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Latest from April Hill

    A couple in Edmond solved a mystery after their child’s pacifiers kept disappearing. The mother and father couldn't figure out what was happening to their child's pacifiers until the baby's grandmother saw the family dog swipe one off a counter.  One nauseous pooch and a trip to their veterinarian's office confirmed the couple's hunch. The family’s dog, named Dovey, had 21 pacifiers lodged in her stomach.  Dovey is on the mend and home, but the vet cautioned pet owners that 'dogs will eat anything, anytime.'  
  • A scuffle with and Oklahoma police officer led to the death of a man over the weekend. Oklahoma City Police Sgt. Robbie Robertson says an officer responded to a request to check on a person lying on the side of the road. Police say when the fight started after the officer approached the man. He knocked her pepper spray away. She then attempted to use a Taser and he took that from her and tried to use it on her. Robertson says the officer then drew her gun and fired, killing the man. The officer has been taken to a hospital with non-life threatening injuries to her face and hands.
  • Trouble has been brewing for weeks at the Oklahoma State Department of Health. Now, just days before Christmas, KRMG has learned that nearly 200 employees will be laid off to reduce costs. The department will eliminate 37 positions immediately and cut 161 more in March. Friday's announcement comes just more than one month after health Commissioner Terry Cline and other officials resigned amid allegations of financial mismanagement. State finance secretary Preston Doerflinger was named interim commissioner. Doeflinger has said spending problems go back more than five years.  The department is under investigation by the state auditor and a state House committee.
  • Governor Mary Fallin issued an executive order on Friday directing state agencies to build an environment free from sexual harassment and unlawful discrimination.  “We have seen a growing number of sexual harassment incidents reported in Oklahoma and across the nation,” said Gov. Fallin. Attorney General Mike Hunter encouraged state agency directors to utilize the training already offered by the Office of Civil Rights Enforcement. The executive order calls for more training to spot inappropriate behavior. “Sexual harassment is wrong and cannot be tolerated,” said Gov. Fallin.  The order also directs agency leaders to notify employees of the procedure for filing and processing a sexual harassment complaint.
  • Governor Mary Fallin called lawmakers to return to the State Capitol for a special session to address the shortfall in the current fiscal year budget. This will be the second special session this year.  Gov. Fallin scheduled the next session on Monday, Dec. 18. “I wanted to give legislators enough notice as possible about when they should return to the Capitol,” said Fallin. Fallin didn’t file an executive order, or an official call, for the special session. She says she’ll do that at a later date. “Before the session begins, I intend to make specific recommendations on how we can balance the budget and meet our immediate needs.” The current 2018 fiscal year budget includes $509 million of one-time funds and future obligations of at least $180 million not included in the 2018 fiscal year budget.
  • State Treasurer Ken Miller announced that the November Gross Receipts to the Treasury are more than 12 percent higher than the same month of last year. Oklahoma has had eight consecutive months with year-over-year growth. The last time monthly gross receipts grew by more than 12 percent was in February 2012. “Gross Receipts to the Treasury, insomuch as they indicate general economic activity, paint an encouraging picture as we enter the holiday period,” Miller said.  “Sales tax collections, a measure of consumer confidence, are up by double-digits and the bulk of holiday shopping including Black Friday is not yet measured with this report.” The three other major revenue streams – gross income, gross production, and motor vehicle taxes – also increased during the month compared to November of last year.
  • U.S. Senator James Lankford, of Oklahoma, supports President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. “I applaud the President’s recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and the start of a long process to move the US Embassy to Jerusalem,” said Sen. Lankford.  Lankford says the Israeli government is in Jerusalem; ignoring the physical location does not bring the region closer to peace. Lankford visited Israel in August and March to meet with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and other diplomats.   
  • University of Oklahoma running back Rodney Anderson is pushing back against a story that is making headlines nationwide. A woman who filed a petition for a protective order against Anderson accuses him of sexually assaulting her.  The petition says Anderson walked the woman home after she had been drinking on Nov. 16.  It says the woman remembers kissing Anderson and vomiting.  She says she later recalled Anderson forcing himself on her and feeling like she couldn't escape.  Anderson's attorney says the allegations are 'patently false' and his client is 'shocked and disturbed by them.' The university hasn’t commented on the case. 
  • A Tulsa dentist is accused in the death his girlfriend’s 19-month-old son last year. Now, 36-year-old Bert Glen Franklin has been charged with conspiracy to have the woman killed. Oklahoma County District Court records show Franklin was charged Monday with conspiracy to commit first-degree murder. Prosecutors say Franklin solicited the help of fellow jail inmates to kill Roxanne Lewis Randall. Franklin was scheduled to go to trial for first-degree murder Monday in the death of Lincoln Von Henry Lewis.  Prosecutors allege Franklin caused fatal injuries to the child's head.  Lincoln died two days later. Franklin has pleaded not guilty to the murder charge.
  • Rumors have been swirling this week about other colleges trying to lure Head football coach Mike Gundy away from Oklahoma State. On Friday, the Oklahoma State/A&M Board of Regents approved an addendum to Gundy's contract that includes a $675,000 pay increase, bumping his salary to $5 million per year. Coach Gundy tweeted 'Cowboy For Life' earlier this week after he was linked to the Vols' open job in Tennessee. 
  • April Hill

    News Director

    April Hill's first "job" in radio was in college at WMSV. Early every morning she would rise and shine after waiting tables late into the night. Hill didn't actually get paid. She was just thrilled to have an opportunity to get real live on-air experience. The importance of her first morning radio anchor gig wouldn't be realized until more than a decade later.

    Hill's first paid job in broadcasting was at the CBS TV affiliate in Jackson, MS, in 1998. Her shift as the associate producer on the morning show at WJTV started at 10:00 p.m. Hill said, "I remember telling my boss how excited I was after getting my first paycheck and he laughed. The check was very small, but I was still a kid really. I'd never had a check that big." She worked a retail job to afford rent in a high crime area of town. "I didn't care. For the first time, I had my own place all to myself. I also got a good laugh when people asked where I lived. Their facial expressions, filled with horror, were so entertaining."

    Hill decided to get in on the action in front of the camera. The market size in Jackson was too big for them to giver her a shot (although she tried). After sending out at least 100 resumés with no response. Hill quit her job to concentrate on chasing her dream full-time. Hill's  brother lived in Tulsa and was willing to let her live there rent free for a few months. "I drove to every small television station from Florida to Iowa, 25 cities altogether. I got only one offer and that's all I needed."

    In 2001, Hill started as a reporter at KLKN-TV in Lincoln, NE. She said, "I really loved Lincoln. It's filled with honest, hard working people." Hill was what they call in the business a one-man-band. She was the reporter, photographer and the editor. Living in a capitol city, and the home of the Husker's, taught her how to cover every story under the sun. "I worked weekends at first, so I was on the 50-yard line every home game covering the fans. I then moved up to the legislature beat Monday through Friday. In between, there were tornados, snow storms and drought... a lot like here in Oklahoma."

    In 2007, Hill decided she wanted to move home. Since she grew up in the small town of Independence, KS, Tulsa was the perfect distance and size. "I had been away from home for so long and it was strange when I would talk to people who knew about my home town. Some had even been there." She took a producer job at KJRH, which had a weather camera on main street in Independence. Hill said, "The meteorologists would use it as much as possible during my newscast because they knew I'd love it."

    Hill was back home and content, until KRMG's Steve Berg approached her about a weekend anchor job that was open at the radio station. "I thought, oh radio? I haven't done that in a while. Sounds like fun." Dan Potter was the news director and hired her a couple of months later. Hill worked seven days a week for three years. She said, "I looked forward to my weekends at KRMG, but I wanted full-time. I wanted it so badly that I would fill-in working both jobs on holidays and only took one weekend off for a family wedding." Her hard work paid off.

    The morning show host at the time, KRMG's Joe Kelley, hired Hill full-time as soon as a position was available. She said, "I loved it from day one. Joe and I just clicked. He worked hard and recognized my work ethic and passion for the radio station. So, Joe became my mentor and all of the sudden promotions started happening faster than I could even ask." A few months after going full-time, Hill was asked to take the morning anchor position. It was only another few months and she was tapped to be the news director, taking over Kelley's position when he moved to sister station WDBO in Orlando. "My emotions were all over the board. I was losing my best boss and gaining the highest position of my career."

    Kelley left Hill in good hands. Dan Potter took over as morning host (remember, he was the one who hired her). "Dan and I are going to continue the momentum than KRMG has been building for years. We're here to stay and even get better. I believe that 100 percent."

    Read More
  • Trading barbs with President Donald Trump via Twitter on Tuesday, women Democrats demanded that Congress investigate past claims of sexual misconduct leveled against the President during the 2016 campaign, as several lawmakers took the extra step of asking for Mr. Trump’s resignation. “President Trump should resign. But, of course, he won’t hold himself accountable,” said Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), who has emerged as the leader of efforts to pressure the President on the issue of past allegations. Mr. Trump lobbed a Twitter barb directly at the New York Democrat on Tuesday morning, labeling her a “lightweight” and “total flunky.” Lightweight Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a total flunky for Chuck Schumer and someone who would come to my office “begging” for campaign contributions not so long ago (and would do anything for them), is now in the ring fighting against Trump. Very disloyal to Bill & Crooked-USED! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2017 Gillibrand answered back, saying her voice would not be shut down by the President. You cannot silence me or the millions of women who have gotten off the sidelines to speak out about the unfitness and shame you have brought to the Oval Office. https://t.co/UbQZqubXZv — Kirsten Gillibrand (@SenGillibrand) December 12, 2017 And she was joined by other Democrats as well, in calling for the stories about the President to get more of a public airing. . @realDonaldTrump is a misogynist, compulsive liar, and admitted sexual predator. Attacks on Kirsten are the latest example that no one is safe from this bully. He must resign. https://t.co/7lNI23K7ib — Senator Mazie Hirono (@maziehirono) December 12, 2017 Are you really trying to bully, intimidate and slut-shame @SenGillibrand? Do you know who you're picking a fight with? Good luck with that, @realDonaldTrump. Nevertheless, #shepersisted. https://t.co/mYJtBZfxiu — Elizabeth Warren (@SenWarren) December 12, 2017 A day after the White House turned aside questions about past claims made by women against the President, Mr. Trump directly addressed the matter, saying that it was all “FAKE NEWS,” calling the charges against him nothing more than ‘false accusations and fabricated stories.’ Despite thousands of hours wasted and many millions of dollars spent, the Democrats have been unable to show any collusion with Russia – so now they are moving on to the false accusations and fabricated stories of women who I don’t know and/or have never met. FAKE NEWS! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2017 At a news conference on Tuesday afternoon, a group of House Democratic women asked Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC), the head of the House Oversight committee, to investigate the accusations against Mr. Trump. “At least 17 women have publicly accused the President of sexual misconduct,” the letter to Gowdy stated. “The President’s own remarks appear to back up the allegations,” the letter continued. “The President has boasted in public and in crude terms that he feels at liberty to perpetrate such conduct against women.” “The ‘Me-Too’ movement has arrived,” said Rep. Lois Frankel (D-FL). “Victims must be heard, perpetrators must be held accountable.” 'To date, more than 17 women have publicly come forward to accuse Donald Trump of sexual misconduct,' lawmaker says. 'Simply said, Americans deserve the truth.' https://t.co/mIxkZRGYzP pic.twitter.com/QhBvmGSxE1 — CBS News (@CBSNews) December 12, 2017 At a news conference, Frankel said the letter – which originally had 58 signatures – had swiftly jumped to over 100 in all. “Americans deserve the truth,” Frankel told reporters. While the Democratic women were in the spotlight, some of their male colleagues also chimed in with calls for a more thorough review of the accusations against Mr. Trump. “If you called for Franken to step down, don’t you also have to say it is the right thing for the President to resign?” said Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) on CNN.
  • After enduring weeks of speculation on what would happen if controversial Republican Roy Moore wins a seat in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers on Capitol Hill are waiting like everyone else to see the next act in this political play, as Senate GOP leaders have made clear they won’t give Moore a hero’s welcome if he does emerge victorious on Tuesday night in Alabama. As Senators arrived for their first vote of the week on Monday evening, Republicans ran a gauntlet of reporters asking a simple question – will Roy Moore soon be in the U.S. Senate? “I don’t know,” said Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), the senior Senator from the Yellowhammer State, who has made clear that he did not vote for Moore, but instead wrote in another Republican in the Alabama Senate race. Pressed again to say if Moore would win, Shelby re-emphasized his vote. “Not with my help,” he said. The polls in Alabama have been back and forth in recent weeks. The latest on Monday from Fox News, showed a 10 point lead for Moore’s Democratic opponent, Doug Jones. Fox News Poll: Enthused Democrats give Jones lead over Moore in Alabama https://t.co/7RZmnq0zXN #FoxNews — Mihai Scorobete (@MihaiScorobete) December 11, 2017 “We’ll see,” said Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), who denounced Moore, and gave $100 to the Jones campaign. “At this point it’s what I call a turnout race,” said Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL), when asked who would win. “It depends who gets their vote out.” While Byrne believes the edge is with the GOP, political pollsters say his turnout argument is on point. “Tomorrow’s Alabama Senate special election will depend on which candidate has more people turn out to vote for him,” pollster Frank Luntz wrote Monday on Twitter. This group of conservative Alabama voters say all 9 of Roy Moore's accusers have been paid to lie against him. #ALSen https://t.co/OT1vV33KRT — Frank Luntz (@FrankLuntz) December 9, 2017 Outside the Senate chamber, many Republicans wanted to wait and see the vote totals before worrying about their next move. “Let’s see what happens,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI), as he was pursued by a group of reporters. “That’s a decision that I leave to the Leader,” Johnson said when asked how Moore should be dealt with by his fellow Republicans – if he wins. “I’m not going to make a call on his qualifications,” said Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC) of Moore. “That will be a decision that will be made after the outcome of the election.” Others were quiet on the subject of Roy Moore for an obvious reason. “The answer to your question is, I’m doing good,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA), before I had even asked the Senator a question. “I can’t talk to you about anything because I’m the Ethics Chairman,” Isakson added, as the Georgia Republican would be in charge of any ethics review of Moore, which the Senate Majority Leader has made clear he would ask for that if Moore is elected. Isakson – and his GOP colleagues – will find out Tuesday night what’s next for them, and what’s next for Roy Moore.
  • A couple in Edmond solved a mystery after their child’s pacifiers kept disappearing. The mother and father couldn't figure out what was happening to their child's pacifiers until the baby's grandmother saw the family dog swipe one off a counter.  One nauseous pooch and a trip to their veterinarian's office confirmed the couple's hunch. The family’s dog, named Dovey, had 21 pacifiers lodged in her stomach.  Dovey is on the mend and home, but the vet cautioned pet owners that 'dogs will eat anything, anytime.'  
  • The Broken Arrow Police Department now has an Unmanned Aerial System Program, better known as a drone. They say it will be used for Crime and Collision Scene Investigation, Emergency Management Incidents, Search and Rescue Operations, and Tactical Situations. They make a point to point out it won't be used for Routine Patrol, Warrantless Searches, or as a Weapons Platform. The drone was made possible by a donation from alumni of the Citizens Police Academy.
  • A scuffle with and Oklahoma police officer led to the death of a man over the weekend. Oklahoma City Police Sgt. Robbie Robertson says an officer responded to a request to check on a person lying on the side of the road. Police say when the fight started after the officer approached the man. He knocked her pepper spray away. She then attempted to use a Taser and he took that from her and tried to use it on her. Robertson says the officer then drew her gun and fired, killing the man. The officer has been taken to a hospital with non-life threatening injuries to her face and hands.