ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
47°
Broken Clouds
H 76° L 54°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    47°
    Current Conditions
    Thunderstorms. H 76° L 54°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    72°
    Evening
    Thunderstorms. H 76° L 54°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    55°
    Morning
    Mostly Cloudy. H 70° L 44°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Steve Berg

    The CEO of a Connecticut-based marketing firm says job applicants must pass what he has dubbed the “snowflake test” before he will hire them.  In an interview with Stuart Varney on the Fox Business Network, Silent Partner Marketing CEO Kyle Reyes defined a snowflake as “somebody who is going to whine and complain and come to the table with nothing but an entitled attitude and an inability to back their perspective.” Some of the questions on the test include a job candidate’s position and beliefs on America, guns, and police. Reyes said he’s not worried about discrimination lawsuits because he believes the test is really just the same kind of personality assessment that companies do routinely in job interviews. He says roughly 60-percent of applicants have not passed his test. Click here to see the whole “Snowflake Test”.
  • We repeat, new emojis are on the way. Many people get very excited about new emoji, which in case you don't know, are the little smiley faces and other such pictographs people use in text messages. According to Emojipedia, they'll be released in June, but might take longer to show up on some operating systems, depending on when those are updated. Word is there will be 56 new ones, including a giraffe, a rock climber, a bearded man, a face with a monocle, and a face making the shush gesture with its finger, among others. What emoji do you think you need in your life? Send us an open mic on the KRMG app and tell us. Click here to see the full list of possible new emojis.
  • Lots of people seek the American Dream, but the NORWEGIAN Dream might not be bad either. The Associated Press says according to the World Happiness Report, Norway is the happiest country on Earth. And yes, part of the reason is money. Norway is a wealthy nation. But it's not the whole reason. The U.S. is obviously pretty wealthy, and we actually dropped from 13th to 14th happiest in the survey. Some in Norway speculate that well-functioning institutions and a broad education and health care safety net are also key. Many of Norway's neighbors are happy too. Denmark, Iceland, Switzerland, and Finland round out the top 5 on the list. The least happy countries according to the survey are the Central African Republic, Burundi, Tanzania, Syria and Rwanda.
  • President Trump’s approval rating dropped five points in the latest poll from Fox News. The survey showed 51-percent of people disapprove of the President, while 43-percent approve. The shift happened over a one-month period in which the survey found that healthcare, immigration, and Russian relations were all factors. The same survey also found however that 48-percent of Americans think the economy is improving, and 51-percent think Trump has done more to fulfill his promises than past presidents. First Lady Melania Trump meanwhile has a 52-percent approval rating among Americans overall, although she is unpopular with Democrats.
  • Business Insider reports that he didn’t specifically identify who it was, but a U.S. general says a close American ally recently used a Patriot missile, which can cost as much as $3 million apiece, to shoot down an adversary’s off-the-shelf drone aircraft, that retails for around $200. As one would hope, the multi-million dollar weapon was successful in destroying the drone. Gen. David Perkins questioned the strategy of using the expensive weapon, saying, “I’m not sure that’s a good economic-exchange ratio.' Click here to read more from Business Insider.
  • T.U.'s law school is moving up in the rankings on this year's list from U.S. News and World Report on the top 100 law schools. The magazine puts T.U. at number 82, up four spots. The school's website says it was based on factors like quality, reputation, placement success and student selectivity. The school is also touting its value, saying its tuition of $24,600 per year is less than many state schools and pointing out that PreLaw Magazine ranked T.U. as the number one best-value private law school. They also say National Jurist ranked the school best in the nation in 2015 for graduate employment in firms size 2-100.
  • Contrary to popular belief, not all the top 'tech' startups are in California. And by top, we mean the best-funded. Tech.co says the most highly funded startup, Uber, is in California, awash in $12.7 billion in funding. But even traditionally non-tech states like Georgia and Utah have startups with more than $1 billion in funding, what tech-types call 'unicorns'. Oklahoma's best-funded tech startup is a company in Norman called Weather Decision Technologies, which is just what is sounds like, providing business-related weather forecasting. Click here to read more about the list from Tech.co.
  • U.S. oil companies are set to bounce back, now that OPEC's three-year price war is over. OPEC's strategy to keep flooding the market with cheap oil and force out U.S. frackers did cause a lot of pain, says CNN, but now U.S. output is now projected to set a record of 9.7 million barrels per day in 2018. Also, fracking technology has now improved to the point that drillers can turn a profit even with oil at $50 a barrel. The hotbed of activity right now is the Permian Basin in Texas and New Mexico.
  • There's a fun treat for Oklahomans in the new hit superhero movie 'Logan'. NewsOK says it turns out that about a third of the movie takes place in Oklahoma City, keeping in mind, they say, that it's Oklahoma City in the year 2029 and that it doesn't appear it was actually shot in Oklahoma City. But NewsOK says moviegoers will nevertheless have fun spotting Oklahoma town names on highway signs and hearing one R-rated insult at Okies from the title character Logan, AKA Wolverine from X-men fame, played for the last time by Hugh Jackman. Logan is tearing up the box office right now at number one.
  • It's a well-known name here in Tulsa, and Dillard's has been ranked as America's favorite department store. That's according to the new list from the American Consumer Satisfaction Index. JCPenney came in number two and impressed the industry watchers by making the biggest gain of anyone on the list from last year.  Fred Meyer, Belk, and Dollar Tree complete the top 5. America's least favorite stores were Sears, Ross, and at the bottom, Walmart. As far as specialty stores go, Costco, Barnes and Nobles, and the Victoria's Secret/Bath and Body Works parent company were top 3. Big Lots, Toys R Us, and Abercrombie and Fitch made up the bottom 3. Click here for a link to the full list.
  • Steve Berg

     Steve Berg joined AM 740 and FM 102.3 Newstalk KRMG in the fall of 2008 and currently anchors the news segments of The KRMG Evening News. Born at St. Francis Hospital (the exact year is not important for our purposes here) and raised in the Brookside neighborhood, Steve is proud to call himself a native Tulsan. Steve is a graduate of Tulsa Edison High School and Oklahoma State University. His first job in broadcasting was at KOSU-FM radio in Stillwater. He then spent roughly 16 years in television, with stints in Pocatello, Idaho, Lansing, Michigan, and at KOTV in Tulsa, before turning his attention back to radio and his current job at KRMG.Steve has won multiple awards for his reporting during his career, most recently in 2010 from the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters in the Feature Series and General News categories.In his free time, Steve enjoys running, snow skiing, reading, video games, movies, TV, trying out new one-of-a-kind restaurants and spending time with friends and family.

    Read More
  • After the collapse of health care reform legislation in the House on Friday, Republicans in the Congress and President Donald Trump now must decide what’s next on their respective agendas, as the GOP tries to pick up the pieces from a very public legislative failure over an issue that had been their central political focus for the last seven years. Here’s the look from Capitol Hill. 1. The first big setback for the Trump agenda. You can try to downplay what happened, but there was little positive to take from this health care debacle in the House. “I will not sugarcoat this; this is a disappointing day for us,” said House Speaker Paul Ryan after the vote was canceled. President Trump tried to blame Democrats, but that rang hollow since the White House had done no serious outreach to the other party. With this setback, it’s even more apparent how little has been done so far by the GOP Congress with respect to the Trump Agenda. Other than approving a series of plans to reverse specific regulations of the Obama Administration, no bills of any import have been passed. Infrastructure, jobs bills, tax cuts, cutting government – all of that sounds good – but so far, no action. And Trump wrote 'The Art of the Deal' — Bill Mitchell (@JerseyGuy_Bill) March 25, 2017 2. Trump allies turn their sights on Speaker Ryan. It wasn’t hard to hear the low rumbling of some supporters of President Trump, as they used the Friday health care debacle to immediately try to make Speaker Ryan the scapegoat. Ann Coulter bluntly said, “Ryan is not on Trump’s side.” Pro-Trump websites like InfoWars and Breitbart immediately attacked Ryan as well, with some conservatives urging the House Freedom Caucus to help dump Ryan, arguing that he is the perfect illustration of the Republican Establishment that needs to be excised from Swamp of Washington, D.C. Paul Ryan is not on @POTUS' side – https://t.co/QVOHBDIKiT #KilledTheBill #FunFactFriday — Alex Jones (@RealAlexJones) March 24, 2017 3. Full repeal of Obamacare needs 60 votes in the Senate. If Republicans couldn’t muster a majority in the House – how are they going to get 60 votes in the Senate to really change the bulk of the Obama health law? The answer – they’re not going to do that any time soon. But full repeal was still the mantra from a number of Republicans as the House GOP health care bill went down the tubes on Friday. “I remain committed to repealing Obamacare and replacing it with conservative reforms,” said Rep. Jim Banks (R-IN). “Congress should take its time and pass a good bill that actually repeals ObamaCare,” said Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-FL). But the truth is, unless Republicans get 60 votes in the 2018 elections, an Obama health law repeal bill faces a difficult road in the Congress. I applaud House conservatives for keeping their word to the American people. I look forward to passing full repeal https://t.co/ftyj6sCw0v — Senator Rand Paul (@RandPaul) March 24, 2017 4. This fight on health care is already over? It seems hard to believe that Republicans are just going to drop the issue of health care reform, especially after making it such a central part of their political message in recent years. But President Trump seemed to send the signal that he is going to focus his political capital on other issues, like tax reform. “That one is going to be fun,” the President said earlier this week, as his Treasury Secretary predicted a final tax bill would on the President’s desk by early August. The last time Congress approved major tax reform was 1986. There’s a reason it hasn’t happened in over 30 years. It is not easy. And the lobbyists of Gucci Gulch will be ready. President Trump says tax reform is the next item on his agenda https://t.co/dLNduSPgl6 — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) March 24, 2017 5. This wasn’t really much of an effort. The White House said the President “left everything on the field” to get a health care bill. But it doesn’t look like that at all. Go back eight years, and Democrats were just launching their 13 month effort to forge what would become known as Obamacare. It went through the spring, summer, fall, winter, and then into the next spring of 2010, before being achieved. By contrast, the GOP introduced its health care bill on March 6 and gave up on March 24. Back in 2009 and 2010, Democrats struggled to keep their side together, but managed to get 60 votes for their package in the Senate. The GOP couldn’t even get a majority in the House. There is still time to go back to the drawing board. But it takes more than 18 days of work. Remember when Republicans promised they would try to fiddle with Obamacare for a few weeks and then give up? — Ramesh Ponnuru (@RameshPonnuru) March 24, 2017 6. Let the Republican finger pointing begin. One of the biggest immediate targets was the Freedom Caucus, the group of more conservative lawmakers which for years has been very good at holding out against the GOP leadership, but has done almost nothing in the way of substantive legislating. Some of that ire was aimed at Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC), the head of the Freedom Caucus. “Mark Meadows is more interested in being on the TV than solving problems,” fumed Rep. Austin Scott (R-GA), who then aimed some more barbs at Meadows and pointedly made sure to tell a reporter – “You can quote me on that.” Exactly right. GOP & Trump own this,but @freedomcaucus & @Heritage_Action & others caused it. They are the pie-in-the-sky caucus. https://t.co/9tMcfk45ox — Brit Hume (@brithume) March 24, 2017 7. Don’t downplay the importance of this setback. Yes, it’s just one bill. Yes, it’s not the end of the world. But this failure was a big deal. Republicans have been talking for years about how they would repeal and replace the Obama health law. Donald Trump said he would do it right away. But for years, I have been reporting – and taking flak for saying – that while the GOP had lots of ideas, they didn’t have consensus on any plan. And that was obvious as they desperately tried to stitch together deals at the last minute to keep the bill moving. It’s pretty easy to lob verbal grenades at the other party – it’s a little different to offer substantive legislation and pass it. Humiliating defeat for GOP after years to prepare. Real blow to their argument that they could govern if only given the chance. — carl hulse (@hillhulse) March 24, 2017 8. This was not a good week for President Trump. It started Monday with the FBI Director publicly confirming that not only was there an investigation of how Russia meddled in last year’s election, but also a probe of any links between the Trump Campaign and Moscow. The FBI chief also made clear there was no evidence to back up Trump’s claim that he had been wiretapped in 2016. And the NSA shot down talk that British Intelligence had helped with surveillance on Trump Tower. Meanwhile, the Trump travel and refugee ban stayed on hold the courts, despite Mr. Trump’s declaration that judges were overstepping their authority. Then the week ended with a health care thud. Tomorrow's cover: Trump forced to cancel health care vote in stunning blow https://t.co/53Po4iXVbM pic.twitter.com/lEQe5Qc22g — New York Post (@nypost) March 24, 2017
  • Unable to convince GOP lawmakers to get on board with a plan to overhaul the Obama health law, Republicans in the House decided not to even force a vote on the measure, a major setback for both President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan. “This bill is dead,” said Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR), the Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, who played a central role in cobbling together this plan. 'This bill is dead,' House Energy & Commerce Committee Chairman Walden says — Cristina Marcos (@cimarcos) March 24, 2017 The bill never even came to a vote, as it became obvious that Republicans had nowhere near a majority of lawmakers ready to vote for it. Democrats were more than happy to pile on the GOP legislative debacle. #ObamaCare 1 – #Trumpcare 0. — Rep. Hank Johnson (@RepHankJohnson) March 24, 2017
  • In the end, monolithic opposition by Democrats coupled with opposition from the far right doomed Friday’s vote on the American Health Care Act, the GOP bill that would have repealed and replaced the law commonly known as “Obamacare.” GOP leadership decided to pull the bill, realizing that it could not pass. The Trump administration made it clear early Friday that negotiations were over, and the president wanted an up or down vote Friday. House Speaker Paul Ryan went to the White House to report he didn’t have the votes to pass the bill; President Trump had previously said win or lose, Rep. Ryan should keep his position as Speaker. The GOP plan (AHCA) would have ended the mandate that all Americans pay for health insurance, replacing it with a plan where the federal government would give Americans tax credits, based on age. That would have saved taxpayers billions of dollars, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, but would have left  24 million additional Americans without health coverage within the next decade. Many governors, including some Republicans, also had serious concerns about the additional burdens passed on to states under the AHCA.
  • The Pawhuska woman recently accused of exposing herself to a classroom of students was arrested this week on accusations of stealing a purse.  According to the arrest report, Lacey Sponsler allegedly stole a purse while at the Broken Arrow Lanes bowling alley near 111th and Elm last Thursday.   The report states that witnesses saw her acting suspiciously and looking at people’s belongings. One witness saw her grab a purse and asked if it was hers. She said it was not.   A witness then reportedly saw Sponsler walk into the game room and return wearing different clothes. Police were called and found her in the bathroom.   Sponsler was arrested in February for doing a cartwheel in front of students at a Pawhuska school. She was not wearing anything under her dress and exposed herself to the students.
  • Authorities in Ohio arrested three people after they discovered the badly decomposed body of a 71-year-old Vietnam veteran in a home, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news Deputies with the Tuscarawas County Sheriff’s Office found the body of Bob Harris, 71, after learning that his Social Security debit card was being used despite the fact that he hadn’t been seen for months, WJW reported. The body had decomposed to the point where the remains were mostly skeletal, lying in the living room of a home in Wainwright. The body was kept a short distance from where the home’s residents slept, according to WJW. “It’s a horribly graphic case,” Sheriff Orvis Campbell told TimesReporter.com. He said Harris’ body was found in some “of the most deplorable conditions we can describe.” Trash and animal waste was found near the body. Harris was living with a married couple and their daughter, according to TimesReporter.com. The family had spread stories about Harris moving to Stark County and allowing them to use his Social Security benefits, Campbell said. Authorities arrested Brian and Stacy Sorohan on charges of abuse of a corpse and theft of a credit card, according to The Associated Press. The couple’s 18-year-old daughter was charged with abuse of a corpse. Deputies said the circumstances surrounding Harris’ death were not immediately clear. An autopsy will be performed to determine whether his death involved foul play, according to TimesReporter.com.