ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
51°
Thunderstorms
H 73° L 54°
  • cloudy-day
    51°
    Current Conditions
    Thunderstorms. H 73° L 54°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    47°
    Afternoon
    Thunderstorms. H 73° L 54°
  • cloudy-day
    38°
    Evening
    Cloudy. H 65° L 27°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from April Hill

    A Rogers County man was arrested for allegedly giving his 12-year-old son advice on how to kill himself. Sheriff's Maj. Coy Jenkins, with the Rogers County Sheriff’s Office, said Friday that the boy suffered minor burns after following his father's suggestion that he light himself on fire. Michael Joseph Jensen was arrested Wednesday on a child neglect warrant.  The boy's grandparents were able to put out the fire. Jenkins said the son had previously attempted suicide and was living with his grandparents when Jensen visited.  Authorities don't believe that Jensen was serious when he told his son to set himself on fire and shoot himself in the head. 
  • The Oklahoma Department of Health says the record breaking flu season now includes the death of a child. Health department records show that the vast majority of this season's flu-related fatalities, 105, were 65-years-old or older. The number of deaths statewide is now up to 153 people. The previous record of 130 deaths was set during last year's flu season. The number of deaths and hospitalizations in the state surpass any other flu season since the Health Department began tracking the illness in 2009. 
  • We’re not out of danger yet, but the Oklahoma economic outlook does seem to be looking up. State finance leaders say collections by Oklahoma's largest operating fund so far this fiscal year are almost 13 percent higher than the same period last year. Denise Northrup, director of the Office of Management and Enterprise Services, said Wednesday the state's coffers have not fully recovered from a prolonged slump in energy prices. In spite of the good financial news, Northrup says the current year's budget has still not been fully funded with only four months left. Collections by the general revenue fund during the first seven months of the fiscal year that began July 1 were $3.3 billion, which is $369 million or 12.7 percent over the same period in the previous year. Last month, collections totaled $596 million, almost $91 million or 18 percent above January 2017.
  • An Oklahoma woman was sentenced to life in prison without parole Monday for killing her adult daughter. Court documents show that Juanita Gomez told police she forced a crucifix down her daughter's throat because she believed the woman was possessed by the devil. Police found 33-year-old Geneva Gomez lying inside her mother's Oklahoma City home with her arms spread out as if she had been crucified. A large crucifix had been placed on her chest. The judge followed the sentence recommended by jurors who convicted her in January of first-degree murder. Attorneys for Juanita Gomez plan to appeal.
  • A judge followed through with his unusual plan Thursday. The Oklahoman reports that U.S. District Judge Stephen Friot showed leniency to 34-year-old Summer Thyme Creel during her sentencing because she had surgery to prevent pregnancies. Creel was convicted of using a counterfeit check at a Walmart in Moore. Judge Friot had suggested the medical procedure in a June order, noting that Creel had relinquished her parental rights to six of her seven children. She faced a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.
  • Former U.S. Army 1st Lt. Michael Behenna, of Edmond, was convicted of killing a suspected terrorist in an Iraqi prison. On Thursday, Attorney General Mike Hunter announced that he sent a letter to President Donald Trump, expressing his support for a pardon. “Michael Behenna was a courageous soldier, a great leader and does not deserve to be labeled a convicted felon for the rest of his life,” said Attorney General Hunter. Behenna was granted parole in 2014 after serving five years of his 15-year sentence.  “He and his family have gone through enough. I encourage President Trump to act quickly and compassionately by pardoning Behenna, to give him back the freedoms he deserves.” Hunter says that without a pardon, Behenna's punishment will continue outside of prison.  
  • The jury didn’t take long to come up with a verdict Wednesday afternoon in the case against Stanley Majors. Jury members found Majors guilty in the August 2016 shooting death of Khalid Jabara outside of his south Tulsa home.  Prosecutors alleged that Majors killed Jabara after bombarding him with racial insults in a feud with Jabara's family for years. Defense attorneys argued in court papers that Majors showed signs of dementia and appeared to have problems with his long-term memory.  They said those issues interfered with their ability to prepare a defense. Majors previously pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder and malicious intimidation and harassment, which is Oklahoma's hate-crime law. The jury recommended life without parole.
  • Drivers on the Inner Dispersal Loop around downtown started to have problems shortly after 3:00pm Tuesday. FOX23 and NEWS102.3 KRMG Chief Meteorologist James Aydelott has been telling us that the winter weather was headed to Green Country Tuesday afternoon and evening, and now it has arrived. Freezing rain and sleet are in the forecast across parts of Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas, leaving roads slick and hazardous in the region. The National Weather Service has issued a winter weather advisory for Tulsa County until midnight. Counties to the south and east of Tulsa are also in the advisory. The National Weather Service says power outages are unlikely, as wind speeds are expected to remain light with accumulations near a tenth of an inch. Sunshine returns Wednesday with highs in the 40s.
  • Governor Mary Fallin delivered her final State of the State address to Oklahoma legislators Monday. As Gov. Fallin finished her speech, a woman holding a toddler accused Fallin of being a 'liar and murderer.'  The heckler shouted from the gallery before House sergeants were able to usher her out of the chamber. The speech was her eighth and final State of the State address. “The Oklahoma Senate appreciates Governor Fallin’s emphasis on solving our budget issues,” said Oklahoma Senate President Pro Tempore Mike Schulz, R-Altus.  Schulz says we can’t only focus on revenue.  “We need to implement budgetary reforms and prioritize our spending to ensure the most efficient use and best return on each tax dollar collected.”  
  • Two national civil rights groups have joined a federal lawsuit against dozens of Oklahoma sheriffs, judges and court clerks. Georgetown University's Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection and Civil Rights Corps joined an amended complaint filed late Thursday in Tulsa. The lawsuit accuses the defendants of operating a debt-collection scheme that preys on poor people by sending them to jail if they can't pay court costs. The plaintiffs want to stop any further arrests of indigent people until the case can go before a judge. The initial lawsuit was filed in November. The suit accuses the Oklahoma Sheriffs' Association, debt collection firm Aberdeen Enterprizes II and others of violating the Constitution by conspiring to collect court costs and unpaid fines without regard to a defendant's ability to pay.
  • April Hill

    News Director

    April Hill's first "job" in radio was in college at WMSV. Early every morning she would rise and shine after waiting tables late into the night. Hill didn't actually get paid. She was just thrilled to have an opportunity to get real live on-air experience. The importance of her first morning radio anchor gig wouldn't be realized until more than a decade later.

    Hill's first paid job in broadcasting was at the CBS TV affiliate in Jackson, MS, in 1998. Her shift as the associate producer on the morning show at WJTV started at 10:00 p.m. Hill said, "I remember telling my boss how excited I was after getting my first paycheck and he laughed. The check was very small, but I was still a kid really. I'd never had a check that big." She worked a retail job to afford rent in a high crime area of town. "I didn't care. For the first time, I had my own place all to myself. I also got a good laugh when people asked where I lived. Their facial expressions, filled with horror, were so entertaining."

    Hill decided to get in on the action in front of the camera. The market size in Jackson was too big for them to giver her a shot (although she tried). After sending out at least 100 resumés with no response. Hill quit her job to concentrate on chasing her dream full-time. Hill's  brother lived in Tulsa and was willing to let her live there rent free for a few months. "I drove to every small television station from Florida to Iowa, 25 cities altogether. I got only one offer and that's all I needed."

    In 2001, Hill started as a reporter at KLKN-TV in Lincoln, NE. She said, "I really loved Lincoln. It's filled with honest, hard working people." Hill was what they call in the business a one-man-band. She was the reporter, photographer and the editor. Living in a capitol city, and the home of the Husker's, taught her how to cover every story under the sun. "I worked weekends at first, so I was on the 50-yard line every home game covering the fans. I then moved up to the legislature beat Monday through Friday. In between, there were tornados, snow storms and drought... a lot like here in Oklahoma."

    In 2007, Hill decided she wanted to move home. Since she grew up in the small town of Independence, KS, Tulsa was the perfect distance and size. "I had been away from home for so long and it was strange when I would talk to people who knew about my home town. Some had even been there." She took a producer job at KJRH, which had a weather camera on main street in Independence. Hill said, "The meteorologists would use it as much as possible during my newscast because they knew I'd love it."

    Hill was back home and content, until KRMG's Steve Berg approached her about a weekend anchor job that was open at the radio station. "I thought, oh radio? I haven't done that in a while. Sounds like fun." Dan Potter was the news director and hired her a couple of months later. Hill worked seven days a week for three years. She said, "I looked forward to my weekends at KRMG, but I wanted full-time. I wanted it so badly that I would fill-in working both jobs on holidays and only took one weekend off for a family wedding." Her hard work paid off.

    The morning show host at the time, KRMG's Joe Kelley, hired Hill full-time as soon as a position was available. She said, "I loved it from day one. Joe and I just clicked. He worked hard and recognized my work ethic and passion for the radio station. So, Joe became my mentor and all of the sudden promotions started happening faster than I could even ask." A few months after going full-time, Hill was asked to take the morning anchor position. It was only another few months and she was tapped to be the news director, taking over Kelley's position when he moved to sister station WDBO in Orlando. "My emotions were all over the board. I was losing my best boss and gaining the highest position of my career."

    Kelley left Hill in good hands. Dan Potter took over as morning host (remember, he was the one who hired her). "Dan and I are going to continue the momentum than KRMG has been building for years. We're here to stay and even get better. I believe that 100 percent."

    Read More
  • We may have found a different use for the oxygen mask on airplanes. The New York Post says, on a flight from Dubai to Amsterdam, a man wouldn't stop, to put it nicely, decompressing his cabin. He was passing gas, repeatedly, despite the men who had the bad luck to be sitting next to him telling him to stop. It was apparently bad enough that they got into a fight and the plane made an emergency landing. They were kicked off the plane along with two women who are completely baffled, because they say they don't even know the men. You can read more about the story here.
  • The White House on Monday signaled that President Donald Trump is willing to back at least one bipartisan measure to strengthen the national instant check system for those who buy firearms, as Democrats in the House and Senate continued to argue that action by the Congress on gun violence is long overdue. “While discussions are ongoing and revisions are being considered, the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system,” said White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. In a written statement sent to reporters, Sanders said the President spoke to Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) on Friday; the Texas Republican has a bipartisan bill with Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT), which would force states and federal agencies to submit more information into the instant gun check system. Our churches and schools should be refuges where children and parents feel secure. Many of these shootings can be prevented. There's no reason not to advance #FixNICS to help https://t.co/0JpZDiLPOr — Senator John Cornyn (@JohnCornyn) February 15, 2018 Interesting morning. Two quick thoughts: 1/ Trump's support for the FixNICS Act, my bill with @JohnCornyn, is another sign the politics of gun violence are shifting rapidly. 2/ No one should pretend this bill alone is an adequate response to this epidemic. — Chris Murphy (@ChrisMurphyCT) February 19, 2018 After a mass shooting last November in Sutherland Springs, Texas, where 25 people died, the Air Force acknowledged that the killer – who received a ‘bad conduct’ discharge from the military – should not have been able to buy guns, but those records were never placed in the instant check system. “For years agencies and states haven’t complied with the law, failing to upload these critical records without consequence,” Cornyn said in November when he introduced this bipartisan gun measure.” Democrats had hoped there would be action on that measure – just like they had hoped there would have been action to ban “bump stocks” after the mass shooting in Las Vegas, action on the “No Fly, No Buy” measure after the Orlando Pulse Nightclub shooting, and then the “FixNics” bill after the Texas shooting. I know assault rifles. I carried one in Iraq. They have no place on America's streets. #Orlando pic.twitter.com/ibKQE2PpqF — Seth Moulton (@sethmoulton) June 14, 2016 Last week’s shooting in Florida simply put all of those requests for legislation to deal with guns on repeat for Democrats. “We can’t ignore the issues of gun control that this tragedy raises,” said Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA). “And so, I’m asking – no, demanding – we take action now.” Democrats would certainly like to do much more than the ‘FixNics’ bill, or banning bump stocks, as other ideas have popped up in recent days, like not allowing anyone under age 21 to buy weapons like an AR-15. But as the President returned to Washington on Monday evening from a long weekend at his Florida retreat, it wasn’t clear if his support for one bipartisan plan would actually mean action – as GOP leaders have not put such measures on the fast track to a vote in the House and Senate. On Sunday, when the President met with House Speaker Paul Ryan in Florida, the two men discussed a series of issues, including “the recent tragedy in Parkland, Florida.” The White House statement on their meeting did not characterize whether legislative action was discussed. No action will happen on anything gun-related this week – as the Congress won’t be back on Capitol Hill for votes until February 26.
  • No one’s counting their chickens just yet, but there’s hope among some Oklahoma lawmakers that a new budget proposal might be able to overcome the (thus far) insurmountable barrier of a 75-percent supermajority. There’s no handy nickname yet for the plan, which includes modifications to many of the elements of the “Step Up Oklahoma” proposal which went down to defeat last week in the House. But some lawmakers are cautiously optimistic that this time, they’ve got a plan that can actually pass. The question now becomes: Will the GOP House leadership bring it to the floor for a vote? Rep. Eric Proctor (D-Tulsa) tells KRMG that longtime State Auditor Gary Jones was a key architect of the new proposal. Jones, a candidate for Governor, also has GOP street cred, as he’s the longest-serving state party chairman in Oklahoma history. The plan has bipartisan support; indeed, Proctor said Friday, he believes all 28 Democrats in the House will vote for it. “Democrats are ready to deliver every member of our caucus for it,” he told KRMG. “Republicans would need to bring 48 of their 72 members.” And while that’s not a slam dunk by any means, it’s an obtainable goal in the eyes of many lawmakers. The main bullet points: An increase to 5% for the first 36 months in the gross production tax on oil and natural gas wells ($200 million) A 75-cent per pack tax on cigarettes ($130 million) A 6-cent increase per gallon on diesel, 3 cents per gallon on gasoline ($113 million) A cap on itemized deductions ($107 million) A hotel/motel tax ($50 million) Ball and Dice gaming reform ($22 million) Proctor said the plan would pay for a $5,000 annual pay raise for teachers, plus raises for other state employees who haven’t seen raises in a decade or more. “The way we see it, it’s a more fair. It spreads out the burden of the taxes not just on the working poor and middle income families, but across all economic spectrums. We believe it’s more fair, and equitable, and just,” Proctor said. “From what I’m hearing from friends on the other side of the aisle, I think if we put this plan on the board, it passes,” he added. “Now the question is gonna be: Are we going to be allowed to vote on it or not?”
  • A South Pacific cruise was interrupted by brawls apparently caused by a 23-member family who threw punches at other passengers, some of whom said they locked themselves in cabins to escape three days of violence. The Carnival Legend arrived in its home port of Melbourne on Saturday, a day after a family was offloaded in an unscheduled stop in Eden, New South Wales in Australia. Police said they were investigating the incident and the operator apologized for the “disruptive behavior” by the group that was removed from the cruise liner. The “big Italian family” spent days attacking Australians aboard the ship, with people “getting strangled and punched up,” passenger Lisa Bolitho told reporters. “Very violent, they were full-on attacks,” she said. She also questioned the ship’s management, quoting the captain as saying, “‘What do you want me to do about it — throw them overboard?’” Cellphone video footage purportedly of the brawl on Friday shows security guards fighting and trying to separate passengers amid shouting and kicking.
  • A 30-year-old man died of injuries after a shooting in Atlanta's Buckhead neighborhood that police believe involved an Uber Eats driver. >> Watch the news report here Police say Ryan Thornton, 30, ordered food from the app to be delivered to the Concorde Condominium on Pharr Court South late Saturday. At 11:30 p.m., Thornton walked away from the delivery car with his order.  Police said words may have been exchanged, and that's when shots were fired from the delivery car. The driver took off in a white Volkswagen.  One of the people WSB-TV's Lauren Pozen spoke with lives close to where the incident happened. The person, who didn't want to be identified, said he heard five gunshots go off outside his apartment.  >> Read more trending news  Thorton died at Grady Memorial Hospital.  If you’ve never heard of Uber Eats, it’s a smartphone app that many people use to order take-out. Uber told WSB-TV that it has a 'no weapons' policy for its drivers.  As the search for the driver continues, this shooting has those who use the app a little hesitant to continue to do so.  'Something needs to be done to further the safety of Uber Eats and make us feel safe,” said the man who lives near the scene. Uber said a statement that it is shocked and saddened by the news and is working with the Atlanta Police Department.