The damage to Germany's economy could flow into the financial markets and harm the U.S. economy. Trade tensions between Japan and South Korea are also rising. And OPEC has whittled down its forecast for global oil demand this year by 40,000 barrels a day to 1.10 million barrels. Falling oil prices could result in fewer U.S. manufacturing and drilling jobs. HOW CONCERNED IS THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION? The president has repeatedly declared that America's economy remains the strongest in the world. The White House has deployed an array to top advisers — including Larry Kudlow, Peter Navarro and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross — to drive home the message that the economy is flourishing and that any data-driven concerns are being distorted by the news media. Yet as The Associated Press and other news organizations have reported, the president is privately fearful that a slumping economy will dim his re-election chances. He has also taken the unusual step of publicly attacking the politically independent Fed for not cutting rates more to try to juice growth. On Monday, Trump tweeted that the Fed's benchmark rate should be slashed by at least a full percentage point — a step that has usually signaled a major economic emergency — and that Powell, Trump's own choice to lead the Fed, has a 'horrendous lack of vision.' Trump added: 'Democrats are trying to 'will' the Economy to be bad for purposes of the 2020 Election.' WHAT REPORTS SHOULD BE WATCHED FOR EARLY SIGNS OF A RECESSION? Major clues could come from reports on job growth, the gross domestic product, retail sales, construction spending and auto sales, among others. It isn't just the headline numbers but often the details of these reports that matter. Which sectors of the economy, for example, are improving or weakening? How fast are wages rising? Are people spending more money at a restaurants? Or are they spending more at grocery stores in a sign they might be cutting back?
  • As a civilian tenured English professor, Bruce Fleming believes he has made important contributions to the U.S. Naval Academy during his 30 years on staff, providing views from outside the military while teaching writing, literature and critical thinking skills to future Navy and Marine officers. Fleming also hasn't been afraid to publicly criticize what he perceives as the shortcomings of military academy training — and that is what he believes ultimately prompted school officials to fire him last year. His iconoclastic op-eds questioning the academies' very existence have drawn the ire of military officials for years, he says. But Fleming's critics say it's not just the professor's quest for public headlines that leads them to support his ouster. They say he has behaved inappropriately in the classroom and become too disruptive to the academy's mission. An administrative law judge overturned Fleming's dismissal last month, and he returned to the academy on Monday on the first day of the new school year — but not as a classroom professor. The academy has assigned him to scholarly research and other tasks while it appeals the judge's ruling. 'His duties will not include teaching or advising midshipmen, as his presence in the classroom and engaging with midshipmen in any advisory role would be an undue disruption to the academic environment,' said Cmdr. Alana Garas, an academy spokeswoman. In a 2017 op-ed in The Federalist, Fleming, who makes $135,000 a year, wrote that academy students have become 'cast members in a military Disneyland run for the benefit of the brass and the tourists, not the taxpayers who pay their way and want better-than-average officers.' Fleming contends military service academies are more like military indoctrination centers than learning institutions that cultivate creative, outside-the-box thinking, which is what he says is needed in future military leaders. 'The more you treat them like children — the more you tell them what to think, the more you circumscribe their ability to make their own decisions — the less effective fighting force you're going to have,' he said in a recent interview with The Associated Press. 'I see myself as an escape valve for their frustration and as someone who can teach them to respectfully disagree with superior officers.' Fleming's contrarian views are accompanied by an unusual teaching style: The 65-year-old professor is known for doing one-armed pushups in class and participated in physical workouts with his midshipmen students to help win their respect. He once sent a photo of himself in a Speedo to an all-male class, as part of a discussion about John Keats' poem 'Ode on a Grecian Urn.' John Schofield, a former academy spokesman who said he respected Fleming as a professor, said the administration was concerned about his behavior in the classroom. In 2018, the academy launched an investigation after five midshipmen filed complaints against the professor. Among the allegations: that he referred to students as 'right-wing extremists,' made comments in class about sex and transgender surgery and touched students without their approval. Schofield also cited Fleming's criticism of the academy's sexual harassment prevention training several years ago — the professor said it presumed guilt on the part of the accused — and how he criticized two female midshipmen who complained about his comments. 'Our needle was not moved by the op-eds,' said Schofield, who is now retired from the Navy. 'Our needle was moved by things that he did beyond that in the classroom that became a distraction from the mission.' Mark Syska, a judge for the U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board, overturned Fleming's dismissal last month. In his ruling, Syska cited 'credibility issues' with the midshipman who filed the longest complaint. Syska described Midshipman Matthew DeSantis' 16-page grievance as 'greatly exaggerated — to the point of being hard to credit on certain points.' The judge also concluded that, based on the testimony of eight others, including two professors, 'the overwhelming majority of his students' enjoyed his teaching style. Fleming contends the effort to fire him is an encroachment on academic freedom. The Naval Academy is the only major service academy with tenured civilian professors who outnumber military professors, unlike at the U.S. Military Academy and the U.S. Air Force Academy. 'I think they're just now waking up to the fact that they made a mistake by tenuring civilians,' Fleming said. 'I think what they really want is ... subservient faculty members the way they want subservient students.' Michael Johnson, an academy graduate who studied creative writing with Fleming and graduated as an English major in 2002, said he thinks the professor is good for the school. 'I think he's an asset ... because of his viewpoints, and he pushes people to think differently and to question things,' Johnson said. 'I respect him, and I hope that he teaches midshipmen again soon. I think it's a win-win-win for him, the midshipmen and the academy.' ___ This story has been edited to correct the word in a quote to 'valve' instead of 'value.
  • A fishing magnate known as the Codfather will never be allowed to return to U.S. fisheries, the federal government said Monday in announcing it has settled its civil case against a man whose arrest for shirking quotas and smuggling profits overseas shocked the East Coast industry. The settlement with Carlos Rafael and his fishing captains will clear the way for his assets to be divested, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. Those assets have been embroiled in litigation. Rafael was based out of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and was sentenced to nearly four years in prison in 2017. He was owner of the one of the largest commercial fishing operations in the country. NOAA Fisheries Assistant Administrator Chris Oliver said Monday the settlement 'accomplishes NOAA's chief objective of permanently removing Mr. Rafael from participation in federal fisheries.' It will also help return Rafael's assets to productive use when they are sold, he said. 'Mr. Rafael's forced divestiture and permanent ban from commercial fishing is a fitting end to this case, on top of the criminal sentence he is already serving,' Oliver said. Rafael's attorney did not return a phone call seeking comment. NOAA's settlement with Rafael also states he is required to pay a civil penalty of just over $3 million and relinquish a seafood dealer permit. He has until the end of 2020 to sell fishing permits and vessels he owns and controls, and the transactions must be approved by NOAA. Seventeen of Rafael's former fishing vessel captains also face penalties under the settlement. One condition is that they must serve suspensions during which they can't board federally permitted vessels while the vessels are at sea, or even offloading. Those suspensions vary from 20 to 200 days based on the captain's violations. Rafael eventually pleaded guilty to false labeling and other charges after federal authorities charged he was operating an elaborate fish fraud. They said his vessels claimed to catch haddock or pollock when they had actually brought species to shore that are subject to stricter quotas. He then smuggled proceeds to Portugal. Rafael's scheme, and his combative attitude, have made him the subject of television specials, including an episode of the CNBC series 'American Greed' that quotes him boasting about controlling the market in New Bedford, one of the most important U.S. fishing ports. The episode was called 'Something's Fishy: The Codfather,' a nickname for Rafael often used by media. New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell said Monday the settlement 'enables the Port of New Bedford to turn the page on the Carlos Rafael saga.
  • A 20-year-old man pleaded not guilty Monday to threatening a Jewish community center in a video that authorities say showed him shooting a semi-automatic rifle. A judge near Youngstown set bond at $250,000 for James Reardon, ordered a mental health evaluation and told him to stay away from Jewish churches and organizations if he is released from jail. Police arrested Reardon Saturday on charges of on telecommunications harassment and aggravated menacing charges, a day after a Jewish organization contacted authorities. Ammunition, semi-automatic weapons, a gas mask and anti-Semitic information were found at a house in New Middleton where he lives with his mother, police said. New Middletown police said the video posted on Reardon's Instagram account last month included the sounds of sirens and screaming with the caption: 'Police identified the Youngstown Jewish Family Community shooter as local white nationalist Seamus O'Rearedon.' The post tagged the Jewish Community Center of Youngstown. The Youngstown Area Jewish Federation said it found out about the threat on Friday and alerted the police and FBI. The organization said it later learned that 'ira_seamus' was an online pseudonym for James Reardon. 'I want to stress that we know of no other threat to the Jewish Community or to any of our agencies at this point it time,' said Andy Lipkin, the federation's executive vice president. '''Nonetheless, I have directed that we maintain the additional level of security for the near future.' Reardon was arraigned by video in Struthers Municipal Court. A message seeking comment was left with his attorney. There was no answer at a phone number for his mother, and a man who answered a number listed for his father hung up. Media outlets in Youngstown reported that Reardon attended the 2017 white nationalist rally that turned violent in Charlottesville, Virginia. New Middletown Police Chief Vince D'egidio told WFMJ-TV that Reardon has posted several videos in which he used derogatory remarks towards the Jewish and African American communities.
  • Police in Arizona said they found shrines to the 'saints of drug trafficking' during a methamphetamine bust at a Phoenix apartment. >> Read more trending news  Phoenix police raided a west Phoenix apartment Aug. 9 after seeing a silver-colored Ford Escape with an Idaho license plate, registered to a man later identified as Fermin De Lora Batista, according to Maricopa County court records. Batista, 50, was among several people who got out of the vehicle and entered the apartment, KNXV reported. Detectives said that upon entering the apartment and permitted to search it, they found 'empty kilo-sized drug packages' with '10,000' written on them, along with a packet of cash, the television station reported. Police said they also found a shrine dedicated to Santa Muerte, Mexico's folk hero of death; and a statue of San Simon, KNXV reported. San Simon is also known as Maximón, 'a mischievous folk saint,' according to National Geographic. According to Maricopa County court records, 'These saints are worshipped for protection from law enforcement and protection from rivals.' After obtaining a search warrant, police said they found 25 bundles of meth inside a door of Batista's vehicle, KNXV reported. Another six packages were found in a wheel well and 13 more inside the tailgate, the television station reported. Batista has been charged with narcotics possession for sale.