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State and Regional News

    07-17-21-30-34 (seven, seventeen, twenty-one, thirty, thirty-four) Estimated jackpot: $65 million 5-1-9 (five, one, nine) QD-AS-4S-5S-9S (QD, AS, 4S, 5S, 9S) Estimated jackpot: $302 million
  • QD-AS-4S-5S-9S (QD, AS, 4S, 5S, 9S)
  • 5-1-9 (five, one, nine)
  • 07-17-21-30-34 (seven, seventeen, twenty-one, thirty, thirty-four)
  • Police in Bartlesville say a 36-year-old Tulsa man has died in a single-vehicle crash in southwest Bartlesville. Bartlesville Police Department Capt. Jay Hastings says Robert Wayne Lee died on Monday when the SUV he was driving struck a curb and rolled off the road into several trees. A passing motorist discovered the wreckage about 5 a.m. and notified police. Hastings says Lee was driving southbound on a local roadway when he struck the curb. He swerved over the center line and back across the road. Hastings says there are no known witnesses to the rollover crash.
  • Police in Pryor have identified a man who died after he was struck by a freight train. Television station KJRH reports (http://bit.ly/2r4POuM ) that 53-year-old Doug Edward Jones was killed when he was struck by the train on Sunday. Police say Jones, a pedestrian, had crawled up on the tracks just before the train hit him. Officials say Jones was critically injured when he was struck by the train at about 10:30 a.m. He was pronounced dead at 11:50 a.m. after being taken to a local hospital. ___ Information from: KJRH-TV, http://www.kjrh.com
  • Brienne Minor gave Michigan its first NCAA women's tennis title, while Virginia's Thai-Son Kwiatkowski beat a familiar foe to capture the men's championship. Minor defeated Florida's Belinda Woolcock 6-3, 6-3 on Monday to become only the third player from the Wolverines to capture a singles title. The other two were men's champions: Barry MacKay in 1957 and Mike Leach in 1982. 'I just feel so honored to represent such a great school,' Minor said. 'I love Michigan and I'm so glad I committed here. I wouldn't want to be anywhere else.' Kwiatkowski took Virginia to its second men's singles title in three years, beating William Blumberg from North Carolina 6-4, 7-6 (5) in an all-Atlantic Coast Conference final. Ryan Shane of the Cavaliers won in 2015. Wrapping up the 12-day championships at the University of Georgia, Andrew Harris and Spencer Papa of Oklahoma and Francesca Di Lorenzo and Miho Kowase of Ohio State claimed doubles titles. Kwiatkowski, a senior, avenged a 6-3, 6-2 loss to Blumberg in last week's team competition. Despite the setback, the Cavaliers won their third straight men's championship. 'Thank goodness the rest of the guys picked me up because Will really took it to me when we went indoors last week,' Kwiatkowski said. 'Today I felt that the coaches gave me a really good game plan, one that was different than what we had before. I just went out and tried to fight as hard as I could ... and it's pretty amazing what happened out there.' Blumberg missed out on a chance to win North Carolina's first men's singles title. 'Thai is obviously an awesome player,' he said. 'No excuses today. He played better than me.' Woolcock was part of a Florida squad that captured the women's team title last week. 'I am so proud of myself considering I won all of my singles matches in the team event and to get this far in singles,' she said. 'I honestly didn't really expect that because I put so much focus and energy into the team event.' In doubles, the host school was denied a title when Harris and Papa defeated Georgia's Robert Loeb and Jan Zielinski 4-6, 6-2, 10-6 in the men's final. Di Lorenzo and Kowase claimed the championship in women's doubles with a 6-7 (6), 6-4, 10-7 victory over Maddie Pothoff and Erin Routliffe of Alabama.
  • The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says a woman is listed in critical condition after she allegedly escaped arrest and leaped from an interstate bridge. Highway Patrol Lt. Kara Phillipi says the incident occurred shortly after midnight Monday after a trooper arrested the unidentified woman on Interstate 44 in Tulsa. The woman was allegedly driving under the influence. The woman was fidgeting in the trooper's vehicle while in route to jail. Philippi says she was able to unbuckle her safety belt and the trooper stopped to re-secure her. The woman allegedly bolted from the patrol vehicle when the trooper opened the door, ran across the eastbound lanes of the interstate and jumped from the overpass. The woman was transported to a Tulsa hospital, where Phillipi says she was listed in critical condition.
  • State officials are urging caution when Oklahomans visit waterways in eastern Oklahoma during the Memorial Day holiday. The Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission says recent heavy rainfall in the region has swelled river levels in the region. The agency says fallen trees and debris have accumulated along the Illinois River following flooding on April 30th, posing navigational hazards to boaters and swimmers. Commercial flotation device operations are recommending that first-time, novice floaters and children do not float in canoes, kayaks or inner tubes but be teamed with experienced floaters using rafts. Officials say floaters should wear a personal flotation device at all times while floating, wading and swimming in area waterways.
  • Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt says the agency is looking for the source of pollution at a contaminated creek in Osage County. Pruitt, Oklahoma's former attorney general, visited the contaminated Bird Creek Friday to discuss the agency's efforts to determine the source of the pollution and correct it. The Tulsa World reports (http://bit.ly/2sdKXoL ) that saltwater contamination was first reported in August 2016 when an oily sheen appeared on North Bird Creek along with dead fish and turtles a few miles from the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. The water is a byproduct of extracting oil. The oil and water are separated and the water is injected back into rock formations. Testing by EPA indicates warm saltwater is percolating up into the creek but the precise source of the saltwater remains unknown. ___ Information from: Tulsa World, http://www.tulsaworld.com
  • While the calendar says we are days away from the month of June, Republicans in Congress are already feeling pressure over their legislative agenda for 2017, as time is already growing short for GOP efforts to overhaul the Obama health law, which also puts a time squeeze on other major initiatives on Capitol Hill. There are no votes scheduled this week in the Congress; the Senate returns to legislative session on June 5, while the House is back in Washington, D.C. on June 6. Here’s some of what faces Republicans in the Congress: 1. Everything keys off of the GOP health care bill. Because the GOP is trying to use the expedited “budget reconciliation” process, which allows them to avoid a filibuster in the Senate, nothing involved with next year’s budget – or with tax reform – can move until health care is settled. GOP Senators have been meeting regularly in recent weeks to decide what to do on health care – but they don’t have a deal as yet, and no one is quiet sure when they might have a vote. “We’re a long ways from that,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (R-ND) told reporters this week. “Damned if I know,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) said about when a deal might be reached. Writing their own bill takes time. Senate laying groundwork for own health care replacement bill — Rusty Arrison (@RustyArrisonXVJ) May 26, 2017 2. Why do you keep saying there isn’t much time? Two things are at work here – the Congressional calendar, and the limits on the “budget reconciliation” process. The authorization to use reconciliation for a health care bill expires on September 30 – the end of the 2017 Fiscal Year. So, the GOP has four months to figure out a bill, and get it approved and sent to the President. But, lawmakers won’t be here much of that four month period. In fact, between now and the end of the fiscal year – there are 43 scheduled legislative work days in the House, which mirrors the Senate schedule. That’s 43 legislative days in session spread out over 18 weeks. You could always get extra time by scrapping the August recess, or working some weekends. 3. The budget is way behind schedule – more than usual. This past week, President Trump delivered his 2018 budget to the Congress. Normally that is done in February. The House and Senate only started having hearings on spending bills this past week. Lawmakers were supposed to approve the blueprint known as the “budget resolution” by April 15. As of now, that plan doesn’t even exist. Congress is supposed to pass all spending bills by October 1, the start of the new fiscal year, but that has not happened since 1996. With the schedule still showing five weeks off during the summer, there is no way that lawmakers are going to meet that spending deadline, which will pave the way for stop gap budgets, and then most likely a year-end omnibus spending deal. Sound familiar? @TheDCVince the congress cannot walk and crew gum at the same time. They haven't begun the FY18 budget.We will get more CRs and then omnibus — Bulldog 6 (@MC22554) May 24, 2017 4. Tax reform still hasn’t taken shape. Despite the Sunday tweet by President Trump about his tax plans, it was obvious in budget hearings last week involving Secretary of Treasury Stephen Mnuchin that a Trump tax plan is not ready to be rolled out any time soon. Remember – all we have right now is a one page document with some bullet points. Even if the White House put out the details this next week, Republicans couldn’t take it up under budget reconciliation rules until they get finished with health care legislation. And, as stated above, the GOP does not seem to be near a deal. Senate Republicans probably cannot let June go by without some kind of agreement on health care. The massive TAX CUTS/REFORM that I have submitted is moving along in the process very well, actually ahead of schedule. Big benefits to all! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 29, 2017 5. You can’t pass bills when you aren’t in DC. Whenever I point out how the Congress is going to be home for an extended break, I always hear from people who say, “If they’re not in DC, they can’t screw things up.” Yes, that’s true. On the other hand, it’s also true that when they aren’t working on Capitol Hill, they can’t pass any bills to fix things, either. And for Republicans right now, if you aren’t at work on the floors of the House and Senate, you aren’t passing any of President Trump’s agenda. Those Republican lawmakers having town hall meetings this week will get a lot of attention. If Republicans in the House and Senate were doing their job, Pres Trump could be returning home to sign laws for taxes, health care, etc. — Pat (@Pat170017001) May 26, 2017 It’s not even the end of May. But time is already running short for Republicans in 2017.
  • A soldier from Illinois was able to spend the Memorial Day weekend with his family in Missouri all thanks to the kindness of a stranger he met at a Dallas airport. U.S. Army mechanic Keaton Tilson, who is stationed at Fort Hood, was stuck at an airport for two days, trying to get a flight on standby, KTVI reported. But Josh Rainey from Glendale, Missouri, wasn’t having any of it.  >> Read more trending news  At first Rainey tried to give Tilson his ticket, but airline regulations wouldn’t allow the transfer, so Rainey decided on the next option, buying a last-minute ticket for Tilson to St. Louis so he can be with family over the holiday weekend. Rainey told KTVI that the he spent $341 on the ticket and that the fact that Tilson was able to get home was worth more than the money. “He walked away and came back and asked if he could hug me, and I think we both had to fight back the tears after that,” Rainey said.
  • Being the U-S Defense Secretary is a tough job, but Marine General James Mattis certainly sounds up to the task. He lit the social media world on fire after he was asked on CBS's Face the Nation what keeps him awake at night. He answered, 'Nothing, I keep other people awake at night.' While that quote has gotten the most attentions, the interview covered a wide range of important topics. He says President Trump standing alongside fellow NATO leaders last week shows he supports NATO. He says war with North Korea would be catastrophic. And he says he was humbled the commitment made by the younger generation of military personnel to carry out decisions made by leaders like himself.
  • Clear water laps at the white sand along crescent-shaped Siesta Beach, helping the Florida shore rank as the best in the country, according to a coastal expert. Dr. Stephan P. Leatherman, known as “Dr. Beach,” released his list of the 2017 best beaches Thursday.  Water and sand quality, as well as environmental management and beach safety efforts, are some of the 50 criteria Leatherman uses to develop the rankings. Here is the Top Ten:
  • For Memorial Day, it was the perfect sign of respect. The photo of a sandwich board outside Mayberry’s Bar & Grill in the northern Kansas city of Washington that pays tribute to the American servicemen who have lost their lives fighting for their country has gone viral.  >> Read more trending news  “We have 619,300 reasons to be closed on Monday,” is written in chalk on the sign, referring to U.S. service deaths from World War I, World War II and the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. The sign was the idea of Mayberry’s employee Kelly Ray, the Wichita Eagle reported. Ray moved from Missouri to northern Kansas earlier this year, and he brought a sign he made while working at a previous restaurant. Mayberry’s would be closed on Sunday and on Memorial Day, but the sign posted outside the restaurant would be photographed and shared across social media. By late Sunday it had been shared more than 109,000 times. “I just love the message,” Ray told the Wichita Eagle on Sunday. “You don’t have to like our president or like some of the things our government is doing, but you sure better respect those who have laid down their lives for us to be able to live here.” According to official U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs numbers, and depending on how deaths are calculated, the sign totals are not completely accurate, but the message is still relevant. Ray told KWCH that many patrons have thanked him for putting up the sign. One veteran thanked him in person, but Ray, who is the restaurant’s manager and chef, stopped him. “I said, ‘No, thank you,’” Ray told KWCH. “You guys are the reason we’re here and we appreciate that. “He said ‘Damn shame more people don’t think like that,’” Ray said. Ray said the idea for the sign was formed when he worked at a Missouri restaurant. “I mentioned to the owner that we should be closed for Memorial Day, and he said, ‘I can’t think of one good reason why we would do that, because people are going to be out and they’ll want to eat,’ ” Ray told the Wichita Eagle. “I saw a post on Facebook with the number of people who have died in our wars, so I basically just put that on a sign and showed it to him.” The owner closed the restaurant. “People talk about Memorial Day being the start of summer and that sort of thing,” Ray told the newspaper. “But what it’s really about is those people who died. I hope people think about them.”