ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
67°
Few Clouds
H 78° L 59°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    67°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 78° L 59°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    73°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 78° L 59°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    60°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 86° L 58°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

NHL sued by former players over head injuries

First the National Football League, and now the National Hockey League. Ten former NHL players have filed a class-action lawsuit against the league for failing to protect players from head-related injuries. 

The complaint claims the NHL actively and purposefully concealed the severe risks associated with head injuries sustained from body checking and fights that can lead to brain impairment down the road. (ESPN)

It reads: "Many of the players, including Plaintiffs, sustained repetitive brain injuries while in the NHL and now suffer from latent or manifest neuro-degenerative disorders or diseases, all of which, in whole or in part, were caused by the NHL’s acts and/or omissions.” (Via New York Daily News)

The lawsuit mirrors legal action take by more than 4,500 former pro football players against the National Football League. 

That lawsuit, which contained similar language about the NFL failing to warn players about the long-term dangers of repeated head hits, ended in August after the NFL agreed to pay $765 million to settle the hundreds of cases. (Via PBS)

ESPN explains the NHL lawsuit " ... accuses the league of promoting a 'culture of violence,' in which players are praised for their fighting and 'head-hunting' skills."

And the attorney for the players says the league's refusal to outlaw "bare-knuckle fighting and body-checking" is at the center of the problem. (Via NESN)

"Instead, the NHL prefers to continue employing and glorifying 'enforcers,' players whose primary role is to fight and violently body-check opposing players." (Via USA Today)

The NHL says they're aware of the legal action, and Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly released this statement on behalf of the league.

" ... we are completely satisfied with the responsible manner in which the League and the Players' Association have managed Player safety over time, including with respect to head injuries and concussions.  We intend to defend the case vigorously and have no further comment at this time." (Via SB Nation)

The lawsuit involves players who in the league during the 70s, 80s, and 90s, including Rick Vaive, Gary Leeman and Curt Bennett. The NHL did not institute a concussion program until 1997 and did not start enforcing strict concussion protocols until 2011. 

- See more at newsy.com.  http://www.newsy.com/videos/nhl-sued-by-former-players-over-head-injuries/#sthash.pcM9SkhT.dpuf

 

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Authorities say former 'Happy Days' star Erin Moran likely died from cancer at her southern Indiana home. A statement released Monday by the Harrison County Sheriff's Department says an autopsy revealed the 56-year-old actress had stage-four cancer, but doesn't specify what type. The department says Moran died Saturday in the rural community of New Salisbury, about 20 miles northwest of Louisville, Kentucky. Officials say standard toxicology test results are pending but that no illegal narcotics were found at the home. A Burbank, California, native, Moran began acting in TV and movies before she was 10 years old. In 1974, she was cast in 'Happy Days' as Joanie Cunningham, the kid sister to high school student Richie Cunningham, played by Ron Howard.
  • While President Donald Trump seems never to be at a loss for words, both spoken and tweeted, a linguistics professor at Georgetown University says there is one phase that does seem to crop up in his public speaking more often than others.  “Believe me” is the most common two-word phrase the president has used in public in his almost 100-day administration, according to a story from CNN. The network asked Georgetown linguistics professor Jennifer Sclafani to study Trump’s remarks during the past three months. Sclafani said she found that Trump said “believe me” 26 times in speeches since his inauguration. 'Trump doesn't bother to get bogged down by details,' Sclafani told CNN after studying the president’s speech patterns. 'He presents himself as a visionary type of leader, focused solely on his vision for the future of the country.' Click here to read the entire story.
  • It could be called the Ten Commandments of Major League Baseball, even though it’s 74 pages long. Or perhaps, since it has just been discovered, it could be baseball’s version of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Regardless, the 1876 “Founding Documents and Original Constitution of Major League Baseball” are a valuable piece of sports memorabilia. The documents will go on sale May 24 in online bidding sponsored by SCP Auctions, Sports Collectors Daily reported. The artifact is a handwritten document that officials from California-based SCP Auctions claim is of “unprecedented historical significance.” The contents became part of baseball’s early bylaws, but the location of the original documents had been a mystery. They had been in the possession of the family of a longtime National League executive and had been passed down through the generations, Sports Collectors Daily reported. “This is a huge revelation,” SCP Auctions Vice President Dan Imler told USA Today. “This is not a document that has made the rounds publicly. It’s never been exhibited in a major institution. It’s never been sold previously in a prior auction. It has never appeared anywhere.” The baseball constitution continues a trend of originating documents that have come to auction. In 2016, SCP Auctions sold a set of 1857 documents representing the original rules of baseball for $3.26 million on auction, Sports Collectors Daily reported. James Naismith’s original 13-page “Rules of Basket Ball” sold for $4.34 million in 2010 by Sotheby’s to a consortium put together by Josh Swade, who chronicled his quest in his 2013 book, “The Holy Grail of Hoops One Fan’s Quest to Buy the Original Rules of Basketball,” and in an ESPN documentary. The SCP auction for the baseball constitution documents will close on June 10.
  • New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said the city would begin to take down the first of four Confederate monuments early Monday, Fox News reported, while a group that sued the city to halt the action held a vigil in protest. The Liberty Monument, erected in 1891, is an obelisk that commemorates the Crescent City White League, which tried to overthrow a biracial government in New Orleans after the Civil War. Landrieu called the Liberty Monument “the most offensive of the four” and said it was erected to “revere white supremacy,” Fox News reported. “If there was ever a statue that needed to be taken down, it’s that one,” Landrieu said. Meanwhile, the Monumental Task Committee began holding a vigil at midnight at the Jefferson Davis statue, WWL reported. Landrieu has begun reviewing a bid for the removal of the Davis, Robert E. Lee and P.G.T. Beauregard statues, WWL reported. A City Hall spokesman issued a statement Sunday, saying that the city is “committed to taking down the Confederate monuments.” 
  • It’s been two years since Broken Arrow High School released a Lip Dub video. The 2017 video was well worth the wait. The video had nearly 20,000 views after just a few days online.