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Latest from Steve Berg

    Back to school time is a good time to remember safety. Safe Kids Tulsa has six safety tips. They say teach your kids early to put away their smart phone or tablet and look left, right, and left again when crossing streets. Tell them to stand three giant steps away from the curb when waiting for the bus and to board one at a time. If they carpool, make sure the car has the right safety seats for their age. Get the kids a medical check-up before they take part in sports. Remember to teach them to hydrate when they're playing. And check playground equipment for any dangerous defects.
  • If your wish list includes a trip to London to hear “Big Ben” chime, you'd better hurry. Because at Noon next Monday, the famous bell will be silenced until 2021, as the Elizabeth Tower where it resides gets some restoration. The Guardian newspaper says the nearly 14 ton bell has marked the hour almost non-stop for 157 years. It still uses the same elaborate, Victorian-era, gravity operated mechanism to sound the bell. It was silent for a couple of years between 1983 and 1985, also for refurbishment. You can read more about the story here.
  • A new study says smoking pot could increase your risk of dying from high blood pressure. But Business Insider says, like a lot of studies, this one comes with a few grains of salt. They say the study doesn't know how often the subjects used pot, only that they had tried it. And there's no way to know what was in the pot. Different strains of marijuana vary a lot and are of course mostly, if not completely, unregulated. But some say there is enough evidence to warrant more study of the drug's effect on the cardiovascular system, especially with recreational use being legalized in more and more places. You can read more about the study here.
  • Heads up, Broken Arrow people: The city wants to hear from YOU. Mainly, people on the south part of town, where the city has been making and is planning more infrastructure improvements to attract development. They say they want to address people's concerns about a retail and restaurant imbalance, compared to other parts of Broken Arrow. If you want to go, it's at 6 p.m. Tuesday August 22nd at South Broken Arrow Baptist Church at 7815 S. Elm Pl.
  • What's just as bad for your health as cigarettes and obesity? Scientists say, LONELINESS! In fact, Newser.com says a study shows social isolation is even WORSE than obesity. Psychologists looked at a combined 148 studies, involving 300,000 people and found that people who claim an active social life have a 50-percent lower risk of an early demise. They recommend teaching kids more social skills and coaching seniors on how to keep an active social life after retirement. You can read more about the story here.
  • Here in the U.S., many worry about guns. In the U.K., they're dealing with a growing number of 'acid attacks.' The Telegraph says in London alone, acid attacks went from 261 in 2015 to 454 last year. Since police started cracking down on knife-crime, they say many gang members have started carrying acid in water bottles and using it to attack rival gangs. Acid attacks are a common problems in Bangladesh, India, and Cambodia too. There are growing calls for legislation to address the problem. You can read more about the story here.
  • A new hotel on Manhattan's Lower East Side is giving neighbors an eyeful. The New York Post reports, according to people who live in the area, guests at the 28-story luxury hotel have a frequent habit of having sex with the blinds open. And not just in bed, but many times, up against the windows. One woman who lives in the apartment house across the streets worries her grandkids will see. Police say it doesn't violate any laws if the guests are indoors. A lot of neighbors have window air-conditioners which they say make it a pain to close their blinds to avoid the spectacle. One woman says it’s a frequent event, happening several times a week. You can read more about the story here.
  • It might sound like science fiction, but the U.S. Air Force is training for battles in outer space. Seeker.com says one of the primary goals for the the 26th and 527th Space Aggressor Squadrons, which train in Colorado in mock battles, is to defend the military's Global Positioning System, made up of 31 satellites. GPS is of course crucial for everything from navigating ships to targeting missiles.  One general testified in a recent Senate hearing that adversaries like China and Russia are devoting a lot of time and effort to lasers, rail guns, and microwave weapons designed to take out satellites. He says they're not doing that for the peaceful use of outer space. You can read more about the story here.
  • For these folks, the glass is often 'half-empty'. Forbes found the 10 jobs with the Most Pessimistic Employees. The top two, dietetic technician and laundry & dry cleaning workers, can most likely be chalked up to low pay. But money isn't everything apparently. The next two, materials scientist and nuclear engineer, have relatively high salaries. Welders, postal carriers, social workers, geoscientists, fabric & apparel patternmakers, and team assemblers round out the top 10. There were basically just two questions in the survey: How do you feel about your salary?  And how do you feel about your employer's future? You can read more about the story here.
  • So who's in the mood for some fried chicken? The website Business Insider was apparently, because they did a taste test at four top chicken chains: Popeye's, Church's, Chick-fil-A, and KFC. And that, by the way, is the order they ranked. The site says Popeye's was the clear winner with the best chicken and tastiest breading. They say Church's and Chick-Fil-A were pretty evenly matched, saying Church's has better chicken and Chick-Fil-A better breading. But they ultimately gave Church's the edge because it has chicken on the bone and Chick-fil-A does not. KFC, they say, is a distant fourth with dry chicken and bland batter. You can read more about the taste test here.
  • Steve Berg

     Steve Berg joined AM 740 and FM 102.3 Newstalk KRMG in the fall of 2008 and currently anchors the news segments of The KRMG Evening News. Born at St. Francis Hospital (the exact year is not important for our purposes here) and raised in the Brookside neighborhood, Steve is proud to call himself a native Tulsan. Steve is a graduate of Tulsa Edison High School and Oklahoma State University. His first job in broadcasting was at KOSU-FM radio in Stillwater. He then spent roughly 16 years in television, with stints in Pocatello, Idaho, Lansing, Michigan, and at KOTV in Tulsa, before turning his attention back to radio and his current job at KRMG.Steve has won multiple awards for his reporting during his career, most recently in 2010 from the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters in the Feature Series and General News categories.In his free time, Steve enjoys running, snow skiing, reading, video games, movies, TV, trying out new one-of-a-kind restaurants and spending time with friends and family.

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  • Going against his own gut feeling that he should pull military forces out of Afghanistan, President Donald Trump on Monday night vowed to intensify American actions against terrorists based in the region, though he gave few details on how U.S. policy would change or on how many more soldiers would be sent in, as the American presence in Afghanistan seems likely to continue, almost 16 years since the September 11 attacks that led to a lengthy U.S. intervention. “My original instinct was to pull out, and historically I like following my instincts, but all of my life I heard that decisions are much different when you sit behind the desk in the Oval Office,” the President acknowledged in a speech from Fort Myer, located just across the Potomac River from the White House. “A hasty withdrawal would create a vacuum that terrorists – including ISIS and Al Qaeda – would instantly fill, just as happened before September 11th,” Mr Trump added. The President gave no details in his speech on his decision to reportedly send more troops to Afghanistan, though it would be nowhere near the levels the U.S. had in the immediate aftermath of the Nine Eleven attacks. Here is the President’s speech.
  • The sexual assault and murder of an 11-year-old girl near Shiprock, New Mexico, has reignited the debate. Ashlynne Mike's mother is urging the Navajo Nation to opt in to the death penalty, particularly for crimes that involve children. Southwestern tribe has long objected to putting people to death. The culture teaches that all life is precious. Tribes have been able to opt into the death penalty for certain federal crimes on tribal land for decades, but nearly all reject it. Legal experts say the decision goes back to culture and tradition, past treatment of American Indians and fairness in the justice system. One federally recognized tribe, the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma, has opted in.  
  • Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese torpedoes.  The sinking of the Indianapolis remains the Navy's single worst loss at sea. The fate of its crew - nearly 900 were killed, many by sharks, and just 316 survived - was one of the Pacific war's more horrible and fascinating tales.  The expedition crew of Research Vessel Petrel, which is owned by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, says it located the wreckage of the Indianapolis on the floor of the North Pacific Ocean, more than 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) below the surface, the U.S. Navy said in a news release Saturday. 'To be able to honor the brave men of the USS Indianapolis and their families through the discovery of a ship that played such a significant role in ending World War II is truly humbling,' Allen said in the news release. The Indianapolis, with 1,196 sailors and Marines on board, was sailing the Philippine Sea between Guam and Leyte Gulf when two torpedoes from a Japanese submarine struck just after midnight on July 30, 1945.  It sank in 12 minutes, killing about 300. Survivors were left in the water, most of them with only life jackets.  There was no time to send a distress signal, and four days passed before a bomber on routine patrol happened to spot the survivors in the water.  By the time rescuers arrived, a combination of exposure, dehydration, drowning and constant shark attacks had left only one-fourth of the ship's original number alive.
  • Monday marks the first time in nearly 100 years that a total solar eclipse will be visible from the continental U.S.  >> Read more trending news The 10 best locations to watch the eclipse across the country can be found here, but if getting to one of those cities isn’t possible, NASA is hosting two four-hour live-streams covering the event. NASA’s live coverage will begin at 11:45 a.m. ET.  Watch NASA’s live streams below. >> Solar eclipse 2017: What time does it start; how long does it last; glasses; how to view it Debbie Lord contributed to this report.
  • The August 21 Great American Solar Eclipse will be the first total solar eclipse to stretch coast to coast in the continental United States in 99 years. Humans are expected to react with amazement when the thin path of totality, or total eclipse, passes through portions of 14 states, but what about their pets? RELATED: The ultimate guide to the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse this August Dogs and cats will be affected by the eclipse much less than wildlife, according to Russell McLendon, science editor for Mother Nature Network. But there are still important things to know about how the solar eclipse could affect dogs and cats, including safety measures responsible owners should take.  Here are five of the most important things to know about how the solar eclipse could affect your pet: Cats and dogs may not notice the solar eclipse much.  Many wild animals may mistake solar eclipses for twilight, McLendon wrote in MNN. Crickets and frogs may jump start their evening chorus, diurnal animals might quiet down and even nocturnal animals like bats and owls might be lured into activity in the eclipse's totality.  While they can't anticipate the eclipse phenomena like humans who read about it ahead of time, family pets are unlikely to have a primeval reaction to the eclipse like their wild animal relatives. They react differently, because their daily routines are influenced by human schedules as well as sunlight levels, McLendon reported. RELATED: Can’t find eclipse glasses anywhere? Make these DIY pinhole cameras, projectors instead Pets may still become fearful during the eclipse.  More than the darkness of the solar eclipse, pets may be apprehensive about the crowds that gather to view it, according to Lloyd Nelson, an Illinois animal-control officer interviewed by the Southern Illinoisan. Be aware that your dog or cat could get spooked by solar eclipse-inspired events that involve crowds of people, whether you take a pet with you to a viewing spot or it's near your home.  'It's sort of like the Fourth of July, but tripled,' said Nelson. 'We are going to have concerts, people shooting off fireworks in the dark of the midday sun, loud noises and strangers.'  Just as you do during firework holidays, make sure your pet is either safe inside for the eclipse or on a leash and under careful watch. Pets can suffer 'eclipse blindness.' One thing we do have in common with our pets is that human, canine and feline eyes can all suffer from 'eclipse blindness' when safe precautions are not taken during the eclipse viewing. During the eclipse, as the moon's shadow starts to block the sun's light, some of the sun's fiery disk will still be visible, according to LiveScience.com . A view of that light can literally burn any eyes, human or cat or dog, that look up at it.  RELATED: A solar eclipse can blind you — here’s how to stay safe during August’s Great American Eclipse The condition, commonly called 'eclipse blindness,' happens when the sun's powerful rays burn sensitive photoreceptor cells in the retina. It usually results in blurred vision and other vision loss instead of complete blindness, since humans and animals ordinarily turn away before complete blindness occurs. Pet's don't necessarily need glasses, but it wouldn't hurt. Space.com's safe viewing recommendations for humans include proper eye protection from NASA-approved eclipse glasses, along with strict warnings against trying to view the partial eclipse with a camera or telescope. Whether your dog or cat also needs the glasses is up for debate in the scientific community. Mike Reynolds, an astronomy professor at Floriday State College in Jacksonville, Florida, told LiveScience.com that it's best to outfit pets who will be out during the eclipse with protective glasses. Another expert quoted in the article wasn't as concerned. 'On a normal day, your pets don't try to look at the sun, and therefore don't damage their eyes,' said Angela Speck, director of astronomy and a professor of astrophysics at the University of Missouri. 'And on this day, they're not going to do it, either,' Animal lovers can help with worldwide research. While it's unlikely that your dog or cat will have a remarkable reaction to the Great American Eclipse, pet lovers might enjoy observing how animals in the wild or even the neighborhood do unusual things. Previous eclipses worldwide have involved reports of night birds singing, bats flying, spiders tearing down webs or owls calling, according to a report in the Southern Illinoisan. But because total solar eclipses are so infrequent, scientists have little beyond anecdotal evidence of animal behavior, Rebecca Johnson, citizen science research coordinator at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, told the paper. To remedy the dearth of research, the academy created a 'Life Responds' project where citizens all over the world download the iNaturalist app from Apple or Android platforms and document the plant and animal reactions they see during the eclipse. To join in the fun, download the iNaturalist app, make an account and practice making observations before the eclipse using the project 'Getting Started' guide.