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Latest from Glenn Schroeder

    Harvesting Washington state's vast fruit orchards each year requires thousands of farm workers, and many of them work illegally in the United States. That system eventually could change dramatically as at least two companies are rushing to get robotic fruit-picking machines to market. The robotic pickers don't get tired and can work 24 hours a day. 'Human pickers are getting scarce,' said Gad Kober, a co-founder of Israel-based FFRobotics. 'Young people do not want to work in farms, and elderly pickers are slowly retiring.' FFRobotics and Abundant Robotics, of Hayward, California, are racing to get their mechanical pickers to market within the next couple of years. Harvest has long been mechanized for large portions of the agriculture industry, such as wheat, corn, green beans, tomatoes and many other crops. But for more fragile commodities like apples, berries, table grapes and lettuce - where the crop's appearance is especially important - harvest is still done by hand. Members of the $7.5 billion annual Washington agriculture industry have long grappled with labor shortages, and depend on workers coming up from Mexico each year to harvest many crops.
  • Researchers have taken an important step toward better lung cancer treatment by using blood tests to track genetic changes in tumors as they progress from their very earliest stages. With experimental tests that detect bits of DNA that tumors shed into the blood, they were able to detect some recurrences of cancer up to a year before imaging scans could, giving a chance to try new therapy sooner. It's the latest development for tests called liquid biopsies, which analyze cancer using blood rather than tissue samples. Some doctors use these tests now to guide care for patients with advanced cancers, mostly in research settings. The new work is the first time tests like this have been used to monitor the evolution of lung tumors at an early stage, when there's a much better chance of cure. Only about one third of lung cancer cases in the United States are found at an early stage, and even fewer in other parts of the world. But more may be in the future as a result of screening of longtime smokers at high risk of the disease that started a few years ago in the U.S. Early-stage cases are usually treated with surgery. Many patients get chemotherapy after that, but it helps relatively few of them. 'We have to treat 20 patients to cure one. That's a lot of side effects to cure one patient,' said Dr. Charles Swanton of the Francis Crick Institute in London. The new studies he led suggest that liquid biopsies might help show who would or would not benefit from chemotherapy, and give an early warning if it's not working so something else can be tried.
  • Researchers are creating an artificial womb to improve care for extremely premature babies - and remarkable animal testing suggests the first-of-its-kind watery incubation so closely mimics mom that it just might work.  Today, premature infants weighing as little as a pound are hooked to ventilators and other machines inside incubators. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is aiming for a gentler solution, to give the tiniest preemies a few more weeks cocooned in a womb-like environment - treating them more like fetuses than newborns in hopes of giving them a better chance of healthy survival.   The researchers created a fluid-filled transparent container to simulate how fetuses float in amniotic fluid inside mom's uterus, and attached it to a mechanical placenta that keeps blood oxygenated.  In early-stage animal testing, extremely premature lambs grew, apparently normally, inside the system for three to four weeks, the team reported Tuesday.   'We start with a tiny fetus that is pretty inert and spends most of its time sleeping. Over four weeks we see that fetus open its eyes, grow wool, breathe, swim,' said Dr. Emily Partridge, a CHOP research fellow and first author of the study published in Nature Communications.
  • Going into this week's federal budget battle, the White House toyed with a hardball tactic to force congressional Democrats to negotiate on President Donald Trump's priorities. They just might eliminate billions of dollars in disputed 'Obamacare' subsidies. But a study out Tuesday from a nonpartisan group suggests that could backfire. Stopping the Affordable Care Act payments at issue may actually wind up costing the federal government billions more than it would save. The Kaiser Family Foundation found that taxpayers would end up paying 23 percent more than the potential savings from eliminating the health law's 'cost-sharing' subsidies, which help low-income people with insurance deductibles and co-payments. It adds up to an estimated $2.3 billion more in 2018, or an additional $31 billion over 10 years. How's that possible? The short answer is that insurers would still be free to raise premiums, driving federal spending even higher on a separate subsidy provided under the program. 'You end up with a counter-intuitive result,' said Larry Levitt, one of the study's authors. Former Congressional Budget Office director Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a Republican economist, reviewed the Kaiser study for The Associated Press and concurred. 'I think this may even be a conservative estimate,' he said. 'It says what's at stake: double-digit premium increases and more money out of the Treasury, not less.
  • Three African countries have been chosen to test the world's first malaria vaccine, the World Health Organization announced Monday. Ghana, Kenya and Malawi will begin piloting the injectable vaccine next year with hundreds of thousands of young children, who have been at highest risk of death. The vaccine, which has partial effectiveness, has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives if used with existing measures, the WHO regional director for Africa, Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, said in a statement. The challenge is whether impoverished countries can deliver the required four doses of the vaccine for each child. Malaria remains one of the world's most stubborn health challenges, infecting more than 200 million people every year and killing about half a million, most of them children in Africa. Bed netting and insecticides are the chief protection. Sub-Saharan Africa is hardest hit by the disease, with about 90 percent of the world's cases in 2015. Malaria spreads when a mosquito bites someone already infected, sucks up blood and parasites, and then bites another person. A global effort to counter malaria has led to a 62 percent cut in deaths between 2000 and 2015, WHO said. But the U.N. agency has said in the past that such estimates are based mostly on modeling and that data is so bad for 31 countries in Africa - including those believed to have the worst outbreaks - that it couldn't tell if cases have been rising or falling in the last 15 years.
  • A coin flip has decided who will lead a tiny southern Illinois town after an election this month ended in a tie. Tammy O'Daniell-Howell is the new village president of Colp, home to about 250 residents, after the coin toss Thursday. Williamson County Clerk Amanda Barnes says opponent Bryan Riekena let O'Daniell-Howell choose heads or tails. She picked heads and that's where it landed. Barnes says both candidates inspected the 2016 North Dakota quarter before the event and that she 'let it just fall to the ground.' The candidates each received 11 votes in the April 4 election. Illinois law calls for coin flips to settle ties. Barnes says the quarter was 'the shiniest one' she could find in the office.
  • Astronomers have found yet another planet that seems to have just the right Goldilocks combination for life: Not so hot and not so cold. It's not so far away, either. This new, big, dense planet is rocky, like Earth, and has the right temperatures for water, putting it in the habitable zone for life, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature . It's the fifth such life-possible planet outside our solar system revealed in less than a year, but still relatively nearby Earth. Rocky planets within that habitable zone of a star are considered the best place to find evidence of some form of life. 'It is astonishing to live in a time when discovery of potentially habitable worlds is not only commonplace but proliferating,' said MIT astronomer Sara Seager, who wasn't part of the study. The first planet outside our solar system was discovered in 1995, but thanks to new techniques and especially NASA's planet-hunting Kepler telescope, the number of them has exploded in recent years. Astronomers have now identified 52 potentially habitable planets and more than 3,600 planets outside our solar system.  The latest discovery, called LHS 1140b, regularly passes in front of its star, allowing astronomers to measure its size and mass. That makes astronomers more confident that this one is rocky, compared to other recent discoveries.
  • Iowa legislators sent Gov. Terry Branstad a measure Tuesday that would ban most abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy and impose a 72-hour waiting period on women seeking the procedure, a move highlighting the state's conservative shift since the November election. The Republican-majority state Senate voted 30-20 along party lines for the legislation, after the GOP-led House approved it earlier this month. Branstad, a Republican, is expected to sign it. The 20-week provision includes no exceptions for rape, incest or fatal fetal conditions, though it would allow an abortion to be performed if the woman's life is at risk. At least 19 other states have similar 20-week bans, which are based on the disputed premise that a fetus can feel pain at that stage. Some have been stuck down by federal appeals courts, though the bulk of the bans are in effect.  The bill also would require a woman to wait 72 hours before she could get an abortion. Iowa would join five other states that have passed the same waiting period requirement, the longest in the country. The legislation is a victory for GOP lawmakers in the state who have attempted abortion restrictions in the past only to be halted by Democrats. Republicans control both chambers and the governor's office for the first time in nearly 20 years following the Nov. 8 election. They've used the new power to push conservative-leaning legislation this session, including abortion restrictions.
  • An alligator has been wrangled after crawling out of a storm drain in Louisiana. WWL reports a 7-foot alligator emerged from a drain in Jefferson Parish on Monday after heavy rains. The drain was located behind an elementary school that wasn't holding class because of spring break. The alligator did move around, but Bucktown resident Hazel Porter described it as mainly 'just chilling.' Video obtained by WWL shows a group of Bucktown residents detaining the alligator by lassoing its neck and tying the rope to a nearby pole as the creature thrashes. Steven Nicholson, a witness, says wildlife professions arrived and taped its mouth shut. The wranglers placed the bound alligator in a pickup truck and planned to relocate it.
  • A Montana State University professor is suing Wal-Mart for libel after he says an employee at the Bozeman store listed his occupation on a fishing license as a 'toilet cleaner.' Gilbert Kalonde, assistant professor of technology education at MSU, filed the suit this past week in Gallatin County District Court. Kalonde is seeking unspecified damages. Wal-Mart spokesman Ragan Dickens told The Associated Press: 'To our knowledge an administrative process to resolve this with Dr. Kalonde is ongoing. We've not been served with the lawsuit, but we take the claims seriously and will respond appropriately with the court.' According to the complaint, Kalonde bought a state fishing license in April 2015, showing the Wal-Mart employee identification of his employment at MSU. But the Wal-Mart employee entered 'clean toilets' into the state database as Kalonde's occupation. The suit contends Wal-Mart exposed Kalonde to 'hatred, contempt, ridicule' through the incident.
  • Glenn Schroeder

    KRMG Morning News Anchor

    Glenn is a self-described news and sports junkie. His passion for radio dates back to 1975. That's the year he got his first taste of life behind a microphone, handling play-by-play duties at his high school radio station. The University of Michigan graduate's circuitous journey to KRMG began at a very small radio station in Alamogordo, New Mexico. After stints at stations in Las Cruces, Mexico and Pueblo, Colorado, Glenn moved to Tulsa is 1991. It didn't take long for the Detroit native to realize that this is where he wanted to plant his roots. The Edward R. Murrow award winning journalist, who spent 10-years at KVOO, cites the Oklahoma City bombing as the most profound and difficult story he's ever covered. "The misery of those who lost loved one was deep and unrelenting. Yet, their strength and faith allowed our emotional scares to heal." Glenn's hobbies include running, gardening, Michigan football and NASCAR. "It's the only sport my wife enjoys." Glenn met Beth, the love of his life, in 1999. The two were married less than two years later.

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  • A woman was recently arrested for allegedly embezzling nearly $9,000 from a Broken Arrow Mazzio's. Police report Diana Pruett confessed to processing false refunds when customers used cash. She would then pocket the money. One resident we spoke to says Pruett is hurting the community by her actions. “It’s really sad when you feel like you can depend on the people that live in our community to be fair and honest,” the resident said.  “We’re all in this community together. “ She was discovered, when a manager noticed something suspicious with the number of returns and refunds at the store. Pruett was booked into the Tulsa County Jail and has since bonded out.  
  • We have updated information regarding a clerk getting fatally shot on Friday at the S&K Food Mart near East Virgin Street and North Sheridan. Following a standoff that lasted a few hours, police confirm three people have been taken into custody at an apartment complex near 31st and Garnett.  One of those suspects wasn’t involved in the standoff.    Police tell us the clerk didn't deserve to have this happen to him. “It’s never good when someone is dead,” TPD said  “It’s senseless.  For very little gain.” It's believed one or more of the suspects may also be responsible for a robbery at a bakery near 11th and Lewis around the same time. As of early Saturday morning,  no names have been released.  
  • President Donald Trump will use his 100th day in office to make a return to the campaign trail, holding an evening rally in the Pennsylvania state capital of Harrisburg, taking his message of change back to the familiar crowds of the 2016 race for the White House. While Mr. Trump has been happy to highlight his accomplishments of his first 100 days – he has also mixed that 100 day review with jabs at the news media, saying the measurement for a new President is a “false standard.” “We’re moving awfully well, getting a lot of things done,” the President told the press after signing an executive order on offshore oil and gas exploration on Friday. “I don’t think there’s ever been anything like this,” Mr. Trump added. President Trump: 'I don't think anybody has done what we've been able to do in 100 days' https://t.co/lww9H061kG — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) April 28, 2017 In a speech on Friday in Atlanta at a gathering of the National Rifle Association, the President visited familiar campaign themes, replaying the events of Election Night, and jabbing at Democrats at every opportunity. “Only one candidate in the General Election came to speak to you, and that candidate is now the President of the United States, standing before you again,” the President said, eagerly reminding the crowd that few people gave him a chance to win last year. “And remember they said, “There is no path to 270.” For months I was hearing that,” Mr. Trump added, as he vowed to protect the Second Amendment during his time in office. President Trump: 'I will never, ever infringe on the right of the people to keep and bear arms' https://t.co/Gsk5Vz2iOV — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) April 28, 2017 The President’s choice to go to Harrisburg – the state capital – is an interesting one, as Dauphin County was one of only 11 counties to vote for Hillary Clinton in November, going 49 to 46 percent for the Democrats. Mr. Trump won the Keystone State by just 44,000 votes, as his wins in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin were a linchpin for his overall victory. “It was a great evening, one that a lot people will never forget,” Mr. Trump said Friday. “Not going to forget that evening.” The President’s decision to hold a Saturday evening rally in Pennsylvania is also notable for what he will leave behind in Washington, D.C. – the White House Correspondent’s Dinner – which Mr. Trump and his top aides decided not to attend.
  • If you have outdoor plans for Saturday, you will need an umbrella and a good pair of rain boots. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mike Lacy tells us most of Saturday will be a rain out. “Pretty good chance for rain, about 100 percent,” NWS said.  “Especially, during the early part of the day.”   We also have a chance for severe weather.   “The main threat should begin to shift to the east and south of Tulsa,” NWS said.   The high for Saturday will be around 73 degrees. There is also rain in the forecast for Saturday night and Sunday.  
  • Police were called to a the S&K Food Mart Friday evening near Virgin St. and Sheridan. Police tell FOX23 the clerk was hit and killed. No one else inside the store was injured. No word yet on the clerk’s identity or any suspect information. Tune to NEWs102.3 and AM740 KRMG for updates.