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State and Regional News

    04-06-31-49-52, Mega Ball: 11, Megaplier: 3 (four, six, thirty-one, forty-nine, fifty-two; Mega Ball: eleven; Megaplier: three) Estimated jackpot: $282 million
  • JC-6C-10C-8D-2H (JC, 6C, 10C, 8D, 2H)
  • 03-06-25-29-34 (three, six, twenty-five, twenty-nine, thirty-four) 04-06-31-49-52, Mega Ball: 11, Megaplier: 3 (four, six, thirty-one, forty-nine, fifty-two; Mega Ball: eleven; Megaplier: three) Estimated jackpot: $282 million 7-7-0 (seven, seven, zero) JC-6C-10C-8D-2H (JC, 6C, 10C, 8D, 2H) Estimated jackpot: $239 million
  • 7-7-0 (seven, seven, zero)
  • 03-06-25-29-34 (three, six, twenty-five, twenty-nine, thirty-four)
  • The Oklahoma Board of Education has approved nearly 900 emergency teaching certificates so far this year and likely will be required to approve more. Oklahoma schools have grown increasingly reliant on filling classroom vacancies with emergency-certified teachers amid a statewide shortage of qualified applicants. State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister tells the Tulsa World that more than 600 emergency certificates were approved Thursday. That's compared to the more than 300 approved in July 2016. The certificates allow individuals to teach before completing the education or training requirements for regular or alternative certification. School superintendents must confirm with the state that no candidates are available to fill a position before hiring someone who needs an emergency certificate. ___ Information from: Tulsa World, http://www.tulsaworld.com
  • A 29-year veteran of the Kansas City, Missouri, police force is the department's new police chief. The city's police board on Friday named Maj. Rick Smith as the successor to Darryl Forte, who retired in May. Smith will take the department's helm on Aug. 15. Smith joined the department in 1988 and has worked as a patrol officer, tactical response officer and supervisor of the homicide unit. Lately, he has served as commander of the department's Central Patrol Division. Smith was a finalist along with Keith Humphrey, the police chief in Norman, Oklahoma. The Kansas City police force has more than 1,800 sworn officers and civilian employees.
  • The number of rigs exploring for oil and natural gas in the U.S. increased by eight this week to 958. A year ago, just 463 rigs were active. Houston oilfield services company Baker Hughes said Friday that 766 rigs sought oil and 192 explored for natural gas this week. Among major oil- and gas-producing states, New Mexico gained four rigs, Oklahoma increased by three and Louisiana, Ohio, West Virginia and Wyoming each gained one. Texas declined by one rig. Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, North Dakota, Pennsylvania and Utah were all unchanged. The U.S. rig count peaked at 4,530 in 1981. It bottomed out in May of 2016 at 404.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency has requested oil producers stop injecting wastewater in seven well sites in northeast Oklahoma to halt saltwater contamination in the area. The EPA's request comes nearly a year after the Bird Creek saltwater contamination first was reported. The agency's goal 'is to make sure that anything injected stays in the formation in which it's injected,' said Sam Coleman, region six administrator for the EPA. Coleman told the Tulsa World brine contamination in the drainage is a long-standing problem. 'We will work with the wells closest to Bird Creek where we have found the hot spots and ask them to voluntarily cease all injection,' Coleman said. Coleman said at least seven wells near the creek have been identified as problem wells after chemical and water monitoring in the creek began in May. He said they require immediate attention. 'There are still a couple of data points that give us concern that something else is happening, as well,' Coleman said. Coleman said the wells are relatively shallow, ranging from 2,700 feet (822.96 meters) to 2,900 feet (883.92 meters). He said the wells likely will need to be capped permanently. 'Based on what evidence we have right now, we don't believe those wells can continue to inject,' he said. Coleman said capping the wells should return pressures and geology to normal. Oklahoma Corporation Commission spokesman Matt Skinner said all of the wells are in Osage County and that the state has no jurisdiction over them. ___ Information from: Tulsa World, http://www.tulsaworld.com
  • State investigators have identified a man whose body was found on the side of a highway in central Oklahoma as a native of Thailand who had been living in Florida. The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation said Friday that 41-year-old Thanakrit Thuetong had been living in the United States since 2012 and may have been driving along Interstate 40 to visit relatives in California. OSBI agents say Thuetong parked his 2009 black Pontiac in the parking lot of a Seminole County convenience store Friday afternoon. Surveillance video shows him inside the store with a black backpack, then walking past his car and along the highway. His body was discovered Sunday. His backpack was missing, and authorities are searching for anyone who may have found it.
  • We have updated information regarding a man accused of breaking into several businesses around Tulsa, through rooftop air-conditioning units. Police report Rory Parker was caught on Friday, leaving a Tulsa Gold and Silver store. The alleged ‘rooftop burglar’s” east Tulsa neighbors were surprised by the news, but happy he's in jail. “I’m glad he’s caught, finally,” a neighbor said.   While searching his home, officers recovered cell phones, electronics, antiques, sports memorabilia, golf clubs, swords and other items.  It’s said to thousands of dollars worth of stolen merchandise. Parker has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.   
  • If you have outdoor plans for Saturday, the forecast will be in your favor. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says we have a beautiful day ahead of us. “Looking mostly sunny, with a high temperature around 90,” Plate said.   The low Saturday night will be around 67 degrees. NWS reports there will be a few more clouds in the sky on Sunday, but not much of a difference in temperature.  The high is expected to be around 88 degrees. For reference, the average high for this time of year in Tulsa is around 95 degrees.  
  • Personal and financial details of the divorce settlement between former Miami Dolphins cheerleader Lynn Aronberg and Palm Beach County State Attorney Dave Aronberg were released in an unusual press statement Thursday. The statement notes that, “according to a source familiar with the negotiations, the former Lynn Lewis, who spun her old Dolphins gig into a successful PR firm, is receiving about $100,000 worth of benefits in exchange for her signature on the dotted line. The deal calls for Aronberg, 46, to pay for half of Lynn’s rent in a luxury Boca Raton condo until next summer. She’s also reportedly getting a brand new BMW and $40,000 cash.” Lynn Aronberg said she does not know how the press release came to include the settlement’s financial details, which she described as confidential, even though she works for the public relations firm, TransMedia Group, that issued the press statement on her behalf. “Whatever’s been put out there, I haven’t gotten to the bottom of it,” Lynn Aronberg told The Palm Beach Post Thursday. Adrienne Mazzone, president of TransMedia, said her client announced the divorce settlement to satisfy a curious public. “Lynn is certainly a media maven,” Mazzone said. “The public has been asking a lot of questions, and we’re simply accommodating that.” Aronberg not only is a client, but an executive vice president of TransMedia, whose website says she has recently returned to the firm where she worked “before launching her own PR firm, Lynn Aronberg Public Relations, which she will maintain to serve a select group of private clients.” Lynn Aronberg said she and her ex-husband agreed to release a single joint paragraph, which reads: “After much consideration over the past few months, we’ve decided to respectfully and amicably part ways and end our marriage. We are, however, dedicated to remaining close friends. We kindly ask for your supporting in preserving our privacy as we start to navigate this new chapter in our lives.” Beyond that paragraph, however, the release includes eight other paragraphs with personal information not typically made public and sent to the press. Dave Aronberg proposed at the Eiffel Tower, according to the statement. Nearly two years later, the statement describes the Aronberg split as the “Trump Divorce,” noting that Dave Aronberg is a Democrat and describing Lynn Aronberg as “a staunch Republican and supporter of President Donald Trump” who “said she felt increasingly isolated in the marriage.” In addition to their different political views, children were also an issue in the marriage, according to the statement. “They have no children, which was a problem for Lynn,” the statement reads. “She said she wanted children, but Aronberg was in no hurry.” Efforts to reach Dave Aronberg Thursday were unsuccessful. Lynn Aronberg said the information about her disagreement with Dave Aronberg on the subject of children was not a secret. “I told people a long time ago that I wanted a baby and that he wasn’t moving quickly enough,” she said. The statement notes that Dave Aronberg is considering a challenge to U.S. Rep. Brian Mast, R-Palm City. At one point, Lynn Aronberg was about to dip into the GOP legal ranks for help with the divorce, according to the statement. “When the divorce seemed to be stalling last month Lynn started interviewing nationally famous divorce lawyers and one, Larry Klayman, the right wing founder of Freedom Watch and Judicial Watch, was ready to pounce until the former lovebirds settled,” the statement reads. Lynn Aronberg said she does not believe the release of personal and financial information from the divorce will have any political impact on her ex-husband. “Do you?” she asked. “I think he looks great. He makes for a great ex-husband. I don’t wish him anything but goodwill. I want the best for him.”
  • For a second straight Friday, there was major job news from the White House, as President Donald Trump used Twitter to announce that his Chief of Staff Reince Priebus was on his way out, to be replaced by Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, in another internal shakeup at the White House. “I would like to thank Reince Priebus for his service and dedication to his country,” the President wrote on Twitter. “We accomplished a lot together and I am proud of him!” But it had been obvious for some time from news reports that Priebus seemed to be on thin ice in the Trump White House. The news broke as the President returned to Washington from an event on Long Island, in New York. Pres. Trump: 'Reince is a good man. John Kelly will do a fantastic job. General Kelly has been a star.' https://t.co/MpIEM5p38Q pic.twitter.com/WW6db9g3SV — ABC News (@ABC) July 28, 2017 Priebus had been on the trip, but according to the White House Pool report, the car he was riding in was separated from the President’s motorcade, as Mr. Trump headed back to the White House. I am pleased to inform you that I have just named General/Secretary John F Kelly as White House Chief of Staff. He is a Great American…. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 28, 2017 …and a Great Leader. John has also done a spectacular job at Homeland Security. He has been a true star of my Administration — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 28, 2017 A week ago, Anthony Scaramucci was unexpectedly brought in as White House Communications Director, prompting the resignation of Press Secretary Sean Spicer. That brought immediate questions about the ability of Scaramucci and Priebus to co-exist inside the Trump White House – and it took just a week for Priebus to be on his way out. On Thursday, House Speaker Paul Ryan – a fellow Wisconsin resident like Priebus – had downplayed the idea that Priebus was in trouble. . @SpeakerRyan: 'Reince is doing a fantastic job at the White House and I believe he has the president's confidence.' pic.twitter.com/UmGCxUaSpX — CSPAN (@cspan) July 27, 2017 Priebus had been the head of the Republican National Committee during Mr. Trump’s ascendancy in the GOP primaries, moving over to help with the campaign for November. He then was tapped as White House Chief of Staff, despite some concerns from some Trump backers, who saw Priebus as too much of the GOP Establishment.
  • The Tulsa Police Department is in the process of renewing its accreditation with the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, commonly referred to as CALEA. An important part of that process is to get feedback from the community on the department’s job performance. The department will be rated based on four criteria: Policy and procedures, administration, operations, and support services. TPD Officer Dan explains that the department needs to know how it’s doing. “It’s basically a public service question,” he told KRMG. “Are we fulfilling the goals and the desires you have for how a police department should act?” There are several ways by which citizens can provide feedback. TPD employees and the public can attend a meeting on August 14th at 7:00 p.m. at the COMPSTAT conference room at the 600 Civic Center. They can also comment by phone from the hours of 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. August 14th by calling 918-596-9339. An independent assessment team will gather those comments, which must be limited to ten minutes. Written comments can be sent by mail to the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA), 13575 Heathcoat Blvd, Suite 320, Gainesville, VA 20155. Ashley tells KRMG so far, the process is going quite smoothly - despite a year of violent incidents including several fatal police shootings. “The guys that are actually doing the paperwork for getting the accreditation up said ‘man, we’re getting our stuff in (in) a timely manner, we’re not having any problems,” he said Friday.