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News
Suspect in stabbing and robbery at Jacksonville MetroPCS arrested; store clerk recovering
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Suspect in stabbing and robbery at Jacksonville MetroPCS arrested; store clerk recovering

Suspect in stabbing and robbery at Jacksonville MetroPCS arrested; store clerk recovering
Emery Deshon Handy

Suspect in stabbing and robbery at Jacksonville MetroPCS arrested; store clerk recovering

(UPDATE at 3:00 a.m.): The suspect in the stabbing of a worker at a Jacksonville MetroPCS has been arrested, the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said early this morning. Officers said they identified Emery Handy, 18, as the man in connection to the robbery and stabbing. 

Read the original report here.

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Action News Jax is learning more about a store clerk who was stabbed in the face by a robber.

That man, who is known by many as "Mr. Rick," is still in the hospital. His co-workers say he could lose an eye.

People who know him had nothing but good things to say about Mr. Rick.

Family members tell Action News Jax they're praying for a quick and successful recovery for the man who works at the Metro PCS on Ramona Boulevard.

Police released surveillance images of the man they say brutally attacked Mr. Rick while robbing the Metro PCS.

Bonnie Miller, a friend of the clerk, said, “We’re all praying for him to get better.”


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Miller runs the dry cleaning store next door. She’s known Mr. Rick for years.

“They’re always looking for Rick. You know, 'Have you seen Rick today? What time’s Rick coming in?'” Miller said.

Co-workers say Mr. Rick was generous, often staying open late so customers could pay their bills.

“Always there for the business, for the customers. He’s working hard for his family,” Muni Shirzai said.

He had a heart for others that others saw as well. Carol Parish runs the diner next to the Metro PCS.

"He would bring people over here and ask me, 'Could you give them something to eat and let me come back and pay for it later?'” Parish said.

On Monday night, Action News Jax spoke with his family about the attack.

Maria Batshone, the sister-in-law of the victim, said, “Nothing should have happened. He does not hurt anybody, he’s very compassionate.”

Surveillance video captured images of the man police say attacked Mr. Rick. Police say the suspect got in through an unlocked door and then stabbed Mr. Rick before stealing from the registers.


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“We’re all in shock. He’s been injured tremendously and, you know, if somebody wanted to take his money, just take it, not do such severe injury on him,” Batshone said.

As Mr. Rick recovers, his family and friends are hoping for the best and remembering the joy he’s brought them.

“'Isn’t it a beautiful day!' That was his favorite saying. He was just very happy,” Miller said.

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