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NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter Alerts

In advance of and during a storm, time can save lives. That's why NEWS102.3 KRMG offers StormCenter Alerts sent directly to your wireless phone for FREE. When you sign up, you'll get the text messages sent directly to your cell when we activate the NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter.

StormCenter is our term for the activation of severe weather coverage on NEWS102.3 & AM740 KRMG. Learn more about our StormCenter coverage.

To subscribe, text the word WEATHER to 95920 and you'll begin immediately receiving NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter updates on your mobile device to  help you stay informed of impending weather.

The NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter will send you an alert whenever a severe weather warning is issued for an adjacent county and is expected to reach Tulsa, or in preparation for a major weather event (snow/ice, tornado from another county doing damage).  

EXAMPLE StormCenter text:

STORMCENTER:  Severe Thunderstorm Warning issued by Nat'l Weather Service for multiple counties as storms approach Tulsa. Live team coverage on NEWS102.3 KRMG and http://krmg.com


Frequently asked questions:

Q:  Is the service really free?

A:  NEWS102.3 KRMG does not charge for text messages sent to or received from 95920; however, if you do not have unlimited text messages on your wireless plan; you may be subject to standard text rates through your wireless provider.

Q:  A thunderstorm warning was issued for Tulsa County, but I didn't receive a text.

A:  You will only receive a text message upon activation of The NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter, if there is a new and serious threat to public safety, and/or there is breaking news associated with the storm (damage, etc).

Q:  What times of day can I expect to receive texts from NEWS102.3 KRMG?

A: We only send StormCenter text alerts between the hours of 7am - 10pm, unless there is a tornado warning for one of our StormCenter counties (Creek, Mayes, Okmulgee, Osage, Pawnee, Rogers, Tulsa, Wagoner, and Washington)

Q:  Why was my text message so delayed? I received an alert after a storm warning had already expired.

A:  Generally, texts are instantaneous. From the time we push 'send' in our system, to the time you receive the alert, it should be less than 30 seconds. However, sometimes, wireless providers have text alerts that get delayed in transit due to system maintenance or other provider issues. Sometimes, you may have had a lack of signal strength or signal outage when the text was sent, which may also cause a delay in receipt. If you experience these problems regularly, please contact us.

Q:  I've signed up, but I'm still not receiving messages from NEWS102.3 KRMG during severe weather. What should I do?

A:  Report the problem here

Q:  I'm unable to send and receive text message on my cell phone. Is there another way I can get StormCenter information from you on the go?

A:  While text messages are the quickest and most effective means of alerting you to a severe weather threat, you can also get StormCenter information on our Facebook page at http://facebook.com/krmgtulsa. Remember to always have a batter powered radio at home in case the power goes out and/or cell service becomes unavailable during a storm.

Q:  Does NEWS102.3 KRMG offer text messages for breaking news and traffic alerts?

A:  Yes, to begin receiving Breaking News alerts on your mobile device, text the word, "NEWS" to 95920; for Red Alert Traffic notices, text the word, "TRAFFIC" to 95920.


  • “Text HELP for help.”
  • “Text STOP to cancel”
  • “Message and data rates may apply”

NEWS102.3 KRMG promises to use your contact information only for the purpose of performing the services (text alerts) for which you provided it to us. We promise not to sell or rent your contact information to third parties.

  • Kidde recalled about 500,000 dual-sensor smoke alarms Wednesday because they pose a risk of people not being alerted to a fire in their home. >> Nearly 600,000 pacifiers, teether holders recalled amid concerns about choking A yellow cap left on during the manufacturing process can cover one of the two smoke sensors and compromise the smoke alarm’s ability to detect smoke. About 452,000 devices were sold in the United States, in addition to 40,000 sold in Canada. >> Johnsonville recalls 109K pounds of sausage after reports of plastic contamination This recall involves models PI2010 and PI9010 of Kidde dual-sensor (photoelectric and ionization) smoke alarms. “KIDDE” is printed on the front center of the smoke alarm. The model number and date code are printed on the back of the alarm. The recall includes: Model: PI9010 (DC/battery powered)Date Code: September 10, 2016 through October 13, 2017 Model: PI2010 (AC/hardwired)Date Code: September 10, 2016 through October 13, 2017 >> 1.4 million Ford vehicles recalled after reports that steering wheel can come loose People should remove the alarm from their wall or ceiling and look through the opening on the side of the alarm for a yellow cap. People should not attempt to take apart the alarm, open the casing, or otherwise remove the yellow cap themselves. If a yellow cap is present, people should immediately contact Kidde to receive instructions and request a free replacement smoke alarm. They should remove and discard the recalled smoke alarm only after they receive and install the replacement alarm. If no yellow cap is present, people should reinstall the smoke alarm and no further action is needed. >> Read more trending news  The United States Consumer Product Safety Commission has received one report of the yellow protective cap being present on a smoke alarm before it was installed in a home. No reports of incidents or injuries as a result of a yellow cap being present have been reported. >> On Boston25News.com: Boston's bravest: Facing a hidden killer The affected smoke alarms were sold at Home Depot, Walmart and other department, home and hardware stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, ShopKidde.com and other websites from September 2016 through January 2018 for between $20 and $40. Read more here.
  • Ending weeks of negotiations between Congress and the White House, GOP leaders on Wednesday night released a $1.3 trillion funding plan for the federal government, an agreement that will result in over $100 billion in new spending in 2018, causing heartburn – and opposition – among more conservative Republicans in the House. Almost six months behind schedule on their budget work, lawmakers produced a mammoth bill, which weighs in at 2,232 pages, the product of extended talks that almost went awry at the last minute. The bill was highlighted by the inclusion of a number of non-spending provisions, like two measurse championed in the aftermath of the February school shooting in Parkland, Florida, which would get more information into the background check system for gun buyers, and to help schools better recognize possible problems with violence. Each party had a laundry list of items that they trumpeted in a flurry of news releases sent to reporters – for Republicans, that often included more money for the Pentagon, while Democrats focused on more money for domestic programs. BREAKING: Budget bargainers clinch $1.3 trillion deal bearing big defense, domestic boosts, no protections for Dreamer immigrants. — AP Politics (@AP_Politics) March 22, 2018 In all, almost 4,000 pages of bill text and supporting materials were released to lawmakers – almost impossible for anyone to read before the votes, which are expected on Thursday. But we did some speed reading – and here is some of what we found: 1. The Omnibus features more spending from budget deal. Following through on a bipartisan budget agreement from earlier this year, this funding measure adds more money to the Pentagon – raising the overall military budget to $700 billion this year, and $716 billion in 2019. This year’s hike was $61 billion: “This is the biggest year-to-year increase in defense funding in 15 years,” GOP leaders said in their argument to Republican lawmakers. More money is also added for domestic programs, but that did not match the defense increase, but it was still one reason why Democrats signed on to the agreement. The total for discretionary funding is $1.3 trillion, more than any single year of the Obama Administration. This critical funding bill fulfills our pledge to rebuild the nation’s military. It also addresses many of our national priorities, such as school safety, infrastructure, and fighting the opioid epidemic. — Paul Ryan (@SpeakerRyan) March 22, 2018 2. More conservative Republicans not pleased. Even before the details were out on the Omnibus, it wasn’t hard to tell what members of the House Freedom Caucus were going to do on this bill – vote against it – even with the big increase in defense funding. “That is not in anyway close to what the election was about, close to what we campaigned on,” said Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH). “We all campaigned on changing the status quo,” said Rep. Warren Davidson (R-OH). “I think all of us agree we’re spending too much,” he added. But that was a minority view within the party, as GOP leaders focused more on the big increase in military funding. – Record spending levels – No wall/border security – Obamacare intact – Funds Planned Parenthood – Sanctuary Cities funded – Barely 24 hours to read a 2,300 page bill This Omnibus is so far from what the forgotten men and women of America voted for. I will oppose it. — Mark Meadows (@RepMarkMeadows) March 22, 2018 3. President Trump backs it with some reservations. After evidently wavering on the details during the day on Wednesday, the President took to Twitter a few hours later to trumpet some of the details in the agreement, and to knock Democrats for what’s not in the Omnibus – as there is no agreement dealing with younger illegal immigrant children, known as the “Dreamers.” “Democrats refused to take care of DACA,” the President said. “Would have been so easy, but they just didn’t care.” Got $1.6 Billion to start Wall on Southern Border, rest will be forthcoming. Most importantly, got $700 Billion to rebuild our Military, $716 Billion next year…most ever. Had to waste money on Dem giveaways in order to take care of military pay increase and new equipment. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 22, 2018 4. Trump could have had much more for border wall. While the President professed himself satisfied with $1.6 billion in money for border security, Democrats reminded him that they had offered $25 billion for the wall, in exchange for provisions allowing the “Dreamers” to stay in the U.S., and for many to get on a 12-year pathway to citizenship. But for a variety of reasons, the President did not want to accept that kind of an agreement with Congress, as both parties blamed the other for the lack of a deal. As for that $1.6 billion, the bill limits where it can be used: 5. NASA sees a budget boost. With the spending spigot open in this bill, there are very few mentions of cuts in the documents handed out by Republicans, as agencies like NASA instead saw their budgets boosted. NASA – which has drawn strong words of praise from President Trump since he took office – saw its budget go above $20 billion for the first time ever, jumping just over $1 billion. That will be good news to lawmakers in Florida – and many other states – which have a piece of NASA’s research and operations. 6. Omnibus includes funds for a new Hurricane Hunter plane. After a round of devastating hurricane strikes in 2017, this spending plan will direct $121 million to buy a “suitable replacement” for a Gulfstream IV Hurricane Hunter plane, which will insure that enough planes are ready for a busy storm season. For example, in late September and early October of 2017, one of those planes had three separate mechanical problems – but when it was grounded, there was no backup plane. That’s long been a concern for Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL), and he noted the provision last night after the bill was released. Just learned that funding for another Hurricane Hunter jet is in the $1.3 trillion spending bill Congress will vote on this week. I've been relentless on this because 20 million Floridians are in the potential path of a hurricane & data from this aircraft saves lives & property. — Bill Nelson (@SenBillNelson) March 22, 2018 7. A big change for the Internal Revenue Service. After years of seeing budget reductions, the IRS was a budget winner in this Omnibus spending agreement, as the agency’s budget will go up almost $200 million to $11.43 billion. There will be $320 million specifically dedicated to implementation of the new tax cut law, which was approved late in 2017, in order to change all the forms, schedules, and internal systems to reflect those changes in tax year 2018. $350 million will be directed to improve IRS customer service, which has been suffering more and more telephone delays in recent years. It was a bit of a switch for the GOP to be bragging about how much money they were spending at the IRS, instead of vowing to find new ways to cut the budget at the tax agency. 8. Trump wanted to end transportation grants. Congress tripled them. One piece of President Trump’s budget plan for 2019, was a proposal to eliminate “TIGER” grants for infrastructure. But instead of getting rid of that $500 million program, Congress increased it by $1 billion, tripling the size of those popular transportation grants. Mr. Trump’s first budget also tried to get rid of the TIGER program, but when you look at the budget, you realize quickly that grant programs are popular in both parties, because they funnel money to the folks back home. 9. The ban on funding for a group that no longer exists. Once again, this year’s funding bills from Congress include a provision to make sure no federal dollars go to the Association of Community Organizations for Reform, known as ACORN – even though ACORN has disbanded – that happened eight years ago, in 2010. But Republicans have wanted to make sure that any group which looks anything like ACORN, or might turn out to be a progressive grass roots group which acts like ACORN, doesn’t get any federal funding in the future. The new congressional spending bill once again bans funds for ACORN, an organization that once helped poor people but no longer exists. cc @zachdcarter pic.twitter.com/YJVQzOb4Fv — Arthur Delaney (@ArthurDelaneyHP) March 22, 2018 10. Death payment for a late lawmaker. Earlier this week came the sad news that Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-NY) had died, after the 88 year old veteran lawmaker had fallen at her home. When members die while in office, it is customary for the Congress to approve a full year’s salary for that member’s spouse or estate. It’s officially known on a budget line as “Payment to Widows and Heirs of Deceased Members of Congress.” Looking through the fine print – it’s actually characterized as “mandatory” spending – and not discretionary. The House will vote first on the plan – most likely on Thursday. The Senate is expected to follow suit soon after. Lawmakers are then expected to leave town for a two week Easter break.
  • Tulsa police were called to the Rest Inn and Suites near Admiral and Memorial Tuesday night around 10:30. A man from Nebraska, with warrants for manufacturing automatic weapons, was inside and refusing to come out. The S.W.A.T team was concerned about any possible weapons inside, so they closed a part of Admiral for several hours to keep drivers away. Investigators believe the suspect, 49-year-old Rush Hembree, held a pregnant girlfriend hostage. Police say he did some damage to hotel walls trying to escape. Hembree came out of the room around 3:30pm.
  • After weeks of negotiations, Congress unveiled a $1.3 trillion funding measure for the federal government on Wednesday night, adding billions in new spending for both the Pentagon and domestic spending programs, adding in a pair of bills dealing with school safety and gun violence, but including no deals on some politically difficult issues like the future of illegal immigrant “Dreamers.” The 2,232 pages of bill text were quietly posted by GOP leaders after yet another day of closed door negotiations, which included a trip down to the White House by House Speaker Paul Ryan. “No bill of this size is perfect,” Ryan said in a written statement, as he touted the extra money in the plan for the U.S. military. “But this legislation addresses important priorities and makes us stronger at home and abroad,” Ryan added. BREAKING: Budget bargainers clinch $1.3 trillion deal bearing big defense, domestic boosts, no protections for Dreamer immigrants. — AP Politics (@AP_Politics) March 22, 2018 Among the items included in the Omnibus funding bill: + The bipartisan “Fix NICS” bill, which would press states and federal agencies to funnel more information into the instant background check system for gun buyers. + The “STOP School Violence Act,” which would send grant money to local governments to help schools better recognize possible violent threats in schools and their communities. + A series of corrections to the recent tax cut law. Even before the text of the bill was unveiled, a number of Republicans were not pleased, arguing the GOP has done little to merit the support of voters back home, saying it will mean more spending and a bigger government. “That is not in any way close to what the election was about,” said Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), who argued the President should veto the bill. Also causing some irritation was the fact that the bill was negotiated with little input from most lawmakers, and sprung on them just hours before the House and Senate were due to head out of town on a two week Easter break. We should have been on the House floor all year, in front of @cspan cameras, debating and amending spending bills. Instead, nearly all of Congress is waiting to see what omnibus bill emerges from the smoke filled room. Post offices are getting named… at least there’s that. — Thomas Massie (@RepThomasMassie) March 20, 2018 It’s a good thing we have Republican control of Congress or the Democrats might bust the budget caps, fund planned parenthood and Obamacare, and sneak gun control without due process into an Omni…wait, what? — Senator Rand Paul (@RandPaul) March 21, 2018 “There is not a single member of Congress who can physically read it, unless they are a speed reader,” said Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC). One of the many provisions in the bill included a $174,000 payment to the estate of the late Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-NY), who died earlier this week. Those type of payments are typical when a lawmaker dies while in office. GOP leaders hope to vote on the Omnibus in the House on Thursday, as lawmakers are ready to go home for a two-week break for Easter.
  • Sure. Take that quiz about which hair-metal band is your spirit animal. Share a few snaps of your toddler at the beach and watch the likes pile up. Comment on that pointed political opinion from the classmate you haven’t seen since the Reagan administration. Just remember that your familiar, comforting online neighborhood — the people you care about most and those you only kinda like — exists entirely on a corporate planet that’s endlessly ravenous to know more about you and yours. On a day when our virtual friends wrung their virtual hands about whether to leave Facebook, a thoroughly 21st-century conundrum was hammered home: When your community is a big business, and when a company’s biggest business is your community, things can get very messy. You saw that all day Tuesday as users watched the saga of Cambridge Analytica unfold and contemplated whether the chance that they had been manipulated again — that their data might have been used to influence an election — was, finally, reason enough to bid Facebook goodbye. Not an easy choice. After all, how would Mom see photos of the kids?