ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
73°
Partly Cloudy
H 84° L 63°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    73°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 84° L 63°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    84°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 84° L 63°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    84°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 88° L 65°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Sports
Dan Marino withdraws from concussion lawsuit against NFL
Close

Dan Marino withdraws from concussion lawsuit against NFL

Dan Marino withdraws from concussion lawsuit against NFL
Photo Credit: Richard Graulich
Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino shakes hands with former players before the Cincinnati Bengals Miami Dolphins at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens on October 31, 2013. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)

Dan Marino withdraws from concussion lawsuit against NFL

Dan Marino’s concussion-related lawsuit against the NFL is ending.

Marino issued a statement Tuesday saying he never intended to be among 15 ex-players added to a suit filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia that claims the league was negligent and careless in its treatment of head trauma.

Marino’s statement, sent to Sports Illustrated’s Peter King, confirmed a report by the South Florida Sun Sentinel that Marino, 52, wanted his name promptly removed. Marino said contrary to the suit, he is not suffering from head injuries from his 17 years as the Dolphins’ quarterback.

“Within the last year, I authorized a claim to be filed on my behalf just in case I needed future medical coverage to protect me and my family in the event I later suffered from the effects of head trauma,” Marino said. “In so doing I did not realize I would be automatically listed as a plaintiff in a lawsuit against the NFL.”

The abrupt change conjures memories of 2004, when Marino was Dolphins senior vice president of football operations for 22 days before deciding it wasn’t for him. Marino’s involvement in this suit reached Day 5 on Tuesday.

>> Read more trending stories

It remains unclear how Marino’s involvement in the suit would have affected his chances of landing a front-office job with the Dolphins. Or if his pursuit of such a role caused him to pull out of the suit so quickly.

Former Dolphins players O.J. McDuffie and Keith Sims have been plaintiffs in injury suits and both have broadcast roles with the club, but Marino’s potential role might be higher profile.

Stuart Ratzan, a Miami attorney who represents McDuffie in his pending case against team doctor John Uribe, said Marino dropping out shouldn’t damage the plaintiffs’ case.

“For a brief moment, I think it could hurt on purely a public-relations level,” Ratzan said. But from a legal standpoint, “That will be decided by a jury, on its merits, not on whether Dan Marino was once a plaintiff,” Ratzan added.

Marino’s history with concussions was limited, especially compared to former San Francisco quarterback Steve Young, whose head trauma forced him to retire. Young and Marino entered the Hall of Fame in 2005. Young is an active NFL broadcaster, as is former Dallas QB Troy Aikman, another Hall of Famer. Aikman also has a history of concussions but like Young has not sued the league. Marino was dropped from CBS’ pre-game show following the 2013 season.

Former quarterback Boomer Esiason said there’s “a new cottage industry” consisting of lawyers trying to coax former players into suing the NFL.

“There is a very large incentive for lawyers to try to get guys like Dan or myself to get involved, to try to use our name,” Esiason said on his CBS Radio show.

Defense lawyers likely would have called attention to an interview Marino gave to Yahoo.com in 2013.

“When I went out there to play I knew there was a chance I could get a concussion or I could break a leg or get a knee injury,” Marino said. “I really do believe they’re protecting the players as much as they can right now.”

The best-documented case of Marino suffering a concussion occurred in September 1992, when he threw a touchdown pass to Fred Banks with 2:15 left in Seattle. After the game, Marino could not recall the play or that the Dolphins had won.

Later that season, Marino outlined the five greatest hits he had absorbed, including the time in 1983 when the New York Jets’ Joe Klecko “rung my bell pretty good” on a sack. Marino also cited a 1989 game against Indianapolis when he was shaken up and threw for only 150 yards, plus a 1985 game against New England in which Andre Tippett hit him underneath the chin, causing Marino to bite his tongue.

Priding himself as an ironman, Marino started 95 consecutive games beginning in 1987, which is fourth on the club’s all-time list. In 1992, he said the streak reassured teammates they can count on him and may have made them play harder for him.

Columnist Mike Freeman had written for Bleacher Report on Tuesday that Marino entering the suit was a game-changer. Freeman wrote that the public no longer could assume plaintiffs were limited to “just a bunch of bitter old men” or broke former players.

“There is now an increased level of credibility,” Freeman had written. “Marino’s name won’t be so easy for the skeptics to dismiss. In effect, he has armored the plaintiffs in this case better than they could have ever dreamed.”

That armor is no more.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

  • Responding to concerns about personal security for lawmakers after last week’s gun attack at a Congressional baseball practice, U.S. House leaders are moving to provide extra money to members for protection back home, as well as new funding to bolster the work of police and security officials on Capitol Hill. Under a plan approved by a House spending subcommittee on Friday, the Congress would provide an extra $7.5 million next year to the Capitol Police for an “increased security posture” around the Capitol, along with $5 million to the House Sergeant at Arms to help with security for lawmakers back in their districts. “We are taking a new fresh look at security,” said Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS), the Chairman of subcommittee that deals with funding for the Legislative Branch. Our FY18 Legislative Branch funding bill increases efficiency & transparency in Congress, enhances security for Members & our constituents. pic.twitter.com/FI36tF2XeH — Rep. Kevin Yoder (@RepKevinYoder) June 22, 2017 “The tragic events of June 14 weigh heavily on these deliberations,” said Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ), the Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, which could vote on the extra money as early as this next week. Also being put into motion is a separate plan to funnel an extra $25,000 to each member of the House – about $11 million in all – to help them increase security back in their districts. “The scariest part for us is there used to be this impression by the public that we all had security everywhere we went,” said Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH). “Now, everyone knows that isn’t the case,” Ryan added, as he lent his support to the extra funding for security as well. The money in this budget bill would not take effect until the new fiscal year – which starts October 1 – so, House leaders are ready to okay extra money immediately for members worried about security back in their districts. Roll Call newspaper reported that could be approved in coming days by the House Administration Committee. Yoder said Congressional leaders are also waiting to see if money raised in campaign contributions for House elections could be put to use for security as well. “Pending an FEC (Federal Election Commission) decision, we’re also looking at whether campaign funds could be used to continue to support security upgrades at personal residences,” Yoder added.
  • An unknown aged girl went to the hospital with burns to her legs, following an overnight house fire. KRMG’s told the fire started around 2:40 a.m., at a residence on West 50th Court North. The homeowner says he was able to get his daughter, grand daughter and sleeping brother out of the house. So far, firefighters haven't released a cause for the fire.  The homeowner believes fumes from a gas can in the garage may have cause the blaze.   
  • Multiple people had to be rescued early Saturday morning in Rogers County. OTEMS paramedics report a boat started to sink on Oologah Lake just after midnight. “Additional information was received that the boat had its nose in the air, four individuals were in the water, and only one was wearing a PDF (personal flotation device),” an official said. “A Rogers County Deputy spotted what might be the boat south of Winganon Bridge but was unable to determine the precise location. However it was located by the Northwest Water Rescue unit and at 0048 hours the rescue boat reported that it had located the victims and was loading the fourth individual into the boat.” KRMG’s told the victims were hanging onto the hull when they were found. So far, no injuries have been reported.  Officials also haven’t released any names.   We do know the Oklahoma Highway Patrol has taken over the investigation.  
  • Tulsa investigators are looking for a driver who fled the scene, after hitting a male pedestrian late Friday night. Police report the auto-pedestrian collision happened around 11:34 p.m., near East Admiral and North Yale. “The pedestrian victim has been declared deceased at this time,” police said.   Investigators don't have a description of the driver or the car.  Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.
  • We know this might start an argument, but according to Business Insider, Oklahoma's most famous band EVER is the Flaming Lips. Business Insider admits the song 'She Don't Use Jelly' is the Norman-based indie rockers only U.S. hit. But they say the band has had many hits in the U.K. and Europe and, even more impressive, three Grammys to their credit. Some on the list are hard to argue with, like Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band in New Jersey or Nirvana in Washington State. You can see the entire list of the most famous bands here.