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Latest from Glenn Schroeder

    The Nielsen company, which has long measured viewership of television programs, now says it has a way to collect and widely spread details about how many people watch programming produced by streaming services like Netflix and Amazon. Nielsen announced its new service on Wednesday and said that eight television networks and studios, including ABC and NBC, have subscribed to it. Even with Amazon’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” winning an Emmy for best drama last month, the number of people who actually watch the program has remained a mystery. Since 2014, Nielsen has been able to count viewership of streamed programs but reported it only to the companies that stream them. The companies, led by industry behemoth Netflix, have largely kept that information a secret. Now, Nielsen will be able to measure viewership of streamed programs through an audio signature that does not require any action by the programmers to activate it, said Brian Fuhrer, Nielsen’s senior vice president of product leadership.
  • A light seen in the night sky over the United Arab Emirates likely was a discarded Russian spaceship breaking up after re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere. Those in Abu Dhabi and Dubai shared online videos and pictures of the light seen in the sky Monday night. Aerospace websites and the Dubai Astronomy Group say it likely came from the cargo spacecraft Progress MS-07, which launched on Saturday. The unmanned, disposable spacecraft, which blasted off from the Russian-leased Baikonur launch complex in Kazakhstan, carried 2.5 metric tons of water, food and scientific equipment to the International Space Station. The governmental Dubai Media Office, citing the sheikhdom’s Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center, earlier called the light a “meteorite.” The space center did not respond to a request for comment on Tuesday.
  • By slashing corporate tax rates, the Trump administration said Monday, the average U.S. household will get an estimated $4,000 more a year. This stunning 5 percent increase is likely to be met with skepticism from tax experts and Democratic lawmakers. Spread across every U.S. household, the White House analysis claims it would generate “conservatively” an income jump totaling $504 billion, or about $200 billion more than the revenues currently generated by the corporate income tax. With this new report, the White House is making a populist argument for its proposal to cut the 35 percent corporate tax rate to 20 percent. Trump has pitched his tax plan as supporting the middle class even though the details point to major companies and the wealthy as the biggest winners. Polls suggest that voters generally frown upon the idea of cutting taxes for businesses — essentially rewarding these firms for avoiding taxes by exploiting loopholes and keeping profits overseas.
  • A potentially groundbreaking treatment for a rare form of blindness moved one step closer to U.S. approval Thursday, as federal health advisers endorsed the experimental gene therapy for patients with an inherited condition that gradually destroys eyesight. The panel experts to the Food and Drug Administration voted unanimously in favor of Spark Therapeutics’ injectable therapy, which aims to improve vision by replacing a defective gene needed to process light. The vote amounts to a recommendation to approve the therapy. The FDA has until mid-January to make its decision and does not have to follow the panel’s recommendation, though it often does. If approved, Luxturna would be the first gene therapy in the U.S. for an inherited disease and the first in which a corrective gene is given directly to patients. While the therapy from Spark Therapeutics targets a small group of patients — about 2,000 in the U.S. — experts say it could pave the way for other genetic treatments for a variety of inherited conditions.
  • Merck has decided to abandon efforts to market a closely watched experimental cholesterol medicine after mediocre test results. Merck’s decision Wednesday to not seek regulatory approval after years of testing marks the fourth time this type of once-promising drug has been scrapped. Merck had continued to study its drug, a so-called CETP inhibitor called anacetrapib, long after rivals had given up on similar drugs. Merck raised hopes when it announced in June that anacetrapib not only lowered cholesterol, but also reduced heart attacks, deaths and other heart disease complications. But in August it disclosed the pill only cut those risks 9 percent. That would have limited sales of the drug, if it had won regulatory approval, in part because cheap, genetic statin drugs lower cholesterol well for most people.
  • The Trump administration’s new birth control rule is raising questions among some doctors and researchers, who say it overlooks known benefits of contraception while selectively citing data that raise doubts about effectiveness and safety. “This rule is listing things that are not scientifically validated, and in some cases things that are wrong, to try to justify a decision that is not in the best interests of women and society,” said Dr. Hal Lawrence, CEO of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a professional society representing women’s health specialists. Two recently issued rules — one addressing religious objections and the other, moral objections — allow more employers to opt out of covering birth control as a preventive benefit for women under the Obama health care law. Although the regulations ultimately address matters of individual conscience and religious teaching, they also dive into medical research and scholarly studies on birth control. It’s on the science that researchers are questioning the Trump administration. They say officials ignored some recent research and stretched other studies. “The interpretation is very selective in terms of the science that they use,” said Alina Salganicoff, director of women’s health policy at the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. “It’s always possible to find one study that validates your claim, but you have to look at the quality of the study and the totality of the research. You can make an argument that you don’t agree because of your religious or moral objections, but that is a different discussion.”
  • Russian operatives likely spent tens of thousands of dollars on ads across Google products, including YouTube and Google search, according to reports.  Accounts connected with the Russian government spent $4,700 on search and display ads, while another $53,000 was spent on ads with political material that were purchased from Russian territory, from Russian internet addresses, or with Russian currency, The New York Times reported. The Times cited an unnamed person familiar with the ongoing inquiry by the search giant.  The Washington Post earlier reported that the technology behemoth uncovered the Russian-backed disinformation campaign as it considers whether to testify before Congress next month, also citing anonymous sources familiar with the investigation. Social media companies Facebook and Twitter have already agreed to testify. The reports said the company discovered the Russian presence by analyzing information shared by Twitter and Facebook, as well its own research and tips from outside researchers. In a statement, Google said it has a “set of strict ads policies including limits on political ad targeting and prohibitions on targeting based on race and religion.” “We are taking a deeper look to investigate attempts to abuse our systems, working with researchers and other companies, and will provide assistance to ongoing inquiries,” the statement continued. Facebook recently shared about 3,000 Russian-backed ads with Congress.
  • Most Americans believe their jobs are safe from the spread of automation and robotics, at least during their lifetimes, and only a handful says automation has cost them a job or loss of income. Just 30 percent of people surveyed say that it is at least somewhat likely that their own jobs will be done by computers or robots. Seventy percent say it is not very or not at all likely. Still, a survey by the Pew Research Center also found widespread anxiety about the general impact of technological change. Three-quarters of Americans say it is at least “somewhat realistic” that robots and computers will eventually perform most of the jobs currently done by people. Roughly the same proportion worry that such an outcome will have negative consequences, such as worsening inequality. “The public expects a number of different jobs and occupations to be replaced by technology in the coming decades, but few think their own job is heading in that direction,” Aaron Smith, associate director at the Pew Research Center, said. More than half of respondents expect that fast food workers, insurance claims processors and legal clerks will be mostly replaced by robots and computers during their lifetimes. Nearly two-thirds think that most retailers will be fully automated in 20 years, with little or no human interaction between customers and employers.
  • Americans are more likely to approve than disapprove of how President Donald Trump is handling hurricane relief in Florida and Texas, but it’s a different story when it comes to Puerto Rico. According to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 48 percent of Americans approve and just 27 percent disapprove of how Trump is handling the recoveries in U.S. states including Texas and Florida that were hit by hurricanes Harvey and Irma. But just 32 percent approve of how Trump is handling disaster relief in Puerto Rico, while 49 percent disapprove. The poll was conducted before Trump on Tuesday made his first trip to the U.S. territory 1,000 miles from the mainland after Hurricane Maria roared ashore Sept. 20 and knocked out all power. The federal response has drawn criticism and the administration has aggressively pushed back.
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is opening a new front in its efforts to reduce high drug prices by encouraging development of generic versions of hard-to-make medicines. Complex drugs and drug-device combinations generally are very expensive and some are widely used. Often, they don’t get generic competition right after their patent expires, as happens routinely with pills. Difficulty in creating copies or near-copies of such drugs and getting them approved may deter generic companies from even trying, FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb wrote in a blog post. That means patients don’t get access to cheaper versions of those drugs and the brand-name medicine makers continue to rake in money, often billions of dollars a year per drug. To get more generic versions of complex drugs on the market, the FDA will begin giving companies guidance on how to win approvals, including offering meetings with agency staff early on, to shorten the time for development and approval.
  • Glenn Schroeder

    KRMG Morning News Anchor

    Glenn is a self-described news and sports junkie. His passion for radio dates back to 1975. That's the year he got his first taste of life behind a microphone, handling play-by-play duties at his high school radio station. The University of Michigan graduate's circuitous journey to KRMG began at a very small radio station in Alamogordo, New Mexico. After stints at stations in Las Cruces, Mexico and Pueblo, Colorado, Glenn moved to Tulsa is 1991. It didn't take long for the Detroit native to realize that this is where he wanted to plant his roots. The Edward R. Murrow award winning journalist, who spent 10-years at KVOO, cites the Oklahoma City bombing as the most profound and difficult story he's ever covered. "The misery of those who lost loved one was deep and unrelenting. Yet, their strength and faith allowed our emotional scares to heal." Glenn's hobbies include running, gardening, Michigan football and NASCAR. "It's the only sport my wife enjoys." Glenn met Beth, the love of his life, in 1999. The two were married less than two years later.

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  • So how does Oklahoma compare to the rest of the U.S. on identity theft. The simple answer. Not great. WalletHub says we ranked 39th out of 51, including the District of Columbia. They looked at a number of metrics including the rate of identity theft per capita and the average amount of money lost per incident. The best advice, they say: have strong passwords, use two-step verification where it's available, and get credit monitoring. Sites like Credit Karma and WalletHub itself offer it for free. You can read more about it here.
  • Cheers to the holidays. A UK-based distillery has just the decorations you need to get through the tough days of Christmas with the family: liquor-filled ornaments.>> Read more trending news Lakes Distillery is offering clear glass ornaments filled with either whisky, gin or vodka. The baubles, as they are called, run about $26 each or you can get a six-pack for about $46. The ornaments are only available in the UK, but for those who are more DIY-minded, Insider suggests finding ornaments that can be filled and a liquor of choice to fill the tree with the spirits of Christmas.
  • Police are still sorting out all of the details of an attempted theft at the Gadget Company Wednesday afternoon near 15th and Boston. Investigators on the scene say the attempted shoplifter was trying to steal a Yeti cooler. The employee chased after the suspect and shots were fired.  No word on any injuries or possible charges.  The suspect was able to get away in a white or gold Honda Civic.  
  • Chick-fil-A customers in six regions will soon be able to feast on some fiery new additions to the chicken restaurant’s menu. >> Read more trending news Officials with the fast-food chain announced Monday that they will be testing two new items at select locations: Spicy Chick-n-Strips and a Grilled Spicy Chicken Deluxe Sandwich. The Spicy Chick-n-Strips are available now in three-count and four-count entrees for a limited time at participating restaurants in Philadelphia, Central Texas and South Texas. The Spicy Chick-n-Strips can also be ordered for catering at select locations. According to Chick-fil-A officials, the strips are a combination of the Spicy Chick-fil-A Chicken Sandwich and the original Chick-n-Strips. Select stores in Orlando, St. Louis and Knoxville, Tennessee, will offer the Grilled Spicy Deluxe Chicken Sandwich, which comes “marinated in a spicy seasoning and is served on a new, toasted multigrain brioche bun with Colby-Jack cheese, lettuce and tomato,” according to a Chick-fil-A news release. The sandwich is served with a new cilantro lime sauce. Chick-fil-A will consider customer response to the test items to determine whether to add them to the menu permanently. >> Related: Chick-fil-A tests large family style meals “We’ve heard from our customers how much they love our current spicy menu offerings, so we’re really excited to give them even more spicy flavor options to enjoy,” said Kanika Patrick, manager of menu development at Chick-fil-A. “We hope our guests in the test cities will try the new Spicy Chick-n-Strips and Grilled Spicy Deluxe Chicken Sandwich and let us know what they think – their feedback will help us determine whether or not we will roll out the new entrees nationwide in the future.” >> Related: World's biggest Chick-fil-A with 5 floors, rooftop deck to open in 2018
  • The Nielsen company, which has long measured viewership of television programs, now says it has a way to collect and widely spread details about how many people watch programming produced by streaming services like Netflix and Amazon. Nielsen announced its new service on Wednesday and said that eight television networks and studios, including ABC and NBC, have subscribed to it. Even with Amazon’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” winning an Emmy for best drama last month, the number of people who actually watch the program has remained a mystery. Since 2014, Nielsen has been able to count viewership of streamed programs but reported it only to the companies that stream them. The companies, led by industry behemoth Netflix, have largely kept that information a secret. Now, Nielsen will be able to measure viewership of streamed programs through an audio signature that does not require any action by the programmers to activate it, said Brian Fuhrer, Nielsen’s senior vice president of product leadership.