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National Govt & Politics
Democrats backing impeachment steadily rising in House
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Democrats backing impeachment steadily rising in House

Democrats backing impeachment steadily rising in House

Democrats backing impeachment steadily rising in House

Back in their home districts on an extended summer break, the drip-drip sound Democrats hear is not coming from the watering the plants, but rather from the halls of the Congress, where more and more Democratic members of the House are publicly announcing their support for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

A flurry of announcements were made on Thursday, as a series of Democrats said they would back an impeachment inquiry by the House Judiciary Committee, bringing the total number to 135 - more than a majority of Democrats in the House.

"I cannot ignore the call to defend our institutions, to safeguard our democratic norms, and to stand up for our democracy," said Rep. Mark Takano (D-CA) on Thursday afternoon.

A few hours earlier, Rep. William Keating of Massachusetts told his Bay State constituents that the Mueller Report left too many unanswered questions about the President, accusing the White House of stonewalling legitimate Congressional oversight.

"No person in America is above the law, including the President of the United States," said Rep. Lauren Underwood, a freshman Democrat from Illinois.

"I support moving forward with an impeachment inquiry, which will continue to uncover the facts for the American people and hold this president accountable," said Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM), the fourth ranking Democrat in the House. 

"This is not a position I’ve reached lightly," Lujan said earlier this week.

When Democrats left town four weeks ago for their six week summer break, the number of lawmakers endorsing the start of an impeachment idea was nowhere near 100.

But it's been creeping up on almost a daily basis - and more lawmakers seem likely to join in the weeks ahead.

Read More
  • Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's first appearance on the Democratic debate stage found him under attack from all sides in Las Vegas on Wednesday night, as the five other Democrats took turns trying to knock over the candidate who threatens them with a seemingly endless supply of campaign money and television commercials in the 2020 race for the White House. “Democrats take a huge risk if we just substitute one arrogant billionaire for another,' Elizabeth Warren said of Bloomberg and the race to replace President Donald Trump. In Bloomberg's first chance to speak to voters from the debate, he opted to go after Bernie Sanders on the issue of electability. 'If he is the candidate we will have Donald Trump for another four years,' Bloomberg said. Here is a look at what the six candidates on stage were able to do: + ELIZABETH WARREN. After a lackluster debate in New Hampshire, Warren left it all on the field in Vegas. She scorched Bloomberg over his taxes, and called him an 'arrogant billionaire.' She ripped Klobuchar for a 'Post-It Note' health plan, and called Buttigieg's health plan a 'Power Point' which took up only two paragraphs. But her night on stage in Vegas will be remembered mainly for her verbal broadsides against Bloomberg, especially when she demanded that he release women from non-disclosure agreements, so people could find out how they had been harassed or discriminated against. With the moderators taking a hands off approach, Warren at one point simply asked the questions of Bloomberg herself, making his first debate night a rough one. + PETE BUTTIGIEG. While the Indiana Mayor got in some shots at Sanders and Bloomberg along the way, he took several extended jabs at Klobuchar, which would seemingly tell us that he is worried about the Minnesota Senator grabbing away some of his moderate base. 'I wish everyone was as perfect as you, Pete,' Klobuchar said at one point as the two tangled multiple times. Buttigieg really got under Klobuchar's skin by highlighting how she couldn't come up with the name of the Mexican leader earlier this week. 'Are you trying to say I'm dumb?' Klobuchar responded icily. Buttigieg also got his jabs in at Sanders and Bloomberg, reminding people they aren't in the party. 'Let's put forward someone who is actually a Democrat,' Buttigieg said. + JOE BIDEN. Unlike the debate in New Hampshire, Biden did not start his evening by conceding defeat, as the more aggressive version of the former Vice President was repeatedly on display. Biden dinged Bloomberg several times, he again threw elbows over the cost of programs put forward by Sanders, and repeatedly reminded others on stage that he was with President Obama on major issues like health care. But Biden reserved his biggest jabs for Bloomberg, on where he stood on the Obama health law, and how the Obama Administration sent in monitors to deal with the 'stop and frisk' policy of the Bloomberg Administration in New York. + BERNIE SANDERS. Normally, Sanders would have probably attracted the most attention in this debate, simply because he is seen in the polls as the front runner, something he reminded the NBC moderators about when they asked him about polls. But with Bloomberg on the debate stage for the first time, Sanders got a little less attention - though he still mixed it up with Bloomberg a number of times. 'You know what, Mr. Bloomberg, it wasn't you who made all that money. Maybe your workers played some role in that as well,' Sanders said. One of the few times that Sanders found himself playing defense was when a local Nevada issue came up, about the powerful Culinary workers union, and their opposition to his Medicare For All health plan - worried it will do away with the benefits they've gained in their labor efforts. + MICHAEL BLOOMBERG. While the attacks on Bloomberg will get the lion's share of attention out of this debate - as we have detailed here, the former mayor of New York also had his share of rejoinders, which were mainly deployed against Sanders. 'I don't think there's any of chance of Sanders beating President Trump,' Bloomberg said early in the debate. 'I'm a New Yorker. I know how to take on an arrogant con man,' Bloomberg said of the President. For the first 15-20 minutes, Bloomberg was doing fine in his first debate, even as the moderators tried to make him an issue. But then, Warren moved in, and Bloomberg struggled through the rest of the first segment. Bloomberg used most of his tougher lines against Sanders, clearly seeing him as his chief rival on Super Tuesday. + AMY KLOBUCHAR. Klobuchar used her last debate in New Hampshire to take a big jump forward in this campaign, but it wasn't clear she was able to repeat that on the Vegas Strip. Klobuchar started by rebuking Bloomberg's campaign for suggesting that she get out of the race. As mentioned above, the Minnesota Democrat spent a good deal of time squabbling with Buttigieg, as it seemed like Klobuchar might have grabbed Mayor Pete and broken him in two if no one else was in the room. After Bloomberg said he couldn't just 'go to Turbo Tax' to do his taxes and release them, Klobuchar called for transparency on tax issues, comparing it to President Trump. Klobuchar is probably in through Super Tuesday, but it's not an easy way forward. She will try to raise more money on Thursday in Denver.
  • A traffic stop by Tulsa Police for a cracked windshield leads to a major bust for Xanax. It happened about a week ago outside a hotel in the area near 31st and Memorial. Tulsa Police say they did a search of the vehicle and found the Xanax, LOTS of it. “They found roughly ten-thousand pills, which is roughly a couple of pounds,” police said. Police say it has a street value of around $50,000. They say there was a large amount of cash in the vehicle too, separated into several individual bundles.
  • With the entry, and early success, of Michael Bloomberg in the 2020 Democratic race for a presidential nomination, the math which would allow a clear-cut winner before the July convention gets more difficult. If no candidate has a firm commitment of 1,991 delegates, delegates at the convention would then choose a candidate to face Donald Trump in November. U.S. Senator James Lankford (R-Okla) tells KRMG that's just what could happen in 2020. “It has all the earmarks at this point of being a race that is not settled on Super Tuesday, and may not even be settled by the time they get to the convention,” Lankford said Wednesday. [Hear our KRMG In-Depth Report featuring US Senator James Lankford] “This could be the first time in a long time where we actually see a brokered convention, where no one comes with a clear majority to the convention, and you see the delegates at the convention actually pick the Democratic candidate,” he added. That hasn't happened since 1952, when both Democrat Adlai Stevenson and Republican Dwight Eisenhower were chosen by what are called “brokered” or “contested” conventions.  Oklahomans will vote as part of Super Tuesday on March 3rd, 2020. The state's Democratic primary is open to independent voters as well as registered Democrats.
  • Attorney General Mike Hunter charged Kevin Jara and Raul Estrada on Wednesday. Both are accused of trafficking 3.5 pounds of heroin in the Tulsa area after an undercover sting. The Tulsa Police Department found heroin and nearly $60,000. The street value for drugs is estimated at around $125,000.  “These two individuals were making a profit, while flooding our state with dangerous narcotics,” Attorney General Hunter said.  “Drugs like heroin cause addiction and death, while ripping apart families and communities.” Jara and Estrada weren taken into custody.
  • As President Donald Trump on Wednesday defended his move to free ex-Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich (D), the President also renewed his attacks on fired FBI Director James Comey over the Blagojevich matter, even though Comey was not at the Justice Department or FBI when the Illinois Democrat was convicted of trying to get money for the U.S. Senate seat of Barack Obama in 2008. 'Rod Blagojevich did not sell the Senate seat,' the President said, countering the evidence presented at trial by the feds in 2010 and 2011 'Another Comey and gang deal!' the President added in his tweet, mentioning Comey for a second straight day in relation to Blagojevich. Comey served as Deputy Attorney General in the George W. Bush Administration. He left in 2005, and did not return to the federal government until he was chosen for FBI Director eight years later in 2013. After Blagojevich was sentenced to 14 years in prison, the Justice Department noted his 'effort in 2008 to illegally trade the appointment of a United States Senator in exchange for $1.5 million in campaign contributions or other personal benefits.' It was not immediately clear why the President mentioned Comey for a second straight day, even though he was not involved in the investigation or prosecution of Blagojevich. 'It was a prosecution by the same people - Comey, Fitzpatrick - the same group,' the President told reporters on Tuesday, also naming former U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, who did lead the prosecution of Blagojevich. Mr. Trump has repeatedly denounced Comey since firing him in May of 2017, calling him a 'slimeball,' denouncing his handling of the Russia investigation, and Republicans have said Comey should be jailed. 'Mr. President,' Comey tweeted a week ago. 'I have never committed a crime, which is an important pre-req for jail in most countries, still including ours.

Washington Insider

  • Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's first appearance on the Democratic debate stage found him under attack from all sides in Las Vegas on Wednesday night, as the five other Democrats took turns trying to knock over the candidate who threatens them with a seemingly endless supply of campaign money and television commercials in the 2020 race for the White House. “Democrats take a huge risk if we just substitute one arrogant billionaire for another,' Elizabeth Warren said of Bloomberg and the race to replace President Donald Trump. In Bloomberg's first chance to speak to voters from the debate, he opted to go after Bernie Sanders on the issue of electability. 'If he is the candidate we will have Donald Trump for another four years,' Bloomberg said. Here is a look at what the six candidates on stage were able to do: + ELIZABETH WARREN. After a lackluster debate in New Hampshire, Warren left it all on the field in Vegas. She scorched Bloomberg over his taxes, and called him an 'arrogant billionaire.' She ripped Klobuchar for a 'Post-It Note' health plan, and called Buttigieg's health plan a 'Power Point' which took up only two paragraphs. But her night on stage in Vegas will be remembered mainly for her verbal broadsides against Bloomberg, especially when she demanded that he release women from non-disclosure agreements, so people could find out how they had been harassed or discriminated against. With the moderators taking a hands off approach, Warren at one point simply asked the questions of Bloomberg herself, making his first debate night a rough one. + PETE BUTTIGIEG. While the Indiana Mayor got in some shots at Sanders and Bloomberg along the way, he took several extended jabs at Klobuchar, which would seemingly tell us that he is worried about the Minnesota Senator grabbing away some of his moderate base. 'I wish everyone was as perfect as you, Pete,' Klobuchar said at one point as the two tangled multiple times. Buttigieg really got under Klobuchar's skin by highlighting how she couldn't come up with the name of the Mexican leader earlier this week. 'Are you trying to say I'm dumb?' Klobuchar responded icily. Buttigieg also got his jabs in at Sanders and Bloomberg, reminding people they aren't in the party. 'Let's put forward someone who is actually a Democrat,' Buttigieg said. + JOE BIDEN. Unlike the debate in New Hampshire, Biden did not start his evening by conceding defeat, as the more aggressive version of the former Vice President was repeatedly on display. Biden dinged Bloomberg several times, he again threw elbows over the cost of programs put forward by Sanders, and repeatedly reminded others on stage that he was with President Obama on major issues like health care. But Biden reserved his biggest jabs for Bloomberg, on where he stood on the Obama health law, and how the Obama Administration sent in monitors to deal with the 'stop and frisk' policy of the Bloomberg Administration in New York. + BERNIE SANDERS. Normally, Sanders would have probably attracted the most attention in this debate, simply because he is seen in the polls as the front runner, something he reminded the NBC moderators about when they asked him about polls. But with Bloomberg on the debate stage for the first time, Sanders got a little less attention - though he still mixed it up with Bloomberg a number of times. 'You know what, Mr. Bloomberg, it wasn't you who made all that money. Maybe your workers played some role in that as well,' Sanders said. One of the few times that Sanders found himself playing defense was when a local Nevada issue came up, about the powerful Culinary workers union, and their opposition to his Medicare For All health plan - worried it will do away with the benefits they've gained in their labor efforts. + MICHAEL BLOOMBERG. While the attacks on Bloomberg will get the lion's share of attention out of this debate - as we have detailed here, the former mayor of New York also had his share of rejoinders, which were mainly deployed against Sanders. 'I don't think there's any of chance of Sanders beating President Trump,' Bloomberg said early in the debate. 'I'm a New Yorker. I know how to take on an arrogant con man,' Bloomberg said of the President. For the first 15-20 minutes, Bloomberg was doing fine in his first debate, even as the moderators tried to make him an issue. But then, Warren moved in, and Bloomberg struggled through the rest of the first segment. Bloomberg used most of his tougher lines against Sanders, clearly seeing him as his chief rival on Super Tuesday. + AMY KLOBUCHAR. Klobuchar used her last debate in New Hampshire to take a big jump forward in this campaign, but it wasn't clear she was able to repeat that on the Vegas Strip. Klobuchar started by rebuking Bloomberg's campaign for suggesting that she get out of the race. As mentioned above, the Minnesota Democrat spent a good deal of time squabbling with Buttigieg, as it seemed like Klobuchar might have grabbed Mayor Pete and broken him in two if no one else was in the room. After Bloomberg said he couldn't just 'go to Turbo Tax' to do his taxes and release them, Klobuchar called for transparency on tax issues, comparing it to President Trump. Klobuchar is probably in through Super Tuesday, but it's not an easy way forward. She will try to raise more money on Thursday in Denver.
  • As President Donald Trump on Wednesday defended his move to free ex-Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich (D), the President also renewed his attacks on fired FBI Director James Comey over the Blagojevich matter, even though Comey was not at the Justice Department or FBI when the Illinois Democrat was convicted of trying to get money for the U.S. Senate seat of Barack Obama in 2008. 'Rod Blagojevich did not sell the Senate seat,' the President said, countering the evidence presented at trial by the feds in 2010 and 2011 'Another Comey and gang deal!' the President added in his tweet, mentioning Comey for a second straight day in relation to Blagojevich. Comey served as Deputy Attorney General in the George W. Bush Administration. He left in 2005, and did not return to the federal government until he was chosen for FBI Director eight years later in 2013. After Blagojevich was sentenced to 14 years in prison, the Justice Department noted his 'effort in 2008 to illegally trade the appointment of a United States Senator in exchange for $1.5 million in campaign contributions or other personal benefits.' It was not immediately clear why the President mentioned Comey for a second straight day, even though he was not involved in the investigation or prosecution of Blagojevich. 'It was a prosecution by the same people - Comey, Fitzpatrick - the same group,' the President told reporters on Tuesday, also naming former U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, who did lead the prosecution of Blagojevich. Mr. Trump has repeatedly denounced Comey since firing him in May of 2017, calling him a 'slimeball,' denouncing his handling of the Russia investigation, and Republicans have said Comey should be jailed. 'Mr. President,' Comey tweeted a week ago. 'I have never committed a crime, which is an important pre-req for jail in most countries, still including ours.
  • Three days before a crucial set of caucuses in the state of Nevada, the leading candidates for the Democratic nomination for President meet in Las Vegas on Wednesday night, as former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg will be on the debate stage for the first time, with top Democrats ready to take aim at the billionaire who has jumped up in the polls after spending millions on campaign ads nationwide. 'It's a shame Mike Bloomberg can buy his way into this debate,' said Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), as Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) have taken aim repeatedly at Bloomberg in recent days. The debate comes as new polling not only qualified Bloomberg for the debate stage in Las Vegas, but also next Tuesday night in Charleston, South Carolina, just a week before a crucial round of primaries in fourteen states on Super Tuesday, March 3. Six candidates qualified for this debate - notably absent is another wealthy candidate who has been at the last two debates, Tom Steyer. Iowa was just over two weeks ago - but so much has changed in the Democratic race, and in the polls. Let's look at each candidate in this debate. + Joe Biden. After a rather sketchy fourth place finish in Iowa, followed by a fifth place finish in New Hampshire, it's not panic button time as yet for Biden supporters, but it is getting close. The big firewall for the former Vice President is probably next week in South Carolina, but a lackluster showing on Saturday in the Nevada Caucuses would not be helpful for his campaign. At the final debate in New Hampshire earlier this month, Biden started off by basically saying he could not win in the Granite State - and then he went out a proved that the following Tuesday. One would expect to look for a different message from Biden, and look for him to be more aggressive tonight, just as he was in the second part of the New Hampshire debate. + Michael Bloomberg. History teaches us that in the modern primary campaign era, no one can skip Iowa and New Hampshire, and then win their party's nomination. But that's absolutely what Bloomberg is trying to accomplish. He did nothing in those two early states, where individual voter campaign work is glorified - as Bloomberg instead went for the national campaign, with ads running in Super Tuesday states and beyond. That seems to be paying off right now as the overall field is not wowing the voters, and Bloomberg's numbers are bubbling up both nationally, and in individual states which are voting on March 3 - Super Tuesday. Don't count Bloomberg out, as a string of polls released on Tuesday only seemed to have good news for him. What does Bloomberg do tonight? Maybe he raises this issue which he turned into a digital ad, and uses it to push back against what could be a torrent of criticism. + Pete Buttigieg. Most people have probably forgotten this statistic, but Buttigieg is the official leader of the Democratic Party race for President right now, as he is two delegates up on Bernie Sanders after Iowa and New Hampshire. By running neck and neck with Bernie Sanders in both of those states, Buttigieg showed that he deserves to be in the top tier of candidates. But can he translate those good finishes in the first two states into big numbers in Nevada on Saturday? That's not so clear cut of a question and answer. Remember, Buttigieg was taking flak from other Democrats in the New Hampshire debate - because he was perceived as a threat. Now, the focus of all the candidates may be on Bloomberg instead of him. + Amy Klobuchar. It was a week today that Klobuchar was the hot, new item emerging from New Hampshire, after her late closing rush which gave her a strong third place finish. But like in New Hampshire, Klobuchar really does not have much of a ground game in Nevada or South Carolina - and she may have to again use this debate to introduce herself to voters who know pretty much nothing about her. Klobuchar is already trying to see if she can push her way into other states, scheduling a visit to Colorado before the Nevada Caucuses. But the extreme disadvantage for Klobuchar on the airwaves vis a vis Bloomberg is something which cannot be ignored. + Elizabeth Warren. After her disappointing fourth place finish in New Hampshire, Warren immediately introduced a new message into her stump speech - going after Bloomberg, and the millions of dollars he was pouring into the race for President. 'Michael Bloomberg came in on the billionaire plan,' Warren said, as the crowd booed at the mention of his name. 'Just buy yourself the nomination.' One would think that Warren - who has often railed at big money in politics - will be one of the two most aggressive towards Bloomberg, along with Bernie Sanders.  But many thought Warren would be aggressive in the final New Hampshire debate - and it did not happen.  Afterwards, Warren admitted she had probably missed a chance to get more attention.  Watch tonight to see if she changes her game plan. + Bernie Sanders. Sanders teed off on Bloomberg before the votes were even cast in the New Hampshire Primary, perhaps sensing more than others - because he has more of a national campaign apparatus - that Bloomberg represents a major threat to the candidates who have picked their way through the individual early states on the calendar. But Sanders also is the strongest candidate to battle Bloomberg right now in the Democratic race, and the size of his crowds in recent days have shown that very clearly. There is still a great reluctance in official Democratic Party circles about Sanders - mainly because he still is not a member of the party. Sanders can certainly box with Bloomberg tonight on stage and feel confident that he will still be in the top tier of candidates when the night is over. The debate is on NBC from 9 pm - 11 pm ET.
  • President Donald Trump on Tuesday issued a series of surprise high profile pardons and commutations, moving to free former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich (D), who was convicted in 2011 of corruption for essentially trying to sell the official appointment to fill the U.S. Senate seat of President Barack Obama. 'He served eight years in jail - a long time,' the President told reporters, as he noted he saw Blagojevich's wife on Fox News, and knew of Blagojevich from his time on 'Celebrity Apprentice.' 'That was a tremendously powerful and ridiculous sentence,' Mr. Trump added, pointedly name-checking former FBI Director James Comey, and the special prosecutor in the case, former U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald. Blagojevich was Governor of Illinois in 2008 when Barack Obama won the White House, thus opening his seat in the Senate. Evidence gathered by the feds showed Blagojevich quickly saw the vacant Senate seat not as a political opportunity, but one which could net the Illinois Democrat big money. 'I've got this thing and it's f#$%ing golden,' Blagojevich was heard on a secretly recorded tape. 'And I'm just not giving it up for f&#$ing nothing!'  In his indictment and trial, prosecutors described Blagojevich as angling for a quid pro quo with a possible Senate pick, where they would set up a non-profit company which would employ Blagojevich after he served as Illinois Governor, funneling big money to him as payback for the Senate appointment. Before being tried and convicted of corruption, Blagojevich was impeached by the Illinois State House, and then convicted and removed from office by the Illinois State Senate in early 2009. The vote was unanimous. Illinois GOP lawmakers in the Congress issued a joint statement two hours after the President's announcement, saying they were disappointed by Mr. Trump's move. 'Blagojevich is the face of public corruption in Illinois,' the lawmakers stated, adding 'we shouldn't let those who breached the public trust off the hook.' The President on Tuesday also issued a pardon for David Safavian, who was convicted of obstruction of justice and making false statements in connection with his involvement in the famous Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal.
  • The political rumble that is the Democratic race for President in 2020 is entering a crucial next fourteen days as 16 states are on the schedule - fourteen of them on Super Tuesday, March 3. Just as the results in Iowa and New Hampshire helped to reshape the race and knock out some of the long shot contenders, the next two weeks should help determine whether the Democratic nomination is going to be sewed up quickly - or if the race will go on for some time. The big news today is that Michael Bloomberg has qualified for his first debate - Wednesday in Nevada.  Here is what to look for in a very active next two weeks: + Nevada comes first on Saturday. The third stop in this year's nominating schedule is the Silver State, as the Democratic candidates will now flood this state for the rest of this week, with caucuses set for Saturday. Just like in New Hampshire, there will be one final debate before the Nevada vote, that is set for Wednesday night on the Strip in Las Vegas. Unlike the Iowa Caucuses, there is early voting allowed in the Nevada version, as voters then indicate alternate choices if their candidate is not 'viable' in the caucus vote. So far, there has been a lot of interest among Democratic Party voters. Are Nevada Democrats ready? When early voting began last Saturday, Nevada Democrats said 56 percent of those voting were joining the caucus for the first time. + After Nevada, it's off to South Carolina. Last on the schedule this month is the Palmetto State. Nevada has caucuses on Saturday February 22. South Carolina has a primary on Saturday February 29. Just as the results of Iowa and New Hampshire helped to winnow and further shape the Democratic race, one would think the same thing happens after Nevada. There will be another debate in South Carolina on Tuesday February 25, in Charleston. So, just in the next week alone, the Democrats will have two debates - the final two before Super Tuesday. + Will Democrats look ahead to Super Tuesday? Unlike the clear full week before the Nevada Caucuses, Democrats only have a couple of days from the vote in South Carolina on February 29 until the 14 states of Super Tuesday, which vote on March 3. Think about it for a second - do you just campaign around the Palmetto State for the full week next week? Or do you also go somewhere else which might help you the following Tuesday? One state? Or 14 other states? There is no easy answer when you consider that California and Texas are two huge states on Super Tuesday. The clock is ticking toward March 3. Fast. + What about Mike Bloomberg? I don't think you can ignore Bloomberg. History tells us we should, as when you ignore Iowa and New Hampshire, usually your campaign for President goes nowhere (see Al Gore 1988, and Rudy Giuliani 2008). But right now, this seems different, mainly because Bloomberg is pouring vast sums of money into advertising for the Super Tuesday states, and the Democratic Party field doesn't seem like it's sorting out very quickly. Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and others have all taken jabs at Bloomberg, who has not been on a debate stage as yet. + Voters are still making up their minds. I spoke to a voter in Virginia this weekend who didn't realize Super Tuesday was just in two weeks. The candidates have that hurdle to overcome. Like a lot of voters, this person was still undecided on who to support on the Democratic side, but indicated they were being bombarded with material from Mike Bloomberg. We haven't seen many polls from Super Tuesday states, but what is notable about this one from Monmouth is that 25 percent of voters say they could still switch. That means there is a lot of wiggle room - and uncertainty - in the next two weeks.