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Latest from Steve Berg

    Some people just never get tired of trying to prove the Moon landing was a hoax. This time, it's a video that was uploaded to YouTube and has gotten around a million views. Newsweek reports the uploader, looking at an old photo from the Apollo 17 mission, claims to have spotted a person not wearing a spacesuit in the reflection of the helmet visor of an Astronaut walking on the moon. But some commenters say it looks just like another astronaut to them. And some point out that these days, just about anyone with simple software can convincingly alter a photo. You can look at the photo in question here.
  • Here's one that's in the spirit of the holidays. Students at the soon-to-be closed St. Gregory's University are raising money for the school's faculty and staff. The Student Body President told Channel 5 in Oklahoma City, they might not be able to help the university's employees find a new job, but they can maybe help reduce some of the stress and help them buy Christmas presents for their families. The Shawnee-based school announced last week it will be closing after failing to get funding from the Department of Agriculture. The students have set up a GoFundMe page and got it started with whatever extra money that student clubs had. You can read more about the story here.
  • The U.S. Navy has been doing live-fire testing to see how well it can shoot down incoming ballistic missiles. And while they don't say explicitly they’re preparing for the kind that would be fired by North Korea, the story at NationalInterest.org points out this is just the kind of capability the U.S. would need if Kim Jong Un decides to launch missiles against South Korea or Japan. There were 3 key takeaways from the testing. They confirmed they can hit an incoming missile with two simultaneous rounds of the Navy's SM-6 missile, which increases the chance of destroying it. They showed they can hit the missile at a low altitude as it's making its final descent toward its target. And they're getting better at firing the defense missiles in rapid succession, in case Kim launches a barrage of missiles. You can read more about the story here.
  • TripAdvisor is now putting warning badges on its site for resorts that have had claims of rape and assault. Engadget reports the website came under fire after reports they deleted reviews from users who said they had been attacked at certain resorts, including the Grand Velas Riveria Maya, where a man says he was drugged and sexually assaulted by a massage therapist, and the Iberostar Paraiso Maya, where at least 3 women reported being raped. They did put one woman's review back up. The site reportedly issued a release saying it apologizes, but the reviewers say the site has not contacted any of them personally. The warning badges advise users there have been 'media reports or events' about the resort and that they may want to do more research. You can read more about the story here.
  • You can spot one of the most famous Star Wars props on Google Maps. It’s Han Solo’s favorite ride, the Millennium Falcon. Just type in “Barrow Hills Golf Club”, which the Sun reports is near Longcross Studios in Chertsey, a town 27 miles southwest of London, and if you're on satellite view, it won't take you long to spot the famous sci-fi ship, even though from the ground, they've got it surrounded by shipping containers to try to hide it. The next installment in the Star Wars franchise, the Last Jedi, comes out December 15th. You can read more about the story here.
  • If you need some extra money for Christmas, how about a Christmas JOB? Woman's Day has a list of 9 companies that are hiring seasonal workers. Target, they say, is hiring a whopping 100,000 temps!  UPS need 95,000 seasonal folks. Macy's 80,000. Michael's 15,000. JCPenney’s 40,000. Some, like Target, Michael’s and JCPenney's, will even give you and employee discount if you want to get hired on and THEN buy your stuff there. You can see the full list from Woman’s Day here.
  • Oklahoma is a little on the 'chunky' side. Okay, make that a LOT on the chunky side, ranked the 8th fattest state in the nation, according to WalletHub. In fact, in the category of food and exercise, we ranked as having the worst diet and exercise habits. The site looked at everything from the obvious like obesity rates, but also at the amount that obesity costs the nation in terms of healthcare. Try $200 billion a year. Not to mention the $68 billion that people spend on weight loss programs and products. Top three fattest are Mississippi, West Virginia, and Tennessee. Three least fat are Colorado, Massachusetts, and Utah. You can see the full list from WalletHub here.
  • A woman on a bicycle riding beside President Trump's motorcade, flips him off, and gets fired for it. 50-year-old Juli Briskman, a Democrat and mother of two, told the Huffington Post she had a gut reaction when the motorcade went by on the way to Mr. Trump's Virginia golf course, that she was upset about DACA, Obamacare, and Puerto Rico. A White House photographer caught the obscene gesture on camera. But her mistake may have been putting it on her Facebook and Twitter profiles. Says says her employer, Akima, a government contractor, told her that violated their social media policies and fired her. She'd worked there about 6 months. You can see the picture of the woman flipping off the President here.
  • So dogs really ARE man's best friend. The Times of London says British researchers did two studies. In one, they put up two fake fundraising campaigns, one for a sick dog and one for a sick human. And the dog got more money. In the other, they showed students fake newspaper stories about a baseball bat attack on a dog, a puppy, a baby human, and an 30-year human, and asked the students to rank their sympathy. The adult finished last. Only the baby could compete with the canines for caring. You can read more about the story here.
  • They call it a 'powerhouse,' a new satellite from the National Weather Service they say will improve forecasts. In just over a week, the Joint Polar Satellite System, or JPSS-1, will ride a NASA rocket into space and set up in a polar orbit, 514 miles up, circling the Earth 14 times a day. It's the first of four new satellites that meteorologists say will provide more accurate forecasts from three to seven days out and provide vital data on future hurricanes, floods, blizzards, and wildfires.
  • Steve Berg

     Steve Berg joined AM 740 and FM 102.3 Newstalk KRMG in the fall of 2008 and currently anchors the news segments of The KRMG Evening News. Born at St. Francis Hospital (the exact year is not important for our purposes here) and raised in the Brookside neighborhood, Steve is proud to call himself a native Tulsan. Steve is a graduate of Tulsa Edison High School and Oklahoma State University. His first job in broadcasting was at KOSU-FM radio in Stillwater. He then spent roughly 16 years in television, with stints in Pocatello, Idaho, Lansing, Michigan, and at KOTV in Tulsa, before turning his attention back to radio and his current job at KRMG.Steve has won multiple awards for his reporting during his career, most recently in 2010 from the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters in the Feature Series and General News categories.In his free time, Steve enjoys running, snow skiing, reading, video games, movies, TV, trying out new one-of-a-kind restaurants and spending time with friends and family.

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  • Jacksonville, Florida, officers say a man when he shot and killed a driver on I-95. >> Watch the news report here Police said 32-year-old Tyrell Brown was sleeping in the passenger seat of 25-year-old Steven Shawn Grady's car as they drove through Jacksonville on Sunday. The group was traveling from Orlando to North Carolina. At one point, Brown woke up and shot Grady in the face, a witness told police. The witness, who was in the backseat of the car, tried to gain control of the wheel. The car ran off the interstate and crashed near the Union Street exit around 3:15 a.m. >> Read more trending news  Officials said Brown violently resisted officers when they got to the scene. There was no indication of a prior altercation between Brown and Grady, officers said. A Jacksonville Sheriff's Office spokesperson said Brown smoked a cigarette dipped in formaldehyde and marijuana before the shooting. He was taken to UF Health Jacksonville for his safety, officers said. Brown is facing a murder charge. His next court date is Dec. 12.
  • After an eight-week special session, the House fell just five votes short of a tax-raising plan to stabilize state revenues. Once the special session was over, Governor Mary Fallin caught legislative leaders off guard when she vetoed a bill that would have closed a $215 million hole in the budget. The plan called for a combination of cuts to agency budgets and raids on state savings accounts. Gov. Fallin will soon ask the Oklahoma Legislature to return to the state Capitol.  Fallin spokesman Michael McNutt said Monday the governor is working to pin down potential dates and define the parameters of her special session call that will determine what kind of bills lawmakers can consider.
  • As the Oklahoma Blood Institute moves into the final stretch of its 40th anniversary year, it’s trying to get word out about what it does, and the need for extra help during the holidays. In those four decades, OBI has grown to become the ninth-largest non-profit blood center in the nation. OBI Recruitment Manager Kenda Burnham told KRMG Tuesday they serve about 90 percent of the hospitals in the state, and for most of them, are the only source of blood. “That includes all childrens’, all veterans’, and all Indian hospitals in the state,” she said. “We also supply St. Francis Health Systems, which is the largest user of blood here in northeast Oklahoma.” That requires a lot of donations. “It takes close to 1,200 donors every single day to ensure we meet the needs of patients all across our systems,” Burnham said. And that need does not go down during the holidays, but unfortunately donations often do. “Holidays are a little more challenging, because people just get out of their regular routine,” Burnham told KRMG. “People are busy doing other things, so sometimes they forget to take time to give blood. So we still have patients in those hospitals, no matter what day of the year it is, that are counting on life-saving blood donors.” The process takes about an hour for a standard donation, and she said most people actually qualify, even if they’ve traveled out of the country or had a tattoo. But only about one in ten who can donate, actually do. Anyone who can help is urged to visit the OBI website and make an appointment, or find a nearby blood drive.
  • The Massachusetts tribe whose ancestors shared a Thanksgiving meal with the Pilgrims nearly 400 years ago is reclaiming its long-lost language, one schoolchild at a time. “Weesowee mahkusunash,” says teacher Siobhan Brown, using the Wampanoag phrase for “yellow shoes” as she reads to a preschool class from Sandra Boynton’s popular children’s book “Blue Hat, Green Hat.” The Mukayuhsak Weekuw — or “Children’s House ” — is an immersion school launched by the Cape Cod-based Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, whose ancestors hosted a harvest celebration with the Pilgrims in 1621 that helped form the basis for the country’s Thanksgiving tradition. The 19 children from Wampanoag households that Brown and other teachers instruct are being taught exclusively in Wopanaotooaok, a language that had not been spoken for at least a century until the tribe started an effort to reclaim it more than two decades ago. The language brought to the English lexicon words like pumpkin (spelled pohpukun in Wopanaotooaok), moccasin (mahkus), skunk (sukok), powwow (pawaw) and Massachusetts (masachoosut), but, like hundreds of other native tongues, fell victim to the erosion of indigenous culture through centuries of colonialism.
  • A photo circulating on social media appears to show a Memphis Police Department officer . >> Watch the news report here The photo was posted on Saturday, and several viewers sent it to WHBQ. >> See the photo here Memphis police acknowledged the photo and issued the following statement: >> Read more trending news 'The officer in question has been identified, and an administrative investigation is underway. This behavior will not be tolerated, and I can assure you that corrective actions will be taken,' said Director Michael Rallings. 'This type of behavior does not represent the hardworking men and women of the Memphis Police Department.