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Latest from Glenn Schroeder

    Shattered by recall costs and lawsuits, Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. filed Monday for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., saying it was the only way it could keep on supplying replacements for faulty air bag inflators linked to the deaths of at least 16 people. The company's bankruptcy filings cleared the way for a $1.6 billion takeover of most of Takata's assets by rival Key Safety Systems, which is based in Detroit but owned by a Chinese company. Takata's inflators can explode with too much force when they fill up an air bag, spewing out shrapnel. Apart from the fatalities, they're responsible for at least 180 injuries worldwide. So far 100 million inflators have been recalled worldwide, the largest automotive-related recall in U.S. history. That includes 69 million in the U.S., affecting 42 million vehicles. Takata's president Shigehisa Takada told reporters in Tokyo that with the company rapidly losing value, filing for bankruptcy protection was the only way it could carry on. 'We're in a very difficult situation, and we had to find ways to keep supplying our products,' Takada said. 'As a maker of safety parts for the automobile industry, our failure to maintain a stable supply would have a major impact across the industry.' 'There was no other way,' he said. Takada said he intends to leave Takata's management once it is handed over to Key Safety Systems and things are running smoothly. 'It would be a big nuisance for the new company if a person like me were to get involved in its management,' he said. The bankruptcy filings by Takata, founded in 1933 as a textiles maker, led the Tokyo Stock Exchange to announce Monday it was delisting the company.
  • You thought your dog was ugly. The World's Ugliest Dog Contest is celebrating man's best friend's perfect imperfections in California on Friday. The pooches - many of which are adoptable or previously adopted - will face off in a red carpet walk and 'Faux Paw Fashion Show,' organizers said. The contestants are judged on first impressions, unusual attributes, personality and audience reaction. A blind Chihuahua-Chinese Crested mix named Sweepee Rambo bested 16 other homely hounds in last year's competition and waddled away with $1,500, a trophy and a flight to New York with her owner, Jason Wurtz, for media appearances. The then-17-year-old champion proved that third time's the charm after falling short in the competition twice before. By celebrating inner beauty, organizers said they hope to showcase that all dogs, regardless of physical appearance, can be lovable additions to any family. Contest rules prevent owners from intentionally altering their animals to enhance appearance for the purpose of the contest. These pooches are celebrated for their natural ugliness, organizers said.
  • The Republican drive to roll back Barack Obama's health care law is on a collision course with a national opioid epidemic that's not letting up. Medicaid cuts resulting from the GOP legislation would hit hard in states deeply affected by the addiction crisis and struggling to turn the corner, according to state data and concerned lawmakers in both parties. The House health care bill would phase out expanded Medicaid, which allows states to provide federally backed insurance to low-income adults previously not eligible. Many people in that demographic are in their 20s and 30s and dealing with opioid addiction. Dollars from Washington have allowed states to boost their response to the crisis, paying for medication, counseling, therapy and other services. According to data compiled by The Associated Press, Medicaid expansion accounted for 61 percent of total Medicaid spending on substance abuse treatment in Kentucky, 47 percent in West Virginia, 56 percent in Michigan, 59 percent in Maryland, and 31 percent in Rhode Island. In Ohio, the expansion accounted for 43 percent of Medicaid spending in 2016 on behavioral health, a category that includes mental health and substance abuse.
  • Long before cats became the darlings of Facebook and YouTube, they spread through the ancient human world. A DNA study reached back thousands of years to track that conquest and found evidence of two major dispersals from the Middle East, in which people evidently took cats with them. Genetic signatures the felines had on those journeys are still seen in most modern-day breeds. Researchers analyzed DNA from 209 ancient cats as old as 9,000 years from Europe, Africa and Asia, including some ancient Egyptian cat mummies. 'They are direct witnesses of the situation in the past,' said Eva-Maria Geigl of the Jacques Monod Institute in Paris. She and colleagues also looked at 28 modern feral cats from Bulgaria and east Africa. It's the latest glimpse into the complicated story of domesticated cats. They are descendants of wild ancestors that learned to live with people and became relatively tame - though some cat owners would say that nowadays, they don't always seem enthusiastic about our company. The domestication process may have begun around 10,000 years ago when people settled in the Fertile Crescent, the arch-shaped region that includes the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea and land around the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. They stored grain, which drew rodents, which in turn attracted wild cats. Animal remains in trash heaps might have attracted them too. Over time, these wild felines adapted to this man-made environment and got used to hanging around people.
  • A wayward tortoise's surprising trek around Ohio has ended happily for its owner, whose two-week search, in a twist of fate, might have saved her sister's life. Otis the California desert tortoise managed to push open a sliding glass door and escape from Kathie Heisinger's home in Sebring in Mahoning County on May 30. Heisinger created flyers offering a $200 reward that was quickly matched by the Sebring Volunteer Fire Department, prompting her to make the reward $500 total. Village residents soon joined Heisinger in her search around Sebring. 'There are a lot of good people in the world,' Heisinger said. Otis quickly became a minor celebrity. Facebook posts and shares, newspaper and television stories and the flyers led to more than 100 phone calls from people who believed they had spotted him. Heisinger then heard rumors that employees of an amusement company working the Sebring Fireman's Festival the weekend Otis went missing might have scooped him up. She called the company headquartered 20 miles away in Stark County and the owner told Heisinger his employees had indeed taken possession of Otis - at least temporarily.
  • A sign marking the Crooked Hill Road exit off a suburban New York parkway has been altered to read 'Crooked Hillary.' Newsday reports the defaced green traffic sign on the Sagtikos Parkway on Long Island was reported to the state Department of Transportation on Wednesday. A DOT spokesman says the sign has been removed and 'defacing public signs is illegal.' Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump often used the moniker 'Crooked Hillary' when referring to Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton, who at the time suffered from the mistrust of many voters.  Trump won the election and in a recent tweet said 'Crooked Hillary Clinton now blames everybody but herself, refuses to say she was a terrible candidate.' Clinton tweeted back 'People in covfefe houses shouldn't throw covfefe,' a dig at Trump for tweeting the mystifying non-word.
  • Bill Pharmer tells The Daily Hampshire Gazette he paid $1 to park in Northampton last week when he and his wife went out for dinner. He put the money in a payment kiosk at 6:15 p.m., not knowing that the city stops parking enforcement at 6 p.m. The Hershey, Pennsylvania, man complained to the city's Parking Division, which passed the problem onto Mayor David Narkewicz. Pharmer says his complaint wasn't about his dollar, but about the 'thousands of people who have lost the dollar' because they were unaware of city parking rules. Narkewicz sent Pharmer a dollar along with a handwritten note of apology.
  • Americans cut spending at gasoline stations, department stores and electronics shops in May as retail sales registered their biggest drop in 16 months, a cautionary sign for the economy. The Commerce Department says retail sales dropped 0.3 percent last month, the first decline since February and the sharpest since a 1 percent decrease in January 2016. Economists had expected sales to increase slightly last month after rising 0.4 percent in April. Sales sank 2.8 percent at electronics stores, 2.4 percent at gasoline stations and 1 percent at department stores, which have struggled with competition from online retailers. Economists have said they think consumer spending, which accounts for about 70 percent of U.S. economic activity, will pick up in the spring and summer after a slow start to 2017.
  • More than half of the midsize SUVs tested by an insurance industry group were found to have unsafe headlights that did not light up the road far enough or caused glare for oncoming drivers. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety said Tuesday that it tested 37 midsize SUVs and only two received a 'good' rating: the 2017 Volvo XC60 and 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe. Twelve were rated 'acceptable,' 12 others were rated 'marginal' and 11 were rated 'poor.' IIHS recommends buying vehicles with headlights rated 'good' or 'acceptable.' 'We continue to see headlights that compromise safety because they only provide a short view down the road at night,' said Matt Brumbelow, a senior research engineer at IIHS. The 2017 Kia Sorento, which received a 'poor' rating, had the worst visibility. IIHS says the Sorento lit up 148 feet down the road, compared with 315 feet for the top-rated Volvo XC60. Other 2017 vehicle models with 'poor' ratings include the Jeep Wrangler, Dodge Journey and the Ford Edge and Explorer.
  • General Electric says Jeff Immelt is stepping down as CEO and John Flannery, president and CEO of the conglomerate's health care unit, will take over the post in August. The 61-year-old Immelt will stay on as chairman until his retirement from the position at the end of the year, with the 55-year-old Flannery stepping into the role after that. Immelt has been at the helm of the conglomerate for 16 years, overseeing a transformation that included selling many of the company's units. Over that time, General Electric sold its insurance, credit card, plastics and security divisions. It also invested more heavily in new technologies, including a recent $1.65 billion acquisition of LM Wind Power, a Denmark-based manufacturer of rotor blades for wind turbines. Flannery is a longtime General Electric executive, starting his career at GE Capital in 1987. He became president and CEO of the company's equity unit in 2002 and eventually joined the health care unit in 2014, focusing on advanced technologies.
  • Glenn Schroeder

    KRMG Morning News Anchor

    Glenn is a self-described news and sports junkie. His passion for radio dates back to 1975. That's the year he got his first taste of life behind a microphone, handling play-by-play duties at his high school radio station. The University of Michigan graduate's circuitous journey to KRMG began at a very small radio station in Alamogordo, New Mexico. After stints at stations in Las Cruces, Mexico and Pueblo, Colorado, Glenn moved to Tulsa is 1991. It didn't take long for the Detroit native to realize that this is where he wanted to plant his roots. The Edward R. Murrow award winning journalist, who spent 10-years at KVOO, cites the Oklahoma City bombing as the most profound and difficult story he's ever covered. "The misery of those who lost loved one was deep and unrelenting. Yet, their strength and faith allowed our emotional scares to heal." Glenn's hobbies include running, gardening, Michigan football and NASCAR. "It's the only sport my wife enjoys." Glenn met Beth, the love of his life, in 1999. The two were married less than two years later.

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  • Hours after the release of a Congressional Budget Office review of a Republican health care bill in the Senate, GOP leaders on Monday night found themselves on the defensive, as a small group of Senate Republicans indicated they might not even vote this week to start debate on the GOP health bill, let alone support the final product. “CBO says 22 million people lose insurance,” said Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), who made clear the GOP plans to reduce Medicaid spending by $772 billion over ten years was unacceptable in her home state. Collins was joined by several other Republicans in publicly saying that without changes, they are not ready to begin debate this week: I want to work w/ my GOP & Dem colleagues to fix the flaws in ACA. CBO analysis shows Senate bill won't do it. I will vote no on mtp. 1/3 — Sen. Susan Collins (@SenatorCollins) June 26, 2017 Mike Lee's spokesman tells me: 'Lee will not vote to proceed to a bill he can't support.'https://t.co/eGe2fSyA09 — John McCormack (@McCormackJohn) June 26, 2017 Ron Johnson on the motion to proceed to the GOP health care bill: 'I would highly doubt I would support it.' — Frank Thorp V (@frankthorp) June 26, 2017 Also ready to vote against the “motion to proceed” to the health care bill – Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), and Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV). Democrats meanwhile used speeches on the Senate floor – and social media outside on the steps of the Capitol – to make their argument that the GOP bill should be shelved immediately. Ummm…people streaming to the Capitol. Crowd getting bigger and bigger and bigger. #HealthcareBill pic.twitter.com/SKnjQtzrBh — Chris Murphy (@ChrisMurphyCT) June 27, 2017 The original plan had been for the Senate to vote on Tuesday to begin debate on the GOP health care bill, with a final vote expected on Thursday or Friday – but that timeline seemed to be on hold for the time being. Earlier on Monday, the Congressional Budget Office found that the plan would mean 22 million fewer people would have health insurance by 2026, not much different than the estimates for a similar bill that was approved by the House in early May. The CBO report found that of the 22 million – 15 million would lose insurance coverage from changes to the Medicaid program, while another 7 million people would lose coverage because of changes in the nongroup and individual insurance marketplaces. The CBO review had good news on the money front for the GOP, as the plan would save an estimated $321 billion over ten years on the federal deficit, spending $1.022 trillion less than current law, while reducing federal tax revenues by $701 billion from 2017-2026. The White House derided the CBO report, arguing their estimates have never been close; meanwhile, the President was doing what he could do from the sidelines to try to sway Republicans to his side. “He made several calls to multiple Senators to hear their concerns and get their ideas, and understand where they’re at and what needs to get done,” said White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer. But with Republicans only able to lose two votes, GOP leaders were struggling to keep the GOP health bill on track in the Senate.
  • The website Money-Rates.com has figured out the best and worst states to make a living. And sure, money is the big factor, including both salaries and the cost of living, as well as income taxes. But they also factor in unemployment rates and workplace safety. The worst three are California and Hawaii, for high taxes and cost of living that outweigh even their high wages, and Montana for low wages and poor workplace safety. You can see the full list here.
  • People in Arizona are used to triple-digit temperatures in the summer, but an extreme heat wave gripping the Southwest this week had temperatures rising to 120 degrees. At that extreme temperature, strange things begin to happen. >> Read more trending news Arizona residents have been posting photos on social media of objects that they say have melted due to the extreme heat. It's important to note that none of these photos have been independently verified. The melted mailbox photo prompted KSAZ to ask an expert if it was possible for extreme heat to do that kind of damage. The engineering expert said that while it was unlikely that the plastic post completely melted, the heat could have weakened it, causing it to fall over, KSAZ reported. As for the photos of melting street signs, KPNX verified via a transportation official that the damage to the sign was age-related, not specifically heat-related. And the photo of the melted trash bin? That was posted on Reddit in 2016, and many doubted its veracity then. One thing is for certain: The heat in Arizona is no joke. Flights were grounded temporarily this week at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix due to the extreme temperatures. Phoenix emergency rooms have seen an increase in burn cases, most contact burns from bare skin touching pavement or a hot car's interior, azcentral reported. Pet owners are urged to take precautions as an increase in heat-related emergencies has been reported at Arizona animal hospitals.
  • Walt Disney’s Disneyland presentation map has sold for $708,000 at an auction    According to Forbes, the map was expected to fetch somewhere around $900,000, but $708,000 is still the most expensive Disneyland map ever sold. The buyer of the map at the Van Eaton Galleries in Sherman Oaks California has not been revealed.   The map of the California theme park that was drawn by Walt Disney and used by his brother Roy in sales pitches to investors.  in 1953. Officials said that the map was eventually given to an employee.   Mike Van Eaton, Co-Owner of Van Eaton Galleries said, “We are beyond thrilled that the map will continue to be appreciated and cherished just like it has been for all these years.”
  • A 35-year tradition continues with the same five guys, on the same bench in the same location. John Wardlaw, Mark Rumer-Cleary, Dallas Burney, John Molony and John Dickson have been friends for more four decades, CNN reported. >> Read more trending news  Wardlaw and Dickson were the first two to meet. Wardlaw’s family rented a home from the Dickson family in 1977. The others joined the pair in high school. After they graduated, some went off to college, while others joined the military.  But every year, they reunite at the Copco Lake cabin of Wardlaw’s grandfather, who built the home in 1970, CNN reported. In 1982, the five guys sat down on a bench and snapped their first photo.  Five years later, they did it again, repeating the pose to make the photo as close to the original as they could. Two rules apply to every photo they’ve taken. Molony must have a glass of some sort in his right hand and Rumer-Cleary must have a hat in his lap, CNN reported.  According to CNN, Wardlaw turned his teenage passion for making Super 8 movies into a career. He’s a filmmaker and photographer in Bend, Oregon. Rumer-Cleary works as a hardware and systems engineer in Portland. Burny is a teacher in Antioch, California. Molony lives in New Orleans and is a photographer. Dickson runs a tourism website in Santa Barbara, California.