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    President Donald Trump escalated his messy clash with former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman on Tuesday, referring to the longtime colleague, who had been the top African-American in his White House, as 'that dog!' Trump tweeted a barrage of insults Tuesday morning as Manigault Newman continued promoting her White House tell-all and releasing secret audio recordings. Her book paints a damning picture of Trump, including her claim that he used racial slurs on the set of his reality show 'The Apprentice.' 'When you give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn't work out,' Trump said. 'Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog!' John Kelly is White House chief of staff. While Trump trades in insults on a near daily basis, deeming Manigault Newman a 'dog' was a stunning move in a row that touched on several sensitive issues in Trump's White House, including a lack of racial diversity among senior officials, security concerns — Manigault Newman taped her firing in the White House Situation Room — and extraordinary measures such as non-disclosure agreements to keep ex-employees quiet. Trump has also pushed back against Manigault Newman's claim that she had heard an audiotape of him using the N-word. He tweeted that he had received a call from the producer of 'The Apprentice' assuring him 'there are NO TAPES of the Apprentice where I used such a terrible and disgusting word as attributed by Wacky and Deranged Omarosa.' Trump insisted, 'I don't have that word in my vocabulary, and never have.' He said Manigault Newman had called him 'a true Champion of Civil Rights' until she was fired. Manigault Newman, the former White House liaison to black voters, writes in her new memoir that she'd heard such tapes existed. She said Sunday that she had listened to one after the book closed. On CBS Tuesday, Manigault Newman released another audio recording that she said showed campaign workers discussing an alleged recording of Trump using the racial slur. The White House and the campaign did not immediately respond to questions. One of the people allegedly featured on the tape is Katrina Pierson, an adviser to Trump's re-election campaign who served as a spokeswoman for his 2016 campaign. Pierson has said she never heard Trump use this type of language and said on Fox that the only person she heard talking about a tape was Manigault Newman. Asked if the book can be backed up by email or recordings, Manigault Newman said on CBS that every quote in the book 'can be verified, corroborated and it's well documented,' suggesting she may have more information to release. The dispute has been building for days as Manigault Newman promotes her memoir 'Unhinged,' which comes out officially Tuesday. In a series of interviews, Manigault Newman has also revealed two audio recordings from her time at the White House, including portions of a recording of her firing by Kelly, which she says occurred in the high-security Situation Room, and a phone call with Trump after she was fired. Manigault Newman says she has more recordings. Asked on MSNBC's 'Hardball' if special counsel Robert Mueller — investigating possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia — would be interested in any of them, she said, 'If his office calls again, anything they want, I'll share.' Trump officials and a number of outside critics denounced the recordings as a serious breach of ethics and security — and White House aides worried about what else Manigault Newman may have captured in the West Wing. The tape recording appears to show Trump expressing surprise about her firing, saying 'nobody even told me about it.' But Manigault Newman said he 'probably instructed General Kelly to do it.' On Twitter, Trump declared Monday that she had been 'fired for the last time,' a reference to her appearances on his reality TV show. He said Kelly had called her a 'loser & nothing but problems,' but he himself had tried to save her job — because he liked her public comments about him. 'I told him to try working it out, if possible, because she only said GREAT things about me - until she got fired!' Trump tweeted. Responding on NBC, Manigault Newman said, 'I think it's sad that with all the things that's going on in the country that he would take time out to insult me and to insult my intelligence.' She added, 'This is his pattern with African-Americans.' First lady Melania Trump, meanwhile, is disappointed that Manigault Newman 'is lashing out and retaliating in such a self-serving way, especially after all the opportunities given to her by the President,' said White House spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham. Manigault Newman's exit does highlight the lack of diversity among Trump's top aides. She was the highest-ranking African-American on the White House staff. She said on NBC that in her absence 'they're making decisions about us without us.' Trump's battle with Omarosa underscores the racial tensions that have defined his presidency. He notably blamed 'both sides' for violent clashes between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, a year ago and has questioned the intelligence of other prominent black figures including California Rep. Maxine Waters, basketball star LeBron James and TV journalist Don Lemon. He also has targeted black NFL players for kneeling in social protest during the national anthem. Manigault Newman also alleges that Trump allies tried to buy her silence after she left the White House, offering her $15,000 a month to accept a 'senior position' on his 2020 re-election campaign along with a stringent nondisclosure agreement. The offer raises fresh question about the ways that White House aides are being offered safe landing spots after they leave. For example, Trump's former personal aide John McEntee, who was removed from his job in April, went to the campaign. Trump tweeted Monday that Manigault Newman has a 'fully signed Non-Disclosure Agreement!' It was not clear exactly what he was referring to. White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway said Sunday on ABC that there are 'confidentiality agreements' in the West Wing. And Trump's campaign said that in the 2016 race she 'signed the exact same NDA that everyone else on the campaign signed, which is still enforceable.' Meanwhile, Trump's attorney, Rudy Giuliani, said on 'Fox and Friends' Monday that Manigault Newman may have broken the law by recording private conversations inside the White House. 'She's certainly violating national security regulations, which I think have the force of law,' Giuliani said. But experts in national security and clearance law said that, while she seriously violated rules — and would likely be barred from ever being granted a security clearance — she probably didn't break any law unless the conversations she recorded were classified. In the recording with Kelly, which Manigault Newman quotes extensively in her new book, Kelly can be heard saying that he wants to talk with her about leaving the White House. 'It's come to my attention over the last few months that there's been some pretty, in my opinion, significant integrity issues related to you,' Kelly is heard saying, before adding that if she makes it a 'friendly departure' then she can 'go on without any type of difficulty in the future relative to your reputation.' Manigault Newman said she viewed the conversation as a 'threat' and defended her decision to covertly record it and other White House conversations, saying otherwise 'no one' would believe her. ___ Associated Press writers Darlene Superville and Hope Yen contributed to this report.
  • The Latest on former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman (all times local): 7:35 a.m. President Donald Trump is calling his former adviser Omarosa Manigault Newman a 'dog.' Manigault Newman has released several audio recordings from her time as a Trump assistant at the White House, including one with the president in which he said nobody told him she had been fired. Manigault Newman also says she has heard audio tape of Trump using the N-word. On Tuesday, Trump tweeted: 'When you give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn't work out. Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog!' That's a reference to Trump's White House chief of staff, retired Gen. John Kelly, who fired Manigault Newman in December 2017 in a conversation she viewed as a 'threat.' __ 12:20 a.m. President Donald Trump and Omarosa Manigault Newman have returned to their roles as reality TV boss and villain as they spar over what she claims the president said and what he contends his former White House aide is making up. Manigault Newman says she heard an audiotape of Trump using the N-word. The president counters that the word isn't in his vocabulary and calls her 'wacky and deranged' and 'not smart.' Their war of words touches on sensitive issues in Trump's White House, including a lack of racial diversity among senior officials, security in the executive mansion, and a culture that some there feel borders on paranoia. In an unusual admission, Trump says the public back and forth is perhaps beneath a person in his position.
  • President Donald Trump and former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman faced off Monday in a messy clash that involved an explosive tell-all book, secret recordings, an ethnic slur and plenty of insults — reviving their roles as reality show boss and villain. Late Monday, Trump tackled Manigault Newman's claim that she had heard an audiotape of him using the N-word. He tweeted that he had received a call from the producer of 'The Apprentice' assuring him 'there are NO TAPES of the Apprentice where I used such a terrible and disgusting word as attributed by Wacky and Deranged Omarosa.' Trump insisted, 'I don't have that word in my vocabulary, and never have.' He said Manigault Newman had called him 'a true Champion of Civil Rights' until she was fired. Manigault Newman, the former White House liaison to black voters, writes in her new memoir that she'd heard such tapes existed. She said Sunday that she had listened to one after the book closed. Earlier, Trump accused Manigault Newman as 'wacky' and 'not smart' after his former co-star revealed her recording of a phone conversation with the president. Beyond their war of words, the row touched on several sensitive issues in Trump's White House, including a lack of racial diversity among senior officials, security in the executive mansion, a culture that some there feel borders on paranoia and the extraordinary measures used to keep ex-employees quiet. In an unusual admission, Trump acknowledged that the public sparring was perhaps beneath a person in his position, tweeting that he knew it was 'not presidential' to take on 'a lowlife like Omarosa.' But he added: 'This is a modern day form of communication and I know the Fake News Media will be working overtime to make even Wacky Omarosa look legitimate as possible. Sorry!' The dispute has been building for days as Manigault Newman promotes her memoir 'Unhinged,' which comes out officially Tuesday. The book paints a damning picture of Trump, including her claim that he used racial slurs on the set of his reality show 'The Apprentice.' In a series of interviews on NBC, Manigault Newman also revealed two audio recordings from her time at the White House, including portions of a recording of her firing by chief of staff John Kelly, which she says occurred in the high-security Situation Room, and a phone call with Trump after she was fired. Manigault Newman says she has more recordings. Asked on MSNBC's 'Hardball' if special counsel Robert Mueller — investigating possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia — would be interested in any of them, she said, 'If his office calls again, anything they want, I'll share.' Trump officials and a number of outside critics denounced the recordings as a serious breach of ethics and security — and White House aides worried about what else Manigault Newman may have captured in the West Wing. The latest tape recording appears to show Trump expressing surprise about her firing, saying 'nobody even told me about it.' But Manigault Newman said he 'probably instructed General Kelly to do it.' On Twitter, Trump declared Monday that she had been 'fired for the last time,' a reference to her appearances on his reality TV show. He said Kelly had called her a 'loser & nothing but problems,' but he himself had tried to save her job — because he liked her public comments about him. 'I told him to try working it out, if possible, because she only said GREAT things about me - until she got fired!' Trump tweeted. Responding on NBC, Manigault Newman said, 'I think it's sad that with all the things that's going on in the country that he would take time out to insult me and to insult my intelligence.' She added, 'This is his pattern with African-Americans.' First lady Melania Trump, meanwhile, is disappointed that Manigault Newman 'is lashing out and retaliating in such a self-serving way, especially after all the opportunities given to her by the President,' said White House spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham. Manigault Newman's exit does highlight the lack of diversity among Trump's top aides. She was the highest-ranking African-American on the White House staff. She said on NBC that in her absence 'they're making decisions about us without us.' Trump's battle with his former top black aide underscores the racial tensions that have defined his presidency. He notably blamed 'both sides' for violent clashes between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, a year ago and has questioned the intelligence of other prominent black figures including California Rep. Maxine Waters, basketball star LeBron James and TV journalist Don Lemon. He also has targeted black NFL players for kneeling in social protest during the national anthem. Manigault Newman also alleges that Trump allies tried to buy her silence after she left the White House, offering her $15,000 a month to accept a 'senior position' on his 2020 re-election campaign along with a stringent nondisclosure agreement. The offer raises fresh question about the ways that White House aides are being offered safe landing spots after they leave. For example, Trump's former personal aide John McEntee, who was removed from his job in April, went to the campaign. Trump tweeted Monday that Manigault Newman has a 'fully signed Non-Disclosure Agreement!' It was not clear exactly what he was referring to. White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway said Sunday on ABC that there are 'confidentiality agreements' in the West Wing. And Trump's campaign said that in the 2016 race she 'signed the exact same NDA that everyone else on the campaign signed, which is still enforceable.' Meanwhile, Trump's attorney, Rudy Giuliani, said on 'Fox and Friends' Monday that Manigault Newman may have broken the law by recording private conversations inside the White House. 'She's certainly violating national security regulations, which I think have the force of law,' Giuliani said. But experts in national security and clearance law said that, while she seriously violated rules — and would likely be barred from ever being granted a security clearance — she probably didn't break any law unless the conversations she recorded were classified. 'None of us have been able to identify that it would be illegal if unclassified,' said Mark Zaid, a Washington attorney, who has focused on national security law. In the recording with Kelly, which Manigault Newman quotes extensively in her new book, Kelly can be heard saying that he wants to talk with her about leaving the White House. 'It's come to my attention over the last few months that there's been some pretty, in my opinion, significant integrity issues related to you,' Kelly is heard saying, before adding that if she makes it a 'friendly departure' then she can 'go on without any type of difficulty in the future relative to your reputation.' Manigault Newman said she viewed the conversation as a 'threat' and defended her decision to covertly record it and other White House conversations, saying otherwise 'no one' would believe her. She may not be finished talking. Manigault Newman said, 'There's a lot of very corrupt things happening in the White House and I am going to blow the whistle on a lot of them.' ___ Associated Press writers Darlene Superville and Hope Yen contributed to this report from Washington.
  • Liev Schreiber is facing a harassment charge in suburban New York, where his lawyer says the actor is accused of shoving a photographer's camera. The Rockland County district attorney's office says the star of Showtime's 'Ray Donovan' is due for arraignment Tuesday in Nyack (NEYE'-ak). The harassment charge dates to June 7 and is a violation, not a crime. The DA's office would not give more details. Schreiber's lawyer, Jonathan Ripps, tells The Journal News the actor maintains his innocence. Ripps hasn't immediately responded to messages Monday. Ripps tells the newspaper that Schreiber is accused of pushing the camera away after its flash went off. Ripps says the allegation 'doesn't rise to the level of any law being broken.' 'Ray Donovan' has been filming recently in Nyack.
  • It took until mid-August, but an original movie is finally no. 1 at the box office. After several months of sequel and franchise reboots leading the weekend box office, the shark thriller 'The Meg' swam away with $45.4 million in its debut at North American theaters, according to final figures Monday. The Warner Bros. release might not be the most inventive movie, but audiences have shown an appetite for shark movies in recent years. Starring Jason Statham, 'The Meg' far exceeded expectations to topple 'Mission: Impossible — Fallout,' which slid to second with $19.4 million in its third weekend. Opening in 1,512 theaters, Spike Lee's 'BlacKkKlansman' also pulled in a strong $10.8 million for Focus Features. The result is the director's best debut in more than a decade. 1. 'The Meg,' Warner Bros., $45,402,195, 4,118 locations, $11,025 average, $45,402,195, 1 Week. 2. 'Mission: Impossible — Fallout,' Paramount, $19,352,090, 3,888 locations, $4,977 average, $161,319,374, 3 Weeks. 3. 'Christopher Robin,' Disney, $12,960,057, 3,602 locations, $3,598 average, $50,549,374, 2 Weeks. 4. 'Slender Man,' Sony, $11,371,866, 2,358 locations, $4,823 average, $11,371,866, 1 Week. 5. 'BlacKkKlansman,' Focus Features, $10,845,330, 1,512 locations, $7,173 average, $10,845,330, 1 Week. 6. 'The Spy Who Dumped Me,' Lionsgate, $6,462,612, 3,111 locations, $2,077 average, $24,422,997, 2 Weeks. 7. 'Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again,' Universal, $5,861,715, 2,812 locations, $2,085 average, $103,870,915, 4 Weeks. 8. 'The Equalizer 2,' Sony, $5,408,237, 2,373 locations, $2,279 average, $89,554,165, 4 Weeks. 9. 'Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation,' Sony, $5,210,815, 2,589 locations, $2,013 average, $146,988,206, 5 Weeks. 10. 'Ant-Man and the Wasp,' Disney, $4,103,636, 1,863 locations, $2,203 average, $203,573,980, 6 Weeks. 11. 'Incredibles 2,' Disney, $3,429,388, 1,545 locations, $2,220 average, $589,771,988, 9 Weeks. 12. 'Dog Days,' Mirror/LD Entertainment, $2,554,766, 2,442 locations, $1,046 average, $3,595,738, 1 Week. 13. 'The Darkest Minds,' 20th Century Fox, $2,142,645, 3,127 locations, $685 average, $10,988,197, 2 Weeks. 14. 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,' Universal, $1,986,530, 1,237 locations, $1,606 average, $409,656,475, 8 Weeks. 15. 'Teen Titans Go! To the Movies,' Warner Bros., $1,824,852, 1,437 locations, $1,270 average, $25,601,396, 3 Weeks. 16. 'Eighth Grade,' A24, $1,587,299, 1,084 locations, $1,464 average, $10,054,342, 5 Weeks. 17. 'Death of a Nation,' Quality Flix, $987,906, 825 locations, $1,197 average, $4,521,847, 2 Weeks. 18. 'Three Identical Strangers,' Neon Rated, $734,313, 326 locations, $2,252 average, $9,719,905, 7 Weeks. 19. 'Skyscraper,' Universal, $674,430, 670 locations, $1,007 average, $66,185,305, 5 Weeks. 20. 'Sorry to Bother You,' Annapurna Pictures, $419,714, 204 locations, $2,057 average, $15,800,118, 6 Weeks.
  • Jim 'The Anvil' Neidhart, who joined with brother-in-law Bret Hart to form one of the top tag teams in the 1980s with the WWE, has died. He was 63. The Pasco Sheriff's Office said Neidhart fell at home, hit his head and 'succumbed to his injury' on Monday in Wesley Chapel, Florida. No foul play was suspected. Neidhart's daughter, known as Natalya, wrestles for the WWE and is a former women's champion. Neidhart made appearances with his daughter on the WWE reality series 'Total Divas.' 'My dad was always a fighter,' she wrote in an Instagram post. Neidhart, Bret 'Hitman' Hart and manager Jimmy 'The Mouth of the South' Hart made up the Hart Foundation stable in the 1980s and 1990s, and the tag team won two WWE championships. 'What a great run we had. I couldn't believe how it took off,' Jimmy Hart told The Associated Press. 'But the reason why was, Neidhart was such a great character back then. Bret was more cool, the girls loved him. Neidhart and myself were kind of the evil twins.' Neidhart married Bret Hart's sister, Ellie, and became part of the famed family wrestling dynasty in Canada. Stu Hart trained his sons, including Bret and former WWE star Owen Hart, as well as Neidhart in the 1970s. Neidhart started his pro wrestling career in Stu Hart's Stampede Wrestling promotion and eventually signed with the WWE in 1985. Hart posted a picture on social media of himself with Neidhart and the WWE tag team belts around their waists with the caption, 'Stunned and saddened. I just don't have the words right now.' Neidhart wrestled mostly for WWE from 1985 to 1997 and was known for his pink and black gear, maniacal laugh and goatee. Ross Hart, his brother-in-law and a former pro wrestler, told The Associated Press that Neidhart suffered from Alzheimer's disease and it was believed he suffered a grand mal seizure on Monday. 'He got up (Monday) morning and went to lower the temperature on the air conditioner and he just collapsed and I think died pretty quickly,' Hart said. 'I think this was stemming from Alzheimer's, which he'd been battling for some time. It's a struggle he's been going through.' Jimmy Hart said Neidhart seemed in good health when they last saw each other in April on WrestleMania weekend. 'He was witty, he was funny. He seemed sharp as a tack,' Hart said. Neidhart was a shot put star in high school in California in the early 1970s and had brief tryouts for NFL teams before becoming a pro wrestler. The Hart Foundation started as bad guys in WWE and won their first tag team championship in 1987 with the help of a crooked referee. They won the tag titles again in 1990 but split up not long after their second reign ended. Bret Hart was the wrestling technician of the team, while Neidhart brought the raw force and power that made them fan favorites later in their run. As a singles wrestler, Hart would become one of the biggest stars in WWE history and made the promotion's Hall of Fame. Neidhart foundered for most of the 1990s before aligning again with Hart, Owen Hart, Brian Pillman and the British Bulldog to form a new Hart Foundation and become the top faction in WWE. Hart is the only wrestler from that incarnation still alive. 'He was very gifted athletically, even though Bret got more of the credit,' Ross Hart said. 'He was more of the power behind the team but at times he did some incredibly gifted things in the ring. He was like a water buffalo. He was tough to control and tame.' Neidhart wrestled briefly for other wrestling promotions and had brushes with the law and spent time in drug rehabilitation later in life. But he found a second act as comic relief on 'Total Divas' and was filmed going shopping with his daughter and teaching wrestlers how to play golf. Neidhart is the latest in a string of former wrestling stars who have died in 2018, including Bruno Sammartino, Vader, Brian Christopher and Nikolai Volkoff. ___ More AP Sports: http://apnews.com/tag/apf-sports and http://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Actress Sean Young was under investigation Monday in New York after the alleged theft of two laptops belonging to a production company that fired her from a new film she was directing. A New York Police Department spokeswoman said no charges have been filed against the 58-year-old star of the 1980s film 'Blade Runner.' However, detectives are still looking into the matter. NYPD Cadet Taylor Cannon said the laptops taken last Thursday from a Queens apartment came with production software for a film Young was directing called 'Charlie Boy.' The actress has acknowledged that she mistakenly took the production laptops instead of her personal ones while retrieving her belongings. In a statement issued last Friday, Young said she had 'gathered what I believed to be my property but later discovered I was mistaken.' She was fired from the film several months ago after a dispute with producers. Her manager, Gregg Edwards, said Monday that a surveillance video shows her 'putting her own tablet into her own car in the middle of the day.' According to police, the video also shows Young entering and leaving the building accompanied by an unknown man. Edwards said his client had pre-arranged with the building owner to enter the apartment, and the door was open when she arrived. 'She assumed it was open so she could get in,' he said. Since then, Young said in her statement, she has contacted producer Dominick Martini 'to arrange for the 2 laptops to be returned and to pick up my 2 laptops at their earliest convenience but have now been receiving threatening voice mails from Director Timothy Hines who has been releasing untrue slanderous statements to the press.' Hines told the New York Post that one of the two computers, open on a desk, belonged to a Russian assistant editor 'and the keyboard was in Russian. ... Her claim that she walked away with the wrong computers does not hold water. One look at it, she could tell it was a Russian keypad.' Young starred in the 1982 film 'Blade Runner' alongside Harrison Ford. Also in the 1980s, she appeared in 'No Way Out' and 'Wall Street,' and more recently on TNT in 'The Alienist.
  • Books on human caging, early Detroit and African-American culture in Los Angeles are among this year's winners for works reflecting the country's diversity. The American Book Awards were announced Monday by the Before Columbus Foundation, founded in 1976 by author-poet Ishmael Reed. Winners included Kelly Lytle Hernandez's 'City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion, and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles, 1771-1965' and Kellie Jones' 'South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s.' Tiya Miles was cited for her history 'The Dawn of Detroit.' Other recipients were Victor Lavalle for 'The Changeling: A Novel,' Valeria Luiselli for 'Tell Me How It Ends,' Tommy Pico for 'Nature Poem' and Rena Priest for 'Patriarchy Blues.' Author-filmmaker Sequoyah Guess was given a lifetime achievement award. The poets-musicians Heroes are Gang Leaders were cited for oral literature and an Editor/Publisher Award was given to the late Charles F. Harris, who championed the works of Alice Walker, Nikki Giovanni and other black writers. ___ This story corrects the gender for Tiya Mills.
  • A British fashion model has been convicted of murdering a more successful rival after a social media-fueled dispute. A jury found George Koh guilty on Monday of stabbing Harry Uzoka through the heart outside Uzoka's London home. The 25-year-old victim was signed to London's Premier Model Management agency and had modeled for GQ and Zara. Prosecutors say Uzoka accused Koh of trying to copy him, and the two men feuded after Koh claimed to have slept with Uzoka's girlfriend. In January, Koh sent Uzoka a message challenging him to a fight. Uzoka was stabbed, and collapsed and died in the street. Koh, 24, had denied murder, saying he was carrying two knives for self-defense. Two other men were convicted alongside Koh. All will be sentenced Sept. 21.
  • Country singer Jason Aldean and his wife, former “American Idol” contestant Brittany Kerr, have revealed the gender of their second child together. Billboard reported that similar to the couple’s announcement of the pregnancy in July, the couple took to Instagram to reveal they were having a baby girl. >> Read more trending news  In a baseball-themed gender reveal video, Aldean’s daughters from a previous marriage, Kendyl, 10, and Keely, 15, guessed whether Kerr was expecting a girl or a boy.  Related: Singer Jason Aldean, wife Brittany Kerr Aldean expecting second child “Jason and I already know what it is, so this is just for the girls, to see their excitement,” Kerr said in the video. Aldean and Kerr tossed balls for the girls to hit, which exploded into pink dust. Both girls guessed correctly. See the gender reveal video below.