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NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter Alerts

In advance of and during a storm, time can save lives. That's why NEWS102.3 KRMG offers StormCenter Alerts sent directly to your wireless phone for FREE. When you sign up, you'll get the text messages sent directly to your cell when we activate the NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter.

StormCenter is our term for the activation of severe weather coverage on NEWS102.3 & AM740 KRMG. Learn more about our StormCenter coverage.

To subscribe, text the word WEATHER to 95920 and you'll begin immediately receiving NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter updates on your mobile device to  help you stay informed of impending weather.

The NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter will send you an alert whenever a severe weather warning is issued for an adjacent county and is expected to reach Tulsa, or in preparation for a major weather event (snow/ice, tornado from another county doing damage).  

EXAMPLE StormCenter text:

STORMCENTER:  Severe Thunderstorm Warning issued by Nat'l Weather Service for multiple counties as storms approach Tulsa. Live team coverage on NEWS102.3 KRMG and http://krmg.com

 

Frequently asked questions:

Q:  Is the service really free?

A:  NEWS102.3 KRMG does not charge for text messages sent to or received from 95920; however, if you do not have unlimited text messages on your wireless plan; you may be subject to standard text rates through your wireless provider.

Q:  A thunderstorm warning was issued for Tulsa County, but I didn't receive a text.

A:  You will only receive a text message upon activation of The NEWS102.3 KRMG StormCenter, if there is a new and serious threat to public safety, and/or there is breaking news associated with the storm (damage, etc).

Q:  What times of day can I expect to receive texts from NEWS102.3 KRMG?

A: We only send StormCenter text alerts between the hours of 7am - 10pm, unless there is a tornado warning for one of our StormCenter counties (Creek, Mayes, Okmulgee, Osage, Pawnee, Rogers, Tulsa, Wagoner, and Washington)

Q:  Why was my text message so delayed? I received an alert after a storm warning had already expired.

A:  Generally, texts are instantaneous. From the time we push 'send' in our system, to the time you receive the alert, it should be less than 30 seconds. However, sometimes, wireless providers have text alerts that get delayed in transit due to system maintenance or other provider issues. Sometimes, you may have had a lack of signal strength or signal outage when the text was sent, which may also cause a delay in receipt. If you experience these problems regularly, please contact us.

Q:  I've signed up, but I'm still not receiving messages from NEWS102.3 KRMG during severe weather. What should I do?

A:  Report the problem here

Q:  I'm unable to send and receive text message on my cell phone. Is there another way I can get StormCenter information from you on the go?

A:  While text messages are the quickest and most effective means of alerting you to a severe weather threat, you can also get StormCenter information on our Facebook page at http://facebook.com/krmgtulsa. Remember to always have a batter powered radio at home in case the power goes out and/or cell service becomes unavailable during a storm.

Q:  Does NEWS102.3 KRMG offer text messages for breaking news and traffic alerts?

A:  Yes, to begin receiving Breaking News alerts on your mobile device, text the word, "NEWS" to 95920; for Red Alert Traffic notices, text the word, "TRAFFIC" to 95920.

 

  • “Text HELP for help.”
  • “Text STOP to cancel”
  • “Message and data rates may apply”

NEWS102.3 KRMG promises to use your contact information only for the purpose of performing the services (text alerts) for which you provided it to us. We promise not to sell or rent your contact information to third parties.

  • An employee is shot in the leg during an armed robbery Friday night at the Royal China Buffet near Admiral and Sheridan. Tulsa police tell us Anthony Cox entered the restaurant and there were customers inside.  He reportedly became impatient while waiting for his loot. “Witnesses believe the suspect shot the victim because he wasn’t moving fast enough with the money,” Police said.  Officers tracked Cox down about a block away from the scene. They recovered a gun and loot from the robbery. Investigators believe Cox could be linked to other robberies.  He has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.   
  • If you have outdoor plans for today, take the kite with you and leave the heavy coat at home. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says the Tulsa area will see a major warm-up, but wind will be a factor. “Cloudy in the morning and then becoming mostly cloudy,” Plate said.  “The high temperature will be in the lower 60’s.  The south winds will be quite breezy, gusting up to 25 mph at times.”  The low Saturday night will only drop to near 51 degrees. On Sunday, NWS is reporting a high near 70 degrees.  However, there is a chance of showers during the daytime.  
  • In a high stakes game of legislative chicken, the U.S. Senate on Friday night blocked a House-passed bill to fund operations of the federal government for the next four weeks, as most Democrats joined with a handful of Republicans to filibuster the spending measure, demanding faster action on immigration matters, driving the Congress toward the first federal government shutdown since 2013. The vote was 50 to 49 – 60 votes were needed. Earlier in the day, President Donald Trump had met with Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer at the White House – but while they seemed to make some progress, there was no final deal. And Mr. Trump made clear who was to blame. Not looking good for our great Military or Safety & Security on the very dangerous Southern Border. Dems want a Shutdown in order to help diminish the great success of the Tax Cuts, and what they are doing for our booming economy. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2018 A handful of members from both parties broke with their leaders on the Senate vote, which would have shut off debate on the four week spending measure approved on Thursday by the House. Mainly because of the impasse over DACA and immigration, several Republicans refused to join with the President, as they voted against the plan. “I believe no one wants the government to shut down,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC). “I also believe that we are inside the ten yard line on finding solutions on all issues.” Other Republican “no” votes included Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT), and Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY). Democrats voting to end debate included five from states which were won by President Trump: Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Sen. Doug Jones (D-AL), Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV), Sen. Clare McCaskill (D-MO), and Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-IN). For many Democrats, the biggest thing missing from a temporary budget plan was something concrete on the DACA program, to deal with close to 700,000 illegal immigrant “Dreamers” now in the United States. In the various Congressional office buildings, immigration activists and many Dreamers joined in demonstrations for their cause. Dreamers protesting right below reporters covering potential shutdown. Chanting #DreamActNow pic.twitter.com/Ad3CxCzo0P — Rebecca Bainer (@rebbainer) January 19, 2018 But Republicans argued that backers of DACA relief were not interested in doing enough to stop people from coming illegally in the future. “We want to be able to resolve this, but it has to be resolved with border security attached to it,” said Sen. James Lankford (R-OK). “There’s a deal here that could be struck very quickly,” argued Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC). But signs of a late agreement did not seem to be there for Senators as the clock ticked toward midnight, a reminder that many hours had been spent in recent months on the issue, so far – to no avail. It wasn’t immediately clear how Congressional leaders would try to broker a deal. President Trump stayed at the White House Friday night instead of flying as scheduled to his Mar-a-Lago retreat in Florida. It’s not clear if he will go there on Saturday for a party to mark his first year in office.  
  • Prosecutors say a 10-year-old was killed by his friend with a crossbow last fall in Lincoln County. On Friday, KRMG learned that the 13-year-old teen has been charged with first-degree murder. Investigators say 10-year-old Austin Almanza was fatally struck by an arrow, which traveled through his body and then pierced his 8-year-old brother in the arm. Prosecutors charged the 13-year-old boy as an adult, making him one of the youngest ever in the state to be charged as an adult with first-degree murder. At a hearing Thursday, a judge ordered a psychological evaluation of the boy to determine how his case should be handled in the future.
  • Reinforcing its strong connection with social conservatives, the Trump administration announced Thursday a new federal office to protect medical providers refusing to participate in abortion, assisted suicide or other procedures on moral or religious grounds. Leading Democrats and LGBT groups immediately denounced the move, saying “conscience protections” could become a license to discriminate, particularly against gay and transgender people. The announcement by the Department of Health and Human Services came a day ahead of the annual march on Washington by abortion opponents, who will be addressed via video link by President Donald Trump. HHS put on a formal event in the department’s Great Hall, with Republican lawmakers and activists for conscience protections as invited speakers. The religious and conscience division will be part of the HHS Office for Civil Rights, which enforces federal anti-discrimination and privacy laws. Officials said it will focus on upholding protections already part of federal law. Violations can result in a service provider losing government funding. No new efforts to expand such protections were announced, but activists on both sides expect the administration will try to broaden them in the future.