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Officials believe that a man mowed down several pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer at the Parliament building Wednesday, BBC News reported.
  • Three days after a GOP health care bill melted down in the U.S. House before a vote, the White House said President Trump is not giving up on his desire to overhaul the Obama health law, as Republicans in the Congress also urged the President to keep pushing ahead on major health insurance changes. “I don’t think it’s dead,” said White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said of the failed GOP health bill, which foundered even after repeated efforts by the President to twist the arms of reluctant Republican lawmakers. “We’re at the beginning of a process. I don’t think we’ve seen the end of health care,” Spicer added, labeling the Obama health law, “an abysmal failure.” Spicer said the White House is currently going through a post-mortem on what went right and what wrong in their effort, as he said members of both parties in Congress had already reached out to both the White House and Mr. Trump about finding some common ground on health care policy. Spicer: Trump has received calls from Republicans and Democrats offering to work with him to improve health care https://t.co/ZQHMnWGI3O — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) March 27, 2017 On Capitol Hill, both parties were still sifting through the embers of the GOP health care bill, which was yanked off the House floor on Friday afternoon before a final vote, clearly short on support, as it divided Republicans along several fault lines. For many GOP lawmakers, the idea of giving up after just 18 days of work on health care changes, was not an option. “We cannot walk away now, without even a vote,” said Rep. Luke Messer (R-IN), a junior member of the House GOP leadership, said on the House floor. “I will continue to fight for a conservative bill to repeal Obamacare and rebuild a people-first health care system,” said Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC). But there was no immediate signal on whether the White House or GOP leaders in Congress would look to tinker with the failed health bill of last week, or maybe start to develop a new plan.
  • Sixteen months after he declared a state of emergency on homelessness, Seattle's mayor is asking voters in this liberal, affluent city for $55 million a year in new taxes to fight the problem. But some are pushing back, saying the city already spends millions to combat homelessness, and things appear to have gotten worse, not better. In making his case, Mayor Ed Murray says the problem has grown exponentially and federal and state help is unlikely. He wants voters to support a proposed ballot initiative that would increase property taxes to raise $275 million over five years for homeless services - almost doubling what Seattle spends each year. Supporters say current resources haven't been enough to stem the rising tide of people on the streets, and the proposed levy will provide more housing for those who need it most. 'This is a city that's not going to wait for a dysfunctional federal government to show up and do something - because lives are being lost,' Murray said at a recent news conference. The mayor, who is up for re-election, would be on the same ballot as the tax initiative if backers gather enough signatures to qualify it for the August election. City voters have approved three property tax increases in as many years to pay for affordable housing, preschools and buses, on top of other taxes, and some say the higher bills are pricing out working- and middle-class families. Others are demanding accountability.
  • Democrats used rules on the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday to force a one week delay in a vote on the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court, as Democratic opponents sent mixed signals on whether or not they would lead an all-out filibuster against President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. The delay by Democrats – which they can do only once before the Judiciary Committee – also included two other top nominations by President Trump to the Justice Department. All three of those nominees are expected to gain committee approval next week. BREAKING: Democrats force one-week delay in committee vote on Supreme Court nominee, choice still on track with GOP support. — AP Politics (@AP_Politics) March 27, 2017
  • Democrats used rules on the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday to force a one week delay in a vote on the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court, as Democratic opponents sent mixed signals on whether or not they would lead an all-out filibuster against President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. The delay by Democrats – which they can do only once before the Judiciary Committee – also included two other top nominations by President Trump to the Justice Department. All three of those nominees are expected to gain committee approval next week – from there, it is on to the Senate floor. BREAKING: Democrats force one-week delay in committee vote on Supreme Court nominee, choice still on track with GOP support. — AP Politics (@AP_Politics) March 27, 2017 For now, a number of Democrats are making clear that they will try to block the Gorsuch nomination, once it reaches the U.S. Senate floor – but it’s not clear if all Democrats will join that move. “As of now I do not believe I can support Judge Gorsuch,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), a former chairman of the Senate Judiciary panel. But Leahy left himself some wiggle room on a filibuster. I am never inclined to filibuster a SCOTUS nom. But I need to see how Judge Gorsuch answers my written Qs, under oath, before deciding. — Sen. Patrick Leahy (@SenatorLeahy) March 27, 2017 Democrats are still angry about Republicans blocking action last year on President Barack Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland for the U.S. Supreme Court. If they stick together, they could deny the GOP 60 votes on the floor of the Senate, and bottle up the Gorsuch nomination. Some in the GOP have threatened to “go nuclear” and change the Senate rules to get rid of the 60 vote threshold for Supreme Court nominees, as has been done for all other Presidential nominees.