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Latest from Glenn Schroeder

    A Michigan State University student has received dozens of phone calls after creating and sharing a dating resume. Joey Adams, 21, was inspired to make the resume after asking out a girl who eventually rejected him, the Lansing State Journal reported. 'She asked if I had a dating resume,' he said. 'I didn't have one, so she told me no.' Adams shared his dating resume online last week after a woman posted on the university's class of 2018 Facebook page saying her roommate needed a date for a formal. The resume included hobbies and what he looks for in a romantic partner. Adams said it started as a joke, but the resume rapidly gained popularity. Less than a week later, Adams has been featured on BuzzFeed and 'Good Morning America.' There's also been a growing push through social media to have Adams on 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show.' 'It's been a cool experience, and my mom is really loving it,' he said. Adams has since been invited to several formals in and around Lansing, some of which he plans to attend. The college junior says the phone calls are 'overwhelming,' especially during midterms week. 'I'm wishing things would go back to normal even though I know it won't happen soon,' he said. 'But for now I'm just having fun riding the wave.
  • Doctors say a baby girl from Africa who's recovering from a risky surgery at a Chicago-area hospital should be able to lead a normal life. Ten-month-old Dominique was born in the Ivory Coast with a not-fully-developed conjoined twin. Doctors performed surgery on March 8 to remove two legs and a second spine that protruded from her back. More than 50 doctors and nurses are now caring for her at Advocate Children's Hospital in Park Ridge, Illinois. Her foster mother, Nancy Swabb of Chicago, says her family learned about Dominique on social media and knew instantly they wanted to help. Swabb says Dominique can now sit up, raise her hands and reach for things, which she couldn't do before. She'll eventually return to her family in west Africa.
  • Women seeking abortions and some basic health services, including prenatal care, contraception and cancer screenings, would face restrictions and struggle to pay for some of that medical care under the House Republicans' proposed bill. The legislation, which would replace much of former President Barack Obama's health law, was approved by two House committees on Thursday. Republicans are hoping to move quickly to pass it, despite unified opposition from Democrats, criticism from some conservatives who don't think it goes far enough and several health groups who fear millions of Americans would lose coverage and benefits. The bill would prohibit for a year any funding to Planned Parenthood, a major provider of women's health services, restrict abortion access in covered plans on the health exchange and scale back Medicaid services used by many low-income women, among other changes. Washington Sen. Patty Murray, the top Democrat on the Health, Labor, Education and Pensions Committee, said the legislation is a 'slap in the face' to women.
  • Twelve-year-old Janet Sylva of Gambia wants to be a doctor when she grows up, she says with a broad grin - one that surgeons in New York gave back to her after removing from her mouth one of the largest tumors they'd ever seen. The 6-pound benign tumor was about the size of a cantaloupe. It prevented Janet from eating, and her breathing had become so difficult that doctors were afraid she might die within a year if nothing was done. 'It made her a prisoner in her own body,' said Dr. David Hoffman, a Staten Island surgeon who became aware of Janet's plight last year after doctors in the neighboring west African nation of Senegal reached out to international health groups for assistance. She had stopped going to school and wore a scarf around her face to hide the massive tumor. Hoffman coordinated with the Global Medical Relief Fund and a team of volunteer surgeons and other medical staff at Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park on Long Island to arrange for Janet to have the surgery, which was performed for free in January. Dr. Armen Kasabian, chief of plastic surgery at North Shore University Hospital, led the team in performing the delicate operation, which not only involved removing the tumor but also rebuilding her jaw by using part of a bone from her leg. Kasabian said the team knew they had to get it right the first time because Janet and her mother, Philomena, would only be in the U.S. for a short time.
  • A woman in labor demanded a friend inject her with heroin and methamphetamine before firefighters arrived at their home and she gave birth while entering an ambulance, New Hampshire police said Wednesday. Police in Concord arrested Felicia Farruggia, 29, of Concord, this week, about six months after her son was born. He is in state custody. Police also arrested Rhianna Frenette, 37, of Belmont, who is accused of giving Farruggia the drugs. They're charged with felony reckless conduct. Frenette also faces a misdemeanor count on the same offense. 'This case is just, honestly, absolutely appalling in my mind,' Lieutenant Sean Ford said. 'No one died, but the risk to that child and to the mother. ... This stuff is just getting out of control.' Both women were arraigned from jail on Wednesday; bail was set at $25,000 for Frenette and $15,000 for Farruggia. It wasn't immediately known whether they had attorneys; the public defender's office in Concord said it had no record that the cases were assigned. Police say Frenette used an unsanitary syringe to try to inject Farruggia at least once before she was successful. After that, Farruggia's boyfriend called 911. Shortly afterward, firefighters arrived, and Farruggia gave birth while entering the ambulance. A police affidavit said while at the hospital, the baby was in stable condition but was breathing rapidly, something that could have been caused by a number of conditions. His urine was positive for methamphetamine and amphetamine. His mother's urine was positive for those drugs and benzodiazepine.
  • An earthquake fault running from San Diego Bay to Los Angeles is capable of producing a magnitude-7.4 earthquake that could affect some of the region's most densely populated areas, according to a study released Tuesday.  The study looked at the Newport-Inglewood and Rose Canyon systems - previously thought to be separate - and concluded they actually form a continuous fault that runs underwater from San Diego Bay to Seal Beach in Orange County and on land through the Los Angeles basin.  The fault poses a significant hazard to coastal Southern California and Tijuana, Mexico, according to the study. It could produce up to a magnitude-7.3 quake if the offshore segments rupture and a magnitude-7.4 quake if the onshore segment also ruptures, according to the study by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego.  Even a moderate quake on the fault could have a major impact on the region, according to Valerie Sahakian, the study's lead author. 'This system is mostly offshore but never more than four miles from the San Diego, Orange County, and Los Angeles County coast,' Sahakian was quoted as saying in a press release from the American Geophysical Union.  The fault's most recent major rupture occurred in 1933 in Long Beach and produced a magnitude-6.4 earthquake that killed 115 people.
  • Michael Fasman's 12-year-old dog, Hudson, limps from pain caused by arthritis and an amputated toe, but Fasman doesn't want to give her painkillers because 'they just knock her out.' So the San Francisco resident has turned to an alternative medicine that many humans use to treat their own pain and illness: marijuana. On a recent morning, Fasman squeezed several drops of a cannabis extract onto a plate of yogurt, which the Portuguese water dog lapped up in seconds. It's become part of Hudson's daily routine. 'We think it's really lifted her spirits and made her a happier dog,' Fasman said. 'It's not that she's changed. She's just back to her good old self.' As more states legalize marijuana for humans, more pet owners are giving their furry companions cannabis-based extracts, ointments and edibles marketed to treat everything from arthritis and anxiety to seizures and cancer. Most of these pet products, which aren't regulated, contain cannabidiol or CBD, a chemical compound found in cannabis that doesn't get pets or humans high. They contain little or no THC, the cannabis compound known for its psychoactive effects. But veterinarians say there isn't enough scientific data to show cannabis is safe and effective for treating animals. Although medical marijuana is legal in 28 states, it remains illegal under federal law, so there has been relatively little research into its potential medical benefits for humans or animals.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday it is withdrawing an Obama-era request that oil and natural gas companies provide information on methane emissions at oil and gas operations. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said the withdrawal is effective immediately, adding that he wants to assess the need for the information the agency has been collecting under a directive issued in November. Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and eight other states had questioned the reporting request as overly burdensome. Pruitt, who until last month was Oklahoma attorney general, said removing the reporting request signals that EPA under his leadership takes seriously the concerns of state officials. 'We are committed to strengthening our partnership with the states,' he said in a statement. 'Today's action will reduce burdens on businesses while we take a closer look at the need for additional information from this industry.' Environmental groups called the withdrawal a cave-in to oil-producing states, including Pruitt's home state and Texas, where new Energy Secretary Rick Perry served 14 years as governor.
  • Dairy producers are calling for a crackdown on the almond, soy and rice 'milks' they say are masquerading as the real thing and cloud the meaning of milk for shoppers. And a group that advocates for plant-based products, the Good Food Institute, countered by asking the Food and Drug Administration this week to say foods can use terms such as 'milk' and 'sausage,' so long as they're modified to make clear what's in them. It's the latest dispute about what qualifies a food as authentic, many of them stemming from developments in manufacturing practices and specialized diets. DiGiorno's frozen chicken 'wyngz' were fodder for comedian Stephen Colbert. An eggless, vegan spread provoked the ire of egg producers by calling itself 'mayo.' And as far back as the 1880s, margarine was dismissed as 'counterfeit butter' by a Wisconsin lawmaker. The U.S. actually spells out the required characteristics for a range of products such as French dressing, canned peas and raisin bread. It's these federal standards of identity that often trigger the food fights.
  • A $45 million entertainment complex featuring exhibits and restaurants focused on the life and career of Elvis Presley is scheduled to open at Graceland in Memphis. Priscilla Presley, the former wife of the late rock 'n' roll icon, is scheduled to appear at the grand opening of the complex in Tennessee on Thursday. The 200,000-square-foot complex is located across the street from Graceland, Presley's longtime home. It features a comprehensive Presley exhibit, a showcase of the cars he owned and used, a soundstage, two restaurants and retail stores. The complex will replace the aging buildings that have housed Presley-related exhibits for years. The center is part of a $140 million Graceland expansion, which includes a 450-room hotel that opened last year. Presley died on Aug. 16, 1977, at age 42.
  • Glenn Schroeder

    KRMG Morning News Anchor

    Glenn is a self-described news and sports junkie. His passion for radio dates back to 1975. That's the year he got his first taste of life behind a microphone, handling play-by-play duties at his high school radio station. The University of Michigan graduate's circuitous journey to KRMG began at a very small radio station in Alamogordo, New Mexico. After stints at stations in Las Cruces, Mexico and Pueblo, Colorado, Glenn moved to Tulsa is 1991. It didn't take long for the Detroit native to realize that this is where he wanted to plant his roots. The Edward R. Murrow award winning journalist, who spent 10-years at KVOO, cites the Oklahoma City bombing as the most profound and difficult story he's ever covered. "The misery of those who lost loved one was deep and unrelenting. Yet, their strength and faith allowed our emotional scares to heal." Glenn's hobbies include running, gardening, Michigan football and NASCAR. "It's the only sport my wife enjoys." Glenn met Beth, the love of his life, in 1999. The two were married less than two years later.

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  • Unable to convince GOP lawmakers to get on board with a plan to overhaul the Obama health law, Republicans in the House decided not to even force a vote on the measure, a major setback for both President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan. “This bill is dead,” said Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR), the Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, who played a central role in cobbling together this plan. 'This bill is dead,' House Energy & Commerce Committee Chairman Walden says — Cristina Marcos (@cimarcos) March 24, 2017 The bill never even came to a vote, as it became obvious that Republicans had nowhere near a majority of lawmakers ready to vote for it. Democrats were more than happy to pile on the GOP legislative debacle. #ObamaCare 1 – #Trumpcare 0. — Rep. Hank Johnson (@RepHankJohnson) March 24, 2017
  • In the end, monolithic opposition by Democrats coupled with opposition from the far right doomed Friday’s vote on the American Health Care Act, the GOP bill that would have repealed and replaced the law commonly known as “Obamacare.” GOP leadership decided to pull the bill, realizing that it could not pass. The Trump administration made it clear early Friday that negotiations were over, and the president wanted an up or down vote Friday. House Speaker Paul Ryan went to the White House to report he didn’t have the votes to pass the bill; President Trump had previously said win or lose, Rep. Ryan should keep his position as Speaker. The GOP plan (AHCA) would have ended the mandate that all Americans pay for health insurance, replacing it with a plan where the federal government would give Americans tax credits, based on age. That would have saved taxpayers billions of dollars, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, but would have left  24 million additional Americans without health coverage within the next decade. Many governors, including some Republicans, also had serious concerns about the additional burdens passed on to states under the AHCA.
  • The Pawhuska woman recently accused of exposing herself to a classroom of students was arrested this week on accusations of stealing a purse.  According to the arrest report, Lacey Sponsler allegedly stole a purse while at the Broken Arrow Lanes bowling alley near 111th and Elm last Thursday.   The report states that witnesses saw her acting suspiciously and looking at people’s belongings. One witness saw her grab a purse and asked if it was hers. She said it was not.   A witness then reportedly saw Sponsler walk into the game room and return wearing different clothes. Police were called and found her in the bathroom.   Sponsler was arrested in February for doing a cartwheel in front of students at a Pawhuska school. She was not wearing anything under her dress and exposed herself to the students.
  • Authorities in Ohio arrested three people after they discovered the badly decomposed body of a 71-year-old Vietnam veteran in a home, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news Deputies with the Tuscarawas County Sheriff’s Office found the body of Bob Harris, 71, after learning that his Social Security debit card was being used despite the fact that he hadn’t been seen for months, WJW reported. The body had decomposed to the point where the remains were mostly skeletal, lying in the living room of a home in Wainwright. The body was kept a short distance from where the home’s residents slept, according to WJW. “It’s a horribly graphic case,” Sheriff Orvis Campbell told TimesReporter.com. He said Harris’ body was found in some “of the most deplorable conditions we can describe.” Trash and animal waste was found near the body. Harris was living with a married couple and their daughter, according to TimesReporter.com. The family had spread stories about Harris moving to Stark County and allowing them to use his Social Security benefits, Campbell said. Authorities arrested Brian and Stacy Sorohan on charges of abuse of a corpse and theft of a credit card, according to The Associated Press. The couple’s 18-year-old daughter was charged with abuse of a corpse. Deputies said the circumstances surrounding Harris’ death were not immediately clear. An autopsy will be performed to determine whether his death involved foul play, according to TimesReporter.com.
  • Tulsa police Thursday released video of an incident in which an officer used his patrol car to end a gunfight. Madison Dickson was the suspect in a string of violent crimes that spanned nearly a week when she was spotted in a vehicle near 91st and Harvard last Saturday. She tried to run, and gunfire is heard on the video, which officers say was directed toward them. The officer swerves left as she points the gun at him, then veers right and runs her over as she attempts to flee. Additional videos released to media by TPD indicate an officer also used a Taser on Dickson after she was down, because she still had the gun and wasn’t responding to commands. “She might not be able to, hang on,” one officer says as others are yelling at her to show her hands. EMSA arrived on the scene a few minutes later, but Dickson died from her injuries.