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    Iran's President Hassan Rouhani has told the Qatari Emir that Tehran is ready for talks with Arab nations to reach a 'real agreement toward peace and brotherhood.' Rouhani's website quoted him as saying in a phone conversation with Qatar's ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, that the Muslim world is beset by divisions and should take steps 'toward peace and brotherhood.' 'In this direction we are ready for talks aimed at reaching a real agreement,' Rouhani was quoted as saying. The report added that the Qatari Emir said in response that talks between Iran and the Arab states of the Persian Gulf should continue. Majority Shiite Iran and predominantly Sunni Saudi Arabia and the UAE supporting opposite sites in the conflicts in Syria, Yemen and elsewhere in the Middle East.
  • The Latest on Group of Seven summit (all times local): 5:10 p.m. After a two-day summit in Italy, French President Emmanuel Macron had warm words for Donald Trump, despite the fact the U.S. president did not join in with other Group of Seven nations in supporting the Paris accord on fighting global warming. Macron praised Trump's 'capacity to listen' and said 'I found someone who is open and willing to deal well with us.' The new French president, a centrist, told reporters that 'I saw a leader with strong opinions on a number of subjects, which I share in part — the fight against terrorism, the willingness to keep our place in the family of nations — and with whom I have disagreements that we spoke about very calmly. I saw someone who listens and who is willing to work.' Macron said he told Trump that is 'indispensable for the reputation of the United States and the interest of the Americans themselves that the United States remain committed' to the Paris agreement. Marcon and Trump were both attending a G-7 summit for the first time. Macron won the French presidency on May 7. ___ 4:35 p.m. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says the G-7 agreed to step up pressure on North Korea, including sanctions. He told reporters it was the first time that the G-7 had recognized the North Korean threat as a priority issue. He says 'the threat has entered a new stage' as North Korea tests missiles and nuclear weapons. Abe adds, 'there is a danger it can spread like a contagious disease.' ___ 4:25 p.m. President Donald Trump's top economic adviser, Gary Cohn, says the other G-7 leaders respect the U.S. position that more time is needed for Trump to make a final decision on whether to stay in the Paris climate accord. Trump tweeted Saturday that he'll make a decision next week. Cohn told reporters: 'They understand where we are, we understand where they are and it's most important that we continue to work together.' Cohn describes the conversation among the leaders was 'very robust' and said there was a 'lot of give and take.' ___ 4:15 p.m. Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni says differences of opinion with President Donald Trump 'emerged quite clearly in our discussion' at the G-7 summit. Gentiloni says: 'Discussing is always useful. I think that all of the leaders present, starting with President Trump, appreciated the informality with which one in this format ... can discuss things calmly and freely.' He notes that the American people chose Trump and adds, 'so we are coming to terms with this choice.' ___ 4:05 p.m. French President Emmanuel Macron praised President Donald Trump's 'capacity to listen' and his 'intention to progress with us.' Macron hailed this as 'one of the true outcomes of this G-7.' Macron said he told Trump it is 'indispensable for the reputation of the United States and the interest of the Americans themselves that the United States remain committed' to the Paris agreement. The French leader says he believes the arguments made by the six other members enabled Trump to understand the importance of that issue and the necessity the Paris agreement for the U.S. economy. ___ 3:50 p.m. Alden Meyer, the director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists, an advocacy group in Washington, said the discord over climate change was unusual for G-7 meetings. He says: 'There have been differences, to be sure, in some past summits, but not a sharp open split like this.' Meyer said many U.S. states, cities, and companies are moving forward on climate action while the Trump administration is 'waffling' on the Paris Agreement. He says: 'President Trump should join these leaders in protecting Americans from the mounting impacts of climate change and reaping the economic benefits of the clean energy revolution, rather than trying to shore up the flagging fortunes of the polluting coal and oil industries.' ___ 3:25 p.m. A summit of the leaders of the world's wealthiest democracies has ended without a unanimous agreement on climate change, as the Trump administration plans to take more time to say whether the U.S. is going to remain in the Paris climate deal. The other six powers in the Group of Seven have agreed to stick with their previous commitment to implement that Paris deal to rein in greenhouse gases to fight climate change. The final G-7 statement expresses 'understanding' for the U.S. review process. The G-7 leaders also cut a compromise deal to acknowledge Trump's stance on trade. They kept the ban on protectionism from previous G-7 statements, but included a statement Saturday that they will 'stand firm against all unfair trade practices.' Climate and trade were sticking points at the two-day summit in Taormina, Sicily. The leaders found agreement on other points, such as backing closer cooperation against terrorism in the wake of the concert bombing in Manchester that killed 22 people. ___ 3:05 p.m. German Chancellor Angela Merkel says G-7 talks on climate change were 'unsatisfactory.' Six of the countries agreed to support the Paris climate change agreement; Trump tweeted he will decide next week. Merkel says the seven wealthy democracies meeting at a summit in Sicily have had a 'reasonable' discussion on trade and have agreed to reject protectionism. The agreement keeps a provision from early meetings in the face of a new approach from President Donald Trump, who has insisted trade must be fair as well as free. Merkel said the leaders agreed to 'act against protectionism.' ___ 2:30 p.m. President Donald Trump says he'll make a final decision next week on whether the U.S. will stay in the Paris climate agreement. Trump made the surprise announcement in a tweet after resisting pressure from European leaders to stay in the agreement. Nearly every nation that signed the 2015 agreement, including the six other G-7 members, has agreed to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The president tweeted Saturday, 'I will make my final decision on the Paris Accord next week!' Trump's pending review of U.S. climate policies has left environmentalists bracing for the possibility of bland G-7 promises that say little after years of increasingly stronger commitments to reduce reliance on fossil fuels and cut greenhouse gas emissions. Trump once proclaimed global warming a Chinese hoax. ___ 1:10 p.m. Shop owners in a Sicilian town have covered their windows with sheet metal and cardboard ahead of a protest expected to take place on the sidelines of a Group of Seven meeting. Several thousand people are expected to march through Giardini Naxos, the seaside town bordering Taormina, the hill top venue of the G7. The march was organized by unions protesting economic inequality, current migration policies and demanding lower military spending. The march is set for Saturday afternoon, as leaders of the world's seven largest democratic economies wrap up their two-day summit. The protests are expected to be peaceful, but the shop owners say they are mindful of violence that has taken place during past G-7 meetings. Marcello Di Giuseppe, said he just wants to be prepared, because 'if there will be damages who will compensate me.' ___ 11:55 a.m. Seven wealthy democracies have reached a deal at their annual summit to give the Trump administration time to tell them whether the United States plans to stay in the Paris climate agreement. A person familiar with the talks said six members of the Group of Seven would stick with their endorsement of the Paris deal, and await a decision from the U.S. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the matter before the formal announcement. The source adds that G-7 members were still wrestling over a statement on trade and whether it would condemn protectionism, as previous group statements have. The last G-7 meeting in Ise-Shima, Japan in 2016 agreed to 'fight all forms of protectionism,' or the use of import taxes and regulations to favor domestic producers over imports.
  • Pope Francis prayed Saturday for the Coptic Christians killed a day earlier in Egypt by Islamic extremists, saying that there are more Christian martyrs today than in ancient times. During a meeting with clergy in the Italian port city of Genoa, Francis urged them to pray 'for our brothers the Egyptian Copts, who were killed because they did not want to renounce their faith.' 'Let's not forget that today there are more Christian martyrs than in ancient times, than in the early day times of the church,' Francis told bishops, priests and nuns gathered in the Cathedral of San Lorenzo. Twenty-nine people died in the attack Friday on Christians traveling to a monastery south of Cairo. The attack, which took place on the eve of the holy Muslim month of Ramadan, was the fourth to target Egypt's Christian minority since December. The Egyptian Cabinet says 13 victims wounded in the attack remain hospitalized. Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi blamed the attack on suspected Islamic State group extremists in Libya. After Francis visited Egypt last month, IS vowed to escalate attacks against Christians and urged Muslims to steer clear of Christian gatherings and Western embassies.
  • Great Britain lowered its security threat level from “critical” to “severe” on Saturday, Prime Minister Theresa May said. >> Read more trending news Earlier, police hunting a suspected network behind Salman Abedi, the bomber who killed 22 people on Monday night during a concert in Manchester, said they had made two further arrests overnight as they closed in on other possible cell members, Reuters reported.  As a result, soldiers who have been assisting police would be withdrawn from Britain's streets at midnight on Monday. 'A significant amount of police activity has taken place over the last 24 hours and there are now 11 suspects in custody,' May said. May cautioned, however, that the lesser threat is still a dangerous one. 'The public should be clear about what this means. A threat level of severe means an attack is highly likely,” she said. “The country should remain vigilant.' The threat assessment has returned to the level it was at prior to the Manchester attack. In Manchester, events planned around the spring bank holiday will go ahead with additional security, including a significant number of armed officers, police said. British officers do not usually carry guns, CNN reported. Events include the Manchester Games, the Great Manchester Run, and a stadium show by bands including The Courteeners, all of which are likely to attract big crowds. This weekend also marks the start of Ramadan, the holiest month of the Muslim calendar, CNN reported.    
  • Dozens of Greek and Turkish Cypriots have linked arms across a U.N.-controlled buffer zone cutting across ethnically divided Cyprus' capital of Nicosia to voice their support for a reunification agreement. Beating drums, blowing whistles and singing traditional Cypriot folk songs, the demonstrators said real peace lies in the hands of ordinary people from both sides of the divide as the Mediterranean island's reunification talks appear to be faltering. Protesters said Saturday's event was to remind politicians not to let ordinary people down. On Friday, a U.N. envoy called off meditation efforts with the island's Greek Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades and Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci after failing to find 'common ground' on convening a final summit for an overall reunification deal. But officials insisted talks haven't collapsed.
  • The Latest on British Airways flight stalled by IT failure (all times local): 1:20 p.m. British Airways has canceled all flights from London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports as a global IT failure causes severe disruption for travelers. The airline says it has suffered a 'major IT systems failure.' BA says terminals at Heathrow and Gatwick have become extremely congested and it is cancelling all flights from the airports until 6 p.m. (1700GMT). It is urging passengers not to go to the airports. Earlier, passengers at Heathrow reported long lines at check-in counters and flight delays. BA has not said what is causing the computer problem, but says it is working to resolve it as quickly as possible. ___ 12:10 p.m. Air travelers faced delays Saturday because of a worldwide computer systems failure at British Airways, the airline said. BA apologized in a statement for what it called an 'IT systems outage' and said it was working to resolve the problem. It said in a tweet that the problem is global. Passengers at Heathrow Airport reported long lines at check-in counters and flight delays. One posted a picture on Twitter of BA staff writing gate numbers on a white board. 'We've tried all of the self-check-in machines. None were working, apart from one,' said Terry Page, booked on a flight to Texas. 'There was a huge queue for it and it later transpired that it didn't actually work, but you didn't discover that until you got to the front.' The problem comes on a holiday weekend, when thousands of Britons are travelling.
  • The Latest on developments in Egypt (all times local): 3:45 p.m. Scandinavian leaders have joined the chorus of world leaders condemning the attack on Coptic Christians traveling to a remote desert monastery south of Cairo that killed 29. Denmark's Prime Minister Lars Loekke Rasmussen says 'we are united in fighting terrorism' and added Saturday that those behind it were 'primitive terrorist criminals.' Norwegian Foreign Minister Borge Brende tweeted that he was 'appalled by yet another deadly attack on #CopticChristians in #Egypt. Rel. minorities must be protected in Egypt and across the world.' His Swedish counterpart, Margot Wallstrom, said Sweden strongly condemns the attack, adding 'our thoughts go to the victims' families & all affected.' ___ 1:50 p.m. The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for an attack on Coptic Christians traveling to a remote desert monastery south of Cairo that killed 29. The group's news agency, Aamaq, said on Saturday that an IS unit targeted the bus the previous day and put the death toll at 32. The discrepancy in casualty figures is not uncommon in the aftermath of major attacks by the militants, who have been waging an insurgency centered at northern Sinai, though attacks on the mainland have recently increased. Egypt responded to the attack, the fourth since December by IS to target Christians, with airstrikes against what the military says are bases in eastern Libya in which the militants have been trained. ___ 10:10 a.m. Egyptian authorities say the death toll in the ambush attack on a bus transporting Christians to a monastery south of Cairo has risen to 29. The Egyptian Cabinet said in a news release that 13 victims of Friday's attack remain hospitalized in Cairo and the southern city of Minya where the attack took place. Authorities had previously said 28 were killed. The attack came on the eve of the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. It was the fourth to target the country's Christian minority since December. Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said that suspected Islamic State group militants attacked the bus and that Egypt had launched airstrikes against what he said were militant training bases in Libya.
  • The Turkish government issued an arrest warrant for Oklahoma City Thunder center Enes Kanter, accusing him of being a member of a terror group, according to The Daily Sabah, a pro-government Turkish newspaper. >> Read more trending news Kanter was detained at a Romanian airport over the weekend because his passport was canceled by Turkey. Kanter documented the experience on Twitter.  Kanter has been a longtime critic of controversial Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and is a vocal supporter of Muslim spiritual leader Fethullah Gulen, a man Erdogan blamed for a coup attempt last year. After the news of the warrant broke Friday, Kanter tweeted, 'Stand For What You Believe!' Gulen, a Muslim spiritual leader, has spent the last 15 years in exile in Pennsylvania. Gulen has denied claims of involvement with the coup, ESPN reported. The warrant, ESPN reported, refers to “Kanter's alleged use of an encrypted messaging application called Bylock, Sabah said, which Turkey claims was especially created for Gulen supporters.' n Turkey, Kanter's Twitter account is blocked. In the Daily Sabah last summer, Kanter's father, Mehmet, announced the family was disowning him. Kanter said he hasn't spoken with his family in almost two years. Kanter was detained last week in Romania after the Turkish government revoked his passport. In a video about it, Kanter said Erdogan is the 'Hitler of this century.' Using his green card, Kanter returned to the United States via London on Monday. He told reporters he plans on becoming a U.S. citizen. 'Right now I am country-less,' Kanter said in Manhattan. 'I am open to adoption definitely. I am going to try to become an American citizen.' Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.  
  • British Airways canceled all flights from London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports Saturday as a global IT failure caused severe disruption for travelers on a busy holiday weekend. The airline said it was suffering a 'major IT systems failure' around the world. It didn't say what was causing the problem but said there was no evidence of a cyberattack. BA said terminals at Heathrow and Gatwick had become extremely congested and cancelled all flights from those airports until 6 p.m. (1700GMT, 1 p.m. EDT). It urged passengers not to go to the airports. Passengers at Heathrow reported long lines at check-in counters, flight delays and failures of BA's website and mobile app. One posted a picture on Twitter of BA staff writing gate numbers on a white board. 'We've tried all of the self-check-in machines. None were working, apart from one,' said Terry Page, booked on a flight to Texas. 'There was a huge queue for it and it later transpired that it didn't actually work, but you didn't discover that until you got to the front.' Another traveler, PR executive Melissa Davis, said she was held for more than an hour and a half on the tarmac at Heathrow aboard a BA flight arriving from Belfast. She said passengers had been told they could not transfer to other flights because 'they can't bring up our details.' Passenger Phillip Norton tweeted video of an announcement from a pilot to passengers at Rome's Fiumicino airport, saying the problem affects the system that regulates what passengers and baggage go on which aircraft. He said passengers on planes that have landed at Heathrow were unable to get off because there was nowhere to park. Heathrow said the IT problem had caused 'some delays for passengers' and it was working with BA to resolve it. Some BA flights were still arriving at Heathrow Saturday afternoon, while many were listed as 'delayed.' The problem comes on a holiday weekend, when thousands of Britons are travelling. BA passengers were hit with severe delays in July and September 2016 because of problems with the airline's online check-in systems.
  • Syrian troops and allied militia have pushed back Islamic State militants, rebels and U.S-backed opposition fighters in a wide offensive in the country's strategic southern desert, the government-controlled media and a war monitor said Saturday. With the new advances, the government and allied troops secured their hold of a strategic juncture in the Syrian desert, restoring their control of mineral and oil resources. The gains also aid government plans to go after IS militants in Deir el-Zour, on the border with Iraq. The state-controlled Syrian Central Military media said the new advances widen the government's control south of Palmyra in Homs province and secure the highway linking the ancient city to the capital Damascus. The gains also secure the phosphate mines in Khneifes, once controlled by the Islamic State group. The area was the backyard of territories once tightly controlled by IS militants, and served as a route linking Palmyra and the borders with Jordan, their de-facto capital Raqqa, and Deir el-Zour near the border with Iraq. The large swath of desert, which had been divided between IS and rebel control, also abuts the capital Damascus and its suburbs. The offensive has been ongoing for days and caused tension in the area, prompting a U.S. airstrike on Syrian government and allied troops near the border with Jordan. The Syrian Central Military media also said the new advances, which secure about 5,000 kilometers (3,100 miles) in the desert area, have also successfully isolated anti-government rebel fighters in the desert area east of Damascus, denying them advances toward the strategic Homs desert area. The opposition Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the government and allied troops have also advanced toward al-Ilianiya, an area controlled by Syrian opposition fighters, backed by the U.S. and western countries, in the desert near the border with Jordan. The advances also open the road for the government and its allied troops toward the IS-stronghold of Sukhna, a key node in the push toward the province of Deir el-Zour, which straddles the border with Iraq, said Mozahem al-Salloum, of the activist-run Hammurabi Justice News network that tracks developments in eastern Syria. The crowded battlefield has been a scene of tension in recent weeks, as the government and allies pushed their way further south where rebel fighters backed by the U.S. military also operate. U.S. warplanes struck a convoy and a base of Syrian and allied troops on May 18, in the first such battlefield confrontation between American and Syrian forces since the conflict began in 2011. U.S. officials said the Syrian advances 'posed a threat' to its troops and allies fighting the Islamic State group in the area.
  • A 43-year-old pilot is dead, following a small aircraft crash Friday night in Leflore County. Oklahoma Highway Patrol reports the crash happened around 7:42 p.m., near Arkoma. “A witness who observed the aircraft for approximately 20 to 25 minutes, advised the aircraft began flying in steep banked spiral, entered a fast downward spiral and collided with the ground, resulting in a small explosion,” OHP said.   Richard Biggerstaff was pronounced dead at the scene.  There were no passengers on the aircraft.   A cause for the crash is still under investigation.  
  • An inquiry into possible wrongdoing by IT staffers employed by a number of Democrats in Congress has garnered more attention in recent days, after a prominent lawmaker gave a public tongue lashing to the Capitol Hill police chief, vowing “consequences” over his refusal to return computer equipment that is evidently part of the ongoing investigation. At issue is a probe into a possible security breach involving Imran Awan, who has worked for Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) and other Democratic lawmakers, as a shared information technology worker. Little has been made public by Capitol Police on what exactly is being investigated; news reports in recent months have linked Awan, several of his relatives, and his wife to some type of Capitol Hill investigation that could involve stolen property and more. The new scrutiny came after a budget hearing on May 18 with U.S. Capitol Police Chief Matthew Verderosa; the hearing before a House Appropriations subcommittee had escaped notice, until reports earlier this week by the Daily Caller, noting the sharp words that Wasserman Schultz had for Verderosa. At the end of her Q&A with the police chief, Wasserman Schultz asks what happens when police find lost items. “I’d like to know how Capitol Police handle equipment that belongs to a member, or a staffer, that’s been lost within the Capitol complex, and found or recovered by one of your officers,” Wasserman Schultz begins. The bottom line from the chief was simple – until an investigation is completed, “I can’t return the equipment,” which is reportedly a laptop from Wasserman Schultz’s office. That answer did not satisfy the Florida Democrat. “I think you’re violating the rules when you conduct your business that way,” Wasserman Schultz said bluntly, as she told the chief that he should “expect that there will be consequences.” In the wake of that somewhat jarring verbal exchange, a reporter on Thursday asked House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi about the Awan investigation. “I’m really not familiar with what you’re talking about,” Pelosi said. “We’ve been busy with a lot of other things,” Pelosi added. U.S. Capitol Police have released little information about what this probe involves, and who exactly is being investigated. According to U.S. House spending records, Imran Awan was a shared employee for thirteen different House members in 2016, earning in the third quarter anywhere from as little as $300 from a pair of Democrats to $6,624.99 from another. Wasserman Schultz paid Awan $5,000.01 for work between July 1 and September 30, 2016. Awan’s wife, Hina Alvi, worked for seven Democrats, plus the House Democratic Caucus, earning close to $44,000 in the third quarter of 2016. Records also show two relatives of Awan’s on the Congressional payroll: Abid Awan worked for eight different House Democrats, while Jamal Awan worked for eight others – all as ‘shared’ employees.
  • Four suspects were arrested Friday afternoon in west Tulsa, following an armed robbery of a woman and a standoff. Police report the victim's help led them to a home near 4th and South 54th West Avenue. “She had a good suspect description,” police said.  “She also had a good description of the suspect’s vehicle.” Around three hours later, the suspects were taken into custody without incident.  As of early Saturday morning, their names haven’t been released.   KRMG's told the victim wasn't harmed.
  • If you're sticking around the Tulsa area this weekend, make sure to stay weather aware. National Weather Service says conditions will turn bumpy later today. “Looks like we could see some storms in the late afternoon and into the evening hours,” NWS said.  “All modes of severe weather look to be possible.” KRMG’s told this could include hail, strong winds and even a tornado.   The high today will be around 90 degrees. KRMG Stormcenter is manned and ready to go if severe weather hits our area.
  • Trying to save you some time and misery on your family vacation this summer, Business Insider is ranking the worst “tourist traps” in each state. We've all driven past those highway signs promising all sorts of superlatives from biggest to strangest to oldest and wondered if it was worth stopping. The list from the site is by no means complete and obviously subjective, but for people passing through Oklahoma, Business Insider (again, their opinion, not ours) says to skip the J.M. Davis Gun Museum in Claremore. But we bet you'll agree that “Foamhenge,” a replica of Stonehenge made of styrofoam is not the best use of your time in Virginia. And don't put the Gum Wall in Seattle on your bucket list. It’s just what it sounds like, a wall where thousands upon thousands of people have stuck their used chewing gum. You can find the full list of tourist traps from Business Insider here.