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  • The “Crisco Cops” tried, but were unable to curb the enthusiasm of Philadelphia Eagles fans celebrating their first Super Bowl berth in 13 years. The Philadelphia Police Department, anticipating raucous fans, greased metal poles in the city with tubs of shortening, WPVI reported. It didn’t matter. Once the Eagles’ 38-7 victory against the Minnesota Vikings in Sunday’s NFC Championship game was official, fans took the streets to yell, honk horns, stand on cars -- and yes, climb up metal poles. Video captured one fan climbing a pole in Center City, WPVI reported. Before the game, the police had some fun with the situation. They tweeted, 'Now comes the time in the night where we must warn everyone about the dangers of saturated fats. Cheer for #Foles! Jeers for #Poles!” The Eagles will face the defending Super Bowl champion New England Patriots on Feb. 4 in Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis. They met in Super Bowl XXXIX, when the Patriots won 24-21 in Jacksonville, Florida.
  • In the third day of a government shutdown, the Senate moved Monday afternoon to approve a bill to fund the operations of the federal government, as Democrats dropped their opposition to a three week funding plan, accepting an assurance from Senate Republicans that there would be an upcoming debate on immigration issues involving illegal immigrants who were brought to this country at a young age by their parents. “The Trump shutdown will soon end,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer. The deal hinged on the pledge of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to bring a bill to the floor of the Senate dealing with DACA, illegal immigrant “Dreamers” and general immigration enforcement matters, if no deal is reached in negotiations by February 8. “I’m encouraged by the commitments that Leader McConnell has made,” said Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE), who joined other Democrats in supporting a move to re-open the federal government. “I’m confident that we can get the 60 votes needed in the Senate for a DACA bill,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, who said the process will be “neutral and fair to all sides.” One way to look at this: Dems wanted to prove to base/activists 1) They are willing to go to mat for DREAMers and 2) They're still in minority and only have so much leverage. With both done, and situation deteriorating, time turn the gov't back on. — Alex Seitz-Wald (@aseitzwald) January 22, 2018 “We have a way to address the fate of the Dreamers, instead of waiting until March,” Schumer added, referencing the March 5 deadline set by President Donald Trump for action in Congress on that subject. But even with this agreement, there is certainly no guarantee that Democrats will get a bill that they like on immigration – and no assurance that whatever gets approved by Senators will be voted on in the House. And there were quickly signs that Republicans would not cave to Democrats on the issue. “We’re not going to go through this charade again where Democrats shut down the government because they’re putting the interests of illegal immigrants and foreigners over American citizens,” said Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR).
  • Led by Rep. John Delaney of Maryland, several members of Congress asked for their pay to be withheld during the government shutdown, reported. >> Read more trending news “I don't think it's right for me to get paid during a government shutdown while my constituents are being furloughed and important and necessary services are being limited or halted all together,” Delaney, a Democrat, said in a statement. “It's time to be responsible and come together on a bipartisan deal to fund the government.” Delaney makes $174,000 annually, which is the base salary for members of Congress. According to Delaney’s spokesman, Will McDonald, Delaney will donate his pay to the Mercy Health Clinic in Gaithersburg, Maryland. It is the same clinic where he donated his salary during the 2013 government shutdown, CNN reported. Republican Reps. Rick Allen of Georgia and Mia Love of Utah tweeted Saturday that they also would not accept pay during the shutdown. Allen said in a tweet that he plans to donate the withheld pay.
  • Lawmakers in Congress on Sunday failed to reach a deal on plan to fund the federal government, meaning the work week will being with furloughs for hundreds of thousands of federal workers across the nation, but there was a hint of progress as a Senate vote on a temporary funding measure was delayed until noon on Monday, with Republican leaders offering a plan which would guarantee a Senate debate on immigration matters in February, in hopes that Democrats would then help to fund the government in the meantime. “Let’s step back from the brink,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on the Senate floor late on Sunday evening, as he urged Democrats to allow the government to re-open, and continue negotiations on a host of issues, including immigration. “The shutdown should stop today,” McConnell added. McConnell outlined a plan to fund operations of the government through February 8, and said that if by that date no agreement had been reached on how to deal with DACA and illegal immigrant “Dreamers” in the United States, then he would agree to bring the issue up on the Senate floor for debate and votes. That immediately won the support of two Republicans who have been trying to broker a deal on the issue. “The Senate should act like the Senate,” said Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), who endorsed the idea of regular order on the Senate floor on immigration. “This is more than a reasonable proposal by the Majority Leader,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who spent much of the last three days shuttling between McConnell, Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, and a host of Senators in both parties, in search of common ground. I'm very pleased to hear Majority Leader McConnell commit to the Senate that if we do not make a breakthrough on immigration by February 8th, the Senate will take the issue up under regular order. This is a more than reasonable proposal by the Majority Leader. — Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) January 22, 2018 “It would be my intention to resolve these issues as soon as possible, so we can move on to other issues important to our country,” McConnell added. But Senate Democrats were not ready to accept, as Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer objected to McConnell’s attempt to hold a vote Sunday night on the plan for a temporary budget that would last until February 8, which is just 18 days away. Still – Senate observers saw that as a positive, as neither McConnell nor Schumer engaged in any scorched earth exchanges, unlike earlier in the day. To some, that may mean a deal is in the works. Supporting notion that shifting 1a vote to Noon Monday indicates deal is attainable: McConnell/Schumer floor remarks were short and generally absent political grandstanding and attacks. Theoretically, a positive sign. — David M. Drucker (@DavidMDrucker) January 22, 2018 Originally, the Senate was to have voted at 1 am on Monday morning, but that vote was delayed until noon, as Republicans hope Democrats will re-think their opposition, and allow a funding measure to go through the Congress.
  • A 42-year-old man is dead following an auto-pedestrian collision Saturday night in Sand Springs. The fatality crash happened around 7:49 p.m. on Highway 97.  “Driver of the car that struck him, a 2002 Kia, along with witnesses reported that the pedestrian darted out in front of him going east through the intersection,” police said.   “The driver of the Kia was southbound in the inside lane and he had no time to react.” Police add 42-year-old Kevin Myers was pronounced dead at the scene.  No word on why he was trying to cross the road.