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Latest from Steve Berg

    The CEO of a Connecticut-based marketing firm says job applicants must pass what he has dubbed the “snowflake test” before he will hire them.  In an interview with Stuart Varney on the Fox Business Network, Silent Partner Marketing CEO Kyle Reyes defined a snowflake as “somebody who is going to whine and complain and come to the table with nothing but an entitled attitude and an inability to back their perspective.” Some of the questions on the test include a job candidate’s position and beliefs on America, guns, and police. Reyes said he’s not worried about discrimination lawsuits because he believes the test is really just the same kind of personality assessment that companies do routinely in job interviews. He says roughly 60-percent of applicants have not passed his test. Click here to see the whole “Snowflake Test”.
  • We repeat, new emojis are on the way. Many people get very excited about new emoji, which in case you don't know, are the little smiley faces and other such pictographs people use in text messages. According to Emojipedia, they'll be released in June, but might take longer to show up on some operating systems, depending on when those are updated. Word is there will be 56 new ones, including a giraffe, a rock climber, a bearded man, a face with a monocle, and a face making the shush gesture with its finger, among others. What emoji do you think you need in your life? Send us an open mic on the KRMG app and tell us. Click here to see the full list of possible new emojis.
  • Lots of people seek the American Dream, but the NORWEGIAN Dream might not be bad either. The Associated Press says according to the World Happiness Report, Norway is the happiest country on Earth. And yes, part of the reason is money. Norway is a wealthy nation. But it's not the whole reason. The U.S. is obviously pretty wealthy, and we actually dropped from 13th to 14th happiest in the survey. Some in Norway speculate that well-functioning institutions and a broad education and health care safety net are also key. Many of Norway's neighbors are happy too. Denmark, Iceland, Switzerland, and Finland round out the top 5 on the list. The least happy countries according to the survey are the Central African Republic, Burundi, Tanzania, Syria and Rwanda.
  • President Trump’s approval rating dropped five points in the latest poll from Fox News. The survey showed 51-percent of people disapprove of the President, while 43-percent approve. The shift happened over a one-month period in which the survey found that healthcare, immigration, and Russian relations were all factors. The same survey also found however that 48-percent of Americans think the economy is improving, and 51-percent think Trump has done more to fulfill his promises than past presidents. First Lady Melania Trump meanwhile has a 52-percent approval rating among Americans overall, although she is unpopular with Democrats.
  • Business Insider reports that he didn’t specifically identify who it was, but a U.S. general says a close American ally recently used a Patriot missile, which can cost as much as $3 million apiece, to shoot down an adversary’s off-the-shelf drone aircraft, that retails for around $200. As one would hope, the multi-million dollar weapon was successful in destroying the drone. Gen. David Perkins questioned the strategy of using the expensive weapon, saying, “I’m not sure that’s a good economic-exchange ratio.' Click here to read more from Business Insider.
  • T.U.'s law school is moving up in the rankings on this year's list from U.S. News and World Report on the top 100 law schools. The magazine puts T.U. at number 82, up four spots. The school's website says it was based on factors like quality, reputation, placement success and student selectivity. The school is also touting its value, saying its tuition of $24,600 per year is less than many state schools and pointing out that PreLaw Magazine ranked T.U. as the number one best-value private law school. They also say National Jurist ranked the school best in the nation in 2015 for graduate employment in firms size 2-100.
  • Contrary to popular belief, not all the top 'tech' startups are in California. And by top, we mean the best-funded. Tech.co says the most highly funded startup, Uber, is in California, awash in $12.7 billion in funding. But even traditionally non-tech states like Georgia and Utah have startups with more than $1 billion in funding, what tech-types call 'unicorns'. Oklahoma's best-funded tech startup is a company in Norman called Weather Decision Technologies, which is just what is sounds like, providing business-related weather forecasting. Click here to read more about the list from Tech.co.
  • U.S. oil companies are set to bounce back, now that OPEC's three-year price war is over. OPEC's strategy to keep flooding the market with cheap oil and force out U.S. frackers did cause a lot of pain, says CNN, but now U.S. output is now projected to set a record of 9.7 million barrels per day in 2018. Also, fracking technology has now improved to the point that drillers can turn a profit even with oil at $50 a barrel. The hotbed of activity right now is the Permian Basin in Texas and New Mexico.
  • There's a fun treat for Oklahomans in the new hit superhero movie 'Logan'. NewsOK says it turns out that about a third of the movie takes place in Oklahoma City, keeping in mind, they say, that it's Oklahoma City in the year 2029 and that it doesn't appear it was actually shot in Oklahoma City. But NewsOK says moviegoers will nevertheless have fun spotting Oklahoma town names on highway signs and hearing one R-rated insult at Okies from the title character Logan, AKA Wolverine from X-men fame, played for the last time by Hugh Jackman. Logan is tearing up the box office right now at number one.
  • It's a well-known name here in Tulsa, and Dillard's has been ranked as America's favorite department store. That's according to the new list from the American Consumer Satisfaction Index. JCPenney came in number two and impressed the industry watchers by making the biggest gain of anyone on the list from last year.  Fred Meyer, Belk, and Dollar Tree complete the top 5. America's least favorite stores were Sears, Ross, and at the bottom, Walmart. As far as specialty stores go, Costco, Barnes and Nobles, and the Victoria's Secret/Bath and Body Works parent company were top 3. Big Lots, Toys R Us, and Abercrombie and Fitch made up the bottom 3. Click here for a link to the full list.
  • Steve Berg

     Steve Berg joined AM 740 and FM 102.3 Newstalk KRMG in the fall of 2008 and currently anchors the news segments of The KRMG Evening News. Born at St. Francis Hospital (the exact year is not important for our purposes here) and raised in the Brookside neighborhood, Steve is proud to call himself a native Tulsan. Steve is a graduate of Tulsa Edison High School and Oklahoma State University. His first job in broadcasting was at KOSU-FM radio in Stillwater. He then spent roughly 16 years in television, with stints in Pocatello, Idaho, Lansing, Michigan, and at KOTV in Tulsa, before turning his attention back to radio and his current job at KRMG.Steve has won multiple awards for his reporting during his career, most recently in 2010 from the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters in the Feature Series and General News categories.In his free time, Steve enjoys running, snow skiing, reading, video games, movies, TV, trying out new one-of-a-kind restaurants and spending time with friends and family.

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  • Tulsa police Thursday released video of an incident in which an officer used his patrol car to end a gunfight. Madison Dickson was the suspect in a string of violent crimes that spanned nearly a week when she was spotted in a vehicle near 91st and Harvard last Saturday. She tried to run, and gunfire is heard on the video, which officers say was directed toward them. The officer swerves left as she points the gun at him, then veers right and runs her over as she attempts to flee. Additional videos released to media by TPD indicate an officer also used a Taser on Dickson after she was down, because she still had the gun and wasn’t responding to commands. “She might not be able to, hang on,” one officer says as others are yelling at her to show her hands. EMSA arrived on the scene a few minutes later, but Dickson died from her injuries.
  • After hours of negotiations that featured personal intervention by President Donald Trump, Republican leaders in the Congress were forced to back off a planned vote on a GOP health care bill, unable to find enough votes approve it and send it on to the Senate for further work. While House leaders said votes were possible on Friday, there was no final agreement to vote on, as more conservative members of the House Freedom Caucus refused to get on board with a deal offered by the White House. “We have not gotten enough of our members to get to yes,” said Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC), the chair of the Freedom Caucus. “I am still a no at this time,” Meadows told a crush of reporters. “I am desperately trying to get to yes.” Rep. Mark Meadows: “I am still a no at this time. I am desperately trying to get to yes” https://t.co/cQi0OGdJGY — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) March 23, 2017 Other Freedom Caucus members said very little as they exited a Congressional hearing room after a two hour meeting on the health bill, leaving Meadows to get out the message. “No comment,” said Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-FL). “Mark’s got everything,” referring to Meadows. “You know I’m not going express the substance of anything that we talked about in there,” said Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) said as reporters trailed him down the hall. Earlier at the White House, there had been optimism after a meeting between Freedom Caucus members and the President. Lengthy standing ovation from the Freedom Caucus when @POTUS walked into the Cabinet Room just now. Big momentum toward #RepealAndReplace. pic.twitter.com/N1FLGAVFMN — Cliff Sims (@CSims45) March 23, 2017 But, there was no deal.
  • Conservative Republicans opposed to the health care reform bill offered by their leadership have forced a delay in a vote on the measure, which was expected to happen Thursday. House GOP leadership announced they will push the vote back about 2:30 Central Time after a flurry of meetings between Republican members of the Freedom Caucus, moderates pushing the plan, and the White House. The delay is seen as a rebuke of the Trump administration, which has brought pressure to bear in an attempt to bring those more conservative members on board. Those Republicans opposed to the bill in its current form generally want deeper cuts in spending on the program. Some have called it “Obamacare Light,” and say it doesn’t offer enough substantial changes to current law. Those in favor of the bill argue it eliminates the mandate, and puts choice back in the hands of consumers. There’s no official announcement on when House Speaker Paul Ryan might try to reschedule a vote.
  • The CEO of a Connecticut-based marketing firm says job applicants must pass what he has dubbed the “snowflake test” before he will hire them.  In an interview with Stuart Varney on the Fox Business Network, Silent Partner Marketing CEO Kyle Reyes defined a snowflake as “somebody who is going to whine and complain and come to the table with nothing but an entitled attitude and an inability to back their perspective.” Some of the questions on the test include a job candidate’s position and beliefs on America, guns, and police. Reyes said he’s not worried about discrimination lawsuits because he believes the test is really just the same kind of personality assessment that companies do routinely in job interviews. He says roughly 60-percent of applicants have not passed his test. Click here to see the whole “Snowflake Test”.
  • A Tulsa parent is speaking out after she says her daughter had a birth control implant embedded into her arm during a trip from school. >> Read more trending news  Miracle Foster says her parental rights were violated. It all started when her 16-year-old daughter attended a Youth Services of Tulsa lecture about sex education at Langston Hughes Academy. After one of the sessions, the teen and other girls reportedly said they wanted to learn more, and the school arranged for Youth Services of Tulsa to pick them up and take them to a clinic. Rodney L. Clark, the school's principal, says he called Foster to get permission to allow her daughter to go on the trip before they left. Foster says that her daughter then received a three-year Norplant implant at the clinic without her parental consent. Representatives from Youth Services of Tulsa say they do not have to tell a parent about any contraceptives given to minors. Title X federal guidelines allows for teens as young as 12 to receive various forms of contraceptives without a parent's consent. They also said they merely inform and transport teens to the clinics of their choice. They are not involved in the conversations between the teens and the physicians at theses clinics. Foster told FOX23 that she feels that she and her daughter should have had the opportunity to discuss what's best for her.  Clark released a statement Wednesday:  'This was not a field trip. Youth Services of Tulsa does an annual in-service on Sex Education. They offer students an opportunity to contact them on their own for more information. The parent gave her child permission to leave the school. Under Title X once young people are at the clinic and are of reproductive age, they can make decisions on their own without parental consent. As you can understand this situation involves a minor and we do not release information about students. Nevertheless, the student was well within their rights of Title X which is a federal guideline that provides reduced cost family planning services to persons of all reproductive age.