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Johnny Manziel's Pro Day was an all-out event

Texas A&M held a Pro Day Thursday.

Well, looking at the headlines, it’s maybe more accurate to say Johnny Manziel held a pro day Thursday.

And to probably no one’s surprise, he “dazzled” an impressive group of attendees. (Via USA Today)

>> Read more trending stories  

The former Heisman Trophy winner had 75 officials, representing 30 teams, watching his every move. Eight NFL head coaches showed up — five of which have picks in the top 10. Texas Governor Rick Perry dropped by. (Via Wikimedia Commons / Shutterbug459)

And Manziel’s new friend, the 41st President of the United States George H. W. Bush, met with the quarterback before he took the field. He jokes, “I could’ve used this helmet in my previous job.”(Via Twitter / @GeorgeHWBush)

Also, did we mention The Houston Texans have the #1 overall pick?

SB Nation writes, “The only things that could make this hootenanny any more Texas are a rodeo, Chuck Norris and Hank Hill.”

But let’s not take away from the focus of the event — Johnny Football.

Fox Sports reports, Manziel “lit it up completing 61-of-64 scripted throws. He also connected on his first 36 attempts.” And the incompletions were all reportedly catchable balls.

Bleacher Report highlights the biggest concerns surrounding Manziel at the moment, including his attitude, arm strength and size. He measured in a shade under six feet at the NFL combine in February.

Perhaps it’s that all-too-common critique that made Manziel want to ‘bulk up’ for the officials. He made the unusual decision to wear pads and a helmet at pro day. (Via Yahoo)

He tells ESPN, it just made more sense to throw in gear.

“Never seen anybody trot out on the field on Sundays when it’s time to play a game and have shorts and a t-shirt on.”

But even decked out in his custom-designed Nike gear, Manziel during pro day isn’t the same as Manziel during a game, according to WFAN’s Mike Francesa. (Via Twitter / @usnikefootball)

“Watching him in a drill. You’re not going to learn anything because he is as instinctive a player. He is as different a player as we’ve seen in a very long time.”

If by different he means “isn’t the prototypical NFL pocket passer”, this NBC Sports writer agrees. That said, he adds, “in May he’s likely to be a first-round draft pick, anointed some team’s franchise quarterback.”

And NFL quarterback Michael Vick can’t wait, saying “Manziel will be a star in the NFL.”

See more at newsy.com.

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