ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

heavy-rain-night
64°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 70° L 63°
  • heavy-rain-night
    64°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 70° L 63°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    66°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 70° L 63°
  • cloudy-day
    68°
    Evening
    Cloudy. H 70° L 63°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from April Hill

    A Rogers County man was arrested for allegedly giving his 12-year-old son advice on how to kill himself. Sheriff's Maj. Coy Jenkins, with the Rogers County Sheriff’s Office, said Friday that the boy suffered minor burns after following his father's suggestion that he light himself on fire. Michael Joseph Jensen was arrested Wednesday on a child neglect warrant.  The boy's grandparents were able to put out the fire. Jenkins said the son had previously attempted suicide and was living with his grandparents when Jensen visited.  Authorities don't believe that Jensen was serious when he told his son to set himself on fire and shoot himself in the head. 
  • The Oklahoma Department of Health says the record breaking flu season now includes the death of a child. Health department records show that the vast majority of this season's flu-related fatalities, 105, were 65-years-old or older. The number of deaths statewide is now up to 153 people. The previous record of 130 deaths was set during last year's flu season. The number of deaths and hospitalizations in the state surpass any other flu season since the Health Department began tracking the illness in 2009. 
  • We’re not out of danger yet, but the Oklahoma economic outlook does seem to be looking up. State finance leaders say collections by Oklahoma's largest operating fund so far this fiscal year are almost 13 percent higher than the same period last year. Denise Northrup, director of the Office of Management and Enterprise Services, said Wednesday the state's coffers have not fully recovered from a prolonged slump in energy prices. In spite of the good financial news, Northrup says the current year's budget has still not been fully funded with only four months left. Collections by the general revenue fund during the first seven months of the fiscal year that began July 1 were $3.3 billion, which is $369 million or 12.7 percent over the same period in the previous year. Last month, collections totaled $596 million, almost $91 million or 18 percent above January 2017.
  • An Oklahoma woman was sentenced to life in prison without parole Monday for killing her adult daughter. Court documents show that Juanita Gomez told police she forced a crucifix down her daughter's throat because she believed the woman was possessed by the devil. Police found 33-year-old Geneva Gomez lying inside her mother's Oklahoma City home with her arms spread out as if she had been crucified. A large crucifix had been placed on her chest. The judge followed the sentence recommended by jurors who convicted her in January of first-degree murder. Attorneys for Juanita Gomez plan to appeal.
  • A judge followed through with his unusual plan Thursday. The Oklahoman reports that U.S. District Judge Stephen Friot showed leniency to 34-year-old Summer Thyme Creel during her sentencing because she had surgery to prevent pregnancies. Creel was convicted of using a counterfeit check at a Walmart in Moore. Judge Friot had suggested the medical procedure in a June order, noting that Creel had relinquished her parental rights to six of her seven children. She faced a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.
  • Former U.S. Army 1st Lt. Michael Behenna, of Edmond, was convicted of killing a suspected terrorist in an Iraqi prison. On Thursday, Attorney General Mike Hunter announced that he sent a letter to President Donald Trump, expressing his support for a pardon. “Michael Behenna was a courageous soldier, a great leader and does not deserve to be labeled a convicted felon for the rest of his life,” said Attorney General Hunter. Behenna was granted parole in 2014 after serving five years of his 15-year sentence.  “He and his family have gone through enough. I encourage President Trump to act quickly and compassionately by pardoning Behenna, to give him back the freedoms he deserves.” Hunter says that without a pardon, Behenna's punishment will continue outside of prison.  
  • The jury didn’t take long to come up with a verdict Wednesday afternoon in the case against Stanley Majors. Jury members found Majors guilty in the August 2016 shooting death of Khalid Jabara outside of his south Tulsa home.  Prosecutors alleged that Majors killed Jabara after bombarding him with racial insults in a feud with Jabara's family for years. Defense attorneys argued in court papers that Majors showed signs of dementia and appeared to have problems with his long-term memory.  They said those issues interfered with their ability to prepare a defense. Majors previously pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder and malicious intimidation and harassment, which is Oklahoma's hate-crime law. The jury recommended life without parole.
  • Drivers on the Inner Dispersal Loop around downtown started to have problems shortly after 3:00pm Tuesday. FOX23 and NEWS102.3 KRMG Chief Meteorologist James Aydelott has been telling us that the winter weather was headed to Green Country Tuesday afternoon and evening, and now it has arrived. Freezing rain and sleet are in the forecast across parts of Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas, leaving roads slick and hazardous in the region. The National Weather Service has issued a winter weather advisory for Tulsa County until midnight. Counties to the south and east of Tulsa are also in the advisory. The National Weather Service says power outages are unlikely, as wind speeds are expected to remain light with accumulations near a tenth of an inch. Sunshine returns Wednesday with highs in the 40s.
  • Governor Mary Fallin delivered her final State of the State address to Oklahoma legislators Monday. As Gov. Fallin finished her speech, a woman holding a toddler accused Fallin of being a 'liar and murderer.'  The heckler shouted from the gallery before House sergeants were able to usher her out of the chamber. The speech was her eighth and final State of the State address. “The Oklahoma Senate appreciates Governor Fallin’s emphasis on solving our budget issues,” said Oklahoma Senate President Pro Tempore Mike Schulz, R-Altus.  Schulz says we can’t only focus on revenue.  “We need to implement budgetary reforms and prioritize our spending to ensure the most efficient use and best return on each tax dollar collected.”  
  • Two national civil rights groups have joined a federal lawsuit against dozens of Oklahoma sheriffs, judges and court clerks. Georgetown University's Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection and Civil Rights Corps joined an amended complaint filed late Thursday in Tulsa. The lawsuit accuses the defendants of operating a debt-collection scheme that preys on poor people by sending them to jail if they can't pay court costs. The plaintiffs want to stop any further arrests of indigent people until the case can go before a judge. The initial lawsuit was filed in November. The suit accuses the Oklahoma Sheriffs' Association, debt collection firm Aberdeen Enterprizes II and others of violating the Constitution by conspiring to collect court costs and unpaid fines without regard to a defendant's ability to pay.
  • April Hill

    News Director

    April Hill's first "job" in radio was in college at WMSV. Early every morning she would rise and shine after waiting tables late into the night. Hill didn't actually get paid. She was just thrilled to have an opportunity to get real live on-air experience. The importance of her first morning radio anchor gig wouldn't be realized until more than a decade later.

    Hill's first paid job in broadcasting was at the CBS TV affiliate in Jackson, MS, in 1998. Her shift as the associate producer on the morning show at WJTV started at 10:00 p.m. Hill said, "I remember telling my boss how excited I was after getting my first paycheck and he laughed. The check was very small, but I was still a kid really. I'd never had a check that big." She worked a retail job to afford rent in a high crime area of town. "I didn't care. For the first time, I had my own place all to myself. I also got a good laugh when people asked where I lived. Their facial expressions, filled with horror, were so entertaining."

    Hill decided to get in on the action in front of the camera. The market size in Jackson was too big for them to giver her a shot (although she tried). After sending out at least 100 resumés with no response. Hill quit her job to concentrate on chasing her dream full-time. Hill's  brother lived in Tulsa and was willing to let her live there rent free for a few months. "I drove to every small television station from Florida to Iowa, 25 cities altogether. I got only one offer and that's all I needed."

    In 2001, Hill started as a reporter at KLKN-TV in Lincoln, NE. She said, "I really loved Lincoln. It's filled with honest, hard working people." Hill was what they call in the business a one-man-band. She was the reporter, photographer and the editor. Living in a capitol city, and the home of the Husker's, taught her how to cover every story under the sun. "I worked weekends at first, so I was on the 50-yard line every home game covering the fans. I then moved up to the legislature beat Monday through Friday. In between, there were tornados, snow storms and drought... a lot like here in Oklahoma."

    In 2007, Hill decided she wanted to move home. Since she grew up in the small town of Independence, KS, Tulsa was the perfect distance and size. "I had been away from home for so long and it was strange when I would talk to people who knew about my home town. Some had even been there." She took a producer job at KJRH, which had a weather camera on main street in Independence. Hill said, "The meteorologists would use it as much as possible during my newscast because they knew I'd love it."

    Hill was back home and content, until KRMG's Steve Berg approached her about a weekend anchor job that was open at the radio station. "I thought, oh radio? I haven't done that in a while. Sounds like fun." Dan Potter was the news director and hired her a couple of months later. Hill worked seven days a week for three years. She said, "I looked forward to my weekends at KRMG, but I wanted full-time. I wanted it so badly that I would fill-in working both jobs on holidays and only took one weekend off for a family wedding." Her hard work paid off.

    The morning show host at the time, KRMG's Joe Kelley, hired Hill full-time as soon as a position was available. She said, "I loved it from day one. Joe and I just clicked. He worked hard and recognized my work ethic and passion for the radio station. So, Joe became my mentor and all of the sudden promotions started happening faster than I could even ask." A few months after going full-time, Hill was asked to take the morning anchor position. It was only another few months and she was tapped to be the news director, taking over Kelley's position when he moved to sister station WDBO in Orlando. "My emotions were all over the board. I was losing my best boss and gaining the highest position of my career."

    Kelley left Hill in good hands. Dan Potter took over as morning host (remember, he was the one who hired her). "Dan and I are going to continue the momentum than KRMG has been building for years. We're here to stay and even get better. I believe that 100 percent."

    Read More
  • Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones said Sunday he will take steps to bolster local school safety by training those who work there. Jones posted to social media that his office will offer free conceal-and-carry classes to a limited number of teachers in Butler County. He also said training on how to react during school shootings would be provided. He said the details would be coming soon online at the Butler County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page. Jones said Saturday he has “been saying this for years” as he tweeted a Fox News story that Polk County, Florida, Sheriff Grady Judd said it would be a “game changer” to allow some handpicked teachers to carry firearms in the classroo Jones, in a video posted Thursday, urged local schools to act now to improve school security in the wake of the mass shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school on Wednesday. He said local schools should stop doing fire drills and allow armed former police and military veterans into buildings to help protect students.
  • A self-proclaimed white nationalist was banned from a Fremont gym after the owners learned he is a leader in the alt-right community. The owners of Northwest Fitness Project say Greg Johnson is longer welcome there. “The trainer terminated his contract and we banned him from the gym,” said Kyle Davis, a co-owner of the gym. It's a move that has some people wondering if it violates a city ordinance that says 'places of public accommodation' can't discriminate based on a person's beliefs. But the owners of the gym say that ordinance doesn't apply -- because it’s not a public space. To use the space, you must be the client of a trainer. “There’s no open gym membership, it's not like people can come and go as they please,” Davis said. “Trainers come and run their own businesses out of this location.' “There's a right of first refusal of the independent trainer. And (the trainer) chose to not work with him anymore due to the harm it would cause his reputation, and not wanting to be associated with those views,” Davis said. The Southern Poverty Law Center calls Greg Johnson an 'international figure for white nationalism” and “one of the leading voices of the far-right.” In September 2017, the New York Times interviewed him undercover and posted it on its website. In the interview, Johnson says, “I would identify myself as a white nationalist. That states the goals I have politically.” When asked about people who are Jewish, Johnson says, “The solution would ultimately (be) to expel them.” Davis said he’s disturbed to hear Johnson’s views. “I would feel threatened, yes,” he said. “I'm converting to Judaism, my fiancée is Jewish and we want to raise our kids Jewish.” The owners say after Johnson was banned, a white nationalist publication told followers to post negative reviews on the gym's Yelp and Facebook pages. “We were at a five (star average review); it went down to a three,” said Matthew Holland, the other co-owner of Northwest Fitness Project. But hundreds of people supported the gym on social media, helping it bounce back. “Now we're to like a 4.8,” Holland said. “We have a great community and we didn't realize how awesome they all were. Going through a rough time like this, it was just so encouraging.” The Puget Sound Anarchists first published last week that Johnson lives in Seattle. It’s also how the gym owners found out about Johnson’s beliefs. Johnson did not comment. The gym said it heard Johnson left the area.
  • A motorist spotted a body in the street around 11:27 p.m. Saturday night. The discovery happened near Young and Quaker. Tulsa Sgt. Dave Walker tells us the medical examiner was called out to help. “They were able to determine he had a gunshot wound to the back of the head,” Walker said.  “That is the reason he died.” Investigators believe a shots fired call about an hour before the body was found is related to this case. The name of the victim hasn't been released. Police don’t have a suspect or motive for the homicide.  Anyone with information regarding the case is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.   Walker adds this is Tulsa’s fifth homicide of 2018.  
  • Today will be perfect for outdoor activities. National Weather Service Meteorologist Chuck Hodges says we have a nice day ahead of us in and around Tulsa. “Should be topping out in the lower 60’s,” Hodges said.  “We’ll be kicking up a little more wind.” The low Sunday night will be closer to 57 degrees. If you get an extra day this weekend for Monday's holiday, make sure an umbrella is nearby. NWS is reporting we could see a few thunderstorms.   The high for Monday will be close to 61 degrees.  
  • In the wake of a fresh round of indictments in the wide-ranging investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election campaign, President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Saturday and Sunday to repeatedly express his frustration with the probe, again proclaiming his innocence, attacking his critics, and demanding attention instead on actions of the Obama Administration and Hillary Clinton. “I never said Russia did not meddle in the election,” the President tweeted on Sunday morning – though Mr. Trump has been very slow to embrace the concept that Russia was at fault, as he derided the investigations into Russian interference in 2016. “They are laughing their asses off in Moscow,” the President said on Twitter. “Get smart America!” Those were just a sampling of a number of tweets from this weekend, as the President let off steam on a number of fronts. I never said Russia did not meddle in the election, I said “it may be Russia, or China or another country or group, or it may be a 400 pound genius sitting in bed and playing with his computer.” The Russian “hoax” was that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia – it never did! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 18, 2018 If it was the GOAL of Russia to create discord, disruption and chaos within the U.S. then, with all of the Committee Hearings, Investigations and Party hatred, they have succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. They are laughing their asses off in Moscow. Get smart America! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 18, 2018 Finally, Liddle’ Adam Schiff, the leakin’ monster of no control, is now blaming the Obama Administration for Russian meddling in the 2016 Election. He is finally right about something. Obama was President, knew of the threat, and did nothing. Thank you Adam! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 18, 2018 The President even rebuked his own National Security Adviser, Gen. H.R. McMaster, over a point that Mr. Trump and his supporters have zeroed in on repeatedly – a lack of evidence that ties any Russian operation to the Trump Campaign. “General McMaster forgot to say that the results of the 2016 election were not impacted or changed by the Russians,” as the President again tried to switch the attention of the moment to questions that the GOP has raised about Hillary Clinton, the Steele Dossier, and the Democratic National Committee. General McMaster forgot to say that the results of the 2016 election were not impacted or changed by the Russians and that the only Collusion was between Russia and Crooked H, the DNC and the Dems. Remember the Dirty Dossier, Uranium, Speeches, Emails and the Podesta Company! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 18, 2018 Deputy A.G. Rod Rosenstein stated at the News Conference: “There is no allegation in the indictment that any American was a knowing participant in this illegal activity. There is no allegation in the indictment that the charged conduct altered the outcome of the 2016 election. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 17, 2018 Funny how the Fake News Media doesn’t want to say that the Russian group was formed in 2014, long before my run for President. Maybe they knew I was going to run even though I didn’t know! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 17, 2018 “The Fake News Media never fails,” the President wrote on Saturday, repeatedly making the argument that any Russian interference in 2016 did not tip the scales of the election in his favor. “Funny how the Fake News Media doesn’t want to say that the Russian group was formed in 2014, long before my run for President,” the President added. “The Russian “hoax” was that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia – it never did!” he tweeted. Critics of the President noted what was missing in his Saturday and Sunday tweets about the Russia investigation was any pledge by Mr. Trump to implement tougher sanctions against Russia which were approved by the Congress, or to order tougher measures to stop any Russian meddling. Last week, the nation’s top intelligence officials all agreed that Russia was going to try to repeat their 2016 effort in the 2018 election – asked by Democrats if there was any specific order from the President to focus on that threat, the intelligence chiefs only indicated that they were focused on the matter. “Look, this is pretty simple,” said retired Gen. Michael Hayden, a former head of the National Security Agency. “The Russians objective was to mess with our heads.” “Based on his late PM – this AM joint Twitter meltdown, it’s safe to say “Trump” is having a nervous breakdown as Mueller’s walls close in,” said John Schindler, a former U.S. intelligence official who has been highly critical of the President’s statements on the Russia probe. Late on Saturday night, the President also drew in the Russia investigation to criticize the FBI over the mass shooting at a high school in Florida last week. ” They are spending too much time trying to prove Russian collusion with the Trump campaign,” the President said. Very sad that the FBI missed all of the many signals sent out by the Florida school shooter. This is not acceptable. They are spending too much time trying to prove Russian collusion with the Trump campaign – there is no collusion. Get back to the basics and make us all proud! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 18, 2018 Here is the latest Russia indictment from last Friday.