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Dale Earnhardt was born into a racing family, following his father, NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Sr., his paternal grandfather Ralph Earnhardt and his maternal grandfather was Robert Gee Sr., a NASCAR car builder, on the racetrack. He has been behind the wheel professionally for 18 years in the NASCAR Cup Series competition. Junior, as he is known, announced his retirement from racing Tuesday.
President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump hosttheir first White House Easter egg roll.
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  • A 1-year-old boy was found wandering in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, after his mother overdosed in a car, WPXI learned. Police said the boy’s mother, Marissa Bailey, overdosed on Harrison Street. The boy was then able to get out of the car and wander around. >> Read more trending news  Video surfaced on social media of police and paramedics responding to the scene where Bailey was found slumped over. “If this isn’t a lesson to her, well then she’s in for a ruder awakening. She might not be so lucky next time, and my grandson might not be so lucky either,” Terri Letner, the boy’s paternal grandmother, said. “It just broke my heart, and I haven’t been able to keep myself together since.” Bailey is charged with endangering the welfare of a child. Police said she admitted to being on heroin and crack, and she hadn't slept in three days. WPXI learned that drug charges were filed in June 2014 against Bailey by Glassport police. She pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and was sentenced to six months’ probation.
  • A Delta Air Lines passenger was asked to exit the plane after he urgently had to use the lavatory when the plane was getting ready for takeoff, and a fellow passenger recorded the incident on video, according to an account in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. >> Read more trending news  According to an article by columnist Jim Stingl, the flight was getting ready to depart from Atlanta to Milwaukee on April 18 when passenger Kima Hamilton tried to use the restroom. A flight attendant told him the plane would lose its place in line for takeoff, so he returned to his seat. But he still had to go, and quickly went to the restroom. That’s when the pilot said the flight would have to return to the gate and remove a passenger. When two agents asked him to exit the plane, Hamilton refused. Then all of the passengers were “escorted off the plane,” and all passengers except him were allowed to reboard. In a written statement, Delta said: “Our flight crews are extensively trained to ensure the safety and security of all customers. It is imperative that passengers comply with crew instructions during all phases of flight, especially at the critical points of takeoff and landing.” Read more about the incident here.
  •  The White House unveiled a broad outline Wednesday for a dramatically simpler tax code that could lead to lower tax bills for many ordinary taxpayers but also eliminate many of the tax deductions that Americans currently claim.   President Trump's plan, which did not include many details, could cut taxes for some middle and high-income families, parents,and also reduce taxes for businesses large and small. The plan would also substantially increase the standard deduction, which reduces a person's taxable income, and would eliminate some common tax deductions such as those used to offset medical costs or state and local taxes.   Until more details are known, it is difficult to know exactly how some taxpayers will fare. The White House will need to work with Congress on the final plan, which could look very different if lawmakers push back against some of the proposed changes.   Here is a look at some of the major changes that could affect you:   Larger standard deduction would mean lower tax bills.   The plan calls for doubling the standard deduction that people can claim on their income tax returns, which would lower tax bills for some taxpayers and lead to a much simpler tax filing process for others. Under the proposal, married couples filing jointly would not owe income taxes on the first $24,000 of income (up from $12,600).   Gary Cohn, the director of Trump's National Economic Council, told reporters Wednesday that the higher standard deduction means that fewer people will have to file itemized deductions to reduce their taxable income, which could lead to a simpler tax return.   Most tax deductions are going away.   All individual tax deductions would be eliminated, with the exception of deductions related to home ownership and charitable contributions, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said at the briefing Wednesday.   Under that scenario, taxpayers would no longer be able to write off expenses now commonly deducted, such as state and local property taxes and medical expenses. The White House will have to work with Congress to finalize the details of the plan, and it's not clear if lawmakers will be willing to eliminate some of the deductions that may be popular in their home states.   Fewer tax brackets.   The proposal would simplify the system to go from seven tax brackets to three brackets of 10 percent, 25 percent and 35 percent. Currently, tax brackets range from 10 percent to 39.6 percent. High earning taxpayers could see an immediate tax break on their income taxes, while low-income families may not feel much of a change, says Alan Cole, an economist with the Tax Foundation, a conservative think tank. However, the proposal did not disclose the income ranges for the new tax brackets.   Bigger tax breaks for parents.   The plan calls for increasing the tax benefits available to families paying for child and dependent care costs, such as day care, but few details were provided. Trump is considering raising the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit, a tax break that currently allows parents to reduce their tax bills by up to $2,100, based on how much they spend on child care.   The approach would be different from Trump's earlier plan, which was criticized as an approach that would mostly benefit higher earners. That plan would have allowed parents to deduct the cost of child care from their income, which would not have provided much tax savings to lower-income families that don't owe much in income taxes.  Reduced taxes on the wealthy.   The plan calls for eliminating two key taxes that traditionally affect higher earners: the alternative minimum tax and the estate tax. The alternative minimum tax is intended to prevent high earners from being able to avoid all income taxes but can also affect middle-income taxpayers.   The estate tax, which is also known as the death tax, affects people who inherit wealth or businesses worth more than about $5.5 million. Some people struggle to pay tax bills owed on money and assets they inherit from family members, Cohn said.   Lower tax rate for business owners.   Some small and family-run businesses are subject to individual income tax rates, which are currently as high as 39.6 percent. Under the president's plan, they would pay a lower rate of 15 percent. Mnuchin said the administration would include provisions to keep wealthy business owners of large companies from taking advantage of the lower rate, but did not offer details.
  • While you can’t buy much for one cent, a copper penny from 1943 could actually buy you a lot. In the same way that some 1970 quarters are worth a lot of money, 1943 copper pennies are some of the most valuable coins out there.  Prior to 1982, all pennies were made out of solid copper with the exception of one year. In 1943, the United States was in the midst of World War II and decided to strictly regulate copper in order to preserve the metal for the war effort. Therefore, the country began creating all new pennies out of steel instead. Despite the mandate, however, there were a few mistakes, and a number of pennies were made out of copper.  RELATED: An Oklahoma woman learned a very valuable lesson after hot pennies led to this painful injury  These rare 1943 copper pennies are worth a lot of money. One in good condition could even be worth around $85,000! A mint-condition, untouched 1943 copper penny might be worth a great deal more, and even one in poor condition could still be worth a good chunk of change.  Unfortunately for the steel pennies, they ran into many problems including rusting, being mistaken for dimes and being magnetic. After the experiment, the government returned to making pennies out of copper. In the years after 1982, the rising cost of copper caused us to change the material we use to make pennies again. Thus, modern pennies only have a copper veneer.  So if you happen across any copper pennies dated 1943, use a magnet to make sure they’re the real deal. If there’s no magnetic pull, then you’ve got a winner!  RELATED: Have loose change lying around? You’ll want to search for this quarter when you find out how much it’s worth
  • United Airlines has announced “substantial” policy changes following the recent incident aboard a recent flight when a passenger was dragged off the plane. “The changes are the result of United’s thorough examination of its policies and procedures, and commitment to take action, in the wake of the forced removal of a customer aboard United Express Flight 3411 on April 9,” the statement on the airline’s website read. The airline says they will now limit law enforcement to safety and security issues. It will also not require customers seated on the plane to give up their seat involuntarily unless it poses a safety or security risk. Customer compensation incentives for voluntarily giving up their original seats will be increased up to $10,000. The full list of changes is below: Limit use of law enforcement to safety and security issues only. Not require customers seated on the plane to give up their seat involuntarily unless safety or security is at risk. Increase customer compensation incentives for voluntary denied boarding up to $10,000. Establish a customer solutions team to provide agents with creative solutions such as using nearby airports, other airlines or ground transportations to get customers to their final destination. Ensure crews are booked onto a flight at least 60 minutes prior to departure. Provide employees with additional annual training. Create an automated system for soliciting volunteers to change travel plans. Reduce the amount of overbooking. Empower employees to resolve customer service issues in the moment. Eliminate the red tape on permanently lost bags by adopting a “no questions asked” policy on lost luggage. The CEO of United Airlines, Oscar Muniz, said in the statement, “Every customer deserves to be treated with the highest levels of service and the deepest sense of dignity and respect. Two weeks ago, we failed to meet that standard and we profoundly apologize. However, actions speak louder than words. Today, we are taking concrete, meaningful action to make things right and ensure nothing like this ever happens again.” On April 9, Dr. David Dao was speaking to security personnel who told him to deplane after the airline overbooked the flight. In a video of the incident taken by a fellow passenger, Dao could be heard telling personnel, “I won’t go, I’m a physician I have to work tomorrow, 8 o’clock…” After the officer on board told Dao they’d have to “drag” him off, the 69-year-old doctor responded by saying he flew from Los Angeles and would “rather go to jail” than be forced to depart the plane. “You’d rather go to jail than just get off?” questions the officer. Another video of the incident taken later shows Dao bloodied and bruised as officials with the Chicago Department of Aviation dragged him through the aisle of the aircraft.